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Most outside influence to krautrock

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Poll Question: what band is most influentual to krautrock
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
10 [58.82%]
2 [11.76%]
1 [5.88%]
2 [11.76%]
2 [11.76%]
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Icarium View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Icarium Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Most outside influence to krautrock
    Posted: March 19 2014 at 09:54
just curious, beocuse i have seen some docus and many states that Floyd and VUs influence on german scene was very much there, but is that true and whos mostly infleunce of the rock bands in the time, which helped krautrock to take shape.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Triceratopsoil Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 09:59
60s psychedelic rock, freeform jazz, Steve Reich, modern "classical" music, etc.  Probably the artists in the poll to some degree.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Icarium Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 10:02
so you vote others, listening to Phallus Dei now i can hear some of the freeform jazz, and some Reich probably and def, modern classical, and some Velvet Underground,
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 10:21
Depends on which Krautrock band we're talking aboutTongue

But in general, I'd say that an album like Ummagumma was hugely influential to the early scene. I've also read a lot of Krautrock gurus mentioning that exact album as the one that 'opened their eyes' to something new in music.

Then there's Stockhausen. A man like Holger Czukay studied under him and brought forth to his upcoming band, CAN, a certain frivolous attitude to alien sounds and in essence: how to make music. 

........and of course the whole 60s mantra of music that sets you free. Much of the Krautrock I love the most sounds like the 60s - only much more crooked, strange and experimental. 
On top of that, you've got all these theatres, communities, artists, painters, actors, directors, authors, political folks and so on - all of these people living together and sharing their thoughts on....well basically everything - that emulsified into a new direction - and especially in music. 

Often you come across places on the internet, where Krautrock is mentioned as one of the few musical directions that started with a clean slate. The music was a strong reaction to the nazi rule of yesteryear - more specifically to the nazi teachers who were still doing their jobs after the war, because the country had been bombed to smithereens and nobody could afford to hire new ones. 
Now as much as I'd like to support this romantic notion of music that springs out the forehead of musicians like an ancient Greek birth, I hear far too many similarities with the psychedelic 60s, the Eastern flirtations of the times - as well as the highly progressive ideas surrounding how to live together, live with the rest of the world, how to eat and love.

So yeah......no vote from me, but this could turn into a nice discussionThumbs Up
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 11:24
< ="text/" ="" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0"> What an interesting topic.  David explains better than I could, and is more knowledgeable than I.  There were a host of influences on different bands, and one could say sub-scenes of Krautrock.  There was the influence of various experimental music/ musique concrete such as, very importantly, Stockhausen on Can.  Can was also also highly inspired by The Beatles (The Beatles recordings had also been inspired by techniques used in musique concrete).  The Velvet Underground influenced Can too.

 Folk music and and various psychedelic acts, influenced the acid folk leaning artists in Krautrock.  I've read that the Stooges was an influence on the harder rockin' music before.  Pink Floyd influenced the psyche and space rock of, say, Amon Duul II and  Ashra Tempel. And of course Sun Ra was an important influence on Krautrock spacey jazz explorations. I hear a strong Ligeti influence in Tangerine Dream, but they were also into other modern composers including Stockhausen, and Jimi Hendrix and Pink Floyd.  Terry Riley (my favourite artist included in Prog Related) also was an important inspiration on such music.  Zappa and various avant-garde composers influenced Faust.

EDITed for like a Brazilian typos (really should start proof-reading before posting, and get some reading glasses).


Edited by Logan - March 19 2014 at 11:37
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mongofa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 12:34
the Velvet Underground --> Can
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Post Options Post Options   Quote gents Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 13:11
Originally posted by Guldbamsen

Depends on which Krautrock band we're talking aboutTongue

But in general, I'd say that an album like Ummagumma was hugely influential to the early scene. I've also read a lot of Krautrock gurus mentioning that exact album as the one that 'opened their eyes' to something new in music.

Then there's Stockhausen. A man like Holger Czukay studied under him and brought forth to his upcoming band, CAN, a certain frivolous attitude to alien sounds and in essence: how to make music. 

........and of course the whole 60s mantra of music that sets you free. Much of the Krautrock I love the most sounds like the 60s - only much more crooked, strange and experimental. 
On top of that, you've got all these theatres, communities, artists, painters, actors, directors, authors, political folks and so on - all of these people living together and sharing their thoughts on....well basically everything - that emulsified into a new direction - and especially in music. 

Often you come across places on the internet, where Krautrock is mentioned as one of the few musical directions that started with a clean slate. The music was a strong reaction to the nazi rule of yesteryear - more specifically to the nazi teachers who were still doing their jobs after the war, because the country had been bombed to smithereens and nobody could afford to hire new ones. 
Now as much as I'd like to support this romantic notion of music that springs out the forehead of musicians like an ancient Greek birth, I hear far too many similarities with the psychedelic 60s, the Eastern flirtations of the times - as well as the highly progressive ideas surrounding how to live together, live with the rest of the world, how to eat and love.

