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Non-Prog Album Reviews

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Post Options Post Options   Quote irrelevant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Non-Prog Album Reviews
    Posted: January 19 2013 at 05:03
Originally posted by Horizons

Originally posted by Vibrationbaby

Lady Gaga
 This record is very rythmical. It has a lot of beat but absoluteyl no feeling or intelligence. I guess If Frank Marino or Segovia were playing guitar it would have been a little bit better. She auditioned for Yes once but Chris said no way. But she is very sexy I think. Could you imagine what she would do to a male in the sack. I wouldn't even need her music. But I would buy this record just to gawk at the cover so this is why I give it a 5 star rating. Lady Gaga rules regardless of her sub-moronic intelligence. Better than any of the worst prog albums from the late seventies including that really bad Genesis record when they had only 3 guys because the guitar player was so fed up and went on an insane drinking binge and the got his life back together and returned to making good music.



uhhhhh

LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ProgMetaller2112 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 19 2013 at 05:13
No Doubt-Push And Shove. Though I love No Doubt's old music(from the self-titled debut to Return of Saturn) this one sounds not so inspired though I do like a few songs on it  (yeah and whatStern Smile). Sparkle and Easy are great pop tunes. The album is not that great  2.5./5Cry. I'm still marrying that Gwen Stefani by the wayStern Smile




tell me this girl is not hot I dare youAngryAngryAngry


Edited by ProgMetaller2112 - January 19 2013 at 05:20
“War is peace.
Freedom is slavery.
Ignorance is strength.”
― George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four

"Ignorance and Prejudice and Fear walk Hand in Hand"- Neil Peart

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Post Options Post Options   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 17 2013 at 07:06
Artist:   Prefab Sprout (UK, 1978 to....)

Album:   Steve McQueen/Two Wheels Good (1985)

Rating:    4.5 stars

Prog Appeal:   
2) Light appeal (3) Strong appeal to those prog rock fans who like its jazz-influenced side)

Review:


Just how bad really was the 80s for music at the end of the day?  While some archetypal 80s sounds have aged pretty badly, it's a closed mind that believes no good albums were ever released in the decade.   One such album is Prefab Sprout's sophomore effort Steve McQueen (available under the name Two Wheels Good in the United States).   Comprised of singer, keyboardist, guitarist and 'lynchpin' Paddy McAloon, his brother Martin (on bass guitar), Wendy Smith on keyboards/guitar/backing vocals and Neil Conti on drums, they started out with a somewhat jagged jangle-pop affair Swoon before blossoming with this wholesome jazz pop treat. 

Robert Christgau gave this a B+ and if you are familiar with his unconditional love for British artists, that says a lot.  He also cites J.D.Considine as calling them Steely Dan lite.  I could not find where J.D.Considine drew this comparison but it's a good one.   I am not too sure about the lite part of it.   McAloon's lyrics revolve around personal themes and more specifically his relationship with girls, while Donald Fagen and Water Becker drew from a broader basket, often commenting pithily on society.   This album also quite adeptly balances more emotional moments as on 'Goodbye Lucille #1' with Steely Dan-esque cynicism ('Hallelujah'), which on the whole makes it quite a different ride from Steely Dan. 

Musically, there's more resemblance to Steely Dan in terms of the fondness for jazz.  Hallelujah in particular does evoke to me their 'My Rival' from the Gaucho album.   But while Prefab Sprout emulate Steely Dan in being complex and cerebral within a relatively accessible framework, there are none of those technically dazzling guitar solos to be found here.   Actually, make that no real guitar solos.    They compensate for this by drawing on some Pink Floyd-esque atmospherics.   The keyboards on say Appetite beautifully evoke the sound of a breeze (similar effects can be heard on When the Angels).   There's a more direct 'whoosh' to introduce Bonny.  

Speaking of Bonny, I quite like McAloon's vocal delivery on that song.  There are times where his smoothness - combined with a lack of legato - makes the proceedings a bit dry but on Bonny as well as Goodbye Lucille # 1, he conveys a touching sincerity that Fagen generally found hard to muster.    His singing makes these two songs so powerful, so haunting that for a long time, it overshadowed the rest of the album for me.   I still find it a bit hard to adjust to Hallelujah or Horsin Around after listening to Bonny.   As Christgau puts it, the well meaning cad. 

McAloon may or may not be a well meaning cad but he is a first rate songwriter, that's for sure.  He doesn't appear to have set much store for modesty and he boldly proclaimed himself the best songwriter on the planet.   Other than the vanity evident in such a statement, I wouldn't necessarily baulk at that comment because it's far and away the best pop album I've heard from that decade.  

