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erik neuteboom View Drop Down
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    Posted: August 16 2008 at 17:32
Hello Paul.
 
Today I had Progwalhalla Hans on the phone, just at that moment the postman arrived with a huge parcel from Musea, the known French progrock label, Monday we will meet in Amsterdam (in an Irish pub Approve ), I am looking forward to write about the new Tempus Fugit and the Believe DVD along lots of other interesting new progrock releases I can borrow from him.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 16 2008 at 17:54
Those two are smack in the middle of my sights. Rubbing hands in gleeBig%20smile
"The more I analyze the human race, the more I love my dog" Mme de Stael
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2008 at 06:49
Hi Erik, good to see you like Pennelli di Vermeer. It didn't really stick with the audience on the last Progwalhalla evening, but apparently listening in a more 'relaxed' environment does the trick. Thumbs%20Up

Next recommendation on my part: the hugely eclectic/symphonic work of Edensong! I'll be posting an album review soon -  reviewed the album during my vacation.

Even prog is rooted in the blues, at some point...
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2008 at 10:05
Thomas, mind your words  Shocked ... but you are right LOL !
 
Angelo, thanks, good to see you back and I am looking forward to your Edensong review. By the way, if you have time this monday, join us in The Old Bell Approve 
 
Finally, on PA:
 
 
TRICANTROPUS%20Recuerdos%20del%20Futuro%20progressive%20rock%20album%20and%20reviews Prog Related
(Studio Album, 2008)
3.00/5
(1 ratings)
TRICANTROPUS — Recuerdos del Futuro
Review erik neuteboom
Special Collaborator New Progrock Bands Specialist

— First review of this album —

3%20stars

Two years ago I started to write for the English version of The Spanish Progressive Rock Page in order to support the Prog Andaluz bands (from Triana and Cai to Alameda, Mezquita and Azahar). Soon I discovered that the New CD Releases section on that site delivered a lot of interesting unknown new progrock bands. After reading the reviews about Bijou, Zaguan, Senogul and Unoma I decided to order their new albums and I am still delighted about the music of these promising new bands. My latest Spanish progrock discoveries in that section are Albatros (captivating heavy psychedelic oriented prog, I hope to see this band very soon on PA) and ... Tricantropus, a trio in which every member plays keyboards (along bass and guitars) with additional guest musicians on instruments like drums to rhythm-guitar.

The instrumental debut-CD entitled Recuerdos De Futuro (nice play of words, it means “memories of the future”) contains 11 compositions that mainly alternate beween mellow atmospheres and slow rhythms, often with jazzrock undertones. But to me it never becomes boring or too laidback because of the interesting accellarations and solos like in the tracks Mar De Cristal (fiery guitar solo with fluent drums and an accellaration with powerful bass runs and a flashy synthesizer solo), the alternating Bajo El Sindrome De Koro (lots of howling guitar runs and a swinging bass) and the beautiful and exciting titletrack (including a jazzy piano solo, a swirling synthesizer solo in a mid-tempo with delicate flutework and a strong guitar solo, supported by organ waves). In the 11 songs we can also enjoy excellent, often sensitive gitar play, a pleasant keyboard variety and an adventurous rhythm-section. The tasteful colouring by the guest musicans on flute, violin and piano adds an extra dimension to the music.

After a few listening sessions I started to appreciate this album more and more, the jazzrock fans and lovers of a guitarsound in the vein of Carlos Santana and Andy Latimer will be pleased. I am curious to their development and hope Tricantropus is not just another fine one-shot-band! My rating: 3,5 stars.



 
 


Edited by erik neuteboom - August 17 2008 at 10:13
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2008 at 11:03
I'll have to pass on the Old Bell, unfortunately. I have to pick up my car at the garage monday morning: it broke down while we were in France, so they towed it back for repair while we continued our travel with a replacement car.
Even prog is rooted in the blues, at some point...
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2008 at 12:21
Angelo, I hope you have had a good time in France and you are reloaded for your new job, good luck Thumbs%20Up 
In September we will organize a new Progwalhalla evening at the home of Hans, I hope you will be there and Dirk and Karin too.
By the way, I am very curious to your opinion about Albatros, I have the idea you will like their heavy psychedelic music (see my review in this thread).
 
 
Good news for the Dutch progheads: on Saturday November 1st the excellent French progrock band Nemo will perform on the annual Progfarm Festival Clap
 


Edited by erik neuteboom - August 17 2008 at 12:24
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 18 2008 at 14:49
 
                                     Today Progwalhalla Hans delivered me a huge pile of new interesting
                                         progrock to review for Progwalhalla and Prog Archives (if added):
 
CD's:
 
Osada Vida - The Body Parts Party (excellent, in the vein of their previous effort)
Tempus Fugit - Chessboard (tasteful and melodic neo-prog with strong work on guitar and keyboards)
Mirage - Borderline
Danny Brill - Better Late Than Never (very interesting album with lots of Hammond, fat synthesizers and
                       Tony Levin as guest musician)
Dyonisos - Ages High (powerful guitar)
Nostradamus (former Solaris Fusion) - Testament (exciting progrock with flute, keyboards and guitar!)
 
               Tempus%20Fugit%20-%20Chessboard  Mirage%20-%20Borderline  Nostradamus%20-%20Testament  Dyonisos%20-%20Aces%20High 
 
DVD's:
 
Believe - Hope To See Another Day Live
Neal Morse - Sola Scriptura And Beyond
Sylvan's Posthumous Silence - The Show
 
                            Sylvan%20-%20Posthumous%20Silence%20The%20Show   Morse,%20Neal%20-%20Sola%20Scriptura%20and%20beyond%202DVD  Believe%20-%20Hope%20to%20see%20another%20day%20live
 
And I bought in Amsterdam the following DVD's:
 
Jethro Tull - Jack In The Green (Live In Germany 1970-1993)
Rick Wakeman - Swedish Television Special 1980
Moogfest 2006 Live featuring Keith Emerson, Jan Hammer, Jordan Rudess and The Mahavishnu Project, this sounds like a "Moog freak's wet dream!"
 
 
 
 


Edited by erik neuteboom - August 18 2008 at 15:08
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 19 2008 at 14:25

Erik, I'll certainly want to pick up the Tull DVD in the near future and I'll certainly be interested to hear what you have to say on the Tempus Fugit cd. I'm very tempted by that one.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 19 2008 at 17:44

Well Paul, I am delighted about Nostradamus and Danny Brill, I will check out or these bands/artists are on PA in order to review it on the homepage and not only in this thread.

Yesterday evening I watched the Jethro Tull DVD, a very good impression of JT on stage with Ian Anderson often showing his 'stork imitation' Wink

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 20 2008 at 14:32
Originally posted by erik neuteboom

Well Paul, I am delighted about Nostradamus and Danny Brill, I will check out or these bands/artists are on PA in order to review it on the homepage and not only in this thread.

Yesterday evening I watched the Jethro Tull DVD, a very good impression of JT on stage with Ian Anderson often showing his 'stork imitation' Wink

 
Well I'm always looking for new and exciting bands Erik so I'll be interested in what you have to say on Nostradamus and Danny Brill.
 
Glad to hear your positive words on the Tull DVD. Too much stuff to buy and not enough money!!! Wink
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 20 2008 at 17:21
 
Well Paul, tomorrow I have time to listen and review the new progrock CD's. At this moment I am listening to Danny Brill, really wonderful prog, from mellow with flute to sumptuous with fat synthesizers (like Rick Wakeman) and powerful Hammond organ, unfortunately unknown on PA.
 
I just decided to move my new Spanish progrock special to this thread because it was poorly visited as a seprate thread and I don't want to see it ending in oblivion so here it is:
 
       
                                    THE RETURN OF THE SPANISH PROGRESSIVE ROCK

 

Two weeks ago I was compiling my serie of threads about Overlooked New Progrock Releases In The Last 5 Years, I noticed how many good bands Spain has delivered in the last decade and then I got the idea to give the new Spanish Progressive Rock a little bit of  special attention here on the Forum, including some bands that are (still) not on PA. Here we go, from A to Z:

 

ALBATROS – Pentadelia (***1/2)

- I discovered this Spanish five-piece formation on The Spanish Progressive Rock Page in the New Releases section, like I did with other promising new Spanish bands Zaguan, Neverness, Bijou and the excellent Senogul. I was very curious to Albatros their sound when I read about their psychedelic oriented blend of several styles, from Rock Andalus to prog metal. Well, during my first listening session I got impressed from the very first moment. Although I trace elements from early Led Zeppelin, Seventies Hawkwind, Pink Floyd (Pompeii-era) and Eighties Rush, I notice that Albatros (the name points at five guys who wants to make psychedelic inspired music) has developped an own musical identity: their trademarks are great dynamics and building up compelling or hypnotizing atmospheres, topped with surprising musical ideas, an adventurous rhythm-section, powerful guitarwork and inventive keyboardplay. The album contains 8 songs, I am delighted about 6 tracks because these showcase Albatros their exciting eclectic musical approach.

* The instrumental 48: it starts with the sound of the sea and birds, blended with powerful saxophone work and then climates that shift from propulsive with prog metal guitar/drums to a slow rhythm with sensitive electric guitar/mellow organ and a dreamy atmosphere with twanging guitar and soaring keyboards, culminating in a very compelling psychedelic mood featuring great interplay, fiery guitar and hypnotizing synthesizers.

* Supernova: a strong and catchy beat in a hypnotizing climate (evoking early Hawkwind) with wah-wah guitar and lots of dynamics, the second part is mellow with Floydian guitar and warm Spanish vocals, culminating in a lush finale delivering a sensitive electric guitar solo and a fluent rhythm-section.

* Santuario: first a mellow climate with twanging acoustic guitar, then an accellaration

featuring fluent drums, inspired Spanish vocals and tasteful interplay between guitar and keyboards.

* The instrumental Ensor: tasteful and varied with sensational interplay between a bombastic choir-Mellotron-like sound and wah-wah drenched guitar with obvious psychedelic undertones.

* Waiting For A Sign: first wailing distorted vocals and bluesy Fender Rhodes piano, then more and more dynamic with a slow but exciting psychedelic inspired synthesizer solo, very compelling music.

 * And finally the instrumental Mehari: dynamic and varied with excellent work on guitar and keyboards, the climate sounds like Heavy Psychedelic Prog.

The other two songs also deliver good and captivating moments but Hombre Menguante suffers from mediocre English vocals and the final track Las Tripas de Goliat sounds a bit too fragmentic to me (too many ideas in one song in my opinion) and I am not pleased with the theatrical way of singing.

- My conclusion: this is a very promising progrock band that will please the fans of psychedelic rock and Heavy Prog, check out their website in order to discover the exciting sound of Albatros!

 

ALTAIR – 3 (***)

- As a duo featuring Alfredo G. Arcusa on drums and Isabel Muniente on keyboards and bass-synthesizer, Spanish band Altair made two albums in the Nineties: Altair from 1990 and Fantasias Y Danzas from 1999. In 2003 Italian progrock label Mellow Records released this live CD, recorded live in Barcelona (2000) after drummer Alfredo Arcusa re-founded Altair as a trio with Emilio Ruiz on keyboards and Albert Guitart on bas.

