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octopus-4 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote octopus-4 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 07 2020 at 14:01
Originally posted by Catcher10 Catcher10 wrote:

I'm all over the map.....a plethora of colors
me too tendentially toward the margins of the four boxes. I'm an extremist
Curiosity killed a cat, Schroedinger only half.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jaketejas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 07 2020 at 14:04
This is along the lines of a new classification scheme that I was pondering over, although the one I was contemplating had nodes (using network software), which is perhaps more tree-like. It is interesting how different people have different ways of interpreting and classifying music. I like your idea, though. Some people might interpret "dull" in a negative way (like to mean boring). But, describing sound with words is not always easy. And, with a compass, you want to use words that give opposing senses at the poles. Interesting idea, indeed!

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I prophesy disaster View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote I prophesy disaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 07 2020 at 14:17
Originally posted by BaldJean BaldJean wrote:

it is a common mistake of native English speakers to think you can just leave out the dots above the umlauts "ä", "ö" and "ü", it won't make any difference. the best example is the difference between "ächten" (to ostracize) and "achten" (to respect). other examples for "ä" would be "währen" (to last) and "wahren" (to preserve) or "wägen" (to weigh) and "wagen" (to risk). examples for "ü" and "ö" are the differences between "lügen" (to lie, as in not telling the truth) and "lugen" (looking carefully out of a hiding place) or "spülen" (to rinse, to flush) and "spulen" (to reel) for "ü" or "lösen" (to solve) and "losen" (to draw lots) or "schön" (beautiful) and "schon" (already) for "ö"
 
Even in English, one has words that have identical spelling, but differ in pronunciation and meaning. For example, "lead" pronounced rhyming with "feed" and meaning "to walk, drive, fly, sail, etc. in front of a group of people, vehicles, planes, ships, etc.", or "lead" pronounced rhyming with "fed" and meaning "a soft heavy grey metal used especially in the past for making pipes, covering roofs, and in paint".
 
 
I was thinking about thinking but it really didn't get me very far.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaldFriede Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 07 2020 at 15:57
Originally posted by I prophesy disaster I prophesy disaster wrote:

Originally posted by BaldJean BaldJean wrote:

it is a common mistake of native English speakers to think you can just leave out the dots above the umlauts "ä", "ö" and "ü", it won't make any difference. the best example is the difference between "ächten" (to ostracize) and "achten" (to respect). other examples for "ä" would be "währen" (to last) and "wahren" (to preserve) or "wägen" (to weigh) and "wagen" (to risk). examples for "ü" and "ö" are the differences between "lügen" (to lie, as in not telling the truth) and "lugen" (looking carefully out of a hiding place) or "spülen" (to rinse, to flush) and "spulen" (to reel) for "ü" or "lösen" (to solve) and "losen" (to draw lots) or "schön" (beautiful) and "schon" (already) for "ö"
Even in English, one has words that have identical spelling, but differ in pronunciation and meaning. For example, "lead" pronounced rhyming with "feed" and meaning "to walk, drive, fly, sail, etc. in front of a group of people, vehicles, planes, ships, etc.", or "lead" pronounced rhyming with "fed" and meaning "a soft heavy grey metal used especially in the past for making pipes, covering roofs, and in paint".
 
English much more than German. Just think of the seven ways the letter combination "ough" can be pronounced: "oh" as in "though", "ow" as in "bough", "oo" as in "through", "aw" as in "thought", "ah-ff" as in "cough", "uh-ff" as in "enough" and "uh-pp" as in "hiccough".

When you see a German word it is pretty clear how to pronounce it once you know the rules of German pronunciation, unless it is a loanword from some other language like for example "beige", which is a loanword from French in German as well as in English. But not if you leave out the dots above the umlauts.


Edited by BaldFriede - August 07 2020 at 16:00


BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.
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