Forum Home Forum Home > Progressive Music Lounges > Prog Bands, Artists and Genres Appreciation
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Canterbury Scene Music
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Canterbury Scene Music

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 23456 14>
Author
Message
 Rating: Topic Rating: 1 Votes, Average 5.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Rednight View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: January 18 2014
Location: Mar Vista, CA
Status: Offline
Points: 4807
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Rednight Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2020 at 15:58
Originally posted by Guldbamsen Guldbamsen wrote:

Originally posted by Rednight Rednight wrote:

Anyone want to recommend the go-to album by Kevin Ayers (RIP)?

I think his first 5 albums are worth owning but singling one out rather depends on your tastes. The obvious is Joy Of A Toy which I love..but my two faves of his are actually Whatevershebringswesing and The Confessions Of Dr. Dream & Other Stories.
Thank you, Guldbamsen.
"It just has none of the qualities of your work that I find interesting. Abandon [?] it." - Eno
Back to Top
siLLy puPPy View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
PSIKE, JRF/Canterbury, P Metal, Eclectic

Joined: October 05 2013
Location: SFcaUsA
Status: Offline
Points: 14717
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote siLLy puPPy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2020 at 16:01
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.

You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend Ģ10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile



If you've only listened to it twice, what makes you think you could possibly write a review about it? It literally took me about five years for it to sink in and I'm an eclectic avid music consumer as well as a musician. Youre attempting to critique something above your comprehension and in the process offer no insight into the music itself. I personally don't review albums until I understand them on a deeper level
At least three-quarters of the albums I've reviewed I only listened to a couple of times, so why should Hatfield & the North be any different? I don't have time to wait five years to understand an album on a deeper level before I review every album. Smile


Then why should anybody take anything  you say seriously? I don't take 5  years to focus on most albums but that one i did. Just sayin, if  you REALLY want to find the cream of the crop of the Canterbury Scene, you really have to crack the tough nut of Rotter's Club. It's the whole scene on steroids :)

https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy
Back to Top
BrufordFreak View Drop Down
Collaborator
Collaborator
Avatar
Honorary Collaborator

Joined: January 25 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Status: Offline
Points: 7954
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote BrufordFreak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2020 at 17:32
I've been trying to argue for several years that it shouldn't be called the Canterbury "scene" but a "style"--especially as there are so many bands internationally who have been inspired by the silly, experimental, psychedelic jazz of The Softs, Egg, Caravan, and Gong.
Holland - Supersister
Belgium - Cos
Germany - Zyma
France - Moving Gelatine Plates, Patrick Forgas, Setna, Alco Frisbass
Spain - Amoeba Split
Italy - Picchio dal Pozzo, Homunculus Res, Moogg, The Winstons
Brazil - Violeta de Outono
Japan - Mr. Sirius
USA -  The Muffins, Manna/Mirage, Inner Ear Brigade, Ampledeed

Plus, as Robert Wyatt says in the above quoted interview, there was no loyalty or pride associated with Canterbury among musicians who happened to pass through their during their lives, it's more of a critical nostalgia coming from literary romantics that has created this category (and the same nostalgia that tries to keep it a "private club" with a "closed door policy"--to which Robert, I'm sure, would strongly disagree).

P.S. Excellent link, David, with that Needlepoint song: they do, indeed, exude many of the sounds and traits of the psychedelic-Beatnick jazz or "Canterbury" style of music that many of us have come to know and love. 


Edited by BrufordFreak - January 22 2020 at 17:32
Drew Fisher
https://progisaliveandwell.blogspot.com/
Back to Top
siLLy puPPy View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
PSIKE, JRF/Canterbury, P Metal, Eclectic

Joined: October 05 2013
Location: SFcaUsA
Status: Offline
Points: 14717
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote siLLy puPPy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2020 at 17:57
^ true dat. Don't forget the new Japanese band De Lorians and Spain's Amoeba Split.

According to the article on wikipedia it is also referred to as the Canterbury Sound


https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy
Back to Top
Mortte View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member


Joined: November 11 2016
Location: Finland
Status: Offline
Points: 5538
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Mortte Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2020 at 22:10
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.

You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend Ģ10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile



If you've only listened to it twice, what makes you think you could possibly write a review about it? It literally took me about five years for it to sink in and I'm an eclectic avid music consumer as well as a musician. Youre attempting to critique something above your comprehension and in the process offer no insight into the music itself. I personally don't review albums until I understand them on a deeper level
At least three-quarters of the albums I've reviewed I only listened to a couple of times, so why should Hatfield & the North be any different? I don't have time to wait five years to understand an album on a deeper level before I review every album. Smile


Then why should anybody take anything  you say seriously? I don't take 5  years to focus on most albums but that one i did. Just sayin, if  you REALLY want to find the cream of the crop of the Canterbury Scene, you really have to crack the tough nut of Rotter's Club. It's the whole scene on steroids :)
I fully agree with Paul about Hatfield. I havenīt also listened it hundreds of times, but I have listened music so long that I know it will never become into group of my favourites from Canterbury albums. 
Back to Top
Psychedelic Paul View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 16 2019
Location: Nottingham, U.K
Status: Offline
Points: 34711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2020 at 22:28
Originally posted by Mortte Mortte wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


I've reviewed five Canterbury Scene albums so far:-
 
KHAN - Space Shanty 5 stars
STEVE HILLAGE - Fish Rising 4 stars
NATIONAL HEALTH - National Health 4 stars
QUIET SUN - Mainstream 3 stars
HATFIELD & THE NORTH - The Rotters' Club 3 stars
 


If you only gave Rotter's Club 3 stars then you clearly don't understand the Canterbury Scene. That album is pretty much the pinnacle of the entire sound that evolved out of the Soft Machine / Caravan / Egg paradigm.