And he had competition...from Fagen's masterful Nightfly for one and from Kate Bush's Hounds of Love.  But Steve McQueen has, as I mentioned earlier, a captivating emotional resonance, if only in places, that Nightfly does not really capture and none of the quirks that necessarily come with the Kate Bush package.   Here then is an album that you could simply play on the speakers and slowly but surely start humming along without trying too hard to contextualise it or to let it grow on you.   It's meant to be pretty straight up on the surface, while rewarding you with plenty of harmonic delights if you're prepared to listen to it more than once.

What might get in the way circa 2013 is the 80s production.   To be fair, it's not as 80s as some other 80s albums.  The drums are pretty loud (louder certainly than they would have been in the 70s) but they don't have that robotic drum machine sound so typical of that decade.  I am not a sound engineer but from observation, I don't think there's too much reverb on the vocals either (another problem usually found in 80s albums).  What does hurt, arguably, is a touch of gloss that somewhat takes the life out of the melodic instruments and diminishes their individuality.  You just get generic guitar and keyboard tones, not tones that you want to hear again and again (like say Steve Hackett's lovely tone on the song Everyday).    There again, it appears they have something in common with Steely Dan, sounding more like studio cats than a bunch of musicians having fun. 

For that reason and because the songwriting is not wow in enough of the songs to warrant a five star rating, I knock off half a star.  But I must stress that that is just nitpicking in an attempt to distinguish masterpieces from other stellar albums.   I love accessible rock/pop albums that are also interesting musically and offer depth for more than a couple of listens;  I would dare to say I love that niche a bit more than prog 101 kind of music.   If you do too, this is well worth a try.  If you love Steely Dan, grab a copy.






Edited by rogerthat - February 19 2013 at 08:02
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dieselhead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 04 2013 at 17:56
I think most people on this site favour music either from or inspired by bands from the 70's. These guys just bought their first CD out and it's a cracking Funk album featuring Joe Bonamassa on lead. A million miles from Prog but it's guaranteed to take any and all straight back to that decade we all know and love so much. There isn't a bad track on it and there's even a hidden track at the end (on 10 minutes). For that reason I'd give 'We Want Groove' a 10/10 score and heartily recommend.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dr wu23 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2013 at 11:28
Originally posted by Dieselhead

I think most people on this site favour music either from or inspired by bands from the 70's. These guys just bought their first CD out and it's a cracking Funk album featuring Joe Bonamassa on lead. A million miles from Prog but it's guaranteed to take any and all straight back to that decade we all know and love so much. There isn't a bad track on it and there's even a hidden track at the end (on 10 minutes). For that reason I'd give 'We Want Groove' a 10/10 score and heartily recommend.
Rock Candy Funk Party

Dieselhead
 
Decent rock/jazz/funk.......reminds me of several  Jeff Beck solo lp's. from the 80's and 90's.and maybe the Dixie Dregs.
But I've never been a big fan of the funk element....so I'd rather listen to BCC with Joe on guitar or Joe's solo blues rock cd's.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote catfood03 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 26 2013 at 22:08
Autechre - Exai (2013)



Autechre's music continues to mutate into ways I never thought imaginable. While their prior trio of releases: Quaristice (2008), Oversteps (2010), and Move of Ten (2010), often highlighted the duo's "softer" and ambient sides, Exai is full-on aggressiveness. I always marveled at Autechre's command of abstract beat-making in the past, but I had warmed up to the explorations heard on those recordings. Exai is dense, sometimes overbearingly so for a 2 hour experience, but it is rarely dull.

Some highlights that grabbed me most upon first listen...

FLeure - Good way to start the 2 hour journey ahead. Let's you know early on that Exai is going to be a rollercoaster ride

VeckoS - Best track from the first half/disc. The sound design is thrilling (especially on headphones). Very cavernous and spooky.

T Ess xi - There's a lot of sound effects in this track that recall much of Mouse On Mars' earlier work. A good mix of MOM humor with Ae's usual mayhem.

Cloudline and Bladelores - I grouped these two together as faves because they offer a bit of retreat from the wilder sections of music. They are both lengthier than most and are as close to "chill" as offered here. Like I said above I'm enjoying what Autechre can do with more relaxed musical atmospheres.

YJY UX - Current favorite overall. This rivals LP5's "Drane2" as Autechre's best album closer. Its beautiful, strange, and one of those tracks that could seem to go on much longer and I'd be happy.

Only Irlite (get0) and Flep seemed like weaker spots, but I might warm up to them with repeated listens.

I'm giving Exai five stars, though even after only a couple spins it is too early to tell if this will stand up to the band's two pinnacle releases, LP5 and Tri Repetae. I've got a good feeling that it'll earn this highest rating even after my frayed mind can process this dense, massive offering.


Edited by catfood03 - March 26 2013 at 22:12
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Post Options Post Options   Quote AtomicCrimsonRush Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 26 2013 at 22:35
Time for a quick review:


 Van Halen (1978) - Van Halen

****

Class act album really, featuring the all time greatest version of You Really Got Me aided beautifully by lead guitar intro Eruption. This lead break knocked everyone off their perch and is quintessential to learning hot licks and hammer ons at high speed. 

Eddie Van Halen became a guitar god overnight and Dave Lee Roth's voice caused singers to wake up. He is a force on this record and the music is clean, fast and no nonsense heavy duty. 

Atomic Punk has a scratchy intro with killer speed riff and awe inspiring lead break. Every track has a muscular riff and every thing works on one of the all time greatest debuts. The album sparked a revival of metal designed for girls. The band looked good and the sound was commercial, melodic, but still brilliantly executed.  

This one is a treasure to revere, and still is heard today now and again on the radio.  
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Post Options Post Options   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2013 at 11:46
Good one!  I might want to write one for 1984 after reading this.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote tamijo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 17 2013 at 04:01


Eat em and smile

Band Name and description: This is the first studio album, by  David Lee Roth supergroup with Steve VaiBilly Sheehan, Gregg Bissonette. they made one more supreeme album Skyscraper (1988) before the band split.

Album information
: 1986

The Review : What we got is a technical very talented Power Heavy. with a bit of Roth flamboyant and a lot of wonderfull Vai, a lot of humour, and a lot of sun. Works more than perfect in the car, on the highway, summer days.
Works well with a six pack too. Its stripped og the dark Dungeons and Dragons Metal elements, but it gets my head banging on most tracks.

Rating - In its own terms, Power Heavy Rock with a twist, its a 5/5,

Prog Appeal 
From a prog. point og view Skyscraper may fit better, but in my book this is the true masterpiece.

NB: a sidenote :On the CD version of Skycraper, they put in 2 tracks as 1-2
  1. "California Girls" (Brian Wilson/Mike Love) – 2:51
  2. "Just a Gigolo/I Ain't Got Nobody" (Casucci/Caesar/Williams/Graham) – 4:41
A horriable idear, because they do not fit with the intension of the album, if you start the CD from track 3, you get the  original better version.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote R-A-N-M-A Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 18 2013 at 23:00

I'm honestly shocked that no one else is jumping on this, but it only just came out and not everyone is a diehard, so I’ll gladly do the honours.

For those who don't know them, the Flaming Lips are one of the oddest bands to have any kind of mainstream following. They began in the 1980s and for the first part of their careers; they were an unorthodox and somewhat self-loathing alternative rock band. What little I've heard from their early discography hasn't really been to my tastes so I haven't killed much of my time on it. Their first glimmer of success did come in this period however. The song "She don't use Jelly" off of their 6th album, released in 1993, Transmissions from the Satellite Heart, was a left field hit. While I am partial to this single and the album as a whole, the best track is hidden away on the B side however. It's a fairly short number clocking in at a little of 4 minutes called Moth in the Incubator. It is a clear break from traditional rock/pop song structure. It mounts from a quavering grungy introduction through a rocky and claustrophobic middle section before bursting into a triumphal finale; truly, an excellent track and a sign of even better things to come.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XA9z5Jq2f_w


Fast forward to 1997 and the Lips are on the verge of breakup. Car crashes, relationships, drugs and most curiously a spider bite almost put the band permanently on ice. This year the Lips release the extremely experimental album called Zaireeka. A 4 album set whose disks are meant to be played simultaneously or in 2s or 3s. It isn't much of a hit, but it is a crossing of the Rubicon (or should I say Rubycon?) away from their traditional alt-rock domain. By the time 1999 rolls around, the band has overcome its travails and releases its newest and some would, validly, argue finest artistic statement, The Soft Bulletin. The Soft Bulletin is delicate and dark and at once prismatic. Lots of people have favourite songs from this album, like the "Spiderbite Song" which serializes their recently overcome travails or the colourful electro-pop of "Race for the Prize" or the breezy summer ode "Buggin'", all great, but those aren't the ones for me. No, my favourite is the two part combination of What is the Light and the Observer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsTbgxh7oTM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ad2YdIQeVZM


The first, and better, of the two is the embodiment of the overflowing joyfulness of which characterizes this period of the Lips. It eventually flows into the latter, which is the darker, driving and morose counterpart, equally essential moods for the complex and expressive new Lips. The Soft Bulletin's two follow ups largely in the same vein, Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots and At War with the Mystics are both quite successful. Yoshimi, the more important of the two is a semi-concept album about a futuristic girl who battles humanoid robots and features their biggest hit, the humanist ballad "Do You Realize??".  AWwtM isn’t to be dismissed offhand either. It has arguably their best rock of the period and strongest instrumental Pompeii AM Gotterdammerung. Their concerts during this period also become a thing of legend. Confetti cannons, swarms of massive bouncy balls, giant laser hands and a human hamster-ball elate crowds the world over. But all the fatalist tinged fuchsia was about to give way to something darker and considerably more powerful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zYOKFjpm9s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKbJpngxzc0


In the later years of band, they've become notorious for the length of time between albums. It was 3 years from Soft Bulletin to Yoshimi, 4 more to AWwtM and 3 again to 2009's Embryonic. Embryonic bears some resemblance to its most recent forbearers in that it is densely layered and sparklingly produced, but in many ways it is a throwback to their older, darker more angst ridden work. The title itself is taken from a line in Moth in the Incubator. The crunchiness is back in a big way and lead singer Wayne Coyne's trademark falsetto is faded well into the background. I and others would argue that Embryonic actually marks a new phase for the band. The raw, manic depression of Embryonic is probably best heard on The Ego's Last Stand, but my favourite is actually one of the bonus tracks, the chilling and beautiful Anything you say now I believe you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyp_UBJut6g


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5PphNl1BTQ


After Embryonic they embarked on some humanist movie making adventures and paid tributes to prog giants with their covers of Dark Side of the Moon and In the Court of the Crimson King. Word started to spread that a new studio album was in the works in 2011. During the intervening period a lot of people were wondering if the new mood for Embryonic would last or if it was passing. Last year the band named the album and confirmed that it would be very dark. The only question left was how dark is that? Well, this month we've finally found out.

THE TERROR
The Flaming Lips (2013)

5/5

... is upon us! In short, the only thing traditionally Flaming Lips about this album is the incredible degree of artistry. There is nothing popularly oriented on this album, and scarcely anything vaguely rocking about it. This a pitch black mechanical drone from start to finish. It takes much more from the textural and melancholic schools like Tangerine Dream, Kraftwerk and Pink Floyd than it does from Beatles or Stones.

The album is comprised of 9 mostly long-ish tracks (by pop standards at any rate) many of which are simply continuations of one another. It is abrasive and cold all the way through and songs sport heart warming titles like You Are Alone, Turning Violent and yes, The Terror. My personal favourite is You Lust which clocks in at an auspicious 13:03. It is frighteningly cold and mechanistic with piston drumming and a central repeating synth lines. It gives me chills, in a good way. Other standouts are the Kraut-rocking the title track which features some poignant drumming, and the aptly named missing Tangerine Dream track You Are Alone, but it’s all so good.

Many of the Lip's albums boarder on the edge of concept albums (especially Embryonic), but this is the final leap. The band hasn’t explicitly called it as such, but the tight playing, narrow stylistic window, continuous nature and obvious theme (it's in the name) belie what its true naturem is. In fact, it's hard to describe each song on their own, but cause they're simply part of the whole. Helpfully, the whole album is currently streaming for free. So check it out.

http://stereogum.com/1314262/stream-the-flaming-lips-the-terror/album-stream/


Many long time fans of the band will probably be turned off by this departure, but I think potential and non-committal fans here at PA should really take notice. If you look into it, The Flaming Lips have come up for inclusion a couple of times and been rebuffed on the grounds of their insufficient progressiveness. Well, all the Observers, Gemini Syringes, Pompeii AM Goterdamerungs and Moths have come home to roost in a big way. This is a progressive rock album and a very good one at that. It is not an album for the meek. It is an unabashed artistic statement by a band overflowing with talent and direction. It is for anyone like me who wanted albums like Zeit, the Hell half of Heaven and Hell and the Hummer to really strike them to the core, this is it. This is the Terror you've been waiting for.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e8/The_Terror_cover.jpg



Edited by R-A-N-M-A - April 18 2013 at 23:17
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Post Options Post Options   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 19 2013 at 06:08
Not a fan, by which I simply mean I haven't yet explored their music.  But I have heard about them and am glad to know they are still going strong.  
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Post Options Post Options   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 19 2013 at 06:47
Artist:   Everything Everything (UK, 2007 to....)