- On 3 (running time over one hour) we can enjoy seven compositions delivering a modern, very tasteful keyboard sound, dynamic drums and flowing bass play. The climates change from dreamy and compelling to fluent and propulsive including a pleasant colouring from the keyboards: flashy synthesizer flights, jazzy, swinging and swirling piano runs, fine organ waves, wonderful orchestrations and some spacy sounds. At some moments the keyboard driven progrock from Altair evokes ELP but not so obvious as on their two studio albums because the new keyboardist has more an own style and plays with more variety. Due to this Altair sounds more convincing and powerful than ever so I would like to recommend this album to the keyboard aficionados, not really earthshaking but just a pleasant one.

 

AMAROK – Sol De Medianoche (****)

- After their album Quentadharkën from 2004 her is the new CD by Spanish progressive folk formation Amarok (which means wolf in Eskimo language). The musical brainchild is Robert Santamaria who played in Venezuolan symphonic prog band Tapobran but later moved to Spain. He is th emani composer, writer and he plays an impressive range of instruments, from keyboards, accordion and Turkish saz to Iranian santur, dulcimer, xylophone and glockenspiel, this is the second coming of Mike Oldfield on Tubular Bells!

- On the new album entitled Sol De Medianoche Robert is assisted by five other band memebers and a serie of guest musicians on instruments like electric – and Spanish guitar, violin, trumpet, Tibetan chant and cymbals. The sound of Amarok is firmly rooted in folk/ethnic music but it scouts the border with jazz, fusion and symphonic prog. The climates are often Eastern sounding, due to the great vocals by Marta Seguar (powerful and expressive), she carries you away to Arabia, Turkey and Iran! The huge array of (often ethnic) instruments gives the music an extra, very captivasting dimension like the assorted woodwind, brass and percussion instruments. Some examples: a sultry atmosphere with varied woodwind – and flute isntruments, a piece with sparkling piano and jazzy guitar (by the known jazz guitar player Andres Oleagui) and a finap part with organ and saxophone in Hermits, lots of dynamics (from swinging Hammond organ and soaring violin-Mellotron to dreamy piano and powewrful trumpet) in Wnedigo, swinging violin, electric guitar and fluent synthesizer runs in Eight Touts and a cascade of shifting moods in the intricate Xionmao II (longing vocals, sensitive guitar an accellaration with organ and brass and Spanish guitar with lush Mellotron and Hammond). I was also delighted about the very special rendition of Keith Emerson his composition Abaddon’s Bolero featuring assorted percussion, accordion, didgeridoo and a final part with organ and trumpet. I am curious what the master thinks about it!

- If you like progressive folk that blends with jazz, fusion and symphonic prog, this CD is captivating and exciting musical adventure!

 

ANDRES OLAEGUI TRIO – Como Ninos (***1/2)

- This CD (2004) is produced by Jorge Pardo who played saxophone and flute with the Paco De Lucia Sextet. I have witnessed two concerts and was very excited about the virtuosic, adventurous and dynamic blend of flamenco and jazz!

- Well, listening to the album Como Ninos I am sure that guitarplayer/bandleader Andres Olaegui and Jorge Pardo share their musical vision because most compositions sound as .. a dynamic blend of jazz and flamenco (tanguillo, bulerias, rumba and solea). The rhythm-section plays very fluent and dynamic with strong jazzy overtones. Andres his electric guitarplay (lots of great soli, very flowing and melodic) is also drenched in the jazz tradition but he has invited many guest musicians on saxophone (Jorge Pardo), flamenco guitar (Javier Romanos who plays in the vein of Paco De Lucia), percussion, bandurria, silbido, laud, cazuus, vocals and palmas. The emphasis on this CD is on jazz but the Andres Olaegui Trio has succeeded to add some interesting flamenco elements, especially on the highlights A Night In Tunesia and La Fiesta. Adventurous music by great musicians!

 

BIJOU - El Profeta (****)

- I discovered this new Spanish band while surfing on The Spanish Progressive Rock Page site, what a great discovery! Bijou is an instrumental five piece band that plays in the ‘24-carat symphonic rock tradition’ with a modern sound. The seven compositions (running time more than 1 hour) sound very pleasant and dynamic: lush and varied keyboards (from sparkling piano to bombastic orchestrations), very moving duo- guitarwork (many sensitive and howling soli, harder-edged riffs or twanging guitars), a splendid and energetic rhythm-section and lots of shifting moods, accellarations and great soli on keyboards and guitar. A very strong point is that Bijou plays wonderful and captivating progrock with an own identity, what an incredible level for a new band on their debut-CD! The highlight on El Profeta is the epic titletrack (3 parts, almost 25 minutes), halfway they manage to create a very captivating Morish climate featuring keyboards that sound like the flamenco piece Zambra Mora, one of the most Arab inspired flamenco rhythms. The guitar riff is a bit too similar to Trevor Rabin his one on Owner Of A Lonely Heart from Yes but that’s the only fact I can be negative about, just enjoy this promising new Spanish band that has delivered a very exciting instrumental album!

 

IBIO – El Regreso (***1/2)

- I was a bit surprised to notice that Ibio had returned to the progrock world with a new CD entitled El Regreso in 2006, 28 years after their one-shot-effort Cuevas De Altamira (1978), a fine blend of prog and folk. To be honest, I am more impressed with El Regreso because the band sounds more matured and they use a wider range of instruments (from synthesizers and clarinet to bagpipes and sitar), what a variety and what a  pleasant, melodic and very harmonic sounding album.