Many albums lumped into the genre like Steve Hillage and Gong are really more psychedelic space rock. Canterbury Scene is a unique brand of jazz-rock with prog tendencies. Hatfield & The North's albums are THE quintessential examples of this sound. Keep listening. It hasn't revealed its secrets yet or you're not listening close enough.

You're right. That's pretty much what I said at the end of my review. The music of Hatfield & the North is too complex for me to fully understand or truly appreciate, so I couldn't honestly give it a higher rating than three stars. I know most PA members gave The Rotter's Club a four or five star rating, but my rating and review is just my own personal point of view. Yes, it IS a good album, but I only give four or five star ratings  to albums that I'd actually want to go out and buy and spend Ģ10 on, but I can't say that about Hatfield & the North, but then again, I've only listened to The Rotters' Club album twice, so maybe it's an album that requires several listens to really get into it.
 
I do like Steve Hillage's first four albums though, despite not being a big fan of his band, Gong. Smile



If you've only listened to it twice, what makes you think you could possibly write a review about it? It literally took me about five years for it to sink in and I'm an eclectic avid music consumer as well as a musician. Youre attempting to critique something above your comprehension and in the process offer no insight into the music itself. I personally don't review albums until I understand them on a deeper level
At least three-quarters of the albums I've reviewed I only listened to a couple of times, so why should Hatfield & the North be any different? I don't have time to wait five years to understand an album on a deeper level before I review every album. Smile


Then why should anybody take anything  you say seriously? I don't take 5  years to focus on most albums but that one i did. Just sayin, if  you REALLY want to find the cream of the crop of the Canterbury Scene, you really have to crack the tough nut of Rotter's Club. It's the whole scene on steroids :)
I fully agree with Paul about Hatfield. I havenīt also listened it hundreds of times, but I have listened music so long that I know it will never become into group of my favourites from Canterbury albums. 
Thanks for your support. I guessed it might cause controversy when I only gave The Rotters' Club album a three star rating when most other PA members gave the album a four or five star rating. I don't feel inclined to listen to the album repeatedly over the course of five years though to see if it's going to change my opinion. A three-star rating still means it's a good album from my point of view, but it's just not an album I'd want to go out and spend money on when there are literally thousands of other albums I'd rather buy instead. Smile
Back to Top
siLLy puPPy View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
PSIKE, JRF/Canterbury, P Metal, Eclectic

Joined: October 05 2013
Location: SFcaUsA
Status: Offline
Points: 14717
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote siLLy puPPy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2020 at 23:04
^ don't get me wrong. I'm not saying everyone has to love the album. I'm just saying that it's one of those connoisseur type of albums that you really have to invest time in to understand the complexities. If you choose not to is one's prerogative, however it's like taking one semester of a class of a foreign language and thinking that's enough to speak it fluently therefore what you present is not really a review but rather an impression. All is valid of course but personally i think the invested time allows the album to take on a completely new dimension undetected in the earlier stages of experiencing it.

https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy
Back to Top
Psychedelic Paul View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 16 2019
Location: Nottingham, U.K
Status: Offline
Points: 34711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 00:56
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

^ don't get me wrong. I'm not saying everyone has to love the album. I'm just saying that it's one of those connoisseur type of albums that you really have to invest time in to understand the complexities. If you choose not to is one's prerogative, however it's like taking one semester of a class of a foreign language and thinking that's enough to speak it fluently therefore what you present is not really a review but rather an impression. All is valid of course but personally i think the invested time allows the album to take on a completely new dimension undetected in the earlier stages of experiencing it.
If I happened to see Hatfield & the North's album at a bargain price charity shop or car boot sale then I would buy it and then I'd listen to it several times over. As I said in my review, it's a complex album that deserves to be listened to several times to fully appreciate it, and that especially applies to the longest track: "Mumps"
 
 
By the way, I always enjoy reading your reviews, even if I don't always agree with them. Smile


Edited by Psychedelic Paul - January 23 2020 at 01:05
Back to Top
Mortte View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member


Joined: November 11 2016
Location: Finland
Status: Offline
Points: 5538
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Mortte Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 02:07
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

^ don't get me wrong. I'm not saying everyone has to love the album. I'm just saying that it's one of those connoisseur type of albums that you really have to invest time in to understand the complexities. If you choose not to is one's prerogative, however it's like taking one semester of a class of a foreign language and thinking that's enough to speak it fluently therefore what you present is not really a review but rather an impression. All is valid of course but personally i think the invested time allows the album to take on a completely new dimension undetected in the earlier stages of experiencing it.
If I happened to see Hatfield & the North's album at a bargain price charity shop or car boot sale then I would buy it and then I'd listen to it several times over. As I said in my review, it's a complex album that deserves to be listened to several times to fully appreciate it, and that especially applies to the longest track: "Mumps"
 
 
By the way, I always enjoy reading your reviews, even if I don't always agree with them. Smile
Actually I have listened only their first album (Iīve got the picture they made only one album). But what I just read about that second album, I donīt think it also will become my big favorites, cause that first one also hasnīt become. I just donīt have any idea, why I would listen even 20 times some album I donīt like at all (or very little like Hatfield). On the other hand I very rare make reviews from the albums I donīt like at all.
Back to Top
siLLy puPPy View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
PSIKE, JRF/Canterbury, P Metal, Eclectic

Joined: