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Petition to get Jon Anderson back into Yes

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lazland View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Petition to get Jon Anderson back into Yes
    Posted: April 21 2013 at 12:45
Originally posted by Dean

Every band that has changed its line-up over the years will have what some fans will consider to be "the definitive" line-up and not all fans will necessarily agree on what that definitive line-up is. My favourite Yes album is Relayer by a very wide margin, but Anderson-Howe-Squire-Moraz-White would not be my definitive line-up. Singers always get the bum deal in a changing line-up because unlike a guitarist, drummer or keyboard player who can adapt, singer's are either unique or sound-a-likes (and a sound-a-like can never compare to the original) - In Marillion Hogarth was never going to be a Fish clone and that changed Marillion more than changing drummers did, and the same is true in Yes..

I agree with this, but in the context of the thread, there is a stark difference between Yes and Marillion. Fish left of his own accord, without any pressure. H, therefore, had the opportunity to remould the band, and a great job he has done.

Anderson was, not to put it too starkly, kicked out, and the manner of it left a nasty taste in the mouth.

Jon Davison is a very good singer. However, Anderson was, in the opinion of long standing fans such as myself, the heart and soul of Yes, and it will never be the same without him.

In short, I agree with all Charles said - always do!Smile


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Post Options Post Options   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 21 2013 at 23:15
Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Dean

Every band that has changed its line-up over the years will have what some fans will consider to be "the definitive" line-up and not all fans will necessarily agree on what that definitive line-up is. My favourite Yes album is Relayer by a very wide margin, but Anderson-Howe-Squire-Moraz-White would not be my definitive line-up. Singers always get the bum deal in a changing line-up because unlike a guitarist, drummer or keyboard player who can adapt, singer's are either unique or sound-a-likes (and a sound-a-like can never compare to the original) - In Marillion Hogarth was never going to be a Fish clone and that changed Marillion more than changing drummers did, and the same is true in Yes..

I agree with this, but in the context of the thread, there is a stark difference between Yes and Marillion. Fish left of his own accord, without any pressure. H, therefore, had the opportunity to remould the band, and a great job he has done.

Anderson was, not to put it too starkly, kicked out, and the manner of it left a nasty taste in the mouth.

Jon Davison is a very good singer. However, Anderson was, in the opinion of long standing fans such as myself, the heart and soul of Yes, and it will never be the same without him.

In short, I agree with all Charles said - always do!Smile

Thank you, my friend!  

*sigh* It never ceases to amaze me how passionate Yes fans are for the band!  We all have an emotional stake in this....personally, I thought the version with Benoit David was rubbish and refused to participate, even though I strongly supported Ollie Wakeman in his role. 

One positive thing that could happen is that Yes could evolve.  Anderson, Squire etc. have often alluded to Yes outliving its founders, and that would be similar to many august symphonies and choirs in the world.  To this end, Jon Davison may be the new vanguard, musically competent and invested in the compositional style of the original composers in a way that Trevor Rabin, Patrick Moraz and others were not.  

I wish the band members had true understudies who could take over when the seniors decided to rest.  The original crew could still play a valuable role in advising, teaching and inspiring, but eventually we all die, and if Yes is meant to live on, it will be people like Davison who carry it forward.  I'm curious to see what happens next! 


Edited by cstack3 - April 21 2013 at 23:17
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Chris S Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 21 2013 at 23:48
LOL.......let the guy be at peace, he is almost 70 now
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Post Options Post Options   Quote twosteves Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 22 2013 at 08:38
I think JA will end up doing a special concert with the his old Yes mates--Chris has said numerous times if the right event came up it would happen (I think the "right event " for Chris means a promoter offering lot's o money lol)  An event that would be special with a DVD, etc. But they better hurry up as they are all approaching 70 and  not as in good shape as the Rolling Stones which is really weird considering all the vegetarianismLOL  I think the group kicked him out because they wanted to (at their advanced ages) take control of their lives and not depend on JA whims---plus they didn't like the songs or ideas he was bringing to the table.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 22 2013 at 10:15
Originally posted by twosteves

I  I think the group kicked him out because they wanted to (at their advanced ages) take control of their lives and not depend on JA whims---plus they didn't like the songs or ideas he was bringing to the table.

...as opposed to Buggles songs from the '80s?  

I guess we won't know unless we ask Squire.  He's been all over the map, suggesting a "Yes residency" on Broadway, bringing back all former players (uh, too late for Peter Banks!), new CD etc.  

