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moshkito View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 19 2017 at 20:36
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Here's a new music article for your reading and aural edification on The Dark Elf File:

Era Enders: How the Psychedelic 60s Became the Hard Rock (or Punk Rock, Prog Rock, Country Rock, Soft Rock, etc.) of the 1970s

...

Very nice ... good choices and I'm not sure I could add a whole lot more. 

FP -- Matty Groves was the song that became known the most, but Reynardine remains one of the prettiest things ever, and probably one of the best guitar things Richard Thompson ever did, and he has many of them for sure.

... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the inner art is all about!
www.pedrosena.com
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 19 2017 at 21:04
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Here's a new music article for your reading and aural edification on The Dark Elf File:

Era Enders: How the Psychedelic 60s Became the Hard Rock (or Punk Rock, Prog Rock, Country Rock, Soft Rock, etc.) of the 1970s

...

Very nice ... good choices and I'm not sure I could add a whole lot more. 

FP -- Matty Groves was the song that became known the most, but Reynardine remains one of the prettiest things ever, and probably one of the best guitar things Richard Thompson ever did, and he has many of them for sure.
Thank you, Mosh. I could have chosen Reynardine or Tam Lin as well. Either is stellar. And Sandy Denny's voice! I don't think Fairport ever reached the same heights without Sandy.
And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 20 2017 at 12:53
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

...
Thank you, Mosh. I could have chosen Reynardine or Tam Lin as well. Either is stellar. And Sandy Denny's voice! I don't think Fairport ever reached the same heights without Sandy.

The song of hers (and there are many) that really stands out is the last one, and probably what is on the album (Rising for the Moon) is probably a tribute to her more than anything else. "One More Chance", and ... well, she didn't get another chance we could say.

On the remastered album she does the same song on piano by herself, and that is even better and so insanely scary when you know what is coming ... it's almost like she knew it. But the violin/guitar duet in the album version is outstanding and so beautifully done.
... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the inner art is all about!
www.pedrosena.com
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 20 2017 at 13:28
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

...
Thank you, Mosh. I could have chosen Reynardine or Tam Lin as well. Either is stellar. And Sandy Denny's voice! I don't think Fairport ever reached the same heights without Sandy.

The song of hers (and there are many) that really stands out is the last one, and probably what is on the album (Rising for the Moon) is probably a tribute to her more than anything else. "One More Chance", and ... well, she didn't get another chance we could say.

On the remastered album she does the same song on piano by herself, and that is even better and so insanely scary when you know what is coming ... it's almost like she knew it. But the violin/guitar duet in the album version is outstanding and so beautifully done.
Oh, I agree in regards to "One More Chance". My favorite of hers has always been "Fotheringay", a song that certainly sounds traditional, but which Sandy wrote. In addition to her haunting voice, the acoustic guitar interplay between Richard Thompson and Denny is excellent as well.
And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2017 at 14:13
For your aural edification, another music article from The Dark Elf File. I went looking for the dirtiest, nastiest, filthiest guitar licks from that greatest era of rock that straddled the 60's and the 70's. Some of these riffs have been known to induce convulsions in the timorous and weak. Nuns have become promiscuous and given up their calling, in essence kicking the habit, after hearing some of these songs.

Kings of the Sleaze: The Nastiest Rock Guitar Riffs, Licks and Leads of the 1960s and 1970s


And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2017 at 15:17
Hi,

A very nice list, though I would probably list more Europeans that are not as well known, as the majority of the ones you got.

But, damn .... I went on a listening binge just for fun ... very enjoyable listing.

Possible additions, even if the music is very different:

Big Brother and the Holding Company - Ball and Chain. I always thought this taught the English how to use a guitar screaming ... and Janis always saying I can scream just as good as you!

CAN - Mother Sky. The hard part for American audiences in listening to this is how the improvisation develops and sometimes repeat. It's very European in its music traditions, and consequently not something that American audiences can stay with a lot, since it is more fluid and kinda never stops.

