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Jane Eyre vs Wuthering Hights

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Poll Question: what is the best novel
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
3 [30.00%]
5 [50.00%]
2 [20.00%]
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Icarium View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Icarium Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Jane Eyre vs Wuthering Hights
    Posted: October 03 2013 at 07:34
Two of the best novels of the 19th century, who is important to many generation of readers, but whos your favourite. i read Jane Eyre and i truly likes it, and i understand its important impact and it rices very important questions even in todays sociaty
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dr wu23 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2013 at 09:40
Never read either but I have seen the various film adaptations.
 
Big smile


Edited by dr wu23 - October 03 2013 at 13:27
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Padraic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2013 at 09:40
Can't say I prefer one over the other.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jude111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2013 at 10:16

Both. I prefer the novel Jane Eyre, but then we wouldn't have Kate Bush's Wuthering Heights were it not for the novel...

Originally posted by aginor

Two of the best novels of the 19th century, who is important to many generation of readers, but whos your favourite. i read Jane Eyre and i truly likes it, and i understand its important impact and it rices very important questions even in todays sociaty

The best? Among the best, yes. But there's a lot of competition: Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment & Brothers Karamazov, Tolstoy's War and Peace & Anna Karenina, Stendahl's The Red and the Black, Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Melville's Moby Dick, Goethe, Twain, Mann, Zola's Germinal, Balzac's Le Père Goriot, George Eliot, Hugo, Dickens...

But... still... The two Bronte sisters' novels, along with Dostoeveky, are among the works that most anticipated, or influenced, 20th century modernist literature (Conrad, Henry James, Mann etc.).


Edited by jude111 - October 03 2013 at 11:02
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2013 at 10:21
Haven't read any of them, and I am not sure I want to if I'm honestEmbarrassed So many books I want to read before I die, and these have never been under consideration. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote silverpot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2013 at 13:14
Jayne Eyre. But both are very well written. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote refugee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2013 at 13:51
I prefer Wuthering Heights. Both novels are good, but … there’s something special about Heathcliff. He’s so dark, so enigmatic, so evil, and still you can’t help feeling sorry for him. And the end should ring a bell for most Genesis fans:

I lingered round them, under that benign sky; watched the moths fluttering among the heath and harebells; listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass; and wondered how any one could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth.

He say nothing is quite what it seems;
I say nothing is nothing
(Peter Hammill)
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Icarium Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2013 at 13:58
^ the scene were Jane spends her last night with Helen Burns, is one of the saddest, most touching, heart warming scence ive ever read, ive not read the whole book yet, but wow heavy
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Man With Hat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 03 2013 at 19:46
Dislike both. But Wuthering Heights takes that cake.

JE for me.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 09:35
No vote.  I read Wuthering Heights a few years back and liked it but don't remember much of it now.  I read Jane Eyre only recently and loved it in spite of the extremely predictable plot.   I would need to read WH again to vote.  
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 10:51
I re-read Naked Lunch last weekend - are they in any way comparable to that?Tongue
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Post Options Post Options   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 10:56
I have never read William S Burroughs but just reading about the book, I don't think they would be remotely similar.  Wuthering Heights meanders a bit but is not non linear and Jane Eyre is very linear.  Without giving too much away, JE is basically the Cinderella story with a twist (or lots of twists, if you will).  
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jude111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 11:20
Originally posted by Guldbamsen

I re-read Naked Lunch last weekend - are they in any way comparable to that?Tongue

No, but they are twisted and gothic underneath the surface. If you want something that can in some ways be compared to Burroughs' novel, check out Jean Genet's Our Lady of the Flowers.)

Or even better: Check out Julio Cortazar's Hopscotch, one of my all-time favorite novels, mind-blowing cut-up literature, set in Paris and Argentina, with dudes listening to jazz, bridges 'beat lit,' the French "nouveau roman" (of which Cortazar was associated, although he wrote in Spanish), Latin American lit, and post-modern literature (it's arguably the first post-modern novel).