- Most of the 11 songs (including 5 instrumentals) are a blend of classical, folk and symphonic rock featuring cheerful climates that contain beautiful interplay between guitar and keyboards, fluent mid-tempo rhythms and wonderful Spanish vocals with strong ethnic undertones. These vocals and the subjects of the songs (often tributes: to the sea, a landscape and singing old fishermen or the abundant local festivities, the battle against the Romans and an imaginary train) add a special flavour to the climates, very distinctive and I am sure that the fans of progressive folk will be very pleased. My highlights are the alternating and inventively composed Romería (great keyboard sound, raw and propulsive guitar riffs and a beautiful grand finale with moving guitarwork), Mar Cantábrico (intense interplay between guitar and keyboards, wonderful vocals and melancholical violin and an accellaration with subtle play on keyboards and guitar) and the excellent final composition Cuevas de Altamira, to me this new version sounds more lush: than the original titletrack from 1978: first a slow rhythm with sensitive electric guitar and a church organ sound, then a surprising duet between sitar and Hammond organ and finally a splendid, very good build-up guitar solo with howling runs, this is Prog Heaven!

 

KOTOBEL – Omphalos (****)

- This is the new CD by the interesting Spanish formation Kotobel, it is their fourth studio effort since the debut album Structures from 1999.

Ra (11.30) : The first part is dreamy feturing flute and classical piano, then a very dynamic atmosphere with a propulsive rhythm, here Kotobel showcases their huge potential: fluent interplay between organ and guitar, sparkling flute work, soaring Mellotron, howling electric guitar and a fiery duel between flute and guitar. The most remarkable element in Kotobel their music on this CD is the opera-like female voice that sounds powerful with a wide range. It will not be everybody’s cup of tea but to me the vocals sound as an extra dimension to the captivating Kotobel prog!

2. Excellent Meat (8.51) : The dynamic, often violent music with lots of heavy parts evokes early King Crimson, especially the fiery electric guitar and powerful drum beats, halfway interrupted by a mellow part with flute and acoustic guitar.

3-8. Pentacle’s Suite (30.11) : In this half hour ‘magnum opus’ we can enjoy Kotobel at their best delivering great shifting moods, strong breaks, excellent interplay and exciting soli on several instruments. My highlights are a howling electric guitar solo in Mercury Pentacle, a wonderful classical intermezzo in Venus Pentacle (including piano and cello) and lots of changing climates in the alternating Mars Pentacle (swirling flute, powerful bass runs, a fat synthesizer sound and virtuosic interplay)

9. MetroMnemo (4.15) : A fluent rhythm with Fripperish guitar work and again many varied and captivating musical ideas.

10. Joropo (4.53) : A dynamic composition, from dreamy with flute and piano to a fluent rhythm with splendid interplay between flute and piano and a strong, flashy synthesizer solo.

11. Omphalos (6.57) : The final song is the titletrack, it starts mellow but gradually turns into more dynamic and bombastic, the vocals sound outstanding between the lush sound of the keyboards, flute and guitar, a great end!

This CD is a very captivating musical adventure, Kotobel prooves that 40 years after the birth of the progressive rock, bands are still able to make progressive rock in the true meaning of the word!

 

MEDINA AZAHARA – Se Abre La Puerta (***1/2)

- When Triana their keyboarplayer/singer Jesus De La Rosa died because of a car accident in 1983, Medina Azahara were generally considered as the succesors of Triana, the masters of the Prog Andaluz movement. During concerts Medina Azahare already played some Triana covers and on this CD compilation you can even enjoy Medina Azahara performing seven Triana covers, one Cai cover and 3 own compositions, all firmly rooted in the Prog Andaluz tradition.

- In fact Medina Azahara is a Heavy Prog version of the more symphonic prog of Triana featuring a powerful and tight rhythm-section, heavy guitar work (lots of fiery solos and propulsive guitar riffs) and an excellent singer who turns out to be a perfect blend of the traditional flamenco singer and the archetypical rock singer, what an emotion and what a power! The seven Triana covers are very pleasant coloured: warm flamenco guitar, heavy guitar riffs, bombastic organ and a flashy synthesizer solo in Abre La Puerta, tender piano and sensitive electric guitar in Una Noche De Amor, great melancholical vocals, wonderful keyboard layers and howling guitar in Hijos Del Agobio, a very compelling atmosphere in Dialogo, Paco De lucia inspired flamenco guitar, lush organ and biting electric guitar in Luminosa Manana, a jazzy piano intro and powerful Hammond organ waves in Tu Frialdad and lots of surprising musical ideas in El Lago, from roaring Hammond organ and slap bass to even rap singing, very original! The version of Cai their composition Amanecer En El Puerto sounds dynamic with beautiful vocals and the three Medina Azahara tracks Hacia Ti (dynamic ballad), Paseando Por La Mezquita (the ultimate blend of flamenco and hardrock) and El Soldado (swirling Hammond organ solo) showcase their pleasant, melodic and harder-edged Prog Andaluz sound, they are very popular in Spain but they deserve wider attention, what a captivating Prog Andaluz!

- This is a very good introduction to the sound of Medina Azahara!

 

MEDINA AZAHARA  - En Gira (****)

- This is the second DVD release by Medina Azahara, the popular 'heavy progressive' rockband from Spain. It's an official video release (1991) from a concert in 2000 and has been put on DVD in 2003. If I compare it to the other DVD entitled En Concierto, this DVD will appeal more to progheads although most songs are tasteful mainstream rock featuring strong harder-edged guitarwork (with echoes from Blackmore and Vai) and functional keyboardplay (some soli on organ and synthesizers). The rhythm-section sound very tight and propulsive, the hugh blond lead singer has a very warm and often emotional stage peformance. The lightshow is beautiful (including pyrotechnics) and the crowd reacts enthousiastic to the music, often due to singer Manuel who runs around and search for contact with the fans in the vein of David Byron and Mick Jagger but less theatrical and self-indulgent. The best moments on this DVD are the harder-edged renditions from the Triana songs Abre La Puerta (great vocals) and El Lago (emotional community singing), the exciting guitar/keyboard solo-duel, the wonderful ballad Otono, the flamenco- inspired Paseando Por La Mezquita and the final track A Toda Ese Gente, a warm goodbey from a very tight and enthousiastic band that is still alive and kicking after 25 years! This is very driven prog and roll!

