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Canterbury Scene Music

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URL: http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=121917
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Topic: Canterbury Scene Music
Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Subject: Canterbury Scene Music
Date Posted: January 03 2020 at 12:03
Just as it says on the label, this is a blog for posting all of your favourite Canterbury Scene songs, albums, concerts and documentaries, or if you just want to drop by for a general chit-chat about the Canterbury Scene, that's fine too. Smile
 
Starting with Steve Hillage - Live in Canterbury - BBC TV 1979
 
 
Amazingly, I only just discovered the Canterbury Scene music of Steve Hillage a week ago after reviewing his first album "Fish Rising" (1975). I'm heading into Nottingham soon to buy his 2nd, 3rd & 4th albums. I'd buy his first album too, but it's no longer available. Confused



Replies:
Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 03 2020 at 13:29
My favourite song:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arDLgz3KHYA" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arDLgz3KHYA


Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 03 2020 at 13:40


Posted By: BrufordFreak
Date Posted: January 03 2020 at 16:09
Favorite "classic era" Canterbury song:




-------------
Drew Fisher
https://progisaliveandwell.blogspot.com/


Posted By: BrufordFreak
Date Posted: January 03 2020 at 16:26
But you should also hear this:



and this:



and this:



and one more:




-------------
Drew Fisher
https://progisaliveandwell.blogspot.com/


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 03 2020 at 23:15
Fav GongSong (also really great performance):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiy5K81qvbg" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiy5K81qvbg


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 03 2020 at 23:18
Vintage Soft Machine:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFDVTbLxBHA" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFDVTbLxBHA


Posted By: dougmcauliffe
Date Posted: January 04 2020 at 01:00
I listened to national health today on the way home from a day of skiing with a friend today. I really only have a surface level knowledge of this sub genre currently but I’m hoping to expand over the coming months

-------------
The sun has left the sky...
...Now you can close your eyes


Posted By: I prophesy disaster
Date Posted: January 04 2020 at 02:10
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Amazingly, I only just discovered the Canterbury Scene music of Steve Hillage a week ago after reviewing his first album "Fish Rising" (1975). I'm heading into Nottingham soon to buy his 2nd, 3rd & 4th albums. I'd buy his first album too, but it's no longer available. Confused
 
I have precisely five Canterbury Scene albums: The first four Steve Hillage albums, and the self-titled Hatfield and the North album. The Hatfield and the North album I got since I started visiting PA (before becoming a member), and the four Steve Hillage albums I got more than 30 years ago, well before I'd ever heard of the "Canterbury Scene".
 
My two favourite Steve Hillage tracks are "Lunar Musick Suite" from L, and "The Glorious Om Riff" from Green. I'm not sure which is my favourite album, though probably Fish RisingSteve Hillage is not an artist I listen to often.
 
I have listened to some Gong since I started visiting PA, and it was quite a while afterwards that I discovered that Steve Hillage was a member (and that "The Glorious Om Riff" is essentially the same as a Gong track). Admittedly, this came as a surprise since the Gong I knew was such songs as "The Pot Head Pixies".
 
 
 


-------------
No, I know how to behave in the restaurant now, I don't tear at the meat with my hands. If I've become a man of the world somehow, that's not necessarily to say I'm a worldly man.


Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 04 2020 at 05:25


Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 04 2020 at 05:27
Originally posted by dougmcauliffe dougmcauliffe wrote:

I listened to national health today on the way home from a day of skiing with a friend today. I really only have a surface level knowledge of this sub genre currently but I’m hoping to expand over the coming months
One of my all time favorite bands. Great players and songs. Hope you enjoy them.


Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 04 2020 at 06:59
Sanguine Hum is classified as Neo-Prog on PA. That should be changed to Canterbury.



Posted By: Mirakaze
Date Posted: January 04 2020 at 09:25
Originally posted by dougmcauliffe dougmcauliffe wrote:

I listened to national health today on the way home from a day of skiing with a friend today. I really only have a surface level knowledge of this sub genre currently but I’m hoping to expand over the coming months

National Health's debut album is the one album I hold more dearly than any other on this earth, it's such an amazing journey. As a musician, this song written by keyboard wizard Alan Gowen gave me huge anxiety for a long time because it felt so far ahead of what I was able to accomplish compositionally, but it did help me to broaden my horizons and refine my own writings:


The two bands that National Health was formed out of (Gilgamesh and Hatfield & The North) are truly excellent as well:






Posted By: dougmcauliffe
Date Posted: January 04 2020 at 09:58
Originally posted by Grumpyprogfan Grumpyprogfan wrote:

Originally posted by dougmcauliffe dougmcauliffe wrote:

I listened to national health today on the way home from a day of skiing with a friend today. I really only have a surface level knowledge of this sub genre currently but I’m hoping to expand over the coming months
One of my all time favorite bands. Great players and songs. Hope you enjoy them.


Absolutely love them, their music is just so damn cool

-------------
The sun has left the sky...
...Now you can close your eyes


Posted By: Sean Trane
Date Posted: January 04 2020 at 10:05
Superb Supersisters




Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 08:36
Hi,

It's kind of strange to think that one area is better than the other ... they are all different, and just about every country has its own "Canterbury" (just look at the Scotland/Wales areas!) ... and they are all a bit different. The Spanish have it (you can look at Flamenco, or the Gypsy stuff, or others), the French have it, and so do many other Europeans!

I think that CANTERBURY as we know it, was about folks that had some education, and many of them became music masters and instructors, whereas in other areas this did not happen, and for that the development of the music took shape and a place as "Canterbury", as if it were a style, but I'm not sure it is just a "style" as much as it is something that borrows from jazz, folk, rock and a lot of other musics. The early days of "Canterbury" is full of artists, writers, musicians and many others ... but we do not seem to think that those things matter ... they DO!

I've always joked that for Soft Machine, for example, what had started as "improvisation" in the early days in the words of Robert Wyatt, actually became "compositions", not improvisations ... since the moments and the changes and a lot of the parts of the music are "pre-defined" and sometimes you can hear the whistle say ... FOUL ... here it is ... that new theme! I really think that Robert's book title is a take on this ... INTENTIONALLY, because it would mean the music was not different each and every time! Not improvised as we think or imagine at all!


-------------
Music is not just for listening ... it is for LIVING ... you got to feel it to know what's it about! Not being told!
www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 10:59
Thanks for all of the great posts everyone. Thumbs Up Maybe it's time I gave Soft Machine another listen, because they're a bit of an acquired taste and I wasn't too keen on them when I heard them for the first time many years ago. I've just seen a 5-CD box set of Soft Machine in my local record shop and it might be worth buying if I can really get into their music. Funnily enough, I'd never heard of the Canterbury Scene before I joined ProgArchives, even though I've been buying and listening to Caravan's albums for the last ten years.


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 12:04
Well, to me it was also in the middle of 2010 when I read Matti Pajuniemi´s book of prog 1967-79, when I heard first time there exists Canterbury scene in prog. Probably that scene had made later, bands in sixties/seventies in the UK just played music they enjoyed, at least those bands of Canterbury were called just prog then.


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 12:22
Originally posted by Mortte Mortte wrote:

Well, to me it was also in the middle of 2010 when I read Matti Pajuniemi´s book of prog 1967-79, when I heard first time there exists Canterbury scene in prog. Probably that scene had made later, bands in sixties/seventies in the UK just played music they enjoyed, at least those bands of Canterbury were called just prog then.
 
I even found a Canterbury Scene band from France - Lard Free - who've never been anywhere near Canterbury as far as I know. Smile 


Posted By: TheH
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 13:14
The No. 1 Website for the original Canterbury Scene: http://www.calyx-canterbury.fr/" rel="nofollow - http://www.calyx-canterbury.fr/
There is Canterbury inspired Music all over the world of Course (Japan:)
 
 


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 13:48
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by Mortte Mortte wrote:

Well, to me it was also in the middle of 2010 when I read Matti Pajuniemi´s book of prog 1967-79, when I heard first time there exists Canterbury scene in prog. Probably that scene had made later, bands in sixties/seventies in the UK just played music they enjoyed, at least those bands of Canterbury were called just prog then.
 
I even found a Canterbury Scene band from France - Lard Free - who've never been anywhere near Canterbury as far as I know. Smile 
Well, as far as I understand it was first meaning those bands in the seventies that have at least some connection to Canterbury. Nowdays it means more a certain prog style, whatever it is, because I don´t think for example Egg and Caravan have really much in common.


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 13:52
Well, didn´t read all from that Canterbury sites, but at least Robert Wyatt seems to think same way as I:

Robert Wyatt

"I couldn't tell you much about that... I don't remember any particular movement happening there. I was at school there, I got married there and I lived there for a while. The school I went to had nothing special, there wasn't any particular interest for art, and I grew bored because I wasn't really good at school... If there ever was a Canterbury scene, it was when the Wilde Flowers became Caravan : they were Canterbury people...".

"I didn't even know it meant me until interviewers started asking me about it. As I say, because I'd bussed in from outside to go to school there I didn't really consider myself a Canterbury person. I think it really means people like Hugh Hopper and Richard Sinclair, who are genuinely based in that area. I met them there and I'm eternally grateful that I met someone like Hugh who provided something I don't think anyone else could have provided. My mind doesn't dwell on it as a place though, if I recall a former fantasy world upon which I draw, it's Harlem in the Forties and not Canterbury in the Fifties...".



Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 14:59


Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 15:04


Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 05 2020 at 18:49


Posted By: Mirakaze
Date Posted: January 06 2020 at 15:10

I'm not sure if this is considered to be a product of the Canterbury Scene, but it does feature a lot of people who were involved with it. Absolute top-notch jazz rock, in any case.


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: January 07 2020 at 11:31
Really like all of the 'Canterbury school' bands....all the ones mentioned already ...some great tracks mentioned....I like Caravan and Hatfield the best  and this track has always been a favorite...
9 feet underground............



-------------
One does nothing yet nothing is left undone.
Haquin


Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 07 2020 at 15:06
Originally posted by Mirakaze Mirakaze wrote:

National Health's debut album is the one album I hold more dearly than any other on this earth, it's such an amazing journey. As a musician, this song written by keyboard wizard Alan Gowen gave me huge anxiety for a long time because it felt so far ahead of what I was able to accomplish compositionally, but it did help me to broaden my horizons and refine my own writings:
Great album and great song. Health/Hatfield are some of my favorite recordings. They are not dated and still sound fresh. Timeless.  I would be interested to hear your music. Not many can compose music like Alan, Phil, Dave, Pip, Richard, and John did.