Album:   The Arc (2013)

Rating:    4.5 stars

Prog Appeal:   
(3) Strong appeal to Gentle Giant fans

Review:


This young band are only two albums old (including the one under review) and are already getting a fair amount of attention from the media.  Perhaps, the fact that they are now promoted by Sony RCA has something to do with that.  But it may also have something to do with their originality.  Sure, there is no music without inspiration from some 'source material', but Everything Everything have their own unmistakable sound. 

I can trace lots of Britpop and contemporary music influences in their style (well, duh, like for a lot of new, upcoming bands).   On the other hand, their love for vocal harmonies and a tendency to develop music very rapidly with lots of notes flowing almost uncontrollably, points more to, yes, Gentle Giant.   When a member of this forum first brought this band to my notice, I think most of the people who enjoyed it (including self) were Gentle Giant fans!  Perhaps, apart from an appetite for almost math-y, goofy complex music, a tolerance for not so appetising vocals is also a trait of GG fans. 

The vocals are certainly something you have to watch out for.   Either you might be able to live with lead singer Jonathan Higgs's weird and more often than not annoying delivery, or it will turn you off the band so heavily that you may not feel like giving it another chance (of course, the third option is that you do like his voice).   He relies almost exclusively on the falsetto and without much by way of finesse or nuance in his approach.  Now as much as I love listening to a great singer, I make any allowance for the vocals when the music clicks for me (yes, I would indeed tolerate Bruno Mars if his songwriting was anywhere near this creative).   I can live with Derek Shulman and I can live with Higgs too (though, admittedly, I find that harder than putting up with the former). 

Coming to the album under review, it is an extension of their style and approach evidenced in the debut (Man Alive) and at the same time, reflects a lot of growth and development.   It continues roughly in the same vein as the debut as it revolves around an aforesaid GG-like fondness for vocal harmonies and rapidly developing music (without quite the same amount of complexity as GG).   However, there appears to be a greater partiality for accessible vocal or instrumental hooks now.  Mind, I did find Man Alive very infectious but on The Arc, they just 'streamline' their approach a bit without losing their uniqueness.  

They are also occasionally a bit more eager to pause and relax and let the beauty of a melody or a chord progression unravel rather than careen at a 1000 miles per hour.   Notice the almost Beatles-like string section in the chorus of Duet.   Beautiful bell-like harmonies accompany the opening verses of Choice Mountain, reminding me strongly of 70s prog just for a moment.   On the other hand, they have seriously upped the ante in terms of the funk aspects of their style.  It was only evident on maybe Schoolin' from the previous album, but Armourland is almost Michael Jackson-like, at least until the chorus (which has a distinct Everything Everything touch...already!).  

Speaking of which, Everything Everything don't achieve an original sound merely through a mish mash of all kinds of combinations of genres (which might be the initial impression they give).   Their melodies and harmonies have distinct patterns that give them away, just like any number of great rock artists from the good old days and going up to Radiohead.  Leaving aside minor reservations about the way they tend to blitz their way through songs, they are one of the most promising new rock bands at least outside of prog.  

They support their stellar writing with vibrant and energetic execution.   They have one of the strongest rhythm sections I have heard from many, many recent bands AND they also throw melodic basslines at you.  There are some catchy guitar licks co existing with contemporary electronic sounds as well as piano (though no actual piano seems to have been used).  Vocals aside, there is not a single track off The Arc that I don't like at least a bit.  Highlights would be Cough Cough, Kemosabe, Duet, Feet for Hands, Armourland and...many more, actually. 

I am sorry to have to dock half a star, then, but I do on account of the vocals and also because no emphatic statement expressing the band's emotions or point of view comes through clearly in the way last years' masterpiece Idler Wheel communicated.   But if the rate at which they are scaling peaks (pun intended) is anything to go by, their creativity alone might make me disregard that aspect in future...again, just like Gentle Giant. 

 


Edited by rogerthat - April 20 2013 at 03:07
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Post Options Post Options   Quote VOTOMS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 21 2013 at 10:11
It would be better if the reviews was organized by title and link at the main page
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Post Options Post Options   Quote rappingangel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2013 at 06:05
Artist:   Pretty lights

Album:   A Color Map of the Sun.

