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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 08 2015 at 08:29
one of my favourite hammond organ groups
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 08 2015 at 09:20
Book Nook:

Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Psychedelic Rock
By Jim DeRatogis
 
Turn On Your Mind may or may not be the definitive book about Psychedelic Rock, but it is the most exhaustive.
 
DeRatogas charts Psychedelic Rock's rise from proto psych band like The Seeds on to major Psych bands of the sixties through the Psych revival of the eighties before concluding with the formation and success of The Flaming Lips in the nineties and into the 21st century.
 
DeRatogis covers every Psych band or individual artist from Donovan through to Hawkwind, Parliament Funkadelic, Neu!, Frank Zappa, The Teardrop Explodes, Spacemen 3, XTC and Faust!
 
There's even an entertaining early chapter where DeRatogis details this book's first publication and the ensuing furor he caused by questioning if the music produced by The Grateful Dead was truly psychedelic and the backlash he received from devoted "Dead heads".
 
The major criticism that I've read leveled against this work is DeRatogis' need to indentify every song or artist with even a minor or passing interest in Psych like the nineties Beatles inspired pastiche  Raspberry Beret by Prince.
 
This book does have a few glaring omissions such as not a single word about H.P. Lovecraft, although post punker P.H. Harvey does get afforded a few lines.
 
Turn On Your Mind is an entertaining as well as an informative read that includes interviews with such Prog and Psych luminaries such as Peter Gabriel, Andy Partridge and The Flaming Lips' Wanye Coyne. 
 
 
 
 


Edited by SteveG - January 08 2015 at 15:09
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 08 2015 at 09:38
Tears For Fears
 
 
 The Seeds Of Love 1989
 
I don't recall if DeRatogis mentioned (Sowing) The Seeds Of Love's Beatles inspired title track in his book Turn On Your Mind, there's even a brief blast of Penny Lane piccolo trumpet on the track!, so I will.
 
The rest of the album follows TFF's great pop inflected New Wave that started with their first album The Hurting.
 
There always seemed to be some subliminal Psych or American sixties influence under some of the band's songs such as the hit Everybody Wants To Rule The World, which always reminded me a bit of late sixties era songs from The Rascals.
 
Rascals or not, TFF produced some stellar pop music in a dismal decade. 


Edited by SteveG - January 08 2015 at 10:22
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 09 2015 at 08:13
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Book Nook:

Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Psychedelic Rock
By Jim DeRatogis
 
Turn On Your Mind may or may not be the definitive book about Psychedelic Rock, but it is the most exhaustive.
 
DeRatogas charts Psychedelic Rock's rise from proto psych band like The Seeds on to major Psych bands of the sixties through the Psych revival of the eighties before concluding with the formation and success of The Flaming Lips in the nineties and into the 21st century.
 
DeRatogis covers every Psych band or individual artist from Donovan through to Hawkwind, Parliament Funkadelic, Neu!, Frank Zappa, The Teardrop Explodes, Spacemen 3, XTC and Faust!
 
There's even an entertaining early chapter where DeRatogis details this book's first publication and the ensuing furor he caused by questioning if the music produced by The Grateful Dead was truly psychedelic and the backlash he received from devoted "Dead heads".
 
The major criticism that I've read leveled against this work is DeRatogis' need to indentify every song or artist with even a minor or passing interest in Psych like the nineties Beatles inspired pastiche  Raspberry Beret by Prince.
 
This book does have a few glaring omissions such as not a single word about H.P. Lovecraft, although post punker P.H. Harvey does get afforded a few lines.
 
Turn On Your Mind is an entertaining as well as an informative read that includes interviews with such Prog and Psych luminaries such as Peter Gabriel, Andy Partridge and The Flaming Lips' Wanye Coyne. 
 
 
 
 
 
Decent book....read it a few years ago. A good read for anyone who wants to dig into the origins and meat of the whole thing.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 09 2015 at 08:22
Regarding The Moody Blues.....I really liked In Search of..., On The Threshold...., and To Our Children...., all 3 are very good psych/pop/prog imho. Spent many a day and night listening to them in the late 60's early 70's.
Not as dark or 'heavy' as some other bands but still very enjoyable.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 09 2015 at 14:32
^Yes, I've giving the Moody's second listen lately. The first and fourth albums still hold up for me.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 09 2015 at 14:59
The United States of America 1968
 
One of the most idiosyncratic but accessible experimental/electronic/psychedelic albums ever made. The United States of America's self titled first and only album was the brain child of electronics wiz Joseph Byrd.
 
Byrd basically built a crude homemade 'synthesizer' with an oscillator, a ring modulator and a voltage control filter, which could be found in every early synth of the era. Using these components separately or in tandem, the group were able to create sounds or alter audio signals, including vocals as well as music, to great effect. However, building one from scratch is one thing, 'programing' it to produce a myriad of sounds was quite another as the components had to be rewired or reconfigured constantly.
 
Joined by an electric violin player that used an early version of an Octavia like devise to raise and drop his instrument one octave, a drummer, a fretless bassist and the Grace Slick sounding vocals of singer Dorothy Moskowitz, TUSoA produced an eclectic array of songs that mimicked acid rock or space rock, along with pyschedelia and electronica, mixed with cultural social commentary that produced music that was both of it's time and of the future.
 
The group broke up due to ego clashes and, what seems the bane of 60's psych groups, drug arrests.
 
Dated at times? Yes, but still worth a listen. And a re-listen.
 


Edited by SteveG - January 15 2015 at 12:38
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 09 2015 at 15:56
^ I always come back to that one for "The American Metaphysical Circus". A very strange, experimental, dark, and yet gripping track. Moskowitz's oscillated vocals can get stuck in my head for a long time after a listen.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 10 2015 at 11:03
Sigur Ros
Agaetis Byrjun 1999
 
Probably the closest that you can get to a psychedelic band from Iceland, Sigur Ros dispensed with the more pop overtures from their previous debut album when creating it's follow up, 1999's experimentally frozen ambient Agaetis Byrjun. Meditative at times and always shifting along in order to take your mind on a journey courtesy of the beautiful soundscapes capped off at times with swirling guitars. The band secured their own odd factor with disembodied vocals, in a made up language no less, that surface from to time throughout the album.
 
Definitely an album to relax to and float down stream.
 
 


Edited by SteveG - January 10 2015 at 12:42
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 10 2015 at 12:08
 
Tomorrow featuring Keith West, Steve Howe, "Twink" and John Wood.
 
I try write about early Psych bands whose music has had either overt or subtle influences on later prog.
 
This 1967 psychedelic band, featuring future Yes guitar icon Steve Howe, unfortunately does not fall into either category.
 
Releasing only two singles before Howe want looking for greener pastures, the first single "My White Bicycle" featured almost all of the prominent period pyschelelic sound tricks, along with faux Beatles styled backing vocals, and actually charted in the U.K.
 
And that's probably all you'll need to really know about Tomorrow.


Edited by SteveG - January 11 2015 at 13:38
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 11 2015 at 12:57
They're back:
The Cry Of Love
Jimi Hendrix: The Cry of Love
 
There has been a lot of criticized leveled against the Hendrix estate (for being greedy, in particular.)
 
I have never held that view as they made Hendrix's most mediocre posthumous reissues such as Crash Landing and Loose Ends. released in 1975 and 1974 respectively, as well 1986's Jonny B. Goode and Band of Gypsys II disappear from the market.
 
Like everyone else, I was confused and annoyed that The Cry of Love and  Rainbow Bridge, released in 1971, were discontinued and replaced by the semi compilation The First Rays of the New Rising Sun in 1997.
 
My guess is that The Cry of Love and Rainbow Bridge were reissued as stand alone albums due to the current surge in vinyl appreciation.
 
I guess we'll never know what precipitated the weird choices made by the Hendrix estate regarding these two albums, but at least they put the situation right last year with their reissues.
 
However, I doubt that will make fans that bought The First Rays of the New Rising Sun feel better.
 
Btw, where' the reissue of 1972's War Heroes?


Edited by SteveG - January 11 2015 at 13:11
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2015 at 08:44
Pond
Hobo Rocket 2013
 
An offshoot of psych pop Aussie band Tame Impala, this album from 2013 dumps Tame Impala's Beatles inspired psych pop in favor of more harder edged psych rock with an acid/Zeppelin tinges at times and even come close to a psychedelic Sabbath hybrid on the song What happened To The Million Men Collide.
Pond also have a couple of psych pop songs to bring back down to earth gently like the infectious title track.
 