Amon Duul 2 - Yeti (the title song)/Dehypnotized Toothpaste (Dance of the Lemmings)/Apocaliptyc Bore-Mozambique (Vive La Trance). In my book, this is the perfect mix of improvisation and song. This guy can rip it non stop in Yeti ... and make David Gilmour sound like he can only do scales and one note ... and then goof around with sound effects non stop in DotL.

Guru Guru - Very early stuff with Ax Genrich deserves attention here, although I doubt that most here can enjoy some Cosmic Junk and Slop and noise and not want to go get their toothbrush and haircut right after it! I always thought that he did not fancy himself a Jimi, but that if noise was part of the music, and in the early "krautrock" it was, and then some. Even in Dance of the Flames, the new guitarist is influenced by Jon McGlothlen and GG just turns it up and lets it rip.

Richard Pinhas/Heldon - Sadly these albums are not exactly "listenable" for anything that resembles a commercial style or design. And Richard's philosophical discussions in the Eurock periodicals are even more out there and difficult to interpret and you wonder where the strings and the fingers meet ... if at all!

Maybe this is your next list ... the great stuff that is not listenable for most ... hehehe ... and then add a Jon Mc and a Terje Rypdal ... doing Jimi's chamber music with DAvid Darling ... wait a minute ... that's music?

Great fun reading your stuff and go chase it down for a listen.
... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the inner art is all about!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2017 at 18:06
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

Hi,

A very nice list, though I would probably list more Europeans that are not as well known, as the majority of the ones you got.

But, damn .... I went on a listening binge just for fun ... very enjoyable listing.

Thanks, Mosh.

I try to not be too esoteric when sharing compositions (although I have mentioned Amon Duul II and Can in previous articles). I attempt to find a middle ground as far as familiarity, as my readership includes more than just prog fans (hence, the inclusion of bands like Aerosmith and Van Halen, for whom I mildly despise except for an album or two).

Regarding Big Brother and the Holding Company, as far as I'm concerned it was Janis and then the rest of them (many of the leads still make me cringe). Her final album, Pearl, showed what she could do with a more professional band. Too bad she couldn't overcome her demons and record more.

But there are certainly bands that are more "out there", compositionally speaking. I probably could have added another 50 to the list of 50+ songs I included. I'll probably add a part 2 in the future. Thanks again.





And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 23 2017 at 15:51
And yet another music article available for your perusal on The Dark Elf File, this one is rather introspective and more personal than my usual commentary ("Objectivity" is, after all, my middle name). It is titled, "Favorite Songs From My Childhood: A Musical Reverie", and presents my recollection of tunes from my adolescence, from the first Beatles appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, to my first concert, Alice Cooper, when I was 12 (and thus became radicalized).

Favorite Songs From My Childhood: A Musical Reverie


And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 25 2017 at 05:48
Hi,

Lovely list ... TV did not come to my mind until after I came to the US and even then, it was a problem, because I could not speak English, and nothing made sense ... even in a movie styled way.

Gosh ... my list would be the horrors for prog folks. Mind you a lot of this was before I came to the US, and only from being able to catch some radio in rinky dinky places in the state of Sao Paulo in Assis and Araraquara.

Maria Betania - Carcara
Ray Charles - I Can't Stop Loving You
Gilbert Becaud - Et Maintenant
Edith Piaf - Hymne a l'amour
Beatles - She Loves You
Rolling Stones - Paint It Black and Between the Buttons albums
Harry Belafonte - Be darned if I know the name of the song or album
Herman and the Hermits early stuff

Some classical music, though ... Rite of Spring (from Lenny of course) ... Turandot (Nielsen, Tebaldi, del Monaco and Leinsdorf) ... Tosca (with Gigli ... listen to the aria ... absolutely soft and beautiful, compared to Pavarotti's ear ripping) ... Ravel with Bolero ... and the odd one ... Carl Orff and Carmina Burana which was really cool when you are 13, 14 and 15!

After October 1965, all hats and tastes are off to the races!
... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the inner art is all about!
www.pedrosena.com
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