So yeah......no vote from me, but this could turn into a nice discussionThumbs Up


I totally agree with this. It depends on the band.
Schmidt and Czukay formed Can as a result of being played new american rock music by Karoli and from hearing MC5 and Velvet Underground when visiting the States.
Guru Guru said that they were deeply in dept to Jimi.
Of course The mothers of Invention and already said Floyd's Ummaguma.
Maybe some Captain Beefheart......
So no vote......from me also 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Man With Hat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 14:49
Excellent post by David, above.

It is a true amalgam of (probably) 100s of influences, including those outside of music. Nevertheless, I'll vote for Floyd.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Wanorak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 14:56
Out of this list PF.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 15:19
I think the jazz scene had it's hand deep in the trousers of the scene too. A guy like Wolfgang Dauner, who later on went onto make his own jazz influenced Krautrock group 'Et Cetera', was hugely influential to a lot of young musicians during the latter part of the 60s. He introduced the sounds of the Eastern world to his unique jazz template, as well as throwing in all sorts of experimentations. 
As far as jazz laden Krautrock groups go, it's obvious that they picked up a thing or two from Wolfgang. 

Terry Riley was also a key figure. His beautiful experimentations with minimalist music and electronics inspired many a Krautrock musicians -hell even folks from outside of Germany. Folks who were in bands, that I myself proudly call Krautrock. Swedish International Harvester, for instance, saw Riley live back in the 60s and got so wired about the possibilities of this new tonal music that develops as it goes along, and then proceeded to record their now classic 'Sov gott Rose Marie'. Had it been released with German lyrics, it would be looked upon today as a cornerstone of the genre. Same goes for the two Älgarnas Trädgård records, that sound strangely close to a Swedish folk influenced Amon Düül ll. 

The Kosmische vibe is to be found all across the globe - music that sounds oh so familiar if you're attuned into the German way of space trucking. One of the reasons why I've never felt the word Krautrock was derogatory...hell by now, it's almost a compliment. Especially coming from yours truly.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Mellotron Storm Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 19 2014 at 16:29
I think most Krautrock bands were very much influenced by Floyd's early albums but some bands like NEU!, Popol Vuh, Can and the many Jazz related ones had other influences. Still if I had to pick one band who had the most influence on the underground German scene it would be Floyd.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Tom Ozric Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 20 2014 at 00:33
Originally posted by Mellotron Storm



I think most Krautrock bands were very much influenced by Floyd's early albums but some bands like NEU!, Popol Vuh, Can and the many Jazz related ones had other influences. Still if I had to pick one band who had the most influence on the underground German scene it would be Floyd.
Couldn't agree more here Jon - Floyd were leagues in front of most other things going on at the time musically. Zappa was also revolutionary and planted the seed for many others.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ExittheLemming Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 20 2014 at 00:47
The only choice that strikes me as not being particularly influential is Zappa, simply because his music is incredibly complex and difficult to play* and apart from the 60's beat-group parodies on Freak Out, the textural psyche elements left his music very quickly.

* that's not to say there ain't Krautrock that's complex and difficult to play but such is not really a defining characteristic of the movement.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote octopus-4 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 20 2014 at 03:54
Originally posted by Guldbamsen

I think the jazz scene had it's hand deep in the trousers of the scene too. A guy like Wolfgang Dauner, who later on went onto make his own jazz influenced Krautrock group 'Et Cetera', was hugely influential to a lot of young musicians during the latter part of the 60s. He introduced the sounds of the Eastern world to his unique jazz template, as well as throwing in all sorts of experimentations. 
As far as jazz laden Krautrock groups go, it's obvious that they picked up a thing or two from Wolfgang. 
Terry Riley was also a key figure. His beautiful experimentations with minimalist music and electronics inspired many a Krautrock musicians -hell even folks from outside of Germany. Folks who were in bands, that I myself proudly call Krautrock. Swedish International Harvester, for instance, saw Riley live back in the 60s and got so wired about the possibilities of this new tonal music that develops as it goes along, and then proceeded to record their now classic 'Sov gott Rose Marie'. Had it been released with German lyrics, it would be looked upon today as a cornerstone of the genre. Same goes for the two Älgarnas Trädgård records, that sound strangely close to a Swedish folk influenced Amon Düül ll. 
The Kosmische vibe is to be found all across the globe - music that sounds oh so familiar if you're attuned into the German way of space trucking. One of the reasons why I've never felt the word Krautrock was derogatory...hell by now, it's almost a compliment. Especially coming from yours truly.


I agree with the above, in particular about Terry Riley. From the listed, Pink Floyd.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Chris S Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 20 2014 at 04:50
Such a solid genre.....Can't ignore The Beatles.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dr wu23 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 20 2014 at 19:05
Originally posted by ExittheLemming

The only choice that strikes me as not being particularly influential is Zappa, simply because his music is incredibly complex and difficult to play* and apart from the 60's beat-group parodies on Freak Out, the textural psyche elements left his music very quickly.

* that's not to say there ain't Krautrock that's complex and difficult to play but such is not really a defining characteristic of the movement.
I would agree with you on Zappa but what exactly is a 'defining characteristic of the movement'....some of my favorite 'krautrock' like Amon Duul 2 and Agitation Free don't really sound very much like Can and Faust...imo.
Please enlighten an old man.
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Edited by dr wu23 - March 20 2014 at 19:06
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