Rating:    4.5 stars

Prog Appeal:  To the followers of hip-hop & soul

Review: While it is difficult to judge a album by just one track; if the Pretty lights track record is anything to go by this album will have the same mix of soul, hip hop and electronica that has become the signature of the Pretty lights. They have recently released the track “Around the Block” and it is pretty awesome. Big smile



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Post Options Post Options   Quote DamoXt7942 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 28 2013 at 10:57
Lysol (1992) - MELVINS

One of stoner masterpieces really, not of progressive rock though. Their heavy, explosive sound launcher kicks our b*** violently, and chorus mysteria salvages our ears from the hell.

Grunge power is always impressive and innovative indeed. Over 30 minute stoner rock quake full of inorganic power is the basis of this EP, and their madness harmonized with deep riffs and warped, scattered killer voices is obviously the life elixir of alternative rock scene. Sound structure is not complex nor complicated, but extremely mind altering and excessive, depressive. Exerted remarkable influence upon the younger stoner killas, and they've done their original play, as you can feel via this stuff. Actually tremendous mind power should be needed when we listen to this heaviness, even for 30 minutes or so. The latter part is not only stonerly heavy but also horribly calm with extreme sound depth created by their rhythm section (bravo).

In conclusion, such an explosive gravity cannot get experienced without listening to this 30 minute anti-comfort / anti-pleasure. Grab this black muddy sound river.
Cool
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Post Options Post Options   Quote deafmoon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 07 2013 at 20:09
Folk singer John Stewart's 1974 album The Phoenix Concerts is a classic. Stewart was a folk artist starting in the Kingston Trio and evolved to become one of America's greatest story-telling songwriters. Stewart wrote about the country, love and life in general. He wrote with a passion for depth of feeling and a fantastic descriptive easiness about living. He passed in 2008. Som eof John Stewart's better known songs were; Chilly Winds, California Bloodlines, Cheyenne, July You're A Woman, Gold, Pirates of Stone County Road, You Can't Look Back and many, many more. If you can sit still and give a folk singer on acoustic guitar a listen, you will not be dissappointed. 
Deafmoon
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Luna View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Luna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 08 2013 at 17:13



[I'm doing this on the spot, so I'm bound to miss something important]

Ever since I was shown the solo project of Will Toledo by forum member The Truth, he has blown me away. This is an album that really feels like a person and has an identity. Can I describe it well? Not really. However, I am very good friends with it if that makes any sense.

The album is conceptual, involving themes of friendship (the big one), but also loneliness and life in general as a 19-year-old. Beginning with "My Boy (Twin Fantasy)", it's established that "We don't see each other much" and "It'll take some time/But somewhere down the line/We won't be alone". Twin Fantasy shines in its dynamics (seen most clearly in "Beach Life-in-Death") and self-expressive lyricism (seen everywhere, but "Bodys" especially).

Despite having multiple 10+ minute songs on the album, the album is very catchy and makes me want to listen again and again. In fact, I thought this album was nothing special after the first listen or so, but the catchiness led me to listen over and over again, cementing it as my favorite album (at least so far). 

One thing that I can see as a turn-off for some would be the recording quality and overall lo-fi-ness of it all. I acknowledge this, but I see it as a part of the art. Keeping with the "album is a person" theme, no person is without flaws, and so this album is perfect in its initial imperfection (I have no critiques on the music itself, however).

Highlights: "There's no devil on one shoulder and angel on the other/They're just two normal people" from "Bodys"

"Part III" of "Beach Life-in Death", completely bursting after the quiet "Part II".

All in all, it's an emotional rollercoaster, made for emotional rollercoasters like myself.

(I missed a ton and might revise this later, but this is the gist of it)

5/5 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote infocat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 08 2013 at 20:45
^ I listened to it one time a few weeks ago and I just don't see it...  oh well
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Belief is not Truth.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Luna Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 08 2013 at 22:03
Originally posted by infocat

^ I listened to it one time a few weeks ago and I just don't see it...  oh well
Took me a little bit to appreciate it too. I might suggest reading along with the lyrics to get a better feel of the music, but the music is intended for a pretty young audience so there's that as well.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dr wu23 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 12 2013 at 23:26
The Temperance Movement
 
Good solid blues based hard rock....similar to the Black Crowes or Humble pie and even a bit of the Faces thrown in here and there. They don't sound completely retro and have a bit of a modern feel to many of the songs. All in all a decent debut for those who like classic sounding rock with a blues and southern based edge.
Et In Arcadia Ego
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