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    Posted: April 10 2024 at 13:25
Originally posted by DamoXt7942 DamoXt7942 wrote:

...
Anthem Of The Sun (1968) - The GRATEFUL DEAD

...

Hi,

Completely agreed! But in the end, I think there is a disconnect that says that California and NY do not fit the "progressive" molds!Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FlashBack2210 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 10 2024 at 11:24
Since I still don’t know for sure whether the EXISTENTIAL DEAD band’s work is progressive music (the application to be added to the archive has not yet been processed, I have not received any feedback from the site administration), I am posting their second single in this thread.

Band: EXISTENTIAL DEAD is a promising one-man band from Finland in the instrumental metal / post-metal genre. The band was founded in 2023 in Finland.

Album: Unreality (Single, 2024). 

Album's cover:


Genre: Melodic metalcore.

Review: The sound is completely new compared to the first single. From the first seconds the track is already catchy with its light and melodic piano intro. Here, somewhere in the background you can hear the cries of birds (apparently this is a reference to the cover of the single), as well as something similar to the sound of the sea. In the main part of the track there is already more action, and here the sound becomes very rich, expressive and even heavy. All thanks to the metalcore guitar riffs that still resonate. Breakdowns and dissonances are added to them. It sounds extremely cold and depressing, but at the same time very sincere. 

Despite the fact that this is instrumental music and there is not a single word in the song, you believe the musician, as if he is telling you his story. It's amazing how EXISTENTIAL DEAD deftly moved from instrumental metal and post-metal to melodic metalcore. It feels like he can play a wide range of metal. Surely the band has a few more tracks in store in different types of metal music.

Raiting: 5 of 5. 

Prog Appeal: I think it might appeal to progressive music fans as they are open to new things in their playlist.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote suitkees Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 31 2024 at 04:24
^ Nice read, thanks! I'm also one who is difficult to convince by solo (or one-instrument) works, but sometimes it works out quite well (e.g. Pärt...). Of the minimalists I've always preferred Reich over Glass - he seems to me a bit more adventurous/intriguing in his music. Glass is generally a good listen, though.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dapper~Blueberries Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2024 at 20:35


Philip Glass - Philip Glass Solo (2024)

Genres: Minimalism

Score: 4/5

In the realm of minimalism, many artists have crafted unique symphonies within their own space of expertise. From Reich’s droning repetitions, to Arvo Pärt’s holy machinations, minimalism, despite its repetitive nature, has showcased a level of singularity within the artists it houses. I sort of get intrigued when I see an album with the minimalism genre attached to it, especially with more modern records. So I certainly was quite interested in Philip Glass’ solo performance this year.

In the realm of classical music, Glass is a man that needs no introduction, being a man with quite the repertoire of works under his belt, Glassworks if you will. The Photographer, Music With Changing Parts, Einstein On The Beach, and his humongous Music in Twelve Parts showcase his quite thrilling output of distinct minimal music that is hypnotic, ambient, and introspective, but with his intriguing styles of composition that takes cues from elements like Brian Eno, or even sometimes moody chamber jazz. I have known of Glass from his Glassworks album, but I never decided to go back into his line of works until I decided to listen to this record.

The title here is very straightforward; It’s Philip Glass playing his songs on the piano alone. There is no string attached with this type of thing, it is as straight as the line can get. However, despite the simple nature of this record, I find the music here to be anything but. Glass certainly has a mastery when it comes to the piano and composition, so in his wake of expertise you get some very well done works of piano music. You get the opening movement from Glassworks, Mad Rush and the Metamorphosis suite from Solo Piano, and Truman Sleeps from The Truman Show OST. Glass has played these older songs for quite some time, and many artists have too, but I find Glass’ interpretations here to have quite the delicacy that pushes this record to a rather beautiful spotlight, feeling like a waltz of sorts for Glass as his fingers dance on the piano with grace, and effort.