 

NEVERNESS – Horizonte De Susesos (****)

-This is a Spanish four piece band that was founded in the late Nineties, this debut CD was released in 2002.

Neverness their sound is powerful and dynamic melodic rock delivering fiery and propulsive guitar work by the two guitarplayers (including the singer). But the frequent, very flowing shifting moods and the varied vitnage keyboard sound give Neverness their music on this CD a strong progressive touch. A few examples: a hypnotizing rhythm with Fender Rhodes piano and fiery guitar in Hasta El Final, strong Spanish vocals (expressive and slightly theatrical), wonderful Mellotron and a biting wah-wah guitar solo in Finjo Y Miento, a break with blistereing wah-wah guitar and fluent drums in the titletrack and warm, a bit melancholical vocals in the psychedelic inspired (mainly because of the organ sound) in Todo Acabará.

But the two highlights are the ‘epic’ compositions (both almost 20 minutes) that start and close this album. First 10 años Y Un Dia : the first part shifts between fiery wah-wah and mellow Hammond organ waves (like Procol Harum), then an accellaration with a synthesizer solo and tight drums, culminating in a dreamy part with twanging guitars and warm vocals. The song continues with a powerful rhythm including a compelling, very strongly build-up guitar solo with howling runs, supported by lush Hammond organ. Gradually the atmosphere becomes more propulsive featuring swirling Hammond organ, powerful guitar riffs and a fiery guitar solo with piano. Then lots of changing climates with great work on guitar and keyboards and in the end sparkling piano, emotional vocals and captivating interplay between guitar, organ and rums, what a splendid composition! The final track is Malahierva : a mid-tempo with fluent synthesizer runs between parts with twanging guitars, then a long, quite experimental interlude (that sounds different from the rest of the CD) featuring varied work on the piano and electric guitar, accompanied by acoustic rhythm guitar. Neverness returns to their dynamic and powerful sound with a mid-tempo that delivers a strong duel between synthesizer and wah-wah guitar. The atmosphere changes into heavy with a biting wah-wah guitar solo but suddenly a dreamy part with Grand piano, slowly changing into a grand finale with swinging piano and a fiery guitar solo, meanwhile I have turned into a Neverness aficionado!

 

NEVERNESS - Cuentos De Otros Mundos Posibles (****)

- It took five years until Neverness produced a successor but if you listen to it, you can conclude that the time was worth waiting, the band has made a huge progress, what a wonderful and often exciting CD!

- The sound of Neverness has no obvious references, every track (between 5 and 13 minutes) on the album contains lots of flowing shifting moods with many interesting musical ideas and a dynamic rhythm-section. A very captivating element is the contrast between the rock-oriented guitar work and the varied ‘vitnage keyboard’ sound, from Mellotron and Moog synthesizer to Fender Rhodes piano, Farfisa organ and Solina string-ensemble. I was carried away during the strongly build-up and often very compelling guitar soli like in Muro De Cristal - Maldita Esperanza (from sensitive to fiery) and Sin Horizonte (long and bluesy with great support on strings and organ). Other great moments are the pyschedelic sounding intro during Desde El Silencio (the guitar and organ sound evoke Pink Floyd At Pompeii), the variety and wonderful vintage keyboards (Mellotron, organ and piano) in Mi Mundo Al Reves and the many goodmusical ideas in the captivating final song Mundo De Locos (4 parts).

I am impressed by this second effort by this new Spanish band, what a good musicians and what a wonderful and often compelling compositions, a big hand for Neverness!

 

OMNI – Solo Fue Un Sueno (***1/5)

- Omni is a Spanish six piece band, rooted in the late Eighties. This is their third album, released in 2007 and again it contains pure instrumentally music.

The sound of Omni on Solo Fue Un Sueno has obvious echoes from Seventies Camel and also reminds me frequently of Dutch Camel-inspired bands Lady Lake and especially Odyssice (it could have been their new album!): very melodic, flowing and often sensitive guitar work (compelling in Noche En Malandar, fiery in Telescopio de Papel en biting wah-wah in Espíritu Libre), omnipresent interplay between guitar and keyboards, some pitchbend driven Minimoog sounding soli (like in Telescopio de Papel and the dreamy final song Salto al Abismo) and finally the use of saxophone (sultry in El Tren De Rota). Like Seventies Camel the sound by Omni is like a ‘warm bath’ as on the Camel albums Mirage and Moonmadness, my favorite Camel-era. Along the strong guitarwork, the keyboard player colours the compositions very tasteful with varied vintage keyboards like the Fender Rhodes electric piano, the violin-Mellotron (wonderful intro on Noche En Malandar), Minimoog synthesizer, Solina string-ensemble and the Hammond organ (swirling solo in the alternating highlight Espíritu Libre).

This is not very original symphonic prog but it sounds wonderful with very good work on guitar and keyboards and tasteful arranged compositions.

 

SENOGUL – Senogul (****)

- One of the trademarks of the Spanish progressive rock is its originality: in the past from bands like Ibio, Carmen, Atila, Itoiz and the flamenco inspired Prog Andaluz bands like Triana, Cai, Mezquita and Azahar and in the present from bands like Bijou, Unoma, Kotobel  and …. Senogul. I was very pleasantly surprised with their debut album entitled Transitos but I am really delighted about their eponymous second CD, what a wonderful symphonic prog!

