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    Posted: July 31 2011 at 20:35

Quella Vecchia Locanda

– An interview by Jim Russell and Andrea Parentin


QVL!  It was not Banco or PFM who initially made me fall head over heels in love with Italian progressive rock, but rather Quella Vecchia Locanda.  In my opinion they are right up there with Orme, Banco, Balletto di Bronzo, and other first tier bands as the most interesting and beautiful examples of the subgenre.  Their two albums are classics to almost any RPI fan, blending progressive rock with classical influences, gorgeous violin and piano, and heartfelt romantic melodies. They were never as popular as the Italian "big three" but try telling that to their fans these days, as QVL will always place highly on the lists of fans exploring Italian prog.  And while no one band completely encapsulates all the wonderful facets of RPI, Quella Vecchia Locanda is one of the bands which must be mentioned when discussing the classic era and describing the unique Italian prog "sound." 

It was very challenging to track down members of the band who would participate, and the process has been going on for the better part of two years on my part.  Two other members have been questioned and may or may not participate in the future, but for now Andrea and I decided to put this out as a part 1 interview with the three members who have contributed to date.  I want to sincerely thank Massimo Roselli, Don Lax, and Claudio Filice for their contribution to the most in-depth QVL interview in some time.  And thanks to Jan for his help in connecting us with Claudio. 

One additional comment.  As we may get additional responses and possibly some rare photos coming to us in the coming months, do check back to this interview a few times for possible updates.  I will try to bump the piece if this happens. 

Without further delay, the story of Quella Vecchia Locanda, Italian prog legends! 

-Jim Russell

 

Tell us first about your earliest musical experiences.

Massimo: I began studying piano when I was six and I continued until the age of fifteen when I started to play with the first bands of boys at New Year and Carnival in restaurants. When I was eighteen for some time I used to play in night clubs

Don: My parents loved music, and I heard a lot of various styles as a small child. We also lived in various countries, so I was introduced to many cultures. When I was 5 we were living in Karachi, Pakistan, and I heard a gypsy woman playing violin at a Christmas fair. I immediately knew that I wanted to play that kind of music on that instrument, and went home and wrote a letter to Santa Claus. My first instrument came under the Christmas tree. My father gave me my first lessons, as he had studied violin as a child, until we moved to India 2 years later, and I began studying with a woman who was seriously classically trained. A seminal experience for me was when Duke Ellington brought his band to Bombay- my father, (a diplomat) invited Duke and his band, as well as a number of excellent Indian musicians- sitar, violin, sarangi and tablas- to have tea at our house followed by a jam session. This completely opened my consciousness to the possibilities of improvising and music. I was 9. A few years later we moved to Paris, where I entered the Conservatory of Music, and got very serious about my studies.

 


Where, when, and how did you meet the other members of Quella Vecchia Locanda?

Massimo: Just during the period I was playing in night clubs I met Patrick, drummer of Quella Vecchia Locanda from whom I bought my keyboard. After some time he told me that they needed a keyboardist and, after a little test, I was recruited.

Don: I was studying at the Santa Cecilia Music Conservatory in Rome, and heard the band play at a party at my younger brother's school. I was so taken with their music that I went up to them on a break and asked if they needed a violinist. They said, yes, as a matter fact they did- and invited me out to their rehearsal space.

Claudio: The band was aware of my musical background and previous experiences. At the same time I was a friend of the bass-player Massimo Giorgi; we attended the same music academy in those days. They contacted me and following our meeting, where, among other things, they gave me the opportunity of listening to their album, I decided to accept their offer.

 


What are your earliest memories of the band after formation?   What kinds of things were you guys doing as friends and for fun?

Massimo: Rehearsal, rehearsal and rehearsals... I had to learn the repertoire of the band, so we had to work very much every day. We didn’t spend much time together, apart from work. I was also trying to keep in touch with my friends outside the band.

Don: I remember the first time we jammed. Out at the old house in the country. I took out my violin, and they started playing a blues. To me it sounded like gypsy music- I'm half Rumanian, and that's where my heart is. I had never really jammed before- being so serious about classical music, but I just dove in and it worked- like magic. We had great "chemistry" as a group- everyone listened to each other, and magic happened.

When we were writing for the first album, the band would have a song, and they would tell me- this needs a classical intro- what can you do? And I'd take some Bach, or Brahms or Corelli, and arrange it to fit the song. It was so much fun and we were very creative.

Claudio: We all had our own commitments beyond the band, some pursued their musical studies, some worked. We'd mostly see each other during the recording sessions seeing that we all lived in different parts of Rome. However, I often met up with Massimo in my free time.

 


 

What was happening prior to the first album?  Was this a period of mostly playing live in the clubs of Rome?

Massimo: Yes, we used to play live but we were also working on the arrangements of the first album. Double work then. But that was also useful to check on stage some pieces of the album

Don: Rehearsing, writing music, playing clubs in Rome and on the coast of Italy.

Claudio: We would play live shows in pubs and clubs. Our music was mostly for listening rather than dancing.

 

 

I understand the band name is taken from the “old house” where the group rehearsed, and that this house was abandoned.  Where was the house?  Is this building still standing today? 

Massimo: Well, let’s say that the “locanda” was the motel of ancient times. The English translation should be “inn”. The house was located on the far northern outskirts of Rome and I suppose that it still stands there today. It was a small house near a quarry.

Don: I still remember the smell of manure from the fields around the house. It was ideal for rehearsing loud music, as there was no-one anywhere near...

Claudio: I believe that the building itself still stands. It was located near via della Pisana, in the "Città dei Ragazzi". We would have pictures taken in there to promote the band and the albums. We would also try in an old house by the quarry since the owner of this quarry would allow us to use the house to practice.

 

 

There was a live CD issued by Mellow Records in 1993, recorded live at the Voom Voom Club in November 1971.  Can you remember anything about this show?

Massimo: You know what? In 1971 QVL hadn’t formed yet, so I do not see how we could have taken part in that event
We never recorded the live album. The only true albums are the eponymous one and “Il tempo della gioia”, both recorded in studio.

Don: I had not yet joined the band.

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_tr_TqyDCEy0/Si5Ikj3ep5I/AAAAAAAADAs/2IcTVtTIx2Y/s400/qvl_02.jpg
-Donald Lax (violinist on the first album)

 

QVL played some of the large Italian rock festivals of the early 70s.  Please tell us which ones and what you remember from the festivals.

Massimo: The most vivid and beautiful memory is about the first festival we took part. It was the Villa Pamphili festival in Rome and I remember we were one of the first bands to play at the opening of the festival. Looking down from the stage we saw a wall of people (maybe 100,000) and I must say that in the beginning I felt a deep emotion. But then adrenaline did its duty. Even today I still can feel a great emotion when I remember that day.

Don: Villa Pamphilli was the biggest. There is nothing that compares with the godlike feeling of playing live through 100 Stacks of Marshalls for over 100,000 people. I'll never forget it.  One of the interesting moments was another huge outdoor concert that was being filmed for National Television.  As we were walking onstage someone handed us a clipboard with "Papers" to sign. It seemed some band members were ready to sign and play, but I read it and it was a contract from Hell, binding us to all manner of ridiculous agreements for years... I told them we wouldn't sign, they said we couldn't play, we said OK. and prepared to walk, calling their bluff- they finally gave in and we performed without signing our lives away. There was a lot of Shady Business in the Italian rock world in those days...

Claudio: I recall performing at Villa Pamphilj, Baths of Caracalla and at the Piper in Rome, among others. At this last one we were one of ten bands that had been chosen by the public. We also performed at a pop festival in Naples, in Genua and in Viareggio where we opened for Van der Graaf Generator.

 

 

Tell us about the first album.  What do you remember about recording it?  What are some of the lyrical themes?

Massimo: The album was recorded in a small studio built in an apartment located in the centre of Rome. The sound engineers were great, friendly and competent. The atmosphere was intimate and familial. The first experience with the recording studio was not so traumatic as I expected. I’ve always managed to play well and record my part at the first shot. The album is about a deformed boy shunned by the community because of his diversity. It’s a kind of metaphor of racism and of the way they judge a person only by the look without going into what a person really is. The album develops the story of this guy and it was in part inspired by Frankenstein’s story.

Don: I remember working hard to make the best music we could. In retrospect, there are things I'd do differently, but at the time I was 18, and very excited to be there. I love that my younger brother was asked to record a clarinet solo on one of the songs. He is no longer alive, and that's the only recording I have of him playing.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Uz_w-XoG6Tg/SEmF1DDwW1I/AAAAAAAAAH8/7mtXp8fTByw/s320/QuellaVecchiaLocanda1.jpg

 

I assume between the first and second album there was more live activity.  What kinds of tours did the band do?  Did QVL tour outside of Italy?  Which countries?  

Massimo: Your assumption is good. We toured in Italy from North to South and some times the legs were exhausting. A vivid memory is a set of gigs that took us in three days from Genoa to Soverato (in Calabria, in southern Italy) to Rimini for the final day of an award called “Gatto d’oro” (Golden Cat). Unfortunately, we never had the chance to play outside Italy. However our albums did reach foreigner audiences and we even reached the top charts in Japan, but a few years after the release of our eponymous album.

Claudio: We toured around Italy, in the main cities and we increased the number of our live performances. 

 

 

Which Italian bands did QVL tour/play with? Which bands did you know as friends?

Massimo: We played with many bands over three years. Many Italian bands (Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, Rovescio della Medaglia, Trip, Grybaldi, New Trolls, Le Orme) and also Van Der Graaf Generator and Shawn Phillips. We got along particularly well with Il Rovescio della Medaglia and with the boys of L’Albero Motore

Don: The bands I remember best were PFM and Banco del Mutuo Soccorso. They were all very friendly.

Claudio: We performed with Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, Osanna, le Orme, New Trolls, PFM and Balletto di Bronzo. 

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_C24sla2g3mo/SbW4LfSgvPI/AAAAAAAACMo/TscbcgHRlz4/s320/qvlmember.jpg

 

Many of us are too young to have been present at the legendary Italian prog festivals of the early ‘70s.  We’ve seen some pictures but please help us understand the “vibe” of the social part of the shows.  Tell us about what was in the air, what people were talking about, politically or socially…

Massimo: Well, those were the years that immediately followed ’68, the year of the student revolt, of the social claiming. Those were the main issues. The festivals were great happenings were youth gathered to listen to excellent music for free. It was a great launch pad, both for new bands and already famous ones who had the chance to express themselves in front of huge crowds

 

 

Tell us about the second album.  What do you remember about recording it?  What are some of the lyrical themes?

Massimo: Shortly after the release of the first album, our producer sold our contract to RCA. So we recorded the second album in RCA studios in Rome. The thing I remember with more pleasure is that the recording sessions took place in the “Studio 2” that was one of the first ones in Europe equipped with the Dolby System device. I enjoyed very much the overdubbing of backing vocals and the “work in progress” during the recording sessions since we had new ideas and advanced technologies on hand. The “concept” of the second album was the story of the band, things that happened in the life of the band of which, however, I had lived only the Villa Pamphili festival.

Claudio: I would say it's a type of music that speaks of dreams, fantasy and the soul.

http://www.progarchives.com/progressive_rock_discography_covers/296/cover_278192512008.JPG

 

What kind of sound was the band shooting for?  A blend of rock and classical?  Was there more to it than that?  Other influences or goals?

Massimo: Well, three of us were classically trained and, of course, we couldn’t help but to be influenced by this. Our goal was to mix rock and classical music. In the second album we tried to play something classical of our own composition. I don’t know if we succeeded, I hope that the listener could perceive it. We tried to avoid to be influenced very much by other bands or composers but we had our preferences, no doubt about it. At the time, for instance, we liked Yes because of their vocal harmonies.

Don: Blending classical and rock was definitely a large part of it for me. We were also very much about telling a story, musically and lyrically.

Claudio: We were always trying to achieve something special, unique, by combining classical and electric instruments, associated with our texts and our worldview. It was a type of classic rock, sometimes even aggressive.

 

 

The recording quality of the 2nd album is so good, with good definition of the strings and nice clarity overall of delicate instrumentation.  Many Italian albums of the period did not have such good dynamics and punch.  Since I know you didn't have much time and budget, how were you guys able to achieve such good sound quality?    Was it because of a great producer, great studio engineers, luck?