Posted By: Mirakaze
Date Posted: January 07 2020 at 16:24
Originally posted by Grumpyprogfan Grumpyprogfan wrote:

Originally posted by Mirakaze Mirakaze wrote:

National Health's debut album is the one album I hold more dearly than any other on this earth, it's such an amazing journey. As a musician, this song written by keyboard wizard Alan Gowen gave me huge anxiety for a long time because it felt so far ahead of what I was able to accomplish compositionally, but it did help me to broaden my horizons and refine my own writings:
Great album and great song. Health/Hatfield are some of my favorite recordings. They are not dated and still sound fresh. Timeless.  I would be interested to hear your music. Not many can compose music like Alan, Phil, Dave, Pip, Richard, and John did.



Ha, well I wouldn't dare put myself quite on their level LOL and this may be deviating a bit from the thread topic but I think these are two of my stronger and more concise songs (both created using FL Studio, although I may in the future seek to have them recorded by an actual band):






Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 07 2020 at 17:14
^ Excellent music, thanks for sharing! 


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 08 2020 at 15:43
Where But For Caravan Would I: an Affectionate Tribute to Caravan (Documentary) [2000]
 


Posted By: hugo1995
Date Posted: January 09 2020 at 15:35
My favorite tracks to play to on my organ are Egg songs (Newport Hospital, Egg Symphony etc). Love Canterbury scene.

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interests: Moon Safari, Gilgamesh, Egg, ELP, Soft Machine, Gong, Opeth (Everything pre watershed), Brighteye Brison, The Flower Kings


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 20 2020 at 12:22
The Canterbury Scene on BBC Prog Rock Britannia [2008]


Posted By: IGNEO1991
Date Posted: January 21 2020 at 16:57
Zopp, a new UK Canterbury band similar to Egg and National Health will drop their debut record on Bad Elephant Music April 10th. Listen to their latest track from the album>>  https://soundcloud.com/zoppofficial" rel="nofollow - https://soundcloud.com/zoppofficial

Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/zoppmusic" rel="nofollow - https://www.facebook.com/zoppmusic


Posted By: IGNEO1991
Date Posted: January 21 2020 at 17:10
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

The Canterbury Scene on BBC Prog Rock Britannia [2008]

I'm from Nottingham too! small world isn't it!


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 21 2020 at 17:25
Originally posted by IGNEO1991 IGNEO1991 wrote:


 
I'm from Nottingham too! small world isn't it!
Yes, it's nice to meet another prog fan from Nottingham. As it happens, I've been out and about all around Nottingham today, looking for bargain CD's in the charity shops in Carlton, Mapperley, Arnold and Sherwood and I picked up seven CD's in total, although none of them were prog. I can only ever remember buying one prog CD from a charity shop and that was just last week when I picked up Genesis' "Wind & Wuthering" album for just a pound from a charity shop on Goose Gate in the city centre. Smile


Posted By: hugo1995
Date Posted: January 21 2020 at 18:13
Originally posted by BrufordFreak BrufordFreak wrote:

Favorite "classic era" Canterbury song:



Yup, possibly my favorite prog track of all time and definitely favorite of the era.

Other honorable mentions (songs and albums):

Mumps - Hatfield and the North
Aigrette - Hatfield and the North
Outbloody Rageous - Soft Machine
Facelift - Soft Machine (really the entire album Third)
Rivmic Melodies - Soft Machine (This is the name of the suite on the first side of their second album)
Sprinkling of Clouds - Gong
You Never Blow Yr Trip Forever - Gong
National Health - National Health
Driving to Amsterdam - Khan
Stranded - Khan
Queen St. Gang - Uriel (AKA Arzachel due to label issues, this entire album is fantastic)

But Mont Campbell, Dave Stewart and Clive Brooks were the greatest trifecta the world has ever seen. All this without the world knowing. 

https://youtu.be/aH8tozNBVHk?t=1333" rel="nofollow - "Chuck, Chuck! It's Marvin! Your cousin, Marvin Berry! You know that new sound you were looking for? Well listen to THIS!"




-------------
interests: Moon Safari, Gilgamesh, Egg, ELP, Soft Machine, Gong, Opeth (Everything pre watershed), Brighteye Brison, The Flower Kings


Posted By: hugo1995
Date Posted: January 21 2020 at 18:15
Hey, as for Prog Rock Brittania, I'm sure you're dying to watch the full documentary, but it's not on YouTube.

https://http://www.documentarymania.com/player.php?title=Prog%20Rock%20Britannia" rel="nofollow - You can watch it here, I watched it a month ago or so.


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interests: Moon Safari, Gilgamesh, Egg, ELP, Soft Machine, Gong, Opeth (Everything pre watershed), Brighteye Brison, The Flower Kings


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 01:09
Originally posted by hugo1995 hugo1995 wrote:

Hey, as for Prog Rock Brittania, I'm sure you're dying to watch the full documentary, but it's not on YouTube.

https://http://www.documentarymania.com/player.php?title=Prog%20Rock%20Britannia" rel="nofollow - You can watch it here, I watched it a month ago or so.
Yes, it was great! I watched the entire Prog-Rock Britannia in nine parts on YouTube, and it was also the inspiration for my Prog Britannia blog. Smile


Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 08:16
I love the Canterbury sound and have a great collection of albums by now. Funnily enough I seem to gravitate more towards the faux-Canterbury acts these days ie the ones that don’t necessarily stem from the British town but rather reside elsewhere...like Norway, Italy and Belgium.

Fans of this style should do themselves a big favour and check out:
COS - Viva Boma
Needlepoint - Aimless Mary
Supersister - Iskander
Picchio dal Pozzio - s/t
The Winstons - Smith
De Lorians - s/t
Moving Gelatine Plates - s/t
The Muffins - Manna/Mirage
Zyma - Thoughts
Volaré - The Uncertainty Principle
Homunculus Res - Limiti All’Eguaglianza Della Parte Con Il Tutto

And one obscure one from the UK:
Magic Bus - s/t

-------------
“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”

- Douglas Adams


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 08:25
I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


Posted By: Mirakaze
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 09:08
Originally posted by hugo1995 hugo1995 wrote:

Yup, possibly my favorite prog track of all time and definitely favorite of the era.

Other honorable mentions (songs and albums):

Mumps - Hatfield and the North
Aigrette - Hatfield and the North
Outbloody Rageous - Soft Machine
Facelift - Soft Machine (really the entire album Third)
Rivmic Melodies - Soft Machine (This is the name of the suite on the first side of their second album)
Sprinkling of Clouds - Gong
You Never Blow Yr Trip Forever - Gong
National Health - National Health
Driving to Amsterdam - Khan
Stranded - Khan
Queen St. Gang - Uriel (AKA Arzachel due to label issues, this entire album is fantastic)

But Mont Campbell, Dave Stewart and Clive Brooks were the greatest trifecta the world has ever seen. All this without the world knowing. 

https://youtu.be/aH8tozNBVHk?t=1333" rel="nofollow - "Chuck, Chuck! It's Marvin! Your cousin, Marvin Berry! You know that new sound you were looking for? Well listen to THIS!"


Have you ever heard National Health's album Missing Pieces? It's an archival release from 1996 that captures material from the band's earliest days when the instrumentation was still relatively stripped down and Mont Campbell was still the main composer, and the result is something which I think sounds close to the final two Egg albums. You'll probably like it.




Posted By: siLLy puPPy
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 09:12
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.


-------------

https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy


Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 09:46
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.
Agreed. In Paul's review of The Rotter's Club he apparently doesn't enjoy the silly lyrics, the song titles, and the jazzy, disjointed, complex arrangements and interludes. He prefers the melodic and harmonious sounds of Camel and Caravan to the "bizarre musical world" of Hatfield and the North. That's okay, but for me The Rotters Club is a masterpiece. Paul tries, but it is obvious he does not understand the Canterbury Scene. 


I agree with Paul's opinion of Khan's Space Shanty but not his view of Hatfield and the North.


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 09:48
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.
You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend £10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile


Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 09:53
I love Rotters’ Club to death but I fully get why others don’t. Hell my best friend is all kinds of crazy for the Canterbury sound and has been for 15 years...yet he’s not wild about Hatfield & The North. He loves National Health though...which I always found extremely odd as both bands seem to straddle the looneybin outskirts of the Canterbury sound...which perhaps isn’t all that strange considering who is playing what

-------------
“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”

- Douglas Adams


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 10:07
Originally posted by Grumpyprogfan Grumpyprogfan wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.
Agreed. In Paul's review of The Rotter's Club he apparently doesn't enjoy the silly lyrics, the song titles, and the jazzy, disjointed, complex arrangements and interludes. He prefers the melodic and harmonious sounds of Camel and Caravan to the "bizarre musical world" of Hatfield and the North. That's okay, but for me The Rotters Club is a masterpiece. Paul tries, but it is obvious he does not understand the Canterbury Scene. 


I agree with Paul's opinion of Khan's Space Shanty but not his view of Hatfield and the North.
That's perfectly fine. I don't expect everyone to agree with my reviews because they're just my own personal opinion, but it's good to know you agreed with my review for Khan's superb  Space Shanty album. Smile


Posted By: siLLy puPPy
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 10:55
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.

You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend £10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile



If you've only listened to it twice, what makes you think you could possibly write a review about it? It literally took me about five years for it to sink in and I'm an eclectic avid music consumer as well as a musician. Youre attempting to critique something above your comprehension and in the process offer no insight into the music itself. I personally don't review albums until I understand them on a deeper level

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https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy


Posted By: Lewian
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 11:06
I have much better access to National Health than to Hatfield and the North, and Rotters' Club is one of these "respect but not love" albums for me. Full of interesting stuff, but to my intuition not all of this makes musical sense. And I'm surely not somebody who needs stuff to be melodic and nice. Although maybe I've not listened enough to it either. Anyway, more intellectual & complex doesn't always mean better.