- This new CD contains 12 compositions inlcuding new versions of all five tracks from the debut album entitled Transitos. The music sounds on one hand very melodic and quite accessible and on the other hand varied and elaborate. The has progressed on all levels: a better sound, very matured compositions, a more lush and varied keyboard sound, the guitar work is excellent and the interplay great. To get an impression: a classical sounding piano intro, soon blended with sensitive electric guitarplay and halfway a female choir, conga’s and dynamic drums in Dr. Gull I, a swinging piano, howling gutiar and a jazzy guitar solo in the catchy Racionalidad, an intro with bagpipe, tehn varied, often swirling piano work and a wide range of instruments (from the fiery guitar and powerful saxophone to a strongly build-up Minimoog synthesizer with pitchbend) in the captivating La Verbena Hermetica, lots of variety and strong duo-guitarplay with an exciting blend of the soli in La Maha Vishnuda, lots of brass and fiery guitar in the Alquin-like Agua, Fuego & Porexpan and dreamy featuring sensitive guitar and soaring keyboards in Travesia De Las Gaviotas. And in some tracks you can enjoy the sound of the flute traverse. My highlights are the two compositions in which Senogul blends several styles and we can enjoy lots of shifting moods: first Tango Mango that sounds as a hybrid of tango, symphonic prog, avant-garde, classical and jazz delivering both synthesizer – and guitar soli as sparkling play on accordeon and harpsichord and second La Mulatta Electrica, loaded with tension and exciting musical ideas, from Al DiMeola-like symphonic jazzrock (fiery guitar and propulsive rhythm-section) to Prog Andaluz (including palmas/handclapping and jaleos/cheerful shouts) with swinging piano and moving electric guitar runs, how cpativating!

- In my opinion Senogul has made a very pleasant and captivating album that showcases the huge talents of this band, highly recommended!

 

TRICANTROPUS – Recuerdos Del Futuro (***1/2)

- In general I am delighted about the Spanish progressive rock because of the original musical approach, the good craftmanship and the pleasant amount of emotion, my favorites are early Triana, Mezquita, Alameda, Cai , Medina Azahara, Iceberg and more recntly Dr. No, Bijou and of course the sensational Senogul! This review is about the new progrock band Tricantropus from Madrid, the wonderful Spanish capital, hosting the new Spanish football champion Real Madrid and I am proud that so many Dutch players are part of that team!

But back to music, Tricantropus is a trio in which every member plays keyboards (along bass and guitars) with additional guest musicians on instruments like drums to rhythm-guitar.

- The instrumental debut-CD entitled Recuerdos De Futuro (nice play of words, it means “memories from the future”) contains 11 compositions that mainly alternate beween mellow atmospheres and slow rhythms, often with jazzrock undertones. But to me it never becomes boring or too laidback because of the interesting accellarations and solos like in the tracks

Mar De Cristal (fiery guitar solo with fluent drums and an accellaration with powerful bass runs and a flashy synthesizer solo), the alternating Bajo El Sindrome De Koro (lots of howling guitar runs and a swinging bass) and the beautiful and exciting titletrack (including a jazzy piano solo, a swirling synthesizer solo in a mid-tempo with delicate flutework and a strong guitar solo, supported by organ waves). In the 11 songs we can also enjoy excellent, often sensitive gitar play, a pleasant keyboard variety and an adventurous rhythm-section. The tasteful colouring by the guest musicans on flute, violin and piano adds an extra dimension to the music.

- After a few listening sessions I started to appreciate this album more and more, the jazzrock fans and lovers of a guitarsound in the vein of Carlos Santana and Andy Latimer will be pleased. I am curious to their development and hope Tricantropus is not just another fine one-shot-band!

 

UNOMA – Croma (***1/2)

- During my weekly surfing on the Spanish progressive rock sites, I discovered this wonderful album entitled Croma (2003) by UNOMA. The prime mover and musical brain is guitarplayer Fidel Vazquez. He has a beautiful, very warm sound and his compositions are varied featuring lots of good musical ideas. Let’s take the album song by song.

1. Croma (5:42) - This is a tasteful arrangement with a pleasant mellow atmosphere featuring twanging electric guitar, piano, a synthesizer solo and beautiful, very sensitive electric guitarwork in the vein of Andy LATIMER from CAMEL.

2. Black Hole (8:50) - The first and final part contain a slow rhythm delivering sensitive, howling electric guitar soli and an organ solo. Halfway there is a break with sensational synthesizer flights and a fiery, MIKE OLDFIELD inspired guitar solo.

3. The Bird (4:32) - Great electric guitar overdubs featuring twanging guitar and slightly distorted soli.

4. Magic Tour (6:10) - It opens with a slow rhythm delivering soaring strings and spacey synthesizer sounds. Then a lot of shifting moods and very spectacular guitarwork (jazzy, heavy riffs and howling soli) and sensational synthesizer runs.

5. In The Name Of God (14:52) - This epic composition contains English vocals (a kind of soulful version of Peter GABRIEL) and has many fluent changing of climates, from warm an slow till bombastic featuring pitchbend-driven synthesizer flights, fine piano – and organplay and sensitive electric guitar soli (with echoes from Andy Latimer). The final part has a fiery, very moving electric guitar solo.

- This showcases the great skills from Fidel Vazquez, a very talented guitarplayer and composer. If you like CAMEL, MIKE OLDFIELD and the music of early GANDALF this CD deserves a change.

 

ZAGUAN Testigo Del Tiempo (***1/2)

- After new, splendid bands like Bijou and Senogul here is Zaguan. They are rooted in 1997 and started as a Triana cover band. If you listen to the vocals this is not a surprise, incredible how similar the singer sounds to the late Jesus De La Rosa who died tragically in a car accident early The Eighties! If I compare Zaguan their own compositions to Triana I analyse that Zaguan sound less symphonic (short compositions and a small range of keyboards) and more folky because of the more omnipresent flamenco guitar. That's also why I have Zaguan categorized as prog folk. The 11 songs on this CD are a very melodic and tasteful progressive blend of rock, folk and symphonic featuring strong and expressive vocals (but not that typical wailing of the flamenco singers), some fiery and howling electric guitar and fluent Hammond organ soli and lots of exciting flamenco guitar runs. If you like Prog Andaluz, especially Triana, this great Spanish prog folk band is worth to check out, what a moving experience!