Massimo: The answer is simple: the second album was recorded at RCA studios in Rome, Italy. C lanced in the study was the first study in Europe to be equipped with Dolby sistem.La RCA output was the same with which we had a contract. RCA bought the rights from the first label, the HELP.  This is the difference in quality between first and second LP.

 

 

One of my favourite things about QVL is that on top of this really tight, solid band, you have all of this beautiful piano and violin.  Much space is given to these two instruments over the two albums, and you make the most of it.  How were you so adeptly able to blend together these traditional instruments with a rock band?

Massimo: I do not remember any particular difficulties in combining classical and rock instruments. It was all quite natural. All that you had to do was to think that classical instruments were just like every other rock instrument and don’t get conditioned. All in all, years later, many have made concerts with symphony orchestras. We were forerunners, weren’t we?  Ah ah ah ah ah ah aha

Don: Massimo and I had the most classical training, and we related in a deep way on that level. The synergy of the band happened through our arranging and the magic of musical chemistry.

Claudio: The violin being a peculiar instrument, we tried to have the violin work in harmony with the piano, the flute, the clarinet, the bass and all the orchestral instruments we used in combinations with the electric ones. 

 

 

Was it challenging to use piano and violin in live shows? 

Massimo: It wasn’t a difficult challenge because the piano was an electronic one, so there were no problems with amplification. The only problem was that it hadn’t the dynamic keyboard so I couldn’t use the piano-forte volume. I solved this problem with a pedal. The violin was amplified with a small magnet applied on the wood and connected to an amplifier.

Don: I was personally very frustrated with the quality of electronics available for the violin in the 70's. If I had had my solid body Zeta electric 5 string violin in those days, it would have been SO much easier! 

Claudio: No, it was not difficult. There was a great understanding with the pianist and I'd often use both the electric and the classical violin based on our needs.

 

http://www.minilps.net/images/stories/shop_image/product/quella-vecchia-locanda-il-tempo-inside-gatefold.jpg

 

Favorite classical composers?

Massimo: I like every kind of music when it’s good and able to convey emotions. However my favourite ones are Beethoven, Bach, Vivaldi and Liszt but I love Russian composers like Stravinsky and Mussorgsky as well.

Don: Bach, Brahms, Beethoven, Mozart, Vivaldi and Dvorak

Claudio: Of course there are many who have inspired me. I would say especially the French ones such as Debussy and Ravel and the Germans such as Bach.

 

 

“Villa Doria Pamphili” is one of the most beautiful pieces of music I’ve ever heard.  Please tell  me about this song. 

Massimo: I’ve already told you of the emotions I felt at the Villa Pamphili festival. In this piece we have tried to reproduce those emotions. The classical soul of the band is evident in the intro featuring piano and violin in the forefront. A piece that I would call simple in its overall structure but full of nuances. It’s one of my favourites along with “A forma di...” that defines the classical direction of the band

Claudio: It was a tribute to the festival where we had a lot of success and it inspired us in writing this song.

 

 

Credits list several members of the band singing.  Who was the main vocalist?  What sang the most on the albums and live?

Massimo: Lead vocals were Giorgio Giorgi’s, although in “Accadde una notte” originally sang the bassist Massimo Giorgi, both during the recording sessions and live. Our aim was to record on the albums music that we could reproduce on stage. In the case of “A forma di...” we had an orchestral base recorded on tape and we used play on it

Claudio: The flute-player Giorgio Giorgi was always the main singer. Massimo was the second singer.

 

 

Tell us about the line-up change that occurred between the albums.  I know Donald returned to the USA, but why did the others leave?  Where did the new members come from?

Massimo: Donald went back to the U.S.A. because the term of his father, who worked at the American embassy in Rome, came to an end. Aldo Coletta, the bass player on the debut album, left for personal reasons. We found Claudio Felice at the Conservatory of Santa Cecilia where he was studying violin while Massimo Giorgi was the cousin of Giorgio (our singer and flutist). He came out from a previous experience with a Roman band called Il Ritratto di Dorian Gray.

Claudio: The bass player, Massimo, and myself were the new additions. He was the cousin of Giorgio and he now teachers at the prestigious academy of S. Cecilia, in Rome.