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 11:20
Originally posted by Lewian Lewian wrote:

I have much better access to National Health than to Hatfield and the North, and Rotters' Club is one of these "respect but not love" albums for me. Full of interesting stuff, but to my intuition not all of this makes musical sense. And I'm surely not somebody who needs stuff to be melodic and nice. Although maybe I've not listened enough to it either. Anyway, more intellectual & complex doesn't always mean better.
I agree. I much prefer National Health's first album too. The Rotters' Club is an album I can respect as a good album, but it's not an album I'd actually want to go out and spend good money on. If I really didn't like the album though, I would have given it two stars. I listened to Matching Mole's first album recently and didn't like it at all, so I chose not to review it rather than give it a negative two star rating. Smile


Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 12:18
I mentioned them earlier on but I feel Needlepoint deserve a post of their own. These guys are quite simply brilliant. They absolutely nail that oh so elusive 70s feel both in chops and production.
Both Aimless Mary and The Diary Of Robert Reverie feel like lost classic Canterbury albums from around 1972. If you dig your Caravan, Hatfield and early Softs, you need to hear this band:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9H8BHGp0KfY

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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”

- Douglas Adams


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 12:41
Originally posted by Guldbamsen Guldbamsen wrote:

I love Rotters’ Club to death but I fully get why others don’t. Hell my best friend is all kinds of crazy for the Canterbury sound and has been for 15 years...yet he’s not wild about Hatfield & The North. He loves National Health though...which I always found extremely odd as both bands seem to straddle the looneybin outskirts of the Canterbury sound...which perhaps isn’t all that strange considering who is playing what
There are some bands in the Canterbury Scene who I really like a lot, such as Caravan, Khan and National Health, for instance, but then there are other Canterbury Scene bands who I've never really been able to get into, such as Gong, Soft Machine, Egg, Matching Mole and Hatfield & the North, so I'm basically in agreement with your best friend. Smile


Posted By: siLLy puPPy
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 12:51
Originally posted by Guldbamsen Guldbamsen wrote:

I love Rotters’ Club to death but I fully get why others don’t. Hell my best friend is all kinds of crazy for the Canterbury sound and has been for 15 years...yet he’s not wild about Hatfield & The North. He loves National Health though...which I always found extremely odd as both bands seem to straddle the looneybin outskirts of the Canterbury sound...which perhaps isn’t all that strange considering who is playing what


Agree. I totally get why others don't. I just find it strangets when someone reviews an album and can only state that they don't get it. Why even bother?

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https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 13:03
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.

You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend £10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile



If you've only listened to it twice, what makes you think you could possibly write a review about it? It literally took me about five years for it to sink in and I'm an eclectic avid music consumer as well as a musician. Youre attempting to critique something above your comprehension and in the process offer no insight into the music itself. I personally don't review albums until I understand them on a deeper level
At least three-quarters of the albums I've reviewed I only listened to a couple of times, so why should Hatfield & the North be any different? I don't have time to wait five years to understand an album on a deeper level before I review every album. Smile


Posted By: Rednight
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 13:14
Anyone want to recommend the go-to album by Kevin Ayers (RIP)?

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"It just has none of the qualities of your work that I find interesting. Abandon [?] it." - Eno


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 13:18
Back to the music: Hatfield & the North - Live at Rainbow Theatre 1975
 


Posted By: FloydianPinkRose
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 13:28
When I come to PA it is as an observer and not as a Prog aficionado, as I have eclectic tastes in music and Prog is part of that. I am friends with Psychedelic Paul and really appreciate his insight and excellent writing ability. He has reviewed albums I had no idea we're even out there, and have listened and enjoyed. But it didn't take five years for me to decide if it was something I could truly appreciate or pay good money for. Most of his reviews give me joy just to read because he has such a flair with his descriptions, is so in tune with what the album is about, and gives a history of the band members. Very interesting! I get a 360 degree view of the album. I have gone and listened to a good deal of the albums he has reviewed and now have a broader perspective of the musical horizon. I welcome genres that in the past I excluded out of ignorance and laziness. I really owe this to Psychedelic Paul, because it is he who helped me see and hear the plethora of Prog groups out there. I can't wait to discover more....just want to say to Guldbamsen, your comment about "straddling the looneybin skirts..." was hilarious! Keep it up, Paul. Your number one fan, FloydianPinkRose.


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 13:36
Originally posted by FloydianPinkRose FloydianPinkRose wrote:

When I come to PA it is as an observer and not as a Prog aficionado, as I have eclectic tastes in music and Prog is part of that. I am friends with Psychedelic Paul and really appreciate his insight and excellent writing ability. He has reviewed albums I had no idea we're even out there, and have listened and enjoyed. But it didn't take five years for me to decide if it was something I could truly appreciate or pay good money for. Most of his reviews give me joy just to read because he has such a flair with his descriptions, is so in tune with what the album is about, and gives a history of the band members. Very interesting! I get a 360 degree view of the album. I have gone and listened to a good deal of the albums he has reviewed and now have a broader perspective of the musical horizon. I welcome genres that in the past I excluded out of ignorance and laziness. I really owe this to Psychedelic Paul, because it is he who helped me see and hear the plethora of Prog groups out there. I can't wait to discover more....just want to say to Guldbamsen, your comment about "straddling the looneybin skirts..." was hilarious! Keep it up, Paul. Your number one fan, FloydianPinkRose.
 
Thank you so much for your warm generous praise. I'm your number one fan too! Heart


Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 14:04
Originally posted by Rednight Rednight wrote:

Anyone want to recommend the go-to album by Kevin Ayers (RIP)?

I think his first 5 albums are worth owning but singling one out rather depends on your tastes. The obvious is Joy Of A Toy which I love..but my two faves of his are actually Whatevershebringswesing and The Confessions Of Dr. Dream & Other Stories.


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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”

- Douglas Adams


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 14:21
Originally posted by Guldbamsen Guldbamsen wrote:

Originally posted by Rednight Rednight wrote:

Anyone want to recommend the go-to album by Kevin Ayers (RIP)?

I think his first 5 albums are worth owning but singling one out rather depends on your tastes. The obvious is Joy Of A Toy which I love..but my two faves of his are actually Whatevershebringswesing and The Confessions Of Dr. Dream & Other Stories.
I generally like Kevin Ayers, but this piece of unlistenable  "music" from his second album almost put me off him for life. Confused
 


Posted By: Rednight
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 15:58
Originally posted by Guldbamsen Guldbamsen wrote:

Originally posted by Rednight Rednight wrote:

Anyone want to recommend the go-to album by Kevin Ayers (RIP)?

I think his first 5 albums are worth owning but singling one out rather depends on your tastes. The obvious is Joy Of A Toy which I love..but my two faves of his are actually Whatevershebringswesing and The Confessions Of Dr. Dream & Other Stories.
Thank you, Guldbamsen.

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"It just has none of the qualities of your work that I find interesting. Abandon [?] it." - Eno


Posted By: siLLy puPPy
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 16:01
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.

You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend £10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile



If you've only listened to it twice, what makes you think you could possibly write a review about it? It literally took me about five years for it to sink in and I'm an eclectic avid music consumer as well as a musician. Youre attempting to critique something above your comprehension and in the process offer no insight into the music itself. I personally don't review albums until I understand them on a deeper level
At least three-quarters of the albums I've reviewed I only listened to a couple of times, so why should Hatfield & the North be any different? I don't have time to wait five years to understand an album on a deeper level before I review every album. Smile


Then why should anybody take anything  you say seriously? I don't take 5  years to focus on most albums but that one i did. Just sayin, if  you REALLY want to find the cream of the crop of the Canterbury Scene, you really have to crack the tough nut of Rotter's Club. It's the whole scene on steroids :)


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https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy


Posted By: BrufordFreak
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 17:32
I've been trying to argue for several years that it shouldn't be called the Canterbury "scene" but a "style"--especially as there are so many bands internationally who have been inspired by the silly, experimental, psychedelic jazz of The Softs, Egg, Caravan, and Gong.
Holland - Supersister
Belgium - Cos
Germany - Zyma
France - Moving Gelatine Plates, Patrick Forgas, Setna, Alco Frisbass
Spain - Amoeba Split
Italy - Picchio dal Pozzo, Homunculus Res, Moogg, The Winstons
Brazil - Violeta de Outono
Japan - Mr. Sirius
USA -  The Muffins, Manna/Mirage, Inner Ear Brigade, Ampledeed

Plus, as Robert Wyatt says in the above quoted interview, there was no loyalty or pride associated with Canterbury among musicians who happened to pass through their during their lives, it's more of a critical nostalgia coming from literary romantics that has created this category (and the same nostalgia that tries to keep it a "private club" with a "closed door policy"--to which Robert, I'm sure, would strongly disagree).

P.S. Excellent link, David, with that Needlepoint song: they do, indeed, exude many of the sounds and traits of the psychedelic-Beatnick jazz or "Canterbury" style of music that many of us have come to know and love. 


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Drew Fisher
https://progisaliveandwell.blogspot.com/


Posted By: siLLy puPPy
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 17:57
^ true dat. Don't forget the new Japanese band De Lorians and Spain's Amoeba Split.

According to the article on wikipedia it is also referred to as the Canterbury Sound

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canterbury_scene" rel="nofollow - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canterbury_scene


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https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 22:10
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.

You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend £10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile



If you've only listened to it twice, what makes you think you could possibly write a review about it? It literally took me about five years for it to sink in and I'm an eclectic avid music consumer as well as a musician. Youre attempting to critique something above your comprehension and in the process offer no insight into the music itself. I personally don't review albums until I understand them on a deeper level
At least three-quarters of the albums I've reviewed I only listened to a couple of times, so why should Hatfield & the North be any different? I don't have time to wait five years to understand an album on a deeper level before I review every album. Smile


Then why should anybody take anything  you say seriously? I don't take 5  years to focus on most albums but that one i did. Just sayin, if  you REALLY want to find the cream of the crop of the Canterbury Scene, you really have to crack the tough nut of Rotter's Club. It's the whole scene on steroids :)
I fully agree with Paul about Hatfield. I haven´t also listened it hundreds of times, but I have listened music so long that I know it will never become into group of my favourites from Canterbury albums. 


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 22:28
Originally posted by Mortte Mortte wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.