Also nothing feels like they drag. Each movement never overstays their welcome, and whilst some may be slightly longer than their originals (Mad Rush going from 13 minutes to 16 minutes), I never felt they were too long, and despite repeated listens I have never felt the album get sluggish at any point.

However, there is one thing that makes this album not feel as though it were the best, and that is because I find minimalism works paired with an orchestra, and not a singular person. Many of Philip’s works, such as Glassworks or The Photographer work very well with an entire movement backing his compositions up, and this goes with every other minimalism composer. However, if played by themselves, they certainly are beautiful, but they never quite meet the same marks, textures, and ideals for me when it comes to minimalism, even beyond to classical music. The beauty of classical music, for me, is having all these people play all these instruments within a large compositional effort to create very rich and beautiful music. It’s the beauty of unity. While I can certainly say Glass does know beauty, I just don’t quite find a solo effort to be as enriching as with some more helping hands.

Philip Glass Solo is a rather interesting record within 2024, even despite it being in a sea filled with stuff like Banshee, or Of the Last Human Being, or A Lonely Sinner. It is quite the unique element I have reviewed, and while I may not fully be on board with the more singular element that this album plays upon, I can certainly enjoy this effort, no matter what time or day.

Best tracks: Mad Rush

Worst tracks: N/A

Edited by Dapper~Blueberries - April 02 2024 at 09:02
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MellotronBoy37 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 15 2024 at 19:14
I sugesting the Brazilian singers, Beto Guedes, Lô Borges and Milton Nascimento... And The Slip Band from Massachusetts, EUA. I think too in a 14 Bis keyboardist, flávio Venturini, but he makes a pop álbuns after 1993, without Prog references. Only a one-off songs in your albums.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FlashBack2210 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 15 2024 at 09:18
I came to this forum from a Google search for "post-metal", knowing nothing about progressive music. My goal here was to talk about a band that released their debut track in the instrumental post-metal genre. This group is EXISTENTIAL DEAD from Finland. 

However, I was just told that this track is not progressive music. Although this is post-metal, and post-metal is listed on the main page of the Prog Archives website. That's why I'm also writing in this thread. In any case, let the forum administrators judge whether I posted my information here correctly. I don't hope that I haven't violated the forum rules. If this is so, then I apologize.

Band: EXISTENTIAL DEAD is a promising one-man band from Finland in the instrumental post-metal genre. The band was founded in 2023 in Finland.

Album: The debut is Cold Hands (Single, 2023)

Album's cover:


Review: EXISTENTIAL DEAD is a mixture of rocking riffs with the atmosphere of a cold northern forest. The group captivates with a unique vision, fresh sound and a piercing world that you want to dive into again and again.

It's similar to a lot of what you've heard, but it's still very new and original. Quite a bright, driving sound, multi-layeredness and virtuoso control of the instrument make you listen carefully to the composition every time you listen to it.

Raiting: 5 of 5. 

Prog Appeal: I think it might appeal to progressive music fans as they are open to new things in their playlist.


Edited by FlashBack2210 - March 16 2024 at 10:01
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 17 2024 at 07:29
Originally posted by DamoXt7942 DamoXt7942 wrote:

Anthem Of The Sun (1968) - The GRATEFUL DEAD

Hi,

Nice to see this ... and it has some of the things that had made so many bootlegs famous, because of the long/longer/longest version of various pieces of music ... there are some really nice things here, and it's a shame that we have limited "progressive" to a specific set of the same things, because there is stuff here that is quite a treat and shows how so much of the "progressive" music grew up.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AlanB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 15 2023 at 07:25
Troika by D'Virgilio Morse and Jennings (2022)

I tried to get this trio added to Progarchives because the three individuals are all prog musicians, but it was deemed not proggy enough. Which is fair, the sound is more Crosby Stills Nash and Young or Simon and Garfunkel, than the usual output of Nick D'Virgilio, Neal Morse, and Ross Jennings.

The idea for this collaboration came together during the covid lockdown, and was at the instigation of Neal Morse, who had wanted to do a more acoustic album for a while. He invited his long-time friend Nick D'Virgilio to come on board, and the trio was completed by Ross Jennings of Haken. Because of covid the album was recorded remotely, making it all more remarkable that the harmonies turned out so well. 

So what we have is a collection of pretty much acoustic songs, occasional use of electric guitar and drums, great melodies, fantastic harmonies. Five songs are attributed to Neal, three to Nick, two to Ross, and a final song which appears in two alternative versions, one attributed to Jennings and Morse, and the other just to Jennings.

Track list:

1. Everything I Am (Morse): A bright start with a chorus that sticks in your head
2. Julia (Jennings and Morse): This is the song that also appears in longer form as a bonus track attributed only to Ross Jennings. Ross submitted it to Neal but he didn't feel it fitted the style of the album so he shortened it and tweaked it. The bonus track version is longer and quite different, both versions are excellent.
3. You Set My Soul On Fire (D'Virgilio): Another nice song, though in my opinion not as good as the first two.
4. One Time Less (Morse): Very catchy, bouncy song
5. Another Trip Around The Sun (Jennings): Another catchy tune, Neal's favourite vocal trick of counterpoint vocal lines a la Gentle Giant is used in the middle of this song.
6. A Change Is Gonna Come (Morse): Taking the tempo down now, this is very much in the vein of a 1960s protest song
7. If I Could (D'Virgilio): Yet another catchy tune, nice use of keyboard here (a windkey, whatever that is).
8. King For A Day (Jennings): Probably the heaviest song on the album, and one that it took me a while to get into.
9. Second Hand Sons (Morse): Another heavier track, this one is better than King For A Day. Puts me in mind of Neil Young's "Southern Man" at one point.
10. My Guardian (D'Virgilio): Still a bit on the heavier side, though less so than the previous two songs. Nothing special about this one.
11. What You Leave Behind (Morse): Beautiful song to finish. Acoustic guitar based, great vocal harmonies, lovely message.

I can totally recommend this album to anyone who likes CSNY and similar bands. I understand a second album from this trio is due out later this year. I look forward to hearing it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DreamTechPlus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 19 2022 at 04:33
Originally posted by BrufordFreak BrufordFreak wrote:

Awesome thread idea! Sorry I hadn't seen it before! Love seeing reviews/recommendations for Prefab, Gaga, etc.!

Band Name and description
FIVE STOREY ENSEMBLE is a progressive neo-classical band from Belarus coming out of the AltrOck label that rose out of the ashes of RATIONAL DIET in 2012-13. Compositions are mostly by former RD members and Five-Storey core members bassoon/saxophonist Vitaly Appow  and pianist/vocalist Olga Podgaiskaja and generally feature accordion, violin, double bass and/or cello, acoustic or electric guitars, some percussion, and classically styled male and female vocals. 

Album information
Their first release from March of 2013 is entitled, Not That City. Several videos of music of live and studio performances from Not That City can be found on YouTube. 

The Review:



FIVE-STOREY ENSEMBLE Not That City


Out of the ashes of RATIONAL DIET rises this phoenix of incredible power and beauty--in my humble opinion, an album ten times better than the very well crafted albums of its predecessor. Yes, Five-Storey Ensemble is the spawn of RATIONAL DIET. RATIONAL DIET founding member and reed player, Vitaly Appow, and keyboard/vocalist Olga Podgaiskaja, of the final two RATIONAL DIET albums, At Work and On Phenomenon and Existences, are principle composers here, while violinist, Cyrill Christya, and bass guitarist, Dmitry Maslovsky participate on several songs.

     While I thoroughly enjoyed the Avant/RIO/Modern Chamber musings of RD, I was quick to zoom in on Not That City once it was posted on progstreaming.com. Bam! Was I broadsided! This album blew me away from the opener through to the last song. It’s music is reminiscent of RATIONAL DIET but, like ARANIS, it is much more melodic and its vocals play a much more important role in defining their sound. The vocals here are used more operatically—and really only used in the forefront of four different songs. Whenever the male tenor and female soprano voices perform I find myself reminded of Goreki’s Third Symphony. Even though vocalists Sergey Dolgushev and composer and keyboard player, Olga Podgaiskaja, respectively, employ operatic approaches stylistically, their vocals are often used almost more as additional instruments—which has the tremendous effect of deepening the conveyance of emotions within each song—and each has such a distinct and different contribution to the songs with their voices—often at the same time--that it has the effect of bringing two very different, almost divergent threads into the emotional weave.   


1. “The Harbinger” (5:51) opens the album with some long, sustained note playing from accordion player, Alexander But’ko. He is then gradually joined by violinist, Anastasia Popova, and oboist, Natalja Malashova, all weaving their magical notes together, slowly, deliciously. At the 2:20 mark pianist, Olga Podgaiskaja, bassoonist Vitaly Appow, and double bass player, Vyacheslav Plesko join in, taking the music into more staccato, rapido mode for several measures before fading back to let the original weave evolve. This cycle of piano- and bass-infused tempo upgrade recurs twice more, before the third occasion, in the third minute, a prolonged, sustained dark theme more suited to PRESENT or UNIVERS ZERO is presented and built upon. This continues until 4:15 when an additional thread of color is provided by male vocalist, Sergey Dolgushev. We then see the song devolve into a final weave coming from Sergey’s plaintive voice and Alexander’s emotional accordion.

     Awesome song—though it does get drawn out a bit in places. I’ve heard this song in three different formats now, album version and two different live performances with two very different instrumental lineups (one more expanded, like the album version). Each has its strengths and charms. (9/10)  


2. “Bondman’s Wings” (2:24) is a short, beautiful and powerful 'folk' instrumental using accordion, bassoon, oboe, and stringed instruments (with some military-like percussion) to tell its tale. Charming!(9/10)


3. “The Incommunication” (5:22) alternating female and male vocals as if in conversation—sounds so romantic yet spiritual, almost religious. Sparse instrumentation of long sustained chords accompany the vocal until the two minute mark when a kind of Renaissance courtly music dances us into another dimension. Incredible constructions of seemingly independent instrumental voices all woven into a spacious yet multi-layered tapestry of exquisite beauty! The voices return for the final two minutes, this time woven within the multi-layered tapestry (a bit too much going on here for these ears). (9/10)


4. “To Ringfly” (3:11) begins as a rondo between accordion, bassoon and percussion and plays out very much in that format with the occasional instrument added here or there. (8/10)


5. “A Disappearing Road" (4:42) To pulsing bassoon, and drum are soon woven in with accordion and other woodwinds. The first third is very Baroque/Renaissance processional feeling, but then structure shifts at about the two minute mark, taking on a more squared, constant feel, and then again at the 3:20 mark in which cacophonous strings play wildly over a woodwind section that holds long, long notes in strange discordant harmonies. Interesting and unusual. (9/10)


6.     “The Unpainted” (7:57) is a haunting, even disturbing song beginning with simple piano arpeggio, double bass, and intermittent injections of string or woodwind instruments. Just after the one minute mark, the discordant tones of a female vocalist enters in low registers, then slowly climbs, octave by octave, until a minute later she is singing her dirge in her highest soprano register. Piano, strings, and woodwinds work themselves into until at 3:35 drums join in to accentuate the drama. A few seconds later and all has calmed down to 'solo' piano attended very sparsely by injections of winds, strings, percussives and, in the sixth minute, an electric guitar(!)--all painting a picture of the most ominous and despondent tones. The most UNIVERS ZERO-sounding song yet! (8/10)


