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Favourite Prog Rock Keyboards

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Poll Question: Vote For All Your Favourite Prog Rock Keyboard Instruments
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
12 [7.10%]
50 [29.59%]
14 [8.28%]
6 [3.55%]
0 [0.00%]
6 [3.55%]
1 [0.59%]
24 [14.20%]
5 [2.96%]
1 [0.59%]
1 [0.59%]
5 [2.96%]
5 [2.96%]
10 [5.92%]
3 [1.78%]
1 [0.59%]
3 [1.78%]
1 [0.59%]
4 [2.37%]
5 [2.96%]
5 [2.96%]
3 [1.78%]
1 [0.59%]
0 [0.00%]
3 [1.78%]
You can not vote in this poll

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progbethyname View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Favourite Prog Rock Keyboards
    Posted: July 05 2013 at 10:26
Originally posted by richardh

Definitely Clavinet which he also used on Nutrocker.


Hey! I've been warming up to that mini keyboard that is the clavinet.
I love it's featured sound in AGALLOCH's THE MANTLE album.
Brilliant. Anyway. Glad to hear of another appreciative response to good old clavi. :)
Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)
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The.Crimson.King View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote The.Crimson.King Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 05 2013 at 13:02
Kerry Minnear was one of the biggest proponents of the Hohner D6 Clavinet.  It's sprinkled throughout Gentle Giant's live "Playing the Fool" album especially in "Excerpts from Octopus".  A cool feature of the clavinet was a lever that you could set which would mute the output.  Here in "Excerpts from Octopus" are a couple different  clavinet sounds.  Unmuted at 2:28 and 2:50, muted at 6:10 and unaccompanied/muted at 6:40.  Nothing else sounded like a clavinet Wink

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Post Options Post Options   Quote KingCrInuYasha Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 05 2013 at 13:48
Mellotron, hands down, followed by the Hammond Organ and the Minimoog.
He looks at this world and wants it all... so he strikes, like Thunderball!
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progbethyname View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 05 2013 at 14:38
Ahhhh tastey mellotron. This has to be my favourite song today.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUeDJTiE4t4&feature=youtube_gdata_player
Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)
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Post Options Post Options   Quote verslibre Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 06 2013 at 18:32
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

Kerry Minnear was one of the biggest proponents of the Hohner D6 Clavinet.  It's sprinkled throughout Gentle Giant's live "Playing the Fool" album especially in "Excerpts from Octopus".  A cool feature of the clavinet was a lever that you could set which would mute the output.  Here in "Excerpts from Octopus" are a couple different  clavinet sounds.  Unmuted at 2:28 and 2:50, muted at 6:10 and unaccompanied/muted at 6:40.  Nothing else sounded like a clavinet Wink


That's right, nothing else did. Herbie Hancock played it to great effect before he (sadly) stopped using it. George Duke used it, too. Led Zeppelin's "Trampled Under Foot" wouldn't be the same without John Paul Jones' bitchin' clav groove. And of course, Stevie Wonder made the clav's sound famous on his hit "Superstition."

Wakeman's spitfire clav lead on "Ice Run" from White Rock is another highlight in the instrument's storied history!
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verslibre View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote verslibre Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 06 2013 at 18:38
I love keyboards amd synthesizers in general so I checked off many of the boxes...LOL!

The Mellotron is such a classic sound, it's perfectly understandable why it's most listeners' favorite. The way the Mellotron characterized the sound of Tangerine Dream's mid-70s music (Rubycon, particularly), the legendary Mellotron chords Tony Banks is known for, and its presence on so many prog albums in general...a timeless sound.

The MiniMoog is just as important, a deadly weapon in the hands of guys like Jan Hammer, Wakeman, Emerson, and countless others. Hammer's MiniMoog solos are among my general favorites, too...he really has "the touch"!

For me, the Fairlight Musicomputer and the Synclavier haven't aged well. I could take them or leave them. They're relics of the '80s that were prohibitively expensive for their time and they were routinely outperformed by lesser instruments then and now!
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The.Crimson.King View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote The.Crimson.King Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 06 2013 at 19:24
Originally posted by verslibre


For me, the Fairlight Musicomputer and the Synclavier haven't aged well. I could take them or leave them. They're relics of the '80s that were prohibitively expensive for their time and they were routinely outperformed by lesser instruments then and now!