You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend £10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile



If you've only listened to it twice, what makes you think you could possibly write a review about it? It literally took me about five years for it to sink in and I'm an eclectic avid music consumer as well as a musician. Youre attempting to critique something above your comprehension and in the process offer no insight into the music itself. I personally don't review albums until I understand them on a deeper level
At least three-quarters of the albums I've reviewed I only listened to a couple of times, so why should Hatfield & the North be any different? I don't have time to wait five years to understand an album on a deeper level before I review every album. Smile


Then why should anybody take anything  you say seriously? I don't take 5  years to focus on most albums but that one i did. Just sayin, if  you REALLY want to find the cream of the crop of the Canterbury Scene, you really have to crack the tough nut of Rotter's Club. It's the whole scene on steroids :)
I fully agree with Paul about Hatfield. I haven´t also listened it hundreds of times, but I have listened music so long that I know it will never become into group of my favourites from Canterbury albums. 
Thanks for your support. I guessed it might cause controversy when I only gave The Rotters' Club album a three star rating when most other PA members gave the album a four or five star rating. I don't feel inclined to listen to the album repeatedly over the course of five years though to see if it's going to change my opinion. A three-star rating still means it's a good album from my point of view, but it's just not an album I'd want to go out and spend money on when there are literally thousands of other albums I'd rather buy instead. Smile


Posted By: siLLy puPPy
Date Posted: January 22 2020 at 23:04
^ don't get me wrong. I'm not saying everyone has to love the album. I'm just saying that it's one of those connoisseur type of albums that you really have to invest time in to understand the complexities. If you choose not to is one's prerogative, however it's like taking one semester of a class of a foreign language and thinking that's enough to speak it fluently therefore what you present is not really a review but rather an impression. All is valid of course but personally i think the invested time allows the album to take on a completely new dimension undetected in the earlier stages of experiencing it.


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https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 00:56
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

^ don't get me wrong. I'm not saying everyone has to love the album. I'm just saying that it's one of those connoisseur type of albums that you really have to invest time in to understand the complexities. If you choose not to is one's prerogative, however it's like taking one semester of a class of a foreign language and thinking that's enough to speak it fluently therefore what you present is not really a review but rather an impression. All is valid of course but personally i think the invested time allows the album to take on a completely new dimension undetected in the earlier stages of experiencing it.
If I happened to see Hatfield & the North's album at a bargain price charity shop or car boot sale then I would buy it and then I'd listen to it several times over. As I said in my review, it's a complex album that deserves to be listened to several times to fully appreciate it, and that especially applies to the longest track: "Mumps"
 
 
By the way, I always enjoy reading your reviews, even if I don't always agree with them. Smile


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 02:07
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

^ don't get me wrong. I'm not saying everyone has to love the album. I'm just saying that it's one of those connoisseur type of albums that you really have to invest time in to understand the complexities. If you choose not to is one's prerogative, however it's like taking one semester of a class of a foreign language and thinking that's enough to speak it fluently therefore what you present is not really a review but rather an impression. All is valid of course but personally i think the invested time allows the album to take on a completely new dimension undetected in the earlier stages of experiencing it.
If I happened to see Hatfield & the North's album at a bargain price charity shop or car boot sale then I would buy it and then I'd listen to it several times over. As I said in my review, it's a complex album that deserves to be listened to several times to fully appreciate it, and that especially applies to the longest track: "Mumps"
 
 
By the way, I always enjoy reading your reviews, even if I don't always agree with them. Smile
Actually I have listened only their first album (I´ve got the picture they made only one album). But what I just read about that second album, I don´t think it also will become my big favorites, cause that first one also hasn´t become. I just don´t have any idea, why I would listen even 20 times some album I don´t like at all (or very little like Hatfield). On the other hand I very rare make reviews from the albums I don´t like at all.


Posted By: siLLy puPPy
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 08:11
^ It's one of the most complex prog albums ever made. It's certainly an acquired taste and one of the Holy Grails of prog. If  you've been listening to prog rock long enough, you'll eventually gravitate to more complex arrangements and end up loving albums like this that have more ideas stuffed in one track than most artists will muster up in an entire career. At least that's what happened for me. I hesistated reviewing for years because it would give me a different impression every time i listened to it. Sometimes i'd find it boring and other times it would blow me away as the best masterpiece ever made. It took about five years before it simmered down and emerged as one of the highlight masterpieces of all of prog rock.


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https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 10:44
Caravan - Nine Feet Underground / For Richard - Live 2003 - 35th Anniversary Concert


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 11:27
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

^ It's one of the most complex prog albums ever made. It's certainly an acquired taste and one of the Holy Grails of prog. If  you've been listening to prog rock long enough, you'll eventually gravitate to more complex arrangements and end up loving albums like this that have more ideas stuffed in one track than most artists will muster up in an entire career. At least that's what happened for me. I hesistated reviewing for years because it would give me a different impression every time i listened to it. Sometimes i'd find it boring and other times it would blow me away as the best masterpiece ever made. It took about five years before it simmered down and emerged as one of the highlight masterpieces of all of prog rock.
I have listened prog from the eighties, but to me has happened backward "development". I think I liked much more complex prog in the eighties than today, today I like more great melodies and strong atmospheres than very complex structures (of course this has some exceptions for example Magma). It´s very possible if I hadn´t listened seventies Rush in the eighties & had found it recently, I wouldn´t like it. I think you just have to accept every prog listener would not love Hatfield. But anyway, I will try that second some day and also give more listens to that first (it hasn´t been totally bad).


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 12:05
My Hatfield & the North review isn't written in stone, so if I listen to The Rotter's Club album again and change my initial opinion of the album, I can always edit my rating or review. Smile
 
I'll give Matching Mole's two albums a wide berth though. Smile I didn't like them at all. Thumbs Down


Posted By: siLLy puPPy
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 12:52
^ cool. Some of the Canterbury stuff is the most convoluted and complex of all prog which is why it is considered amongst hardcore proggers as the zenith of prog rock expressions. It's sorta like the cream of the crop for Olympic marathon proggers!

Caravan is definitely the right place to start for beginners. It's the most poppy of the Scene whereas the jagged soundscapes of Hatfield, Moving Gelatine Plates and Matching Mole are some of the most demanding.

The middle range includes artists like Gong, Hillage, Supersister and Soft Machine.

What's cool about the Canterbury Scene is that it connects a disparate style of musical expression with an intangible "feel" through jazzy chord progressions that is instantly identifiable when you listen to it but is almost impossible to express in words.

Although it could easily be lumped into the greater jazz-fusion category, the Cant Scene defiantly exists in its own little world that despite reaching a sort of musical cul de sac in the 70s which limits newer artists to imitating the early pioneers, still exudes a charm unlike any other sound and perhaps the most successful style of prog that creates warm and inviting emotional connections coupled with some of the most brutal complex technical workouts in the prog universe.

Oh yeah, great stuff indeed!



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https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 13:02
^^ I totally agree with Caravan being the most easily approachable and easy-to-listen-to music out of all of the Canterbury Scene bands, because they were the first Canterbury Scene band I really got into before I even knew there was such a thing as the Canterbury Scene. Smile
 
I'd also agree that Matching Mole are one of the most challenging and demanding of all of the Canterbury Scene bands, even more so than Hatfield & the North. Smile


Posted By: Mortte
Date Posted: January 23 2020 at 22:05
^I like first Matching Mole much more than first Hatfield, although it´s not also my most favourite from Canterbury.


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 27 2020 at 10:17
I noticed they'd got both of Hatfield & the North's albums in my local FOPP record store today in Nottingham for just £7 each, but they'd got nothing by National Health, although they said I could order both National Health albums at £14 each. It's a pity it wasn't the other way around. I would have been more that happy to have paid £7 each for National Health's two albums. Smile


Posted By: David_D
Date Posted: April 20 2023 at 05:47

My Canterbury faves are:

     The Soft Machine  - The Soft Machine  (1968)

     Caravan  -  In the Land of Grey and Pink  (1971)

     Khan  -  Space Shanty  (1972) 

     Gong  -  Shamal  (1975)   



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                      quality over quantity, and all kind of PopcoRn almost beyond


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 20 2023 at 08:11
Originally posted by David_D David_D wrote:


My Canterbury faves are:

     The Soft Machine  - The Soft Machine  (1968)

     Caravan  -  In the Land of Grey and Pink  (1971)

     Khan  -  Space Shanty  (1972) 

     Gong  -  Shamal  (1975)   

I posted this thread so long ago that I'd totally forgotten about it. I thought it was your thread, or am I just losing the thread (again!?). No, don't answer that. Tongue


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 21 2023 at 03:23
 3 stars 1975: Hatfield & the North - The Rotters' Club -  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvtMst6bN4A" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvtMst6bN4A

HATFIELD & THE NORTH were a two-album Canterbury Scene band, named after the well-known A1 Motorway sign on the Great North Road from London to Edinburgh. Their first eponymously-titled album passed by virtually unnoticed at the time of its release in 1974, but their second album "The Rotters' Club" (1975) is much better-known. The line-up for this second album featured Dave Stewart on keyboards, Phil Miller on guitar, Richard Sinclair on bass and lead vocals, Pip Pyle on drums, a 4-piece brassy horn section and a 3-piece female choir of Barbara Gaskin, Amanda Parsons & Ann Rosenthal, collectively named The Northettes.

The opening song "Share It" sounds strangely familiar, even upon first hearing. This upbeat jaunty Jazz-Rock number is very reminiscent of both Caravan and Camel. There's no doubting that Hatfield & the North are an English band from Richard Sinclair's clear-cut vocals, which sound as English as fish & chips. The obscure lyrics are a riddle wrapped in an enigma though, but that only adds to the quaint English charm of this catchy tune . Here's a brief opening taster of the lyrics:- "Tadpoles keep screaming in my ear, Hey there! Rotter's Club! Explain the meaning of this song and share it" ..... The bizarre meaning of this particular song will perhaps forever remain shrouded in mystery, when even the singer sounds baffled by the abstruse lyrics. And now for a little instrumental lounge music with "Lounging There Trying", which sounds like the kind of sophisticated improvisational Jazz you might listen to whilst coolly sipping a gin and tonic in a trendy cocktail lounge. There's no clue as to what the strangely-titled "(Big) John Wayne Socks Psychology on the Jaw" might be all about, because it's a brief 43 second instrumental, and the slightly discordant music bears little relation to the bizarre song title. This leads us into the even shorter "Chaos at the Greasy Spoon", which does indeed sound chaotic and a bit of a tuneless mess to be absolutely honest, so it's something of a blessed relief that it's less than half-a-minute long. Next up is "The Yes No Interlude" which is not so much an interlude, but more of an extended 7-minute instrumental jam session, where the musicians throw caution to the wind with gay abandon and let loose with some wild and improvisational Canterbury Scene Jazz. We're back to more familiar territory with "Fitter Stoke Has A Bath", which sounds like a typical lively Jazz-Rock song that Caravan might have recorded, although the meaning of the weird song title and lyrics are just as obscure as Hatfield & the North's instrumental numbers. Here's a brief example of the totally nonsensical lyrics:- "Bing billy bong - silly song's going wrong, Ping pong ping, clong cling dong, Tie me up, turn me on, Bing billy bang, Desperate Dan, frying pan, Cling clong cling, Bong bing bang, Michael Miles, Bogey man," ..... Yes indeed! Song lyrics don't come much sillier than that! They sound like the kind of wacky lyrics you might have heard in a typical Eurovision Song Contest entry from the 1970's. There's a return to some kind of normality - or whatever passes for normal in the bizarre musical world of Hatfield & the North - with "Didn't Matter Anyway". This is a gentle Caravan-esque song floating on a mellow wave of flute and delicate keyboards. It's the most approachable and easy-to-listen-to song on the album. You can just relax and let the worries and cares of the day slip away listening to this gorgeous insouciant song, because whatever might have been troubling you, it probably "Didn't Matter Anyway".