7.     Yesterday Dormant” (5:40) is a classical sounding discourse between male and female vocalists. Very powerful. I love music like this (no matter that it's being sung in a language I neither know or understand.) Kind of reminds me of a more classical sophisticated version of Jon Anderson's "Chagalll Duet", a conversational duet he did with Sandrine Piau from 1994's Change We Must. Beautiful music! Very powerful in the way that Sergey’s tenor is so strong, staccato, and positive while Olga’s soprano is so delicate, melodic and pleading. (9/10)

 

8. “The Protector” (3:22) uses oboe and piano over rapid hand drumming--all of which makes me feel very at home, as if I were at a Renaissance Faire. The slowed down piano chord hits with cello and percussion section that begins around the 2:20 mark is quite devastatingly sad, a mood that is then quickly dispelled with a return to the opening section. But the song then concludes with a half-a-minute of some very ambiguous chords and feel. (8/10)


9. “Fear-Dream” (3:47) piano, strings and bassoon dominate this one, though accordion, oboe and a little percussion are also involved. It's very powerful and emotional. Electric guitar even joins in for some soloing a couple of times--especially during the last minute. This one reminds me of the music of one of my favorite modern groups, KOTEBEL. (9/10)


10. “Amid the Smoke and Different Question” (6:31) starts out sounding like a Broadway/operetta, even Moulin Rouge-ish. A male vocalist sings over the simple support of long, sustained accordian chords, and later is accompanied by an almost-separate woodwind dance, then another separate, discordant thread comes from strings, and then yet another seemingly unrelated theme arises from the deeper woodwinds. It's as if several small troubadour groups are parading through a town center, criss-crossing at the center, each playing its own little diddy as it passes by where the tenor continues, unphased, singing his plaintive dirge. Brilliant and gutsy! (9/10)


11. “Not That City” (6:57) begins as a rondo between oboe, chor anglais, and bowed double bass and then accordion. Then harpsichord takes over! The other instruments join in in a frolicking folksie tune with the accordion and chor anglais kind of dominating the twin melody lines. The at 2:15 all stops and piano enters to take over lead melody and rhythm making while all other instruments slow down in long languorous sustained notes in gorgeous harmonies. At 3:32 it happens again, everything stops and adjusts to a section in which strings lead the basic rhythm while all else pulse and dance around them (even the double bass and viola). Another shift allows the song to play out its final minute in a very dreamy, mysterious but beautiful way. Incredible song! My favorite on the album. Were I a music theorist I might appreciate and enjoy this even more—it seems so bold and daring.  (10/10)


Without a doubt Not That City is one of my favorite album of the albums I've heard from 2013. It's music excites and mesmerizes me, its constructs surprise and delight--they raise my hopes for the possibilities of music and for the possibilities of humanity.



Rating:

5 Stars, unquestioned; six if it were allowed (occasionally). I've not been this excited about a new album since MAUDLIN OF THE WELL's Part The Second blew me away back in '09. Stunningly creative and fresh.


Prog Appeal:
I understand that the music from Not That City is lacking in the "rock" elements that are considered essential to PA's foundation, but I believe this album is so progressive that it should be included on the archives.


Wow, I remember getting this album from CDBaby in 2013, along with an album by Bulbs. Anyone remember Bulbs?

Love, DreamTechPlus.
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(cover art ommitted because nudity; no actual bits shown but possibly still too risqué for this forum)

Never content to work within a single genre for too long, Dani Lee Pearce on this release has found herself returning to the synthpop style of her work from the 2017-18 period. By no means a regression however, the songs on Unfair Harmonies are a refinement of a specific approach to songwriting she only touched upon at the time: each song develops as a gradual construction of melodic snippets and ornaments that on their own sound strange and defective, but which, when put together, interlock and complete each other like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle even as they twist and turn in unusual chord progressions and intervals to keep listeners on their toes. The opening track is particularly powerful in this regard, starting with synthesized percussion and bleeps until more and more layers are stacked up to create a powerful, stately, anthemic composition.