Edited by jude111 - October 04 2013 at 11:24
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 11:34
^Thanks man, I appreciate the recs.
At one point in time I need to step outside of the beatnik bubble I've been living in the past few years (with the few exceptions of Herman Hesse, Aldous Huxley, Camus, and Douglas Adams).
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jude111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 11:38
Originally posted by Guldbamsen

^Thanks man, I appreciate the recs.
At one point in time I need to step outside of the beatnik bubble I've been living in the past few years (with the few exceptions of Herman Hesse, Aldous Huxley, Camus, and Douglas Adams).


Well, Cortazar's a beatnik, but a European/South American one. After all, I know there's Woodstock and all, but Paris in 68 was the place to be, not LA. And a great many of the jazz musicians so lovingly portrayed by the beat writers were usually in Europe as well...


Edited by jude111 - October 04 2013 at 11:40
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 11:52
Originally posted by jude111

Originally posted by Guldbamsen

^Thanks man, I appreciate the recs.
At one point in time I need to step outside of the beatnik bubble I've been living in the past few years (with the few exceptions of Herman Hesse, Aldous Huxley, Camus, and Douglas Adams).


Well, Cortazar's a beatnik, but a European/South American one. After all, I know there's Woodstock and all, but Paris in 68 was the place to be, not LA. And a great many of the jazz musicians so lovingly portrayed by the beat writers were usually in Europe as well...

Definitely gonna look into Cortazar, thanks a gazillion.

To be honest with you, then I kinda knew there was a European "beatnik" scene, even if the term was coined for the American kickstarters. The Beatnik explosion, jazz, blues, 60s music with aspirations of togetherness and Jackson Pollock are to me the very heart of America - and the one I love. Pollock describes the other side of the medal whilst doing the exact opposite thoughTongue

Don't worry I know enough of the world to step outside of any "Americanization" in regards to culture, art and literatureWink But they did some wonderful stuff in all these areas, even if some of them came in the wake of the true genesis.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jude111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 13:44
Originally posted by Guldbamsen

Definitely gonna look into Cortazar, thanks a gazillion.

To be honest with you, then I kinda knew there was a European "beatnik" scene, even if the term was coined for the American kickstarters. The Beatnik explosion, jazz, blues, 60s music with aspirations of togetherness and Jackson Pollock are to me the very heart of America - and the one I love. Pollock describes the other side of the medal whilst doing the exact opposite thoughTongue

Don't worry I know enough of the world to step outside of any "Americanization" in regards to culture, art and literatureWink But they did some wonderful stuff in all these areas, even if some of them came in the wake of the true genesis.
 
 
I know what you mean, I feel the same way. I read "On the Road" at 17 or so, and I was hooked, trying to live the life of the characters in that book, haha. It was sad for me to discover how different America was in the late 80s (when I was "on the road") then the America described in that novel. A vanished world...
 
Maybe I'm mistaken, but I thought you are European? :-) p.s. If you want to trade passports, you can have my American citizenship, for your EU membership, hahaha. LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 14:01
Originally posted by jude111

Originally posted by Guldbamsen

Definitely gonna look into Cortazar, thanks a gazillion.

To be honest with you, then I kinda knew there was a European "beatnik" scene, even if the term was coined for the American kickstarters. The Beatnik explosion, jazz, blues, 60s music with aspirations of togetherness and Jackson Pollock are to me the very heart of America - and the one I love. Pollock describes the other side of the medal whilst doing the exact opposite thoughTongue

Don't worry I know enough of the world to step outside of any "Americanization" in regards to culture, art and literatureWink But they did some wonderful stuff in all these areas, even if some of them came in the wake of the true genesis.
 
 
I know what you mean, I feel the same way. I read "On the Road" at 17 or so, and I was hooked, trying to live the life of the characters in that book, haha. It was sad for me to discover how different America was in the late 80s (when I was "on the road") then the America described in that novel. A vanished world...
 
Maybe I'm mistaken, but I thought you are European? :-) p.s. If you want to trade passports, you can have my American citizenship, for your EU membership, hahaha. LOL


I'm a native DaneCool and no buddy, I think I'll hold onto my citizenship thank you very muchLOL
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Epignosis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 16:43
I will rarely read a book a second time, but Wuthering Heights is on that short list.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 04 2013 at 18:07
19th century chick lit.


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