It's time now to don a dinner jacket and order a dry martini - shaken not stirred - for the Side Two opener "Underdub", because it's another pleasant cocktail lounge diversion to while away four minutes of spare time whilst waiting for your dinner date to arrive for the evening. And finally, we arrive at the 20-minute long suite "Mumps" to close out the album. The music is divided into four parts with the kind of weird and crazy titles that we've come to expect by now:- 1. "Your Majesty Is Like a Cream Donut (Quiet)"; 2. "Lumps"; 3. "Prenut"; 4. "Your Majesty Is Like a Cream Donut (Loud)". The Jazzy Canterbury Scene music is just as eccentric and off-kilter as the titles suggest, featuring another wild excursion into uncharted realms, occasionally sounding atonal and disjointed, but always unexpected and totally unpredictable. It's an endlessly complex arrangement that deserves to be listened to several times to truly appreciate the musical diversity on offer here.

"The Rotters' Club" is undoubtedly an essential album for fans of the Canterbury Scene sound, but it's not so essential for Prog-Rock fans generally. The album won't be to everyone's taste, because this is wild and improvisational Canterbury Scene music that's nowhere near as approachable and easy to listen to as the more melodic and harmonious sound of Caravan and Camel for instance. "The Rotters' Club" album is not for the uninitiated. If you've dipped your toes into the Canterbury Scene with Caravan, then Hatfield & the North by contrast are like jumping into the deep end. Their complex music veers more towards the Jazz Fusion end of the musical spectrum, than the more traditional British Jazz-Rock sound. On the other hand, if you're in the mood for some uninhibited and unrestrained Jazzy flights of fancy, then head on up the Great North Road to the sound of Hatfield & the North



Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 21 2023 at 06:33
 4 stars 1975: Steve Hillage - Fish Rising -  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZKRONKA7j8" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZKRONKA7j8

Renowned guitarist STEVE HILLAGE has been part of the Canterbury Scene since the late 1960's. He was involved with two early one-album band projects: the psychedelic Arzachel (Uriel) album in 1969 and Khan's outstanding "Space Shanty" album in 1971. He's also been a longstanding member of the Jazz-Rock band, Gong. More recently, Steve Hillage was one half of the electronic dance duo, System 7. He also teamed up with ambient musician Evan Marc in 2008 to record the album "Dreamtime Submersible". The album reviewed here, "Fish Rising" (1975), is his first album in a long solo career spanning four decades and seven studio albums. He followed the "Fish Rising" album with six more releases in the late-1970's & early 80's:- "L" (1976); "Motivation Radio" (1977); "Green" (1978); "Rainbow Dome Musick" (1979); "Open" (1979); & finally, "For to Next" (1983). Many of Steve Hillage's bandmates from Gong featured on his first solo outing, including most notably, Pierre Moerlen on drums and percussion and Mike Howlett on bass. The line-up also included Dave Stewart on keyboards, who later paired up with Barbara Gaskin for "It's My Party (And I'll Cry If I Want To) in 1986. The 2007 remastered CD edition of "Fish Rising" added two bonus tracks to the original five pieces of music on the album.

"Fish Rising" consists of three long suites of music and two shorter songs. The album opens radiantly with the four-part "Solar Musick Suite", the longest piece on the album at nearly 17 minutes long. The first part "Sun Song (I Love It's Holy Mystery)" bursts into view like a brilliant ray of sunshine. This warm and melodic prog is positively glowing in rainbow colours with some simply sensational soaring guitar riffing from Steve Hillage. He's in fine voice too with his rich silver-toned vocals adding to the sense of warmth. It's a joyous and uplifting song with a flower-power message of love and peace and eternal optimism as these lyric reveal:- "So people look into each others eyes and gaze at them with certainty, We're gathered here today from all around to celebrate eternity, The spirit in the air is never far immersed in our totality, And the answers that we sit and hope to find, Are living here in side of we." ..... This joyful and invigorating music feels like the burgeoning arrival of spring, where colourful flowers are blooming in a twisting and transitional dance of new growth, as mother nature shakes off winter's cold embrace. This is warm and radiant music to stimulate and rejuvenate the soul. The "Solar Musick Suite" merges effortlessly into "Canterbury Sunrise", a lively Jazz-Rock instrumental, giving Steve Hillage a chance to really shine with some impressive soloing and with Dave Stewart providing sterling accompaniment on the organ. Next up is "Hiram Aftaglid Meets the Dervish", a wild and uninhibited whirling dervish of stirring Canterbury Scene music that's very reminiscent of some of Caravan's wilder Jazz-Rock freak-outs. Finally, there's a brief reprise of the glorious opening "Sun Song", to leave one feeling in joyously buoyant mood. Next comes the simply-titled "Fish", which is a bit of a tuneless mess to be perfectly honest, with the discordant music thrown together in a seemingly haphazard fashion. This is a fish that would have been better left in the ocean. The only good thing about this musical mash-up is it's less than 90 seconds long. Moving swiftly on now with the dreamweaving "Meditation of the Snake", a swirling and twisting magic carpet ride of transcendental ambience that washes over the listener like a blissful dreamwave of sound.

Opening Side Two now, we're going fishing with the 9-minute aquatic suite, "Salmon Song", and it's a pretty good catch too. It's a psychedelic rainbow trout swimming in a sea of spacey guitars, combined with some heavy sonorous riffing, and not forgetting those trademark Hillage guitar glissandos which soar right up into the stratosphere. This is one fish you won't want to throw back into the sea. And now we come to the album highlight, the 15-minute-long seven-piece suite, "Aftaglid", to bring the album to a dramatic and powerful conclusion. This is a real psychedelicatessen of musical styles, featuring gently pastoral acoustics, wild psychedelic riffing and Middle Eastern mantras, all combined together into a magnificent musical melange of sound.

"Fish Rising" is an album full of psychedelic delights, featuring super soar-away soloing, spacey New Age ambience, dynamic keyboard virtuosity, and jaunty Jazz-Rock, all combined together into a delicious potpourri of Canterbury Scene music. This fish-themed album will have you hooked.



Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 21 2023 at 11:06
 4 stars 1978: National Health - National Health -  http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_l4v-1-VUXOEB35EOWIOBCXQLnaW2fY3KM" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_l4v-1-VUXOEB35EOWIOBCXQLnaW2fY3KM

NATIONAL HEALTH were a Canterbury Scene outfit formed from the remnants of Hatfield & the North and Gilgamesh. The band featured Dave Stewart on keyboards (who later went on to form a duo with Barbara Gaskin in the 1980's), Phil Miller on electric guitar, Neil Murray on fretless bass, Pip Pyle on drums and percussion and Amanda Parsons on vocals. National Health recorded three albums during their brief time in the spotlight:- "National Health" (1977); Of Queues and Cures (1978); and "D.S. Al Coda" (1982). It's time now to take out a prescription for National Health's first album and find out if music really is the best medicine.

The album opens with the bright and sparkling "Tenemos Roads". Running at over fourteen minutes long, it's a complex improvisational and uplifting piece of music with some truly dynamic keyboard virtuosity from Dave Stewart, with Amanda Parsons' lovely soprano vocals soaring up up and away into the wild blue yonder like a high-flying bird. It may be hard to discern the lyrics to discover what "Tenemos Roads" is all about, so here's a brief taster:- "From the cradle to the grave, There are roads for us all, That we'll find, and follow to the end, Leading upwards to a place in the stars, Ten million miles away, There's a path called Tenemos Roads" ..... This warm and inviting opening number is like a radiant sunburst of glowing rainbow colours that's guaranteed to brighten up the the dullest of days. It's All That Jazz and a lot more besides and just what the doctor ordered.

Next up is the 10-minute-long "Brujo" which transports us to calmer climes with a gorgeous pastoral woodwind opening, conjuring up images of gently rolling green pastures bathed in warm golden sunshine. This serves as a prelude to another sunburst session of wild improvisational Jazz-Rock with some ethereal vocalese ad-libbing from Amanda Parsons. The music is positively aglow with complex time signatures, dynamic changes of tempo and some delightful keyboard flights of fancy from Dave Stewart. In other words, it's everything we've come to expect in the best Canterbury Scene music. Apparently, "Brujo" is Spanish for sorcerer, so just lie back and let this music weave its magical spell on you.

The first two pieces of music on Side Two "Borogoves (Excerpt from Part Two)" followed by "Borogoves (Part One)" seem strangely back to front, but putting that minor detail aside, "Borogoves" is a complex and compelling 10-minute piece of music where the listener never quite knows what's coming next upon first hearing. To try and put such a dynamic improvisational piece of music into words would do it a disservice, other than to say it's intricate and invigorating Jazzy music with more than enough unexpected twists and turns to keep any Canterbury Scene fan happy, and just in case anyone's wondering what a "Borogove" is, it's a silly mythical bird invented by Lewis Carroll for his nonsense poem, "Jabberwocky".

There are "Elephants" in the room for the final piece of music, which turns out to be a 14-minute-long free-flight instrumental jam session. It's another complex Jazz-Rock composition containing undecipherable lyrics, with the music sounding as marvellously wild and unpredictable as a stampede of "Elephants". It's an endlessly entertaining combination of gentle pastoral flute and keyboard passages and wild uninhibited outbursts of unrestrained Canterbury Scene music.

"National Health" is a playful and passionate avant-garde demonstration of evergreen Canterbury Scene music at its best, featuring an accomplished and experienced group of musicians who are really in their element with this eclectic and endlessly diverse album. Sometimes the Jazzy music is manic and unrestrained, and sometimes it's pleasant and pastoral, but it's always energetic and exhilarating. National Health is just the prescription you need for some lively Canterbury Scene Jazz.




Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: April 21 2023 at 12:00
Both Hatfield lps are marvelous...I love them to death. Also love......
 National Health
Caravan
Soft Machine
Khan and Fish Rising with HIllage 
Egg
Cos
Supersister
Amoeba Split
Sanguine Hum




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One does nothing yet nothing is left undone.
Haquin


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: April 21 2023 at 12:09
Recommended to Canter bury heads..............



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One does nothing yet nothing is left undone.
Haquin


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 21 2023 at 14:09
 3 stars 1975: Gilgamesh - Gilgamesh -  http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGfb2R92OHul3x-CqZ-98b5x_jTK5V6xL" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGfb2R92OHul3x-CqZ-98b5x_jTK5V6xL

GILGAMESH (named after a legendary Sumerian king of Mesopotamia) were a two-album Canterbury Scene band led by keyboard player Alan Gowen. Gilgamesh are closely associated with two other Canterbury Scene bands from the proggy 1970's era: Hatfield & the North and National Health, with various band members migrating from one band to another. Gilgamesh recorded two mostly instrumental albums of complex Jazz Fusion:- "Gilgamesh" (1975) and the comically- titled "Another Fine Tune You've Got Me Into" (1978), the album title no doubt inspired by the comic duo Laurel & Hardy. There was also a much later compilation album "Arriving Twice" which arrived once in the year 2000. It's time now to delve into the not-so-ancient musical legend of Gilgamesh and check out their first self-titled album.

The Gilgamesh album opens with the three-piece-suite: "One End More / Phil's Little Dance - For Phil Miller's Trousers / Worlds Of Zin". With a total running time of over ten minutes in this opening number, there's plenty of time for a wild excursion into typical experimental Canterbury Scene territory. It's mostly laid-back instrumental Jazzy music, focusing mainly on keyboards, electric guitar and delicate understated percussion, with occasional harmonising vocals courtesy of Amanda Parsons. This dynamic and ever-changing style of inventive Jazz Fusion will be instantly recognisable to fans of Hatfield & the North and National Health, so even if you've never heard this particular Gilgamesh album before, listening to this album on the record player will sound as comfortably familiar as wearing a comfy woolly sweater or donning a pair of fluffy carpet slippers that have been warmed-up by the fire. Having been introduced to the album, it's now time to meet "Lady and Friend", which opens as a tranquil keyboard piece to put one in a relaxed frame of mind, but be prepared for the occasional outburst of strident electric guitar when you least expect it. This is like the kind of cool Jazz you might hear played in a cocktail lounge, only this endlessly entertaining music comes shaken and stirred with a slice of lemon and a cherry on top. Notwithstanding the fact that the complex instrumental Jazz on this album has so far been as enigmatic as the mysterious legend of Gilgamesh, "Notwithstanding" takes us into even wilder exotic realms of musical experimentation, which will no doubt leave fans of the Canterbury Scene sound awestruck in amazement at the musical proficiency on display here. For the uninitiated though, this may be one step beyond what is enjoyable or even listenable.

Arriving at Side Two now comes "Arriving Twice", a short and sweet, pleasant stroll along the mellow Canterbury Scene trail. We come to the second of the three extended three-piece-suites on the album now with "Island Of Rhodes / Paper Boat - For Doris / As If Your Eyes Were Open". It's a seven-minute pleasure cruise opening in calm waters, but with occasional large waves in the shape of dynamic keyboard and guitar runs. This is music that should come supplied with a windbreaker and a sou'wester hat, as it's a constantly changing fusion of Jazz and Rock, charting an unpredictable course through some choppy windswept waters. It's time now to spare a thought "For Absent Friends", a gentle acoustic guitar diversion running at just over one minute long, and we're all at sea again with the final three-piece suite "We Are All / Someone Else's Food / Jamo And Other Boating Disasters - From The Holiday Of The Same Name." There are no real surprises in store here. It's a very familiar 8-minute-long pleasure trip aboard the good ship Canterbury for another weird and wonderful excursion into the outer reaches of complex Jazz Fusion. To play us out now comes "Just C", a 45-second-long gentle tinkling of the keyboards to put one in a relaxed and mellow frame of mind.

This Canterbury Scene album of experimental Jazz Fusion will almost certainly appeal to fans of Hatfield & the North and National Health, so even if you've never heard this album before, you'll know exactly what to expect from Gilgamesh if you're at all familiar with those two legendary bands of the Canterbury Scene. If you've already headed up the Great North Road to the sound of Hatfield & the North and picked up a prescription for National Health on the way, then Gilgamesh would make an ideal third stop-off point on the musical journey along the Canterbury Scene trail.




Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 21 2023 at 15:15
3 stars 1975: Quiet Sun - Mainstream -  http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k5cj7CqlqUQyE7VXL7IlujXMjXlJQiDUI" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k5cj7CqlqUQyE7VXL7IlujXMjXlJQiDUI

QUIET SUN were a short-lived, British Jazz-Rock combo. Their line-up included Phil Manzanera (of Roxy Music fame) on guitar. Their one and only album "Mainstream" (1975) has been described as Canterbury Scene music, although none of the London- based band members are actually from the city of Canterbury. After all, Canterbury Scene is more of a musical description than a geographical location. Although Quiet Sun split up in 1972, Phil Manzanera got the band together again in 1975 for a one-off studio session and this album was the result. Renowned record producer and former member of Roxy Music, Brian Eno, participated in the making of the album, although he wasn't credited as the album's producer. The 2011 CD reissue of "Mainstream" included five bonus tracks added to the original seven mostly instrumental pieces on the album. So, what can we expect from Quiet Sun's "Mainstream" album? One suspects that the band were being a little bit ironic with the "Mainstream" choice of album title. Is it going to be mainstream music or something a little more offbeat? Well, let's find out.

It's sunny side up for the 7-minute-long opening number "Sol Caliente" (Spanish for "Hot Sun"), a warm and inviting sunburst of fuzzy guitar-driven, psychedelic Jazz-Rock. This long uptempo instrumental piece really gives the musicians a chance to shine in a psychedelic jazz guitar freak out, with a nifty keyboard player in his element and with the drummer pounding away on his kit with frenetic energy as if his life depends on it. It's not exactly a toe-tapper, because your feet could hardly keep up with the frantic pace of this upbeat and offbeat piece of music with its unusually complex time signature, so just lie back and enjoy it. There's more funky fusion on the way with "Trumpets with Motherhood". It's anybody's guess what this bizarrely- titled piece of music is all about, because it's another instrumental number. You might at least be expecting to hear some trumpets though in a piece of music titled "Trumpets with Motherhood", but no, there's not a toot of a brass trumpet horn to be heard anywhere, because this is another uptempo fuzzy guitar and electric piano combination. It's less than two minutes long though so there's barely time to nip out the room and make a cup of tea, so you may as well stick around for the next number, "Bargain Classics". You're unlikely to find this rare album in the bargain classics section of your local store though, as it's a pretty hard album to get hold of these days. So, what does the music sound like you may well ask. Well, it's a very offbeat and "off-piste" piece of music in a highly irregular time signature, which is intricately complex and fascinating to put it kindly, but which is all over the place, to put it unkindly. It all depends on your point of view: if you're an aficianado of Jazz Fusion, then you may go into rhapsodies of delight upon hearing this musical mayhem, but on the other hand, if Jazz-Fusion is not your thing, then you may want to skip to the next piece of music, which is "R.F.D.". The meaning of the initials "R,F.D." are shrouded in mystery, but this is a pleasantly soothing, laid-back mellow number to close out Side One, so lie back, relax, and let the music play as the cares of the day drift away, because this gorgeous piece of music is like a bright ray of sunshine on a hot sandy beach.

Side Two opens with one of the most bizarrely-titled pieces of music of all time: "Mummy was an Asteroid, Daddy was a Small Non-Stick Kitchen Utensil". It's just as well it's an instrumental piece, because if this song had lyrics, they'd probably make no sense at all, although that's never been a problem in the wierd and wonderful world of prog, where just about anything goes when it comes to song lyrics. Anyway, back to the music we have here, and it's another intense and fast-paced Jazz-Fusion freak out, which is *almost* as freaky as the track title implies, but don't let that put you off, because the music is very impressive. It's also pretty wild and "finger-licking" good, so be prepared to hear some fast and furious acid guitar riffs. We're off at a "Trot" for Song No. 6 now, a 5-minute-long piece of uptempo Jazz-Fusion which gallops along nicely to bring us to the closing piece of music on the album, "Rongwrong". It's another bizarre track title in an album full of peculiar and offbeat track titles, and at times, peculiar and offbeat music to match. "Rongwrong" is the longest song on the album at nearly 10 minutes in duration. It's also the first real song on the album, as it actually includes lyrics for the first time. If you think the song title is bizarre though, take a look at these off-the-wall lyrics:- "I'm looking in my little black book, to see if I was right or rongwrong, within the confines of whoremonger logic, to even try to sing this song. I could have asked the I Ching, but that would have taken up too much time, And with the time before fall, I didn't see there was no time to lose, If things got bad it could always turn into a blues, Like they do back home on the Delta ? grunt and groan." ..... Confused? You will be! Never mind the lyrics though, what about the music? It's joyful, uplifting and exuberant, but also quite offbeat, which is just what we've come to expect by now from an album that is a little bit off the beaten track.

This Canterbury Scene album of Jazz-Rock/Fusion is certainly not "Mainstream" and it may not be to everyone's taste, but it is pretty good and definitely worth a listen. One can't help feeling though, that the album could have been better if most of the tracks had included vocals instead of just the final song on the album. It certainly would have made the music more memorable if most of the tracks had included lyrics. That said, if you're heavily into Jazz-Fusion, then this rare long-lost album might be right up your street.



Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 22 2023 at 00:37
 5 stars 1972: Khan - Space Shanty -  http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_neCfaRIj9J2aZKoMS909hNhdmCxafD_fo" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_neCfaRIj9J2aZKoMS909hNhdmCxafD_fo

Khan were a short-lived Canterbury Scene band who got together to record one outstanding album "Space Shanty" in 1972 before breaking up shortly afterwards. The band featured guitar legend and singer Steve Hillage, who later went on to success with Gong as well as having an illustrious solo career following the release of his first album "Fish Rising" in 1975. On keyboards was Dave Stewart (not to be confused with guitarist Dave Stewart of the Eurythmics), a distinguished keyboard player who was a member of the Jazz-Rock bands, Egg, Hatfield and the North, National Health, and Bruford, at various times during his long career. He also played together with Steve Hillage on the Arzachel (Uriel) album in 1969. Dave Stewart later worked with Barbara Gaskin (formerly a member of Prog-Folk band Spirogyra) and they teamed up to achieve single success in 1981 with "It's My Party {And I'll Cry If I Want To). The bass player on Khan's "Space Shanty" album was Nick Greenwood, a member of The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, and on drums was Pip Pyle, a talented drummer who went on to be a member of the Canterbury Scene bands, Gong, Hatfield and the North and National Health. The "Space Shanty" album contains six long epic pieces of diverse music of between 5 and 10 minutes duration, consisting primarily of a heavy prog, hard-rocking sound, interspersed with some quirky Jazz-Rock passages and quieter melodic moments, Khan sound like a heavier version of Caravan in places, and all the better for it too. "Space Shanty" is a very gratifying album to listen to as a whole and warrants repeated listening to truly appreciate the musical delights on offer here. The 2005 CD reissue of the album contained two bonus tracks.

"Space Shanty" opens in spectacular style with the title track, a song of awe-inspiring power and versatility, demonstrating the musical prowess of the four talented musicians to the fullest extent. This is Prog-Rock at its absolute best: heavy and loud and proud and displaying breath-taking musical virtuosity, guaranteed to leave the listener enthralled and astounded at the same time. Next is "Stranded", a beautifully melodic song which warms the heart with its lush harmonics and emotionally charged vocals. The song features an intricate, instrumental Jazz-Rock break to delight and entertain the listener. This memorable song represents another perfect demonstration of the musical virtuosity of these four amazingly talented musicians. Song No, 3 "Mixed Up Man of the Mountains" continues the album in similar epic and dramatic style, with a powerful Hard Rock sound combining well together with some complex Jazz-Rock sequences. Side Two opens with the longest song on the album "Driving To Amsterdam", a 9-minute-long song which displays its Canterbury Scene credentials to the fullest extent, with a heavy "Caravan-esque" Jazz-Rock sound and featuring some masterly guitar riffs and keyboard virtuosity from the combined talents of Steve Hillage and Dave Stewart. The penultimate song "Stargazers" is another heavy Jazz-Rock number with some interesting changes of time signature and dramatic changes of pace. "Hollow Stone" brings this memorable album to a suitably impressive close with emotionally wrought vocals and a spectacularly heavy and powerful sound, very reminiscent of some of Uriah Heep's epic songs.

The "Space Shanty" album is a classic which has stood the test of time, and still sounds as fresh and original today as it did at the time of its release way back in 1972. Thanks to ProgArchives and YouTube, this album is now receiving the acclaim and recognition it truly deserves. "Space Shanty" will delight and astound Progressive Rock lovers everywhere with its awesome power and virtuosity. It's an absolutely essential album for any discerning collector of classic early 1970's Prog-Rock.



Posted By: zwordser
Date Posted: April 22 2023 at 15:51
Well, been appreciating Canterbury for many years now (largely due to finding info about it on this site!). Been loving listening to a lot of Zopp recently. 

But with a lot of talk about Steve Hillage here, I suppose I should do a shout-out for this album-- I found the CD quite by chance and had it for several months before listening on a car trip.  Didn't expect so much greatness, and I was blown away!




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Z


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 22 2023 at 16:59
^ Steve Hillage has sometimes been referred to as "the hippie from outer space", which reminded me of the Space Hippies in Star Trek, although they're light years away from the Canterbury Scene. Smile



Posted By: jamesbaldwin
Date Posted: April 22 2023 at 19:02
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

^ Steve Hillage has sometimes been referred to as "the hippie from outer space", which reminded me of the Space Hippies in Star Trek, although they're light years away from the Canterbury Scene. Smile


Wonderful!!!


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"Happiness is real only when shared"


Posted By: Nogbad_The_Bad
Date Posted: April 22 2023 at 20:22
Space Shanty is a stone cold classic

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Ian

Host of the Post-Avant Jazzcore Happy Hour on Progrock.com

https://podcasts.progrock.com/post-avant-jazzcore-happy-hour/


Posted By: Mellotron Storm
Date Posted: April 22 2023 at 22:14
Originally posted by Nogbad_The_Bad Nogbad_The_Bad wrote:

Space Shanty is a stone cold classic

Agreed! Just listened to it along with...
Steve Hillage- Fish Rising
National Health- Of Queues And Cures
Moving Gelatine Plates- s/t
National health- Playtime
My last five Canterbuy listens.

That Playtime cd is still available through Wayside and I'd be picking it up if any of you haven't yet. It's a live record of the NATIONAL HEALTH lineup that played live the most. Gowen, Greaves, Miller and Pyle with guitarist Alain Eckert guesting on three tracks. I love this one! It's more jazzy perhaps but just a pleasure. I can't help but think that when this goes out of print it's gone.


-------------
"The wind is slowly tearing her apart"

"Sad Rain" ANEKDOTEN


Posted By: Mellotron Storm
Date Posted: April 22 2023 at 22:17
I also spun INVISIBLE OPERA COMPANY OF TIBETs UFO Planante which has a canterbury flavour to it and they cover Moon In June to perfection. A Brazilian band with GONG and VIOLETA DI OUTONO connections.

-------------
"The wind is slowly tearing her apart"

"Sad Rain" ANEKDOTEN


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: April 23 2023 at 05:08
   A-Z of Canterbury Scene Music from Around the World 

 3 stars 1971: Daevid Allen - Banana Moon -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kdjWQxGRIYr-7tPLKpl9p9bcuavfjCYJg" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kdjWQxGRIYr-7tPLKpl9p9bcuavfjCYJg
 3 stars 1976: Daevid Allen & Euterpe - Good Morning! -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGPRENFJQmJyErt1Uzukp1oh1kiyynGv5" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGPRENFJQmJyErt1Uzukp1oh1kiyynGv5
 4 stars 1977: Daevid Allen - Now is the Happiest Time of Your Life -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mfzHH9Ab83_eJFHQc_jqWNiIOj33nJZuQ" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mfzHH9Ab83_eJFHQc_jqWNiIOj33nJZuQ
 2 stars 1979: Daevid Allen - N-existe pas! -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZOYOaFziLn_llooCsiHUK-8cYc5VrtyN" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZOYOaFziLn_llooCsiHUK-8cYc5VrtyN
 1 stars 1982: Daevid Allen - Divided Alien Playbax 80 -  https:///www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_ly9kvfq-dUILzIE3_tn8ncp7FR6wbzFs4" rel="nofollow - http:///www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_ly9kvfq-dUILzIE3_tn8ncp7FR6wbzFs4
 2 stars 1990: Daevid Allen - Ja-Am: Seven Drones -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQZ0SruqsqU" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQZ0SruqsqU
 2 stars 1990: Daevid Allen, Gilli Smyth & Harry Williamson - Stroking the Tail of the Bird -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYjWO-XY5eg" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYjWO-XY5eg
 3 stars 1990: Daevid Allen - Australia Aquaria -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nTH9ZjwBZHaPcIBgovxDu7Cl05rsiaKfE" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nTH9ZjwBZHaPcIBgovxDu7Cl05rsiaKfE
 3 stars 1992: Daevid Allen & Kramer - Who's Afraid? -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kxwjEvtPUM" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kxwjEvtPUM
 3 stars 1993: Daevid Allen - Twelve Selves -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nYmsplk_UG-8C3OR4n73lR91LwS7bl3_M" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nYmsplk_UG-8C3OR4n73lR91LwS7bl3_M
 3 stars 1995: Daevid Allen - Dreamin' a Dream -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqEJOj3Curg" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqEJOj3Curg
 3 stars 1995: Daevid Allen & Kramer - Hit Men -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k77cMZjWrgKJ24FPtPgK55TEFTJTmRf84" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k77cMZjWrgKJ24FPtPgK55TEFTJTmRf84

 4 stars 2010: Amoeba Split - Dance of the Goodbyes -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nwtYq2apl-nXQbvMh-UuxHs9WJ9UQIozA" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nwtYq2apl-nXQbvMh-UuxHs9WJ9UQIozA
 3 stars 2016: Amoeba Split - Second Split -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_l1JvGcXxZ77o_ak9gUhUSptB3aDCIqzkk" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_l1JvGcXxZ77o_ak9gUhUSptB3aDCIqzkk
                  
 3 stars 2003: Antique Seeking Nuns - Mild Profundities -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_l3OfKs7rWgV-A6MEhT5mNBwNagt4N9gW8" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_l3OfKs7rWgV-A6MEhT5mNBwNagt4N9gW8
 3 stars 2006: Antique Seeking Nuns - Double Egg with Chips and Beans -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kxCfH2SHoylf76-r6pUWu8-9gGpc3jc9E" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kxCfH2SHoylf76-r6pUWu8-9gGpc3jc9E
 3 stars 2009: Antique Seeking Nuns - Careful It's Tepid

 5 stars 1969: Arzachel - Arzachel -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRW8bkl33yU" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRW8bkl33yU