The folktronica arrangements of Pearce’s directly preceding works are now replaced by a synth palette ranging from chiming textures to electric guitar-mimicking sounds to pure tones such as the quirky square wave that’s sure to bring a smile to listener’s faces when it introduces them to “Kind Of A Gremlin”. Even the vocals are electronically treated to add to the robotic feel of an album that nonetheless feels full of life and energy.

Highlights for me are the mantric, hypnotic disco march “In Passion’s Clutch”, and the closing “Teenagers In A Tennis World” which I find to have the most memorable hook, and those falsetto notes in the chorus have an irresistible beauty to them. A highly accomplished effort, in all.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DamoXt7942 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 03 2021 at 20:15
Anthem Of The Sun (1968) - The GRATEFUL DEAD
Originally posted by dAmOxT7942 dAmOxT7942 wrote:

This creation must be called progressive, let me say at first. "Anthem Of The Sun" was released in 1968 as the second album of a US psychedelic live-based Giant GRATEFUL DEAD. Their first eponymous album was out in the previous year, that features authentic blues rock songs plus their original psychedelic titles. Actually my first GRATEFUL DEAD was the first album which did not impress me so badly. And "Anthem Of The Sun" has perfectly immersed me ... even now! In this album they launched their real innnovative psychedelia, not discharged by any other combo in those days. I do not know what a circumstance they studio-recorded under, but this incredible 'outer' atmosphere they shot in the real world should have been one and only. No suspicion they strongly implanted their enthusiasm into our mind.

Reagrdless to say (!), the highlight of this album is on Side A. The whole side, especially "That's It For The Other One - New Potato Caboose" suite forms a wonderful psychedelic grandeur. The very first Pigpen's keyboard opening is quite suggestive. Soft and smooth, slowtempo melody lines and rhythmic bases make us safe and sound. Do not be deceived. They never betray us. The melodic / rhythmic situation alters evetually (such a POOR mixing sounds not bad at all!). Randomized colourful sound starshines catch us. The rhythm section's performance is not strictly precise nor perfectly refined (but loose and vague intentionally) but such an easygoing playing adds good decoration to this song. In the middle dreamy kaleidoscopic part we the audience could get absorbed eternally. And this inexpressible psychedelic aroma provides the following masterpiece "Neo Potato Caboose" very beautiful and delightful one. The first part sounds pretty bluesy, flavoury featuring calm, settled vocals and instrumental streamings. The latter involves fascinating, energetic flexibility by every single instrument, especially ultimate keyboard-oriented fantasy. This suite might be one of monnumental works in the worldwide music scene, I consider (or overestimate?).

"Born Cross-Eyed" sounds like an oasis momentally. This song was composed  / written by Bob, another buffer but strength in The DEAD. Really amazing and catchy, but somewhat hearty flowery mystery should be around the opus. The shortest stuff in this album cannot be avoided but the existence should be important for the whole production definitely.

However, we cannot avoid joining their improvisational opus as if we were at a venue on Side B. In the longest track "Alligator" are various rock elements. The first shot is funky, slowtempo, laidback blues phase. We can easily imagine they played with full of relax and pleasure even in the front of the big audience. Reed whistle blows are also comfortable. And in the middle part the playing situation changes unexpectedly. Uptempo freakout impromptus constructed mainly by Mickey's percussion, Jerry's flexible guitar, Pigpen's psychedelic loose keyboards, completely ring our bells. Such a powerful sound convention should be followed by the last "Caution", another crazy big one. Magnificent improvisation with quirky tape effects is solidified just like kinda vanguard of Krautrock. Not only guitar plays but also voices are mystically trembling in a irregular manner, but splendid sound waves can appeal to us drastically. Really don't know what a situation they played this production under, but surely they provide dreamy, hallucinogenic psychic aroma through the flexible musical advice. It is renowned they played improvisationally on stage 'overnight' for getting unified with the audience. Always wish I could have attended such a tremendous gig in late 1960s.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ShW1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 16 2021 at 05:44
Originally posted by BrufordFreak BrufordFreak wrote:

Band Name and description
FIVE STOREY ENSEMBLE is a progressive neo-classical band from Belarus coming out of the AltrOck label that rose out of the ashes of RATIONAL DIET in 2012-13. Compositions are mostly by former RD members and Five-Storey core members bassoon/saxophonist Vitaly Appow  and pianist/vocalist Olga Podgaiskaja and generally feature accordion, violin, double bass and/or cello, acoustic or electric guitars, some percussion, and classically styled male and female vocals. 

Album information
Their first release from March of 2013 is entitled, Not That City. Several videos of music of live and studio performances from Not That City can be found on YouTube. 

The Review:



FIVE-STOREY ENSEMBLE Not That City


Out of the ashes of RATIONAL DIET rises this phoenix of incredible power and beauty--in my humble opinion, an album ten times better than the very well crafted albums of its predecessor. Yes, Five-Storey Ensemble is the spawn of RATIONAL DIET. RATIONAL DIET founding member and reed player, Vitaly Appow, and keyboard/vocalist Olga Podgaiskaja, of the final two RATIONAL DIET albums, At Work and On Phenomenon and Existences, are principle composers here, while violinist, Cyrill Christya, and bass guitarist, Dmitry Maslovsky participate on several songs.

     While I thoroughly enjoyed the Avant/RIO/Modern Chamber musings of RD, I was quick to zoom in on Not That City once it was posted on progstreaming.com. Bam! Was I broadsided! This album blew me away from the opener through to the last song. It’s music is reminiscent of RATIONAL DIET but, like ARANIS, it is much more melodic and its vocals play a much more important role in defining their sound. The vocals here are used more operatically—and really only used in the forefront of four different songs. Whenever the male tenor and female soprano voices perform I find myself reminded of Goreki’s Third Symphony. Even though vocalists Sergey Dolgushev and composer and keyboard player, Olga Podgaiskaja, respectively, employ operatic approaches stylistically, their vocals are often used almost more as additional instruments—which has the tremendous effect of deepening the conveyance of emotions within each song—and each has such a distinct and different contribution to the songs with their voices—often at the same time--that it has the effect of bringing two very different, almost divergent threads into the emotional weave.   




Without a doubt Not That City is one of my favorite album of the albums I've heard from 2013. It's music excites and mesmerizes me, its constructs surprise and delight--they raise my hopes for the possibilities of music and for the possibilities of humanity.



Rating:

5 Stars, unquestioned; six if it were allowed (occasionally). I've not been this excited about a new album since MAUDLIN OF THE WELL's Part The Second blew me away back in '09. Stunningly creative and fresh.


Prog Appeal:
I understand that the music from Not That City is lacking in the "rock" elements that are considered essential to PA's foundation, but I believe this album is so progressive that it should be included on the archives.

I defenitely agree with the review above. FIVE STOREY ENSEMBLE - NOT THAT CITY is a 5 stars album, its (even) better than its root - Rational Diet, and I cannot see why this album is not listed in the archievs. its a true chamber rock. BTW they are still here, they have a second album, and now working on their third. 
I purcheased this album (NTC) back in 2013/14 and, but due to a permanent delay, listening to it just now. It's stunning. 
Thank you BrufordFrick for a detaild well-written review.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Spaciousmind Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 27 2021 at 13:43
I have the Midge URE: Rewind - The Greatest Hits Tour from 2002.  Its a pretty good live performance DVD.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SteveG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 09 2020 at 14:21
             

 

 

Midge Ure ‎– Orchestrated

Genre:
Style:
Year:

Tracklist

Hymn6:56
Dancing With Tears In My Eyes5:03
Breathe4:47
Man Of Two Worlds4:46
If I Was5:14
Vienna5:07
The Voice5:18
Ordinary Man4:32
Death In The Afternoon7:06
Lament4:29
Reap The Wild Wind4:01
Fragile6:19

                                

I didn't think much of this album before popping the disc into player. These types of orchestral do overs always sound schmaltzy or contrived. But this was excellent. Ultravox was always dramatic and in this case the songs are still bigger than the orchestral arrangements as is Midge Ure's voice . A few are clunkers but the majority are superb.