A Tame Impala for your older brother, if you will. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 12 2015 at 09:31
Post Cards from Yoshimi:
Ego Tripping At The Gates of Hell
Ego tripping at the Gates of Hell EP 2003
 
After hitting on their magic formula of mixing prog pop and alt rock to produce 1999's wonderful The Soft Bulletin, The Flaming Lips created the fantastic follow up Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots in 2002.
Critically acclaimed and extremely popular, the album made The Flaming Lips into real music stars.
 
As demand for live appearances accelerated globally, the overwhelmed Lips found time to release two EPs in 2003. The first, Ego Tripping at the Gates of Hell basically picked up where The Lips  left off with three tracks that sound like outtakes that never made it onto Yoshimi. Assassination of the Sun, I'm a Flying Sunbeam and Sunship Balloons are all linked together and are cheerfully atmospheric as The Lips continue to sing of those evil machines.
 
The first remix of several Y Yoshimi tracks soon surfaces as Do You Realize gets an organic sounding dance mix that does nothing to improve this gorgeous song. Two remix/remakes of Ego Tripping At The Gates of Hell follow that again do no more than show how spectacular the original is, but they are interesting. 
 
The second 2003 EP released by The Lips, Fight Test, is a bit more interesting as it showcases The Lips performing live in radio studio studios and at a university campus. the album starts off with the familiar song Fight Test unaltered from the Yoshimi album but is quickly followed by the interesting live covers of non Lips tunes like the 60's hit Can't Get you Out of My Head (no it's not a cover of the ELO song) and a cover Beck Hanson's The Golden age. The Golden Age reveals Wayne Coyne's vocals devoid of auto tune and filtering found on studio releases as his naked voice is much closer to Neil Young's and has a deeper timbre and is more folky than his 'studio voice'. An excellent cover of Radiohead's Knives Out follows and The Lips channel the song's minor key melancholia perfectly. What's interesting about these covers is there more stripped down sound that shows off Steven Drozd's love of the Mellotron and that he is quite skilled on piano as well as synths and sequencers.
 
Another remix of Do You Realize? follows. this time the song has more of an European electronic dance club mix which again does little to improve on the original.
 
The EP closes with a faux cowboy song (The Lips hail from Oklahoma after all) titled Thank You Jack White for the Fiber Optic Jesus that You Gave Me! Far out.
 
If you think  that Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots was a 5 star masterpiece (like yours truly) than these two EPs will add the Yoshimi sound experience.
 


Edited by SteveG - January 12 2015 at 09:34
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2015 at 09:55
Book Nook:
Captian Beefheart by Mike Barnes
 
Reissued after Van Vliet's death in 2010, this incredibly detailed bio of the good Captain is an entertaining and enjoyable read. it covers details of every album produced by this avant garde genius including his peak Trout Mask Replica years from 1969-1972, With incisive interviews from luminaries like Frank Zappa (who is quite candid about Van Vliet), Van Vliet's 'stickly' persona, and the details of his self imposed exile from the music word (or just the world).
 
Always rejecting any claims to his music being 'purposely' psychedelic, not with standing, Caption Beefheart  is a worthy addition to the Psych lounge as this is an enjoyable read for even the most casual of Beefheart's fans. 


Edited by SteveG - January 13 2015 at 10:03
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2015 at 12:11
I remember Beefheart being somewhat more accepting of the label "psychedelic" than Zappa, though. At least the Captain actually used hallucinogenic drugs regularly, which Zappa avoided out of concerns that they might impair his technical skills as a composer and performer.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2015 at 13:24
I remember the L.A. psychedelic period that was happening along Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood. My friends and I were just youngsters but we would cruise Sunset Strip on the weekend looking at the "hippies".
Of course you had to visit some of the many "head shops" and pick up some incense and a couple of posters.
Unfortunately we were too young to go into the clubs and hear any of the psych bands that were popular at the time.
One song that always comes to mind (probably because of the name) was Incense and Peppermint by The Strawberry Alarm Clock.
I read The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test in the early seventies and recall a very young Jerry Garcia constantly hanging around and bugging The Merry Pranksters. They finally let him and his buddies go onstage during the Acid Tests and they encouraged the band to play strange and bizarre sounding music while the audience was tripping on acid.
This was pre Grateful Dead.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2015 at 14:23
Originally posted by Toaster Mantis Toaster Mantis wrote:

I remember Beefheart being somewhat more accepting of the label "psychedelic" than Zappa, though. At least the Captain actually used hallucinogenic drugs regularly, which Zappa avoided out of concerns that they might impair his technical skills as a composer and performer.
I think Beefheart flip-flopped on the psychedelic issue when he was around Zappa, so it's hard to definitively say how he felt on the issue. This book suggests that that was his feelings were negative about it prior to recording Trout Mask Replica, but says little else on the psychedleic issue after that album was released.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2015 at 14:50
Rock Docs:
 
Youre Gonna Miss Me : A Film About Roky Erickson
You're Gonna Miss Me: A film about Roky Erickson (Palm Pictures DVD)
Not really a biography, the film does touch on Roky's early career with the Elevators and what lead him to be institutionalized in  a Texas mental hospital. And what events took place after his release, and the effort's of Roky's younger brother to rescue Roky from 'the care' of his mother, who did not believe in psychiatric treatment and let Roky's mental condition spiral out of control.
The film starts off with the usual testimonials to Roky by Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top, Patty Smith, Gibby Haynes of the Butthole Surfers and Thurston Moore Of Sonic Youth, before you're placed into the Texas court where Roky's custody trail is underway.
 
Backtracking into the Roky's lost years when he turned on every TV set, radio, programmed Casio keyboard, and every other devise that could make noise, so the ensuing cacophony of sound would block out the voices in Roky's head. This shown to full effect on camera and is disturbing.
 
Also shown are Roky's videotaped poetry readings, taken by his mother and later bootlegged, which clearly show why Roky was considered an icon by Goth rockers and their offshoots, as Roky's disturbing portrayals of the hypocrisy of the 1950's American nuclear family is viscerally revealed and, again, is extremely disturbing.
 
But you immediately feel that this was a cathartic experience for this gentle but tormented soul.
 
What is also amazing as how Erickson was still able to write incredible songs, again videotaped by his mother, in the most emaciated of physical and mental conditions.
 
Included is an interview with Roky's mother explaining why she helped Roky to 'legally' declare himself an alien being that is not from this planet! 
 
Also shown is the extraordinary lengths that his brother Sumner Erickson went to, both emotionally and financially, to help Roky.
 
The movie is a dark glimpse into Eicikson's life that does come out right in the end, and casts light on why the man is so revered by  early San Francisco Psych rockers, Punk rockers, Gothic rockers, Noise rockers and way more than I need to list.
 
Highly recommended for fans of Erickson and his multi generational devotees.
 
 


Edited by SteveG - January 14 2015 at 16:09
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2015 at 15:46
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Book Nook:
Captian Beefheart by Mike Barnes
 
Reissued after Van Vliet's death in 2010, this incredibly detailed bio of the good Captain is an entertaining and enjoyable read. it covers details of every album produced by this avant garde genius including his peak Trout Mask Replica years from 1969-1972, With incisive interviews from luminaries like Frank Zappa (who is quite candid about Van Vliet), Van Vliet's 'stickly' persona, and the details of his self imposed exile from the music word (or just the world).
 
Always rejecting any claims to his music being 'purposely' psychedelic, not with standing, Caption Beefheart  is a worthy addition to the Psych lounge as this is an enjoyable read for even the most casual of Beefheart's fans. 
 
Thanks for the heads up on this book....my friend Bill is a huge Beefheart fan.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 15 2015 at 13:05
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by Toaster Mantis Toaster Mantis wrote:

I remember Beefheart being somewhat more accepting of the label "psychedelic" than Zappa, though. At least the Captain actually used hallucinogenic drugs regularly, which Zappa avoided out of concerns that they might impair his technical skills as a composer and performer.
I think Beefheart flip-flopped on the psychedelic issue when he was around Zappa, so it's hard to definitively say how he felt on the issue. This book suggests that that was his feelings were negative about it prior to recording Trout Mask Replica, but says little else on the psychedleic issue after that album was released.
After taking a second look at the book, it was Beefheart's anger by the album Strictly Personal being over saturated with psychedelic effects at the mixing stage, along with influence from his new producer Mr. Zappa, that seems to have provoked his statements to that effect at that very time.
To me, he's as spacey as a satellite. 


Edited by SteveG - January 15 2015 at 14:28
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