I agree.  Nowadays a $3,000 Yamaha Motif XF does nearly everything a $150,000 Synclavier did (except print out sheet music).  I still have to give the Synclavier props though, without it Zappa never would have created "Jazz From Hell", "Civilization Phaze III", "FZ Meets the Mother's of Prevention", "Francesco Zappa", and who knows what other Synclavier madness still hiding in his vaults?
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Gerinski View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Gerinski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 06 2013 at 20:33
I guess that the Synclavier and Fairlight were necessary steps along the road, even if expensive and questionably performant by today's standards, before the 80's star digital synths like the Yamaha DX-7, Korg M1 and Roland D-50 changed the music world.
And besides sounds playback, digital sampling was a new technology and these machines helped bridge the gap. Much of Zappa's or Pat Metheny's music would not have existed without the Synclavier.
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verslibre View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote verslibre Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 06 2013 at 22:29
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King


Originally posted by verslibre

For me, the Fairlight Musicomputer and the Synclavier haven't aged well. I could take them or leave them. They're relics of the '80s that were prohibitively expensive for their time and they were routinely outperformed by lesser instruments then and now!

I agree.  Nowadays a $3,000 Yamaha Motif XF does nearly everything a $150,000 Synclavier did (except print out sheet music).  I still have to give the Synclavier props though, without it Zappa never would have created "Jazz From Hell", "Civilization Phaze III", "FZ Meets the Mother's of Prevention", "Francesco Zappa", and who knows what other Synclavier madness still hiding in his vaults?


Eddie Jobson recorded Theme Of Secrets entirely with the Synclavier. For the time, it was unique, I will not contest that. It made for a very pleasant listening experience.
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The.Crimson.King View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote The.Crimson.King Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 06 2013 at 22:58
Originally posted by Gerinski

I guess that the Synclavier and Fairlight were necessary steps along the road, even if expensive and questionably performant by today's standards, before the 80's star digital synths like the Yamaha DX-7, Korg M1 and Roland D-50 changed the music world.
And besides sounds playback, digital sampling was a new technology and these machines helped bridge the gap. Much of Zappa's or Pat Metheny's music would not have existed without the Synclavier.
Ya, I was looking up info on the synclavier and it mentioned it was an 8-bit sampler with 2 meg of storage space but for an additional $30,000 you could upgrade to 1 gig.  If you bought all the extras it could act as a self-contained recording studio for a cool $400,000.  The big deal for Zappa was that he could finally hear his most complex compositions played exactly as he wrote them.  I also found a picture of Pat Metheny running a Roland GR300 guitar synth through his.  They were definitely pushing the bounds of technology for that time.


Edited by The.Crimson.King - July 06 2013 at 23:00
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Gerinski View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Gerinski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 07 2013 at 00:41
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

 
I also found a picture of Pat Metheny running a Roland GR300 guitar synth through his.  They were definitely pushing the bounds of technology for that time.
Here is a video of Metheny showing his Synclavier II controlled from his Roland G-303 guitar



Don't know if you have seen my article about instruments commonly used in Prog, I comment about all these there

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The.Crimson.King View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote The.Crimson.King Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 07 2013 at 20:01
Originally posted by Gerinski


Don't know if you have seen my article about instruments commonly used in Prog, I comment about all these there


No, I wasn't aware of it but just had a look.  Outstanding!  I love all the pix!

Are you aware of a book called "Vintage Synthesizers" by Mark Vail?  It was written in collaboration with Keyboard Magazine and is in at least it's 2nd edition.  It's 300+ pages and full of pix and diagrams and is an outstanding resource for prog keyboard nuts like us LOL  
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Gerinski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 08 2013 at 01:34
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

Originally posted by Gerinski


Don't know if you have seen my article about instruments commonly used in Prog, I comment about all these there


No, I wasn't aware of it but just had a look.  Outstanding!  I love all the pix!

Are you aware of a book called "Vintage Synthesizers" by Mark Vail?  It was written in collaboration with Keyboard Magazine and is in at least it's 2nd edition.  It's 300+ pages and full of pix and diagrams and is an outstanding resource for prog keyboard nuts like us LOL  
I had never seen it, I just searched it and it looks interesting, thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote verslibre Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 08 2013 at 02:00
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King


Originally posted by Gerinski

Don't know if you have seen my article about instruments commonly used in Prog, I comment about all these there

No, I wasn't aware of it but just had a look.  Outstanding!  I love all the pix!
Are you aware of a book called "Vintage Synthesizers" by Mark Vail?  It was written in collaboration with Keyboard Magazine and is in at least it's 2nd edition.  It's 300+ pages and full of pix and diagrams and is an outstanding resource for prog keyboard nuts like us LOL  


Yeah, that's a great book!