Edited by SteveG - October 09 2020 at 14:24
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote jude111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 05 2020 at 12:31
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by jude111 jude111 wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

I love Father John Misty's music too. I have all four of his albums on CD and I can hear the resemblance to early Elton John too, although I don't find his music to be anywhere near as depressing as  Nick Drake's three maudlin albums. Smile

When I wrote that, I think I hadn't yet discovered his previous albums. As much as I like Pure Comedy, I think Honeybear is my favorite. Have you heard his recent live album, Off-Key in Hamburg? It's really, really good.
I didn't realise Father John Misty had released a fifth album, mainly because all of the record stores have been closed for the last ten weeks. Smile

He released it on Bandcamp about a month ago, with the message, "All proceeds from Off-Key In Hamburg will be donated to the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund." https://fatherjohnmisty.bandcamp.com/album/off-key-in-hamburg-2

It was just added to Spotify as well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 04 2020 at 22:08
Originally posted by jude111 jude111 wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

I love Father John Misty's music too. I have all four of his albums on CD and I can hear the resemblance to early Elton John too, although I don't find his music to be anywhere near as depressing as  Nick Drake's three maudlin albums. Smile

When I wrote that, I think I hadn't yet discovered his previous albums. As much as I like Pure Comedy, I think Honeybear is my favorite. Have you heard his recent live album, Off-Key in Hamburg? It's really, really good.
I didn't realise Father John Misty had released a fifth album, mainly because all of the record stores have been closed for the last ten weeks. Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote jude111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 04 2020 at 19:24
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

I love Father John Misty's music too. I have all four of his albums on CD and I can hear the resemblance to early Elton John too, although I don't find his music to be anywhere near as depressing as  Nick Drake's three maudlin albums. Smile

When I wrote that, I think I hadn't yet discovered his previous albums. As much as I like Pure Comedy, I think Honeybear is my favorite. Have you heard his recent live album, Off-Key in Hamburg? It's really, really good.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 04 2020 at 15:31
Originally posted by jude111 jude111 wrote:

Funny, I am literally sitting here listening to Elton John and Father John Misty on a Spotify playlist I created when this review was posted. Father John Misty's new album "Pure Comedy" sounds so much like Elton John at his height in the 1970s, that I wondered if played back-to-back with Elton John tunes I'd still feel that way. To my amazement, I do. If you're an Elton John fan, definitely listen to "Pure Comedy." Highlights include the first 4 songs, and tracks 8, 11 & 12. His previous album, I Love You Honeybear, is also recommended, if slightly less Elton-inclined. As on reviewer has put it, these are albums Elton might have made if Bernie Taubin had been depressed LOL
 
I love Father John Misty's music too. I have all four of his albums on CD and I can hear the resemblance to early Elton John too, although I don't find his music to be anywhere near as depressing as  Nick Drake's three maudlin albums. Smile


Edited by Psychedelic Paul - June 04 2020 at 15:34
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jaketejas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 04 2020 at 14:57
Well, it has been almost one year since my last prog album non-review.  Herewith, heretoforeandthence, and forthwith, is my prog album non-review for 2020:  "  ".  

Be sure to catch my next one in 2021 - that is, if I somehow manage to survive 2020.  Until then, keep up-voting Zoso on the LZ album thread so that I don't have to eat crow with Dark Elf … and stay safe everyone!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jaketejas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 17 2019 at 15:57
Here's my prog album non-review: " ". Oops wrong forum.
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