 

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Edited by erik neuteboom - August 20 2008 at 17:23
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 21 2008 at 01:35
Hi erik,
 
how about the new Doracor album titled Lady Roma? Have you got the chance to listen to this record?
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 21 2008 at 05:05
Andrea, as soon as Progwalhalla Hans has received his Btf. order I will do my best to review the new Doracor, I am looking forward to that moment!
 
I just listened to the new Osada Vida (exciting Heavy Prog/Prog Metal with great work on guitar and keyboards) and new Tempus Fugit (wonderful neo-prog, very tastefully arranged) and later I hope to have time to listen to new bands Nostradamus and Danny Brill Thumbs%20Up
 
Yesterday evening I watched the new Neal MOrse DVD, recorded near my hometown The Hague in De Boerderij, I was blown away by his very symphonic rock sounding music with many Dutch musicians on stage, including my former iO Pages (Dutch progrock magazine) collague Collin Leijenaar on drums Clap
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 21 2008 at 16:29
 
 
                      Today I supported these lesser known progrock bands on the PA homepage:
 
 
TEMPUS%20FUGIT%20Chessboard%20progressive%20rock%20album%20and%20reviews
Review by erik neuteboom Special Collaborator New Progrock Bands Specialist

4%20stars In the second half of the Nineties this Brazilian formation released their debut album Tales From A Forgotten World (1997), an official bootleg live album (1998) and the second effort The Dawn After The Storm (1999) so 3 albums in 3 years but then .... there was a long silence. In Prog Veteran (from Brazil) his review I read that Tempus Fugit performed at the USA Progfest festival in 2000, in Copacabana in 2002 and actually around that time all compositions for new album were ready. But unfortunately it took six years before Tempus Fugit released their third studio album entitled Chessboard in 2008. Was it worth waiting for so many years?

- Well, I am delighted about Tempus Fugit their melodic sound (but I prefer native vocals instead of English) on Chessboard: very tastefully arranged and scouting the borders between modern symphonic rock and neo-prog featuring wonderful work on keyboards and guitar and lots of flowing changing climates. My highlights are the lush Vangelis-like synthesizer sound in Pontos de Fuga, many shifting moods, an acoustic guitar solo with a violin-Mellotron sound and exciting guitar solos in The Princess, splendid interplay between fiery guitar and fat sounding keyboards in the alternating Chessboard Part A and a beautiful blend of acoustic guitar and piano and fiery wah-wah drenched guitar and a compelling grand finale with howling guitar and fluent synthesizer flights in the wonderfully build-up in Chessboard Part B.
- I am sure this new album will please both the symphomaniacs as the neo-progheads, highly recommended!

 
OSADA%20VIDA%20The%20Body%20parts%20Party%20progressive%20rock%20album%20and%20reviews
Review by erik neuteboom Special Collaborator New Progrock Bands Specialist

4%20stars After their highly acclaimed previous effort entitled Three Seats Behind A Triangle (2006) I was very curious or this new Polish progrock band was albe to deliver again such an exciting and dynamic sound on this new album entitled The Body Parts Party (2008).

- During my first listening session I noticed that Osada Vida didn’t change their sound, in fact it’s very much in the vein of Three Seats Behind A Triangle: the atmospheres alternates between Heavy Prog and prog-metal with fat and propulsive guitar riffs, lots of fiery and wah-wah drenched guitar solo, an often thundering rhythm-section and sensational synthesizer flights. But it is the blend of inventive musical ideas into Osada their music that gives their sound an extra dimension, this lifts it high above the average prog metal bands that are too often focussed on scale-acrobatics and high-adrenaline climates. Some good examples: mellow with soaring keyboards and a subtle guitar solo in Brain - Mind On Cloud Nine, use of the distinctive Hammond sound in Spine - In Full Swing, varied keyboards (Fender – and Grand piano and organ) in the dreamy Heart - Back And Forth, a swinging bass, lush keyboards and excellent interplay in Muscle - Strong But Powerless, a compelling build-up with jazzy piano and a spacey climate in Bone - My Name is Bone The Single Bone and a hypnotizing Riverside-like atmosphere in the strong bonustrack Remember Your Name.
- Congratulations to Osada Vida, they have succeeded to make another exciting album, two years after Three Seats Behind A Triangle. In my opinion they are able to compete with Riverside as the best Polish progrock band at this moment!

 
This evening I listened to interesting new progrock bands Nostradamus (Hungary) and Danny Brill (USA), I hope to review these bands tomorrow evening.

 



Edited by erik neuteboom - August 21 2008 at 16:32
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 21 2008 at 20:46
Since you are firmly anchored in the Low Countries I have a few Questions for you, has Trion ever done a live show as far as you know, I just received and reviewed "Pilgrim", what a blast! Any news on Odyssice releasing something new?  Thomas "the Dutchfan" hahaha
"The more I analyze the human race, the more I love my dog" Mme de Stael
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 22 2008 at 09:59
Well, Osada Vida have chosen an interesting concept for their album, as I see frrom the song titles.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 22 2008 at 10:57
Thomas: I will ask their keyboardplayer, I hope to see him tomorrow and the Dutch Symforce Festival, he is a fanatic progrock concert visitor.
 
Norbert: a bit 'sick' title Dead  but the music is great!
 