Yes seemed to work best with a high level of creative tension, so maybe, IF they want to do something, they should strive for that.  Their latest albums just seemed to have a "let's get one out in the racks!" kind of feel to them, although there are a few high-points mixed in.  

I hear you about "Little Napoleon" Jon Anderson!  However, his instincts usually seem to hew to what we believe Yes should sound like.  

I think Howe should go on tour with the Steve Howe Group and let Steve Hackett take over his slot!   Any other ideas on a new guitarist for Yes?  (Trevor Rabin not allowed as an answer).
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Post Options Post Options   Quote twosteves Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 22 2013 at 11:04
Seems the Buggles produced an album many people on this site respect as a proper Yes album--Drama--so, I guess it seemed logical to revisit it for FFH---which I like---I know you read what the guys say, and they haven't liked the songs Jon brings to the table lately--but went along with it. I mean for me JA writing has been very hit (rarely) or miss (often) for some time. I still would like him in the band as he's my fav male vocalist. Chris is all over the map,( but CHris loves Yes but also needs money)--which may be bothering Howe--I've seen them a few times in recent times and Howe is the only one getting great reviews and exciting me and audiences consistantly---so for me no Howe --no Yes. I did sense in recent interviews, Steve misses the working relationship he had with JA---the writing team that gave us many of the great Yes songs.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote infandous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 22 2013 at 14:16
Originally posted by cstack3

Originally posted by twosteves

I  I think the group kicked him out because they wanted to (at their advanced ages) take control of their lives and not depend on JA whims---plus they didn't like the songs or ideas he was bringing to the table.

...as opposed to Buggles songs from the '80s?  

I guess we won't know unless we ask Squire.  He's been all over the map, suggesting a "Yes residency" on Broadway, bringing back all former players (uh, too late for Peter Banks!), new CD etc.  

Yes seemed to work best with a high level of creative tension, so maybe, IF they want to do something, they should strive for that.  Their latest albums just seemed to have a "let's get one out in the racks!" kind of feel to them, although there are a few high-points mixed in.  

I hear you about "Little Napoleon" Jon Anderson!  However, his instincts usually seem to hew to what we believe Yes should sound like.  

I think Howe should go on tour with the Steve Howe Group and let Steve Hackett take over his slot!   Any other ideas on a new guitarist for Yes?  (Trevor Rabin not allowed as an answer).



I think Glass Hammer should just replace all the members of Yes, and play all Yes songs (and maybe open for themselves with GH music).  Wink

Okay, that originally came to me as a joke, but it could work!

Listening to "If" and "Cor Cordium", I just keep thinking that they sound like albums that Yes might have made if they hadn't lost their touch at the end of the 70's.  Of course, there are some key things lacking, but maybe with a little input from the former members (including Anderson), they could turn them into true Yes albums.






Edited by infandous - April 22 2013 at 14:19
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dellinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 22 2013 at 19:45
Originally posted by cstack3


Originally posted by twosteves

I  I think the group kicked him out because they wanted to (at their advanced ages) take control of their lives and not depend on JA whims---plus they didn't like the songs or ideas he was bringing to the table.
...as opposed to Buggles songs from the '80s?  
I guess we won't know unless we ask Squire.  He's been all over the map, suggesting a "Yes residency" on Broadway, bringing back all former players (uh, too late for Peter Banks!), new CD etc.  
Yes seemed to work best with a high level of creative tension, so maybe, IF they want to do something, they should strive for that.  Their latest albums just seemed to have a "let's get one out in the racks!" kind of feel to them, although there are a few high-points mixed in.  
I hear you about "Little Napoleon" Jon Anderson!  However, his instincts usually seem to hew to what we believe Yes should sound like.  
I think Howe should go on tour with the Steve Howe Group and let Steve Hackett take over his slot!   Any other ideas on a new guitarist for Yes?  (Trevor Rabin not allowed as an answer).