 

 

According to the inserts in the CD reissues, the first album was composed by Giorgio Giorgi, Massimo Roselli, and Gianni Dell’Orso. Is this accurate?

Claudio: That is correct.

Massimo: Well, we can say that is formally correct. The truth is that Gianni Dell’Orso signed the songs just because of legal issues with SIAE (Italian Society of Authors and Publishers) for copyright. He was our producer and didn’t contributed at all to the song-writing except for some hints during the recording sessions. And, to be honest, my participation in the song-writing for the first album is limited to the last track. When I joined the band the pieces were almost completely ready. I did nothing but the piano parts. I signed the songs because of legal issues since I was the only member of the band registered in SIAE then.

Don: I recall all of us working together.

 


-Massimo Roselli (keyboards)

 

The second album was composed by Dino Cocco and Giorgio Giorgi.  If this is correct, why was there a change in the composition credits between the two albums?

Massimo: Yes, it’s right. But this time my role in the song-writing was important. We can say that the song-writing proceeding was collective but the basic ideas were mostly mine. Cocco signed for reasons of copyright. In Italy at the time in live concerts copyrights were granted to the same composer for only 30% of all the pieces performed. So we changed the composer of the music just for this reason. On the contrary the lyricists had granted 100% of copyrights.

Claudio: If I recall, we had all agreed that Giorgi and Cocco were to have that role.

 

 

The first album had a heavier edge to it, a more focused rock edge.  The second album seemed much more elaborate and classically tinged, romantic.  How would you describe the two albums?  Which one do you feel is more successful?

Massimo: The reason for the difference is explained in the previous answers. The second album was mostly my and Massimo’s brainchild and we were of classical extraction. I was already working on other ideas when the band split up. I would say that the first album was conceived as a rock album in which the piano parts were added, while the second one was conceived starting from the piano parts.

Don: Of course I'm partial to the first album, but the second one is very beautiful as well.

Claudio: The first was innovative, in that we had just performed at several festivals and we sold 40,000 copies! The second album was more elaborate and has been appreciated more. We recorded it at the RCA with the symphonic orchestra and therefore the quality of the sound is greater. I really appreciate the first one, but the second one is overall a better album.

 

 

Who were some of your influences?  What bands were you listening to at the time?

Massimo: We tried to avoid any influence. We didn’t like to be compared with other bands. As far as I am concerned, I used to listen to all the bands of that period, from Yes to King Crimson, from Jethro Tull to Santana, to Chicago and so on. Today like then I listen to every kind of music, what matters for me is only quality.

Don: Duke Ellington, Ravi Shankar, King Crimson, Genesis, Jethro Tull, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Traffic, Santana, Emerson Lake and Palmer.

Claudio: We'd listen to the main Italian and foreign bands such as King Crimson, Jethro Tull, Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Genesis and PFM.

 

 

When specifically did QVL break up? 

Massimo: In the summer of 1975 I think... Many years have passed and maybe I could be wrong.

Claudio: The band kept on playing for a year, I had to leave because I had to sit my last violin exams at the academy in Rome and I needed more time to study, therefore being on tour would have been too demanding.  A violist took my place, a difficult thing in itself to substitute a violin with a viola, and within a year the band split up. We all had our own commitments beyond QVL.

 

 

Why did you split up?

Massimo: We disbanded for economic reasons. We were at the beginning, our equipment was bought in installments and we were not supported by our record company (it was RCA) which did absolutely nothing to promote the album. Furthermore, it was the period of austerity on account of the oil crises and the consequent shortage of gasoline. Cars had to stop during the weekends and venues were empty, so they didn’t organize concerts anymore. So, with much regret, we split up in order to pay the debts for our instruments.

 

 

Were there ever any attempts to revive the band? 

Massimo: No, we took different paths in life and gave up music, apart Massimo Giorgi.

Don: I would love that.

Claudio: That I know of there haven't been any. I had already made my choice.

 

 

What have you been doing in the years since the band split?  Share whatever you feel comfortable sharing with us. 

Massimo: Well, soon after the split up I looked for another band since music was in my DNA but I never had the chance to meet the right people. Then I got a job and all was over. The mistake I made was not insisting with music letting me be driven away by the pressures coming from my family.

Claudio: I put together a string quintet with Massimo and we would perform, record tracks for films and travel abroad (Germany, France and Switzerland). As a soloist I performed several times in Italy and often also accompanied by the piano or chamber music. I have played with the orchestra of Santa Cecilia, the RAI orchestra, the Teatro dell'Opera in Rome, the Sinfonica Abruzzese and several orchestras as the first violin.
Since 1982 I teach and hold the chair of violin at the academy of music in Campobasso.

 

 

The cover art of both albums are absolutely beautiful, among the most striking in progressive rock.  Who painted these covers?   Tell us a bit about what they mean. 

Massimo: I can’t be of any help I fear. The boys who painted the covers were friends of the drummer. The meaning of the first one is evident: the inn, the hunchback boy... It describes the album concept. The second one has no reference to the album, we just liked it!

Claudio: If I recall, the original idea came from Dino Cocco's sister who was a painted and the final design was completed by the RCA.

 

 

The last few years have seen another, more intense revival of the passion for the 1970s Italian Prog bands.  PFM, Delirium, Latte Miele, and other classic bands have reformed and released high quality new albums.  Is there any chance QVL could ever compose another album?

Massimo: Dear Jim, no way at all, unless I start to look for other musicians to reform the band with a new line up. But I’m a man of a certain age by now, I have no links with the music business, in short, it’s an utopia to think so. Of the old progressive bands only PFM have always been in the music business during all these years not only with albums and concerts but with other activities

Don: As far as I know, I'm the only one still performing as a professional musician. It would be wonderful and exciting to do such a project, but seems unrealistic.

Claudio: I doubt this can happen. Probably not with the old line-up. Massimo and I are very busy with classical music at the moment.

 

 

Is there any unreleased QVL material anywhere-live stuff, unfinished demos, anything? Could any of this ever be released?

Massimo: No, I don’t think so.

Claudio: Certainly the other members of the band possess such material. I do not have anything.

 

 

The original Italian rock explosion of the early 1970s produced hundreds of amazing albums.  Do you have any favorites?

Massimo: Definitively yes! Banco del Mutuo Soccorso and PFM.

Don: PFM

Claudio: I'd say PFM's album were the most impressive in those days.

 

 

When you look back at that time, what final thoughts do you have?

Massimo: Well, it was a wonderful experience, I loved that job and maybe I should have persisted. But eventually I’m happy also because I see that we are appreciated even 35 years after the release of the last album. Maybe we should have been 30 years younger and release an album now. Anyway, thank you to all the fans who still appreciate us and love our music.

Don: It changed the entire direction of my career as a classical violinist. After years of exploring everything from rock to jazz, middle eastern, Classical Indian, Greek, and Latin music, I eventually went back to "Retread" classical music- joining Symphony orchestras, playing in string quartets and chamber groups. I still love both classical and Rock, and now, playing 7 nights a week for the last 14 years at Four Seasons on Maui, I work with a wonderful guitarist to incorporate all these influences, and we play everything from Bach to Bossanovas, Carlos Santana to Coldplay, Mozart to Metallica... and I'm still composing and recording my own music.

My favorite thing lately is to play for one or two people at home. I listen to their souls, and just play the music that comes through, spontaneously creating a song that is just for them, just for that moment, unrecorded except by their experience.

Claudio: I feel some nostalgia for that period, our music was appreciated and those were beautiful days. Enthusiasm was greater in the days of our youth. There were many bands, some unheard-of: it was an age where many performed but only a handful would become renowned.

http://www.progarchives.com/progressive_rock_discography_band/296.jpg

"Back row: left Giorgio Giorgi, right Donald Lax. Row below from left to right: Massimo Roselli, Dino Cocco, Romualdo Coletta.  It was in 1973. No, it wasn’t the old house but some Roman ruins that are located near Villa Doria Pamphili. I think it was part of an ancient church but I do not remember very well."  -Massimo


Donald Lax official site: http://www.mauiviolin.com/


-Jim Russell/Andrea Parentin, August 2011



Edited by Finnforest - August 04 2011 at 10:43


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Negoba Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 31 2011 at 21:26
Thanks Jim...QVL may well be my favorite RPI band. Bravo.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Mellotron Storm Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 31 2011 at 22:13
Great intertview guys !Clap  Might be the time to re-visit those two classics.It's so good to hear them talk about the past which must seem like a life-time ago to them.Amazing band !
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Post Options Post Options   Quote memowakeman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 31 2011 at 22:56
This was quite an interview. Thank you guys, it was a very nice read!

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Post Options Post Options   Quote dreadpirateroberts Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 01 2011 at 00:17
Wow, fantastic, thank you Jim and Andrea, and QVL. Appreciate the massive amount of work everyone must have put in to this!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote harmonium.ro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 01 2011 at 04:13
Impressive interview, one of the best ever on PA. Thanks Jim and Andrea! 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Todd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 01 2011 at 11:55

Beyond words.  Thank you both, and thanks to Massimo, Don, and Claudio.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Moogtron III Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 01 2011 at 16:47
Great interview, and QVL is a really good band.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote sleeper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 01 2011 at 17:43
An exceptional band, Il Tempo Della Gioia is my favourite RPI album that I've so far discovered, and this was an excellent and informative interview with the band and thanks to Don, Claudio and Massimo for agreeing to do it.

And well done Jim and Andrea for the excellent interview.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Nightfly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 02 2011 at 14:27
Great to see this Jim, really looking forward to reading it but unfortunately I'll have to come back to it when i have a bit more time.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Finnforest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 03 2011 at 19:56
Thank you everyone for the kinds words, this one was a labor of love for both Andrea and I.  We're big fans of this band.  Hopefully the guys who didn't reply will get to it someday and we can add their thoughts to this.  


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 04:05
Damn you guys!! I didn´t notice this yesterday. Read about half now, and yes Jim you can really feel it was a labor of loveBig smile
I´m going to store some for later, but let me just say, that I laughed out loud, when they were asked about the live album - and it turns out they weren´t even a band at the time...
I was listening to Realta´ from the first album this morning, when I first stumbled across this interview. Talk about coincidence!

Big cheers from Denmark!!! You guys have made an awesome interviewClapClapClap
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Post Options Post Options   Quote NotAProghead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 08:48
Thanks, guys. Well done! Clap


Only small and not so important detail:

Massimo: The most vivid and beautiful memory is about the first festival we took part. It was the Villa Pamphili festival in Rome and I remember we were one of the first bands to play at the opening of the festival. Looking down from the stage we saw a wall of people (maybe 10,000) .....

Don: Villa Pamphilli was the biggest. There is nothing that compares with the godlike feeling of playing live through 100 Stacks of Marshalls for over 100,000 people.  


10 or 100 thousand people?

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Finnforest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 08:59

I noticed that too, but communication was not easy, and I decided that readers can research this if they want the precise number.  I did my partLOL



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Post Options Post Options   Quote NotAProghead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 09:12
Definitely so. Smile

By the way, I have a better quality QVL photos (one is the same as at the band's page, the second is different) in Paolo Barotto "100 foto storiche" book. I'll scan and send them to RPI team.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Finnforest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 09:31
Thanks Gene, but coincedently Todd has the book too and has said in the RPI team thread that he would handle this.  Thumbs Up


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Post Options Post Options   Quote andrea Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 10:14
Originally posted by NotAProghead

Thanks, guys. Well done! Clap


Only small and not so important detail:

Massimo: The most vivid and beautiful memory is about the first festival we took part. It was the Villa Pamphili festival in Rome and I remember we were one of the first bands to play at the opening of the festival. Looking down from the stage we saw a wall of people (maybe 10,000) .....

Don: Villa Pamphilli was the biggest. There is nothing that compares with the godlike feeling of playing live through 100 Stacks of Marshalls for over 100,000 people.  


10 or 100 thousand people?

 
 
About 100,000 people! 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Finnforest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 10:44
Thanks guys, i updated the population count in the interviewThumbs Up


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Post Options Post Options   Quote avestin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 14:50
brilliant interview. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote NotAProghead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 04 2011 at 16:14
Thanks, Andrea.
Who are you and who am I to say we know the reason why... (D. Gilmour)
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