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spock84 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Kevin Gilbert
    Posted: May 02 2004 at 19:33
I figured he needed a thread. So.. any of you into his music? If I'm in the mood for some 'light' music he'll be one of the first things I put on. Giraffe, Toy Matinee, Thud, The Shaming of the True etc.

And just one insensitive question.. Was he buried or cremated?
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 03 2004 at 05:11
I only know Kevin Gilbert through Keith Emerson's 'Changing States' album.He produced it,played tuba on it (Abaddon's Bolero) and wrote some entertaining sleevenotes.Sounds like he was a great and talented guy.
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Bjørn Are View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 03 2004 at 06:34

Kevin was a highly entertaining and iextremely ntelligent musican, as proved by his friendship with Keith and his endless fascination for Gentle Giant.

I enjoy Thud thorougly and his GG pastiche very much (available on the tribute CD "Giant Tracks") - see his Suit Canon - Fugue of the A&R Staff  at http://www.blazemonger.com/GT/suit.canon.html.

Shuffle, shuffle. shuffle.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 03 2004 at 09:02
Yeah. That's an interesting track. (also on Shaming of the True)
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lucas View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 03 2004 at 18:48
I am really pleased to see I am not the only one to recognise Kevin was one of the most talented pop-prog artists. He wrote songs that are unforgettable, with NRG, Giraffe, Toy Matinee or in his solo career. His music is pure emotion, and no matter if it is pop or prog, it is always a pleasure to listen to his unique and strong vocals. He is well-known in the pop industry as he produced artists such as Michael Jackson or Sheryl Crow, but he is also featured on almost all the Magna Carta tributes to the prog giants (Genesis, Pink Floyd, Yes...). I know he was a huge fan of these groups, and the song he wrote while in NRG, "Instrumental" is very ELP-influenced. I am a bit confused as I own only mp3s by Kevin, not a single album by him. However all these mp3 are worth listening : "Goodman, badman" with fantastic keyboard parts and interesting vocals, all achieved by Kevin, "Another day", a beautiful love song once again with superb keyboard parts and his typical voice, an acoustic track called "Leaving Las Vegas", another piano/keyboard-oriented track called "Water under the bridge". A pop-oriented song with accents reminiscent of Spock's pop songs : "Until I get her back". A song that features banjo : "Tired old man". Some songs he wrote with NRG : "Simpler times" with a fantastic chorus and great keyboard playing, "Dana Rae" a pop song in the style of "Emotion detector" by Rush. There is a song that features a great bassline : "One bad habit". He also wrote poignant balads : "When strangers part", "The Toy Matinee", "Blank page" and the both magnificent and dark "Song for a dead friend". "In every line" and "Best of everything" are also worth checking out. If you don't know Kevin, at least the songs I listed above, I urge you to discover this talented artist.
"Magma was the very first gothic rock band" (Didier Lockwood)
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 03 2004 at 19:40
Now that you've mentioned the Magna Carta tribute albums, I have to say I prefer Kevin's version of Siberian Khatru over the Yes original. Espcially the piano thing part from 2:51 up to the guitar solo, which is totally different from the original.
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Dan Bobrowski View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 04 2004 at 11:08

Originally posted by spock84 spock84 wrote:

Now that you've mentioned the Magna Carta tribute albums, I have to say I prefer Kevin's version of Siberian Khatru over the Yes original. Espcially the piano thing part from 2:51 up to the guitar solo, which is totally different from the original.

They injected Bruford's "Sahara of Snow" into that section. Incredible. Mike Keneally and Gilbert made that the best track on that tribute. I think it had a bit of "Heart of the Sunrise" in there too. I'll have to listen to that again.

I just picked up "Thud" last night in Fresno. Great CD. The lyrics are wonderful. This one had a single of "Kashmir" with it. Cool. I'll have to search out the others.

NRG (No Reason Given) can be downloaded from this site, it is not on CD, make yer own: http://www.kevingilbert.com/NRG/NRGalbum.html

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 04 2004 at 17:20
Originally posted by danbo danbo wrote:

NRG (No Reason Given) can be downloaded from this site, it is not on CD, make yer own: http://www.kevingilbert.com/NRG/NRGalbum.html

Thanks Danbo.

"Magma was the very first gothic rock band" (Didier Lockwood)
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 04 2004 at 17:25
Wow, some of the NRG is incredible, some of it sounds like 80's style cast-offs. Defintely worth the time and effort to download and burn.
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Dick Heath View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 04 2004 at 19:07
Thanks for the information on Kevin Gilbert, a name and a  person little known here in the UK, apart from being in the small print of the liner notes of some  Shrapnel/Magna Carta tribute albums.  Nobody  has mention that Gilbert was involved in the remastering on the wrongly neglected Touch album - (IMHO) the first  great American progressive rock album, which influenced  Yes and Kansas alike. In passing, why isn't Touch listed here, I have a review ready for such a seminal and (at the time of its original  release) a truly unique album?
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 04 2004 at 19:42

Originally posted by Dick Heath Dick Heath wrote:

Thanks for the information on Kevin Gilbert, a name and a  person little known here in the UK, apart from being in the small print of the liner notes of some  Shrapnel/Magna Carta tribute albums.  Nobody  has mention that Gilbert was involved in the remastering on the wrongly neglected Touch album - (IMHO) the first  great American progressive rock album, which influenced  Yes and Kansas alike. In passing, why isn't Touch listed here, I have a review ready for such a seminal and (at the time of its original  release) a truly unique album?

Short answer Dick?

(No offence now!) Ermm This site is run by humans who haven't yet heard every prog album ever made (or all those you and I consider prog), and who have other demands on their time as well. Sometimes it takes a while -- sometimes they make a judgement (their site = their right), and it never happens. Be patient, & don't get yer skimpies in a twist if Max & Ron decide "uh uh."Stern Smile

'Sokay? 'Sokay!Smile



Edited by Peter Rideout
"And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'
He chortled in his joy.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 04 2004 at 19:52
 Skiing One slick Canuck, eh?





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Peter View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 04 2004 at 19:58
 ^ Ha! It is to laugh!
"And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'
He chortled in his joy.
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Dick Heath View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 05 2004 at 08:52

Quote:

Short answer Dick?

(No offence now!) Ermm This site is run by humans who haven't yet heard every prog album ever made (or all those you and I consider prog), and who have other demands on their time as well. Sometimes it takes a while -- sometimes they make a judgement (their site = their right), and it never happens. Be patient, & don't get yer skimpies in a twist if Max & Ron decide "uh uh."Stern Smile

'Sokay? 'Sokay!Smile

 

 

Peter I appreciate this and admire the efforts. But in the case of Touch attack by persistent attrition might pay off. If you read my editorial on the Ghostlands website, you'll discover how strongly I feel about the Touch album and its relevance in the development of early prog. I'm amazed at its neglect and therefore why people are unaware of it. Since writing that editorial some years ago I've had 20 to 25 people write (all but one in the US), thanking me for reminding them of this gem they heard 1969 and asking how to find a copy (check Wild Places Records). More should know of it

I believe there are gems and in some cases, masterpieces, in prog which have been long forgotten by all but a few.  There is as much to learn by digging back into the archives, than waiting for the latest release by a nu.progressive or neo prog band. Touch and perhaps T2 are forgotten because they had little promotion by their record labels at the time of their release, selling at best a few thousand copies. Touch eponymous album (as an import LP in London) in particular would have been played in all the right clubs and  had some influence on future prog bands  - indeed Jon Anderson says as much in the CD reissue's liner notes.

 

So this website with the potential to be the most comprehensive around, has to be as completist as possible - but no one person knows every prog band that has been around. So at the risk of including bands/artists who only a small fraction of the prog fraternity would accept as prog (but that could be debated out in reviews), cast the net wide. Glad to see RTF is now included - Weather Report next.....?

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