As a matter of fact, I didn't find "Fly from Here" so terrible. I actually liked those 80's songs that form the main bulk of the "Epic" (which is not an epic in my ears), and am glad they were released in such a beautiful way (specially Sad Night at the airfield). I even found Benoit's voice very beautiful (still, he was no Jon Anderson... but for that album, he didn't have to be). Still, of course, it was not among the best albums from the band... but it still was not worse than any of the albums released since Going for the One.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 22 2013 at 20:57
Originally posted by Dellinger

Originally posted by cstack3


Originally posted by twosteves

I  I think the group kicked him out because they wanted to (at their advanced ages) take control of their lives and not depend on JA whims---plus they didn't like the songs or ideas he was bringing to the table.
...as opposed to Buggles songs from the '80s?  
I guess we won't know unless we ask Squire.  He's been all over the map, suggesting a "Yes residency" on Broadway, bringing back all former players (uh, too late for Peter Banks!), new CD etc.  
Yes seemed to work best with a high level of creative tension, so maybe, IF they want to do something, they should strive for that.  Their latest albums just seemed to have a "let's get one out in the racks!" kind of feel to them, although there are a few high-points mixed in.  
I hear you about "Little Napoleon" Jon Anderson!  However, his instincts usually seem to hew to what we believe Yes should sound like.  
I think Howe should go on tour with the Steve Howe Group and let Steve Hackett take over his slot!   Any other ideas on a new guitarist for Yes?  (Trevor Rabin not allowed as an answer).


As a matter of fact, I didn't find "Fly from Here" so terrible. I actually liked those 80's songs that form the main bulk of the "Epic" (which is not an epic in my ears), and am glad they were released in such a beautiful way (specially Sad Night at the airfield). I even found Benoit's voice very beautiful (still, he was no Jon Anderson... but for that album, he didn't have to be). Still, of course, it was not among the best albums from the band... but it still was not worse than any of the albums released since Going for the One.

I suppose that, musically, it was okay.  However, I was pretty angry at the way they treated Ollie Wakeman, and I just never warmed up to Benoit David.  I've only listed to FFH a few times, I should probably give it a few more tries. 

Mind you, it's a masterpiece next to Union, Big Generator & a host of other stinkers from Yes!  However, there was no really brilliant moment in FFH for me to latch onto, whereas I could warm up to at least one song on all the other Yes albums.  

The ruthlessness with which Squire acts is very repellant to me.  He reminds me of a big corporate raider or Wall Street tycoon...maybe Howe will reunite with Anderson and Wakeman?  I'd enjoy something like that!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 23 2013 at 01:21
I may already have said it earlier but FFH is inferior to every GH album I have heard inlcuding even the maligned Three Cheers For The Broken Hearted. Its not bad though. I have it on my I-pod and Benoit David is absolutely fine. It lacks though and if you still have a hunger for symphonic prog (as I have) then you can safely ignore it (and just about everything else Yes have made since 1977 for that matter). Of course Yes 1971 - 1977 versus Glass Hammer is no contest and that explains the only good reason for Yes still existing.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote infandous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 23 2013 at 11:49
Originally posted by cstack3

Originally posted by Dellinger

Originally posted by cstack3


Originally posted by twosteves

I  I think the group kicked him out because they wanted to (at their advanced ages) take control of their lives and not depend on JA whims---plus they didn't like the songs or ideas he was bringing to the table.
...as opposed to Buggles songs from the '80s?  
I guess we won't know unless we ask Squire.  He's been all over the map, suggesting a "Yes residency" on Broadway, bringing back all former players (uh, too late for Peter Banks!), new CD etc.  
Yes seemed to work best with a high level of creative tension, so maybe, IF they want to do something, they should strive for that.  Their latest albums just seemed to have a "let's get one out in the racks!" kind of feel to them, although there are a few high-points mixed in.  
I hear you about "Little Napoleon" Jon Anderson!  However, his instincts usually seem to hew to what we believe Yes should sound like.  
I think Howe should go on tour with the Steve Howe Group and let Steve Hackett take over his slot!   Any other ideas on a new guitarist for Yes?  (Trevor Rabin not allowed as an answer).


As a matter of fact, I didn't find "Fly from Here" so terrible. I actually liked those 80's songs that form the main bulk of the "Epic" (which is not an epic in my ears), and am glad they were released in such a beautiful way (specially Sad Night at the airfield). I even found Benoit's voice very beautiful (still, he was no Jon Anderson... but for that album, he didn't have to be). Still, of course, it was not among the best albums from the band... but it still was not worse than any of the albums released since Going for the One.

I suppose that, musically, it was okay.  However, I was pretty angry at the way they treated Ollie Wakeman, and I just never warmed up to Benoit David.  I've only listed to FFH a few times, I should probably give it a few more tries. 