 3 stars 1969: Kevin Ayers - Joy of a Toy -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k-qlYZxEK3hoiN3fb-pdGm0TS-KJ8KaLc" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k-qlYZxEK3hoiN3fb-pdGm0TS-KJ8KaLc
 2 stars 1970: Kevin Ayers and the Whole World - Shooting at the Moon -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_n9qnG8Kc2xZNuFnd7vb7OXzB05IQh2ljU" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_n9qnG8Kc2xZNuFnd7vb7OXzB05IQh2ljU
 3 stars 1972: Kevin Ayers - Whatever She Brings We Sing -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lI1C8TC3_q4tdBovWYyph6LVdcWNmg1gs" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lI1C8TC3_q4tdBovWYyph6LVdcWNmg1gs
 3 stars 1973: Kevin Ayers - Bananamour -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_noGgeRonwGaY43r2bu5IaQwe50zKDXOh4" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_noGgeRonwGaY43r2bu5IaQwe50zKDXOh4
 3 stars 1974: Kevin Ayers - The Confessions of Dr. Dream and Other Stories -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mDTq8MvTkJasJqx-v8AeaHhKwBiajPu3Q" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mDTq8MvTkJasJqx-v8AeaHhKwBiajPu3Q
 3 stars 1974: Kevin Ayers, John Cale, Eno & Nico - June 1st, 1974 -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lUOfzV14SiysO4L1YXi52o3t-G2N_gKJg" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lUOfzV14SiysO4L1YXi52o3t-G2N_gKJg
 2 stars 1974: Kevin Ayers, Lady June & Brian Eno - Lady June's Linguistic Leprosy -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k6aSpLAxKwUxAfK5FACCudm4cql4niozk" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k6aSpLAxKwUxAfK5FACCudm4cql4niozk
 3 stars 1975: Kevin Ayers - Sweet Deceiver -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nyfh5cA3NjgCSUjqwds0toDLnGP9AChQ4" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_nyfh5cA3NjgCSUjqwds0toDLnGP9AChQ4
 3 stars 1976: Kevin Ayers - Yes We Have No Mananas -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_n_TzzYSVssm-FgNxWUF0UNBNAGDe8Ngr0" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_n_TzzYSVssm-FgNxWUF0UNBNAGDe8Ngr0
 3 stars 1976: Kevin Ayers - Odd Ditties -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4cFJtUcmjZm67wwlY3JhlsdiU-bonHcI" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4cFJtUcmjZm67wwlY3JhlsdiU-bonHcI
 3 stars 1978: Kevin Ayers - Rainbow Takeaway -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lL0i2VIk7q8jbM7__0PZSj5RgDn7QzhYE" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lL0i2VIk7q8jbM7__0PZSj5RgDn7QzhYE
 2 stars 1980: Kevin Ayers - That's What You Get Baby -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lG_GidedTSBMYDbzqfxgI592gYv5PG37c" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lG_GidedTSBMYDbzqfxgI592gYv5PG37c
 2 stars 1983: Kevin Ayers - Diamond Jack and the Queen of Pain 
 2 stars 1984: Kevin Ayers - Deja Vu -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lAmFqn2UIV8qJ06okcD7-QsPhGvwpCa7s" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lAmFqn2UIV8qJ06okcD7-QsPhGvwpCa7s
 2 stars 1986: Kevin Ayers - As Close as You Think -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mrgnr46k6iPkXSvu6TBy2OWKQe2iRc15g" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mrgnr46k6iPkXSvu6TBy2OWKQe2iRc15g
 3 stars 1988: Kevin Ayers - Falling Up 
 2 stars 1992: Kevin Ayers - Still Life with Guitar -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4cFJtUcmjZkhMW_QdSzqCuGaRCGvnXym" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4cFJtUcmjZkhMW_QdSzqCuGaRCGvnXym
 3 stars 2007: Kevin Ayers - The Unfairground -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_neQNTm5cy5LBglpOuP9jmnWLgNtnaVqtc" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_neQNTm5cy5LBglpOuP9jmnWLgNtnaVqtc
 3 stars 2017: Kevin Ayers, Lady June & Ollie Halsall - The Happening Combo -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k8soagIuEPtqXG8a5G3ePHu-VRwYG9vxw" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k8soagIuEPtqXG8a5G3ePHu-VRwYG9vxw                   
                  



Posted By: Jacob Schoolcraft
Date Posted: May 13 2023 at 22:45
This is a list of my Canterbury cds

Caravan- Caravan
If I Could Do It Again
The Land Of Grey And Pink
Waterloo Lily
Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night
New Symphonia
Cunning Stunts
Blind Dog At St. Dunstans

Soft Machine

Third
Fourth
Five
Six
Seven
Bundles

Egg-Egg
The Polite Force
The Civil Surface

Hatfield And The North
The Rotters Club

National Health- National Health
Of Queues And Cures
DC Al Coda
Missing Pieces
Playtime

Gilgamesh - Gilgamesh
Another Fine Tune You've Got Me Into
Arriving Twice

Soft Heap

Robert Wyatt
Rock Bottom
Ruth Is Stranger Than Richard

Gong
Magick Brother
Continental Circus
Camembert Electrique
Flying Teapot
Angels Egg
You
Live Sheffield 74'
Live Est Mort
A Collection
Shapeshifter
Family Jewels
Gong 2000
2032
I See You
Love From Planet Gong ( box set)
Live Longlaville
Greasy Truckers at Dingwalls Dancehall

Matching Mole- Matching Mole
Little Red Record

Michael Giles- Progress ( ex Caravan members)







Posted By: geekfreak
Date Posted: May 13 2023 at 23:32
Originally posted by dr wu23 dr wu23 wrote:

Recommended to Canter bury heads..............



Excellent album

-------------
Friedrich Nietzsche: "Without music, life would be a mistake."



Music Is Live

Two people are better off than one, for they can help each other succeed.



Keep Calm And Listen To The Music…
<


Posted By: Jacob Schoolcraft
Date Posted: May 16 2023 at 04:55
Originally posted by Grumpyprogfan Grumpyprogfan wrote:

Sanguine Hum is classified as Neo-Prog on PA. That should be changed to Canterbury.




Thanks for sharing this! Something about this piece brings memories of Happy The Man or early Kit Watkins


Posted By: Jacob Schoolcraft
Date Posted: May 20 2023 at 11:12
A style of writing which developed because of most Canterbury musicians shifting around to different bands. Dave Sinclair, Mike Ratledge, Dave Stewart and Alan Gowen having similarities in their choice of chord progressions and voicing.

There are many comparisons. The chords for "Carol Ann" from Soft Machine Seven have similarities to chord progressions heard in the music of Caravan, National Health, Gilgamesh, Hatfield and the North, Egg, and Robert Wyatt.

In the 70s it wasn't a style that surfaced in bands like Weather Report, RTF, Miles Davis, or Herbie Hancock. It felt obsolete when I heard it. Some of its essence I felt through the early instrumental albums of Frank Zappa...for example, Grand Wazoo.

Chord progressions producing a dark sound had similarities played by different keyboardists and scattered throughout the music of Hatfield And The North and Gong. The piece "As If" from Soft Machine 5 is very reminiscent of a style heard in the music of Gong. "Shaving Is Boring" from Hatfield And The North actually sounds like the Gong band in 73' and 74'.

The way Dave Stewart was spoken to by a record executive made me ill. It sounds like what everybody else is doing? Really?
Or the Canterbury style was not commercially viable enough because it acquired a taste.. So that gives me the impression that anyone who chooses to think different and write different..they are only doing it out of self interest and nobody could ever have a principle but you huh? Charlie? Whatever your name is? 😃


Posted By: Jacob Schoolcraft
Date Posted: May 20 2023 at 13:39
Michael Giles Progress is a very Canterbury style album featuring ex Caravan members John G. Perry on bass and instrumentalist Geoffrey Richardson. David Scott MacRae who worked with Back Door, Robert Wyatt and Richard Sinclair.John Mealing who worked with Passport and later on Strawbs albums. Ray Warleigh ..saxophonist flutist on Mike Oldfield and Soft Machine recordings. Peter Giles on bass and Catherine Howe "a Kate Bush before her time" sings on 2 tracks.

The album has the spirit of Canterbury sound. The songs are interesting and the playing is outstanding. Michael Giles' vocal style improved on this album. His voice sounds more developed on Progress in comparison to his vocal delivery on "Tomorrow's People "

The album seems to tell a story of a guy who boards a train that takes him to London to do session work. Some songs depict the tale of a musician on a train ride with sightseeing and daydreaming along the way.

To me this album is pure Canterbury and I highly recommend it to hard-core fans of that style.


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: July 22 2023 at 09:57
Originally posted by Jacob Schoolcraft Jacob Schoolcraft wrote:

This is a list of my Canterbury cds

Caravan- Caravan
If I Could Do It Again
The Land Of Grey And Pink
Waterloo Lily
Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night
New Symphonia
Cunning Stunts
Blind Dog At St. Dunstans

Soft Machine

Third
Fourth
Five
Six
Seven
Bundles

Egg-Egg
The Polite Force
The Civil Surface

Hatfield And The North
The Rotters Club

National Health- National Health
Of Queues And Cures
DC Al Coda
Missing Pieces
Playtime

Gilgamesh - Gilgamesh
Another Fine Tune You've Got Me Into
Arriving Twice

Soft Heap

Robert Wyatt
Rock Bottom
Ruth Is Stranger Than Richard

Gong
Magick Brother
Continental Circus
Camembert Electrique
Flying Teapot
Angels Egg
You
Live Sheffield 74'
Live Est Mort
A Collection
Shapeshifter
Family Jewels
Gong 2000
2032
I See You
Love From Planet Gong ( box set)
Live Longlaville
Greasy Truckers at Dingwalls Dancehall

Matching Mole- Matching Mole
Little Red Record

Michael Giles- Progress ( ex Caravan members)

That's an impressive list! I have a lot of catching up to do. Here's my less than impressive list of Canterbury Scene CD's:-

 4 stars 1968: Caravan - Caravan -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LvQAAWpar7ljgL2p-CPuqdG" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LvQAAWpar7ljgL2p-CPuqdG
 4 stars 1970: Caravan - If I Could Do It All Over Again, I'd Do It All Over You -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LtsoUorBySZ8GsEIMLVrI2R" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LtsoUorBySZ8GsEIMLVrI2R
 5 stars 1971: Caravan - In the Land of Pink and Grey -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LuvsF8fnd5IFaqvwNUGPObK" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LuvsF8fnd5IFaqvwNUGPObK
 3 stars 1972: Caravan - Waterloo Lily -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LsOng1dEWl9YfLB9YU3TkUq" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LsOng1dEWl9YfLB9YU3TkUq
 4 stars 1973: Caravan - For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1Lt0FuNvUESL3n07pAc4QxoA" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1Lt0FuNvUESL3n07pAc4QxoA
 4 stars 1974: Caravan - Caravan and the New Symphonia -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LsEzP-B6i809C-GjZxNi_6g" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LsEzP-B6i809C-GjZxNi_6g
 4 stars 1974: Caravan - Live at Fairfield Halls -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1Lv-fS99f25caecobqPW6dS8" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1Lv-fS99f25caecobqPW6dS8
 4 stars 1975: Caravan - Cunning Stunts -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1Ls4dlIIyu6g5CNS_Lt6ZwL" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1Ls4dlIIyu6g5CNS_Lt6ZwL _

 4 stars 1975: Steve Hillage - Fish Rising -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LvwFtG5LIkPAy_Fmsks0Lhh" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LvwFtG5LIkPAy_Fmsks0Lhh
 4 stars 1976: Steve Hillage - L -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LsJndAzM6fEnwKOGwi4TrsH" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LsJndAzM6fEnwKOGwi4TrsH
 3 stars 1977: Steve Hillage - Motivation Radio -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LvI_07tUJxbj0OI-oX1nrwM" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1LvI_07tUJxbj0OI-oX1nrwM
 4 stars 1978: Steve Hillage - Green -  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1Lvo3YXX04HjNszPq4lV" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoIDt_C5y1Lvo3YXX04HjNszPq4lV __-_



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