Yesterday evening I watched the Believe DVD, wonderful music, a must!!
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 22 2008 at 15:02
Albatros you said? Where can I find some samples?
Even prog is rooted in the blues, at some point...
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 22 2008 at 15:21
 
                                         Hello fellow Dutchman, try this: 
 
http://www.fotolog.com/psico_albatros
www.myspace.com/psicoalbatros
www.psicoalbatros.com
 
                          And  Progwalhalla Hans has one copy of Albatros their Pentadelia album,
                                             he was positive about their music Thumbs%20Up
 


Edited by erik neuteboom - August 22 2008 at 15:22
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 22 2008 at 16:24
 
 
                                        Two interesting new (non PA) progrock bands:
 
 
DANNY BRILL – Better Late Than Never (***1/2)
Better%20late%20than%20never
- Danny his musical story starts while growing up in the suburbs of Cleveland (USA), he was exposed to a lot of music at an early age by his parents. Although not musicians themselves, they were great music lovers and this inspired Danny, at the age of 6 he started piano lessons at the Cleveland Institute of Music. After 6 years of formal classical training, he continued studying classical piano through high school where he also started playing electric organ. During this same time Danny had a parallel interest in popular music, in May of 1971 he saw a mindblowing ELP show that changed the course of his life. In fact Danny has dedicated his first solo CD, Better Late Than Never, to Keith Emerson for being such a huge musical influence as a keyboard player. He now knew what he wanted to do professionally and musically he had been shown how to combine classical elements and compositional techniques with rock to make what would become later known as 'progressive rock'. After college he spent several years playing in bands professionally but none got as far as a record deal. After the last of these groups, (Liquide Lighte), broke up in 1976 Danny moved to New York City working at various dead end jobs and playing briefly in several ill-fated bands before finally deciding that he'd had enough of the of the starving artist existence. It had been fun, but it was time to establish something a bit more secure so he founded Keyboard Instrument in New York City, which he still owns and operates. For many years Danny had all but given up playing, but had never quite completely given up on the dream of a career as a recording artist. Finally, in 2004, he began playing a bit and writing some new material, just for his own enjoymenty. But about this same time he got together with his friend, the drummer Michael Sciotto, and played him some of his new material. Mike was so enthused, he convinced Danny to embark on recording a CD, which they co-produced together. Figuring that he wasn't getting any younger, he thought if he was ever going to do anything again with his music, this was the time for a second attempt at a musical career. His resulting debut solo CD is aptly titled Better Late Than Never. In a way it was over 30 years in the making, because a few of the songs have their beginnings that long ago. But most of the material is new or updated, and the result is a contemporary progressive rock sound (abridged version of the biography on Danny Brill’s excellent website).

- For me listening to the 10 compositions on Better Late Than Never means making an entertaining musical journey with lots of changing landscapes and unexpected views. Every song has its own atmosphere and own tasteful colouring with a wide range of instruments but the roots are obviously the Classic Seventies Prog. I am blow away by the creative and adventurous way Danny has blended elements from ELP and King Crimson with his own ideas and the variety he has delivered on this album. For example: a slow rhythm with a catchy beat as the foundation for work on Hammond, Fripperish sounding guitar, xylophone, fat synthesizers and fiery guitar in the instrumental opener Bakers Dozen, a dreamy climate featuring warm Grand piano, flute and mandolin in Double Feature, Part 2 –David, a swinging rhythm with spoken words, jazzy piano, distorted Fripperish guitar and bombastic keyboards in Prelude/Demented, beautiful Grand piano arpeggio’s blended with classical orechestrations in the compelling instrumental Images In The Rain, a catchy beat with cynical vocals, a saxophone solo and Honky Tonky piano in the funny Fantasyland and sitar and tablas in the sultry, Ravi Shankar inspired Indjia. But the most original and alternating track is the final one: first a spacey atmosphere with synthesizer beeps and bleeps, then acoustic rhythm guitar and warm vocals, a slow rhythm with strong interplay, a short part with powerful Hammond work, a swinging piano with soft cello and delicate flute and finally bluesrock with a heavy guitar solo, accompanied by a mellow violin-Mellotron sound, unique progrock!

- This album needs a few listenings sessions but if you are up to a musical adventure, Danny Brill his debut CD is worth to discover!
 
NOSTRADAMUS - Testament (****)
Testament
 
- In 2007 the rhythm-section of the legendary Hungarian progrock band Solaris founded Solaris Fusion and released the mini-CD Mystica (2 compositions). In 2008 this Hungarian formation changed their name into Nostradamus with almost the same line-up (only a new fluteplayer) but another musical direction, I would like to describe it as a Heavy Prog version of Solaris.
- On this album it’s obvious that most musicians are classically trained, the interplay is awesome and especially the compositorial skills of keyboardplayer Valeria Barcsik are great, this turns listening to Testament into a captivating musical experience. I am excited about the tension between on one hand the heavy rhythm-section, propulsive guitar riffs and powerful guitar and on the other hand the sparkling flute and sumptuous keyboards, it sounds like “classical meets progmetal”, great! My favorite moments on this CD are Solarissimo (bombastic and dynamic with swirling flute, fat synthesizer flights and sensitive electric guitar runs, the Spanish undertones are strong), Divine Comedy (between Heavy Prog and progmetal with fiery guitar, sparkling flute and orchestral keyboards), the enervating and dynamic titletrack (omnipresent flutework, warm Grand piano, propulsive guitar riffs, a strong organ solo and excellent interplay), a beautiful build-up in Emotion (from dreamy with twanging guitar to a compelling grand finale with howling guitar) and warm interplay between classical flute and acoustic guitar in Secret In Hand. A bit of a maverick is the short song African Cotton Typesetters In Ireland that blends African singing and Irish folk instruments, very special! The bonustrack My Emotion is a strong conclusion, it starts mellow with dreamy vocals and soaring keyboards and ends bombastic with howling electric guitar.
- What a stunning debut CD this Hungarian formation has delivered, it deserves worldwide atention, progheads alert!
 
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Edited by erik neuteboom - August 22 2008 at 18:04
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