Mind you, it's a masterpiece next to Union, Big Generator & a host of other stinkers from Yes!  However, there was no really brilliant moment in FFH for me to latch onto, whereas I could warm up to at least one song on all the other Yes albums.  

The ruthlessness with which Squire acts is very repellant to me.  He reminds me of a big corporate raider or Wall Street tycoon...maybe Howe will reunite with Anderson and Wakeman?  I'd enjoy something like that!



Despite my better judgment, I ended up buying Fly From Here several months after its release.  I generally agree with your comments about it. As I've said before, it sounds like prog muzak to me.  Something made for elevators and department stores were geriatric old proggers go (which, admittedly, is most proggers LOLWink ).

However, I am forced to admit that it is probably better as a cohesive and well composed album than anything Yes has done since at least the Keys albums (though musically, I thought Magnification was pretty good.....I just couldn't stand Anderson on it, who I usually love.......there were just way too many vocals and the lyrics were a bit too similar and new age drenched for my tastes).  That, sadly, didn't make it a good album for my tastes though, and certainly well short of a true Yes album (again, all IMO).  Looking at the writing credits, it's even harder to think of it as a real Yes album.  Drama was a solid album, but even with that one I feel like it's not a true Yes album and only sounds good compared to what came immediately before and after it.






Edited by infandous - April 23 2013 at 11:52
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Post Options Post Options   Quote twosteves Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 23 2013 at 12:17
I agree there are too many vocals and too many new age drenched lyrics on Mag---Howe has said the same. Although, I love ITPO and think it's one of their best since the 70's.-  I like FFH because I think there is some great playing by Howe on it---I mean without his playing on "the man you always wanted me to be"--that song would be a sappy Squire song---also love Howe's guitar at the end of Into the Storm--it moves me as I hear that song as an angry /sad /positive song about JA---sorta the Genesis Squonk version of a good-bye to an imp member.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dellinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2013 at 12:21
Originally posted by cstack3


Originally posted by Dellinger

Originally posted by cstack3


Originally posted by twosteves

I  I think the group kicked him out because they wanted to (at their advanced ages) take control of their lives and not depend on JA whims---plus they didn't like the songs or ideas he was bringing to the table.
...as opposed to Buggles songs from the '80s?  
I guess we won't know unless we ask Squire.  He's been all over the map, suggesting a "Yes residency" on Broadway, bringing back all former players (uh, too late for Peter Banks!), new CD etc.  
Yes seemed to work best with a high level of creative tension, so maybe, IF they want to do something, they should strive for that.  Their latest albums just seemed to have a "let's get one out in the racks!" kind of feel to them, although there are a few high-points mixed in.  
I hear you about "Little Napoleon" Jon Anderson!  However, his instincts usually seem to hew to what we believe Yes should sound like.  
I think Howe should go on tour with the Steve Howe Group and let Steve Hackett take over his slot!   Any other ideas on a new guitarist for Yes?  (Trevor Rabin not allowed as an answer).


As a matter of fact, I didn't find "Fly from Here" so terrible. I actually liked those 80's songs that form the main bulk of the "Epic" (which is not an epic in my ears), and am glad they were released in such a beautiful way (specially Sad Night at the airfield). I even found Benoit's voice very beautiful (still, he was no Jon Anderson... but for that album, he didn't have to be). Still, of course, it was not among the best albums from the band... but it still was not worse than any of the albums released since Going for the One.

I suppose that, musically, it was okay.  However, I was pretty angry at the way they treated Ollie Wakeman, and I just never warmed up to Benoit David.  I've only listed to FFH a few times, I should probably give it a few more tries. 
Mind you, it's a masterpiece next to Union, Big Generator & a host of other stinkers from Yes!  However, there was no really brilliant moment in FFH for me to latch onto, whereas I could warm up to at least one song on all the other Yes albums.  
The ruthlessness with which Squire acts is very repellant to me.  He reminds me of a big corporate raider or Wall Street tycoon...maybe Howe will reunite with Anderson and Wakeman?  I'd enjoy something like that!


Indeed, the kicking out of Oliver was unexcusable. I didn't like it then and don't like it now. With Anderson, it might have been explained because they had been waiting for him for a while and didn't know if he'd come back and so on... and when Anderson was ready to come back, they already had Benoit so it wouldn't have done to kick him out (I mean, whenever have you heard about Yes kicking someone out?). But still, in the end, there are some songs I really liked on this album. I only hope they don't do the same thing to Davison... the only reason I would think he would do well to step aside would be for Anderson to come back (and even then, perhaps it would be better to have both of them together).
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Post Options Post Options   Quote twosteves Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2013 at 17:14
Originally posted by Dellinger

Originally posted by cstack3


Originally posted by Dellinger

Originally posted by cstack3


Originally posted by twosteves

I  I think the group kicked him out because they wanted to (at their advanced ages) take control of their lives and not depend on JA whims---plus they didn't like the songs or ideas he was bringing to the table.
...as opposed to Buggles songs from the '80s?  
I guess we won't know unless we ask Squire.  He's been all over the map, suggesting a "Yes residency" on Broadway, bringing back all former players (uh, too late for Peter Banks!), new CD etc.  
Yes seemed to work best with a high level of creative tension, so maybe, IF they want to do something, they should strive for that.  Their latest albums just seemed to have a "let's get one out in the racks!" kind of feel to them, although there are a few high-points mixed in.  
I hear you about "Little Napoleon" Jon Anderson!  However, his instincts usually seem to hew to what we believe Yes should sound like.  
I think Howe should go on tour with the Steve Howe Group and let Steve Hackett take over his slot!   Any other ideas on a new guitarist for Yes?  (Trevor Rabin not allowed as an answer).


As a matter of fact, I didn't find "Fly from Here" so terrible. I actually liked those 80's songs that form the main bulk of the "Epic" (which is not an epic in my ears), and am glad they were released in such a beautiful way (specially Sad Night at the airfield). I even found Benoit's voice very beautiful (still, he was no Jon Anderson... but for that album, he didn't have to be). Still, of course, it was not among the best albums from the band... but it still was not worse than any of the albums released since Going for the One.

I suppose that, musically, it was okay.  However, I was pretty angry at the way they treated Ollie Wakeman, and I just never warmed up to Benoit David.  I've only listed to FFH a few times, I should probably give it a few more tries. 
Mind you, it's a masterpiece next to Union, Big Generator & a host of other stinkers from Yes!  However, there was no really brilliant moment in FFH for me to latch onto, whereas I could warm up to at least one song on all the other Yes albums.  
The ruthlessness with which Squire acts is very repellant to me.  He reminds me of a big corporate raider or Wall Street tycoon...maybe Howe will reunite with Anderson and Wakeman?  I'd enjoy something like that!


Indeed, the kicking out of Oliver was unexcusable. I didn't like it then and don't like it now. With Anderson, it might have been explained because they had been waiting for him for a while and didn't know if he'd come back and so on... and when Anderson was ready to come back, they already had Benoit so it wouldn't have done to kick him out (I mean, whenever have you heard about Yes kicking someone out?). But still, in the end, there are some songs I really liked on this album. I only hope they don't do the same thing to Davison... the only reason I would think he would do well to step aside would be for Anderson to come back (and even then, perhaps it would be better to have both of them together).

From everything I've read--Yes have always kicked people out when it suits them--they kicked out Peter Banks for Howe, Kaye for Wakeman, Moraz for Wakeman, and the others, they some may not have been officially fired, but more squeezed out. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote songfacts Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2013 at 15:42
Dear Jon Anderson and Yes fans,

Here is an interview that we here at Songfacts.com recently did with Jon: http://www.songfacts.com/blog/interviews/jon_anderson_of_yes/

Anderson talks about the spiritual inspirations behind the likes of "And You And I," "Long Distance Runaround" and "Starship Troopers," which he thinks of as his "search for truth and search for an understanding of what God truly is." Anderson also speaks of his return Yes in the 1980s, when the band became unlikely MTV stars, all thanks to "Owner Of A Lonely Heart."


Enjoy!
Songfacts.com
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dennismoore Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2013 at 16:56
Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Dean

Every band that has changed its line-up over the years will have what some fans will consider to be "the definitive" line-up and not all fans will necessarily agree on what that definitive line-up is. My favourite Yes album is Relayer by a very wide margin, but Anderson-Howe-Squire-Moraz-White would not be my definitive line-up. Singers always get the bum deal in a changing line-up because unlike a guitarist, drummer or keyboard player who can adapt, singer's are either unique or sound-a-likes (and a sound-a-like can never compare to the original) - In Marillion Hogarth was never going to be a Fish clone and that changed Marillion more than changing drummers did, and the same is true in Yes..

I agree with this, but in the context of the thread, there is a stark difference between Yes and Marillion. Fish left of his own accord, without any pressure. H, therefore, had the opportunity to remould the band, and a great job he has done.

Anderson was, not to put it too starkly, kicked out, and the manner of it left a nasty taste in the mouth.

Jon Davison is a very good singer. However, Anderson was, in the opinion of long standing fans such as myself, the heart and soul of Yes, and it will never be the same without him.
 
@Laz:  I do think you misunderstood Dean's post and his comparrison of what happened in Marillion.  He is simply saying that a change of vocalists can affect the biggest sounding change in a band.  The early part of his post is spot on.
 
Also, Anderson was not kicked out. That is Jon's very emotional side of the story.  Reality is that world tours are planned a year in advance and Jon's poor health just went perhaps 6 months too long (through no fault of anybody) and after waiting 4 years (and many touring cycles), Steve, Chris & Alan made a tough choice and hit the road agian(which is how they earn most of their income.)
 
Also, somebody else said Pater Banks was kicked out.  He wasn't.  Peter had very strong opinions on where YES should go as a band after the 1st two albums and nobody else in the band agreed with him.  He very much isolated himself.
 
I sure wish Anderson would rejoin YES, but once big egos & artists split, the business of World Touring makes it hard to come back together again.  Like it or not the current YES tour of three complete albums is doing well enough to tour into that small Island nation south of Ireland, and the lads are getting on so well they want to record.  Its silly to expect 5 grown men to throw that all away to make one guy happy and reunite with Jon Anderson.  (I personally wish that would
hapen, but then I only want what a fan wants.) Steve, Chris & Alan & Jon & Geoff are in fact trying to make a living
and further their careers.
 
From my selfish fan perspective, I would force a tour with JA and also force Wakeman back in the band...
I doubt that will appen any time soon, but I do think YES will do one final tour with JA before they are done.  Time is running out so I would guess around 2015???
 
 
"Yeah, people are unhappy about that - but you know what, it's still Yes." - Chris Squire
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Evolver Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2013 at 17:05
I am considering petitioning Jon Anderson to join Keith Emerson and Carl Palmer, just so I can call their band "APE".
Trust me. I know what I'm doing.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote twosteves Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2013 at 18:22
Agree with dennismoore---it's a shame JA health is not good enough for him to go on long tours---Yes was very patient with him (4 years is a long time when your getting old) but also as Howe has said---JA really tried to take over everything without much great music coming out as a result---so if JA were to come back, he's have to collaborate more and not treat the band like a back up band---they are all skilled writers, musicians.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Shutoku Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 03 2013 at 02:26
I think JA is singing very very well still. And he seems to have been on his solo tour for quite awhile so I think the health is not so bad now. 
I'd love him and Wakeman back with Yes, but it would just be nostalgia. 
And I'm OK with that. Yes were legends and there is nothing wrong with resting on your laurels...more so when you are approaching 70 and your laurels are pretty damned impressive! 
But I'd rather see Anderson and Wakeman resting on their laurels, than some other singer and keyboardist resting on Anderson and Wakeman's laurels.  (I wonder if I just set a record for most uses of the word "laurels" in one paragraph?  LOL )

Honestly I don't care about new music from them for the most part. (though I am looking forward to Olias II, as I have always loved the original) Wakeman is touring Journey to the Centre of the Earth soon, which is awesome! I'd be more into seeing that than a concert of new material from him.

I know that is not really "progressive" and I think Jon Anderson is still very much about doing new things, but I do think it is natural that artists peak at some point and then the quality of the work will tend to diminish. I mean we kind of do this as biological beings anyway. 
Still I think it is good to want to keep creating, and I think JA really does it for the sake of art and being creative, not to please any demographic, so it is all good. But I think most fans will still prefer to hear him sing Heart of the Sunrise, over anything new he comes up with.

I also think it might be interesting to hear Anderson sing a re-done version of Wakeman's "No Earthly Connection" Album, which every time I listen to, I wish it was Anderson singing.

Still I think a petition is silly. They are grown men who can make their own choices about who they want to perform with. 


Edited by Shutoku - August 03 2013 at 03:00
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Post Options Post Options   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 03 2013 at 07:47
Originally posted by Evolver

I am considering petitioning Jon Anderson to join Keith Emerson and Carl Palmer, just so I can call their band "APE".

missing a bass player so a quick phone call to Mike Rutherford then for Rutherford, Anderson,Palmer and Emerson


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