And here's a great website: http://www.vintagesynth.com/
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The.Crimson.King View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote The.Crimson.King Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 08 2013 at 12:44
Originally posted by verslibre

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King


Originally posted by Gerinski

Don't know if you have seen my article about instruments commonly used in Prog, I comment about all these there

No, I wasn't aware of it but just had a look.  Outstanding!  I love all the pix!
Are you aware of a book called "Vintage Synthesizers" by Mark Vail?  It was written in collaboration with Keyboard Magazine and is in at least it's 2nd edition.  It's 300+ pages and full of pix and diagrams and is an outstanding resource for prog keyboard nuts like us LOL  


Yeah, that's a great book!

And here's a great website: http://www.vintagesynth.com/

Ya, my favourite section is called "Dredging the tar pits of technology" and features some incredible keyboards that were so outrageous in design that they never got beyond a single prototype.  Great stuff.  There's another book I'd recommend to those of us who put a vote behind the mighty mellotron.  It's called, "The Mellotron Book" by Frank Samagaio and is 150 pages of history, photos, and details of the inner workings of our beloved tron.

www.vintagesynth.com is a great site, I could easily spend hours there and referred to it frequently while putting this poll together Wink 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote brainstormer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 08 2013 at 14:38
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

Originally posted by verslibre

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King


Originally posted by Gerinski

Don't know if you have seen my article about instruments commonly used in Prog, I comment about all these there

No, I wasn't aware of it but just had a look.  Outstanding!  I love all the pix!
Are you aware of a book called "Vintage Synthesizers" by Mark Vail?  It was written in collaboration with Keyboard Magazine and is in at least it's 2nd edition.  It's 300+ pages and full of pix and diagrams and is an outstanding resource for prog keyboard nuts like us LOL  


Yeah, that's a great book!

And here's a great website: http://www.vintagesynth.com/

Ya, my favourite section is called "Dredging the tar pits of technology" and features some incredible keyboards that were so outrageous in design that they never got beyond a single prototype.  Great stuff.  There's another book I'd recommend to those of us who put a vote behind the mighty mellotron.  It's called, "The Mellotron Book" by Frank Samagaio and is 150 pages of history, photos, and details of the inner workings of our beloved tron.

www.vintagesynth.com is a great site, I could easily spend hours there and referred to it frequently while putting this poll together Wink 

RE: Dredging the tar pits of technology" 
You have a link to this?  Doesn't seem to come in a google search
except possibly as a book chapter.



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The.Crimson.King View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote The.Crimson.King Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 08 2013 at 14:54
Originally posted by brainstormer

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

Originally posted by verslibre

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King


Originally posted by Gerinski

Don't know if you have seen my article about instruments commonly used in Prog, I comment about all these there

No, I wasn't aware of it but just had a look.  Outstanding!  I love all the pix!
Are you aware of a book called "Vintage Synthesizers" by Mark Vail?  It was written in collaboration with Keyboard Magazine and is in at least it's 2nd edition.  It's 300+ pages and full of pix and diagrams and is an outstanding resource for prog keyboard nuts like us LOL  


Yeah, that's a great book!

And here's a great website: http://www.vintagesynth.com/

Ya, my favourite section is called "Dredging the tar pits of technology" and features some incredible keyboards that were so outrageous in design that they never got beyond a single prototype.  Great stuff.  There's another book I'd recommend to those of us who put a vote behind the mighty mellotron.  It's called, "The Mellotron Book" by Frank Samagaio and is 150 pages of history, photos, and details of the inner workings of our beloved tron.

www.vintagesynth.com is a great site, I could easily spend hours there and referred to it frequently while putting this poll together Wink 

RE: Dredging the tar pits of technology" 
You have a link to this?  Doesn't seem to come in a google search
except possibly as a book chapter.




I don't have a link, I have the actual book Wink

Section: "Hearts of the Modern Synth Industry"
Chapter: "It Came from the Music Industry"
Sub Chapter: "Dredging the Tar Pits of Technology"
Some of the great headings: "Riding the Oblivion Express", "It Slices, It Dices", "Monophonic Monstrosities", etc...





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FusionKing View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote FusionKing Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 10 2013 at 19:18
The Fender Rhodes is sexy
The Hammond Organ is smokin'
and Moogs should be illegal for thier drug-like effect. Wink
"Man is nothing else but that which he makes of himself" - Sartre
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Post Options Post Options   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 10 2013 at 20:25
Still loving the sh*t out of the Oberheim OP courteous of mr. GEDDY Lee.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote antonyus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 22 2013 at 08:35
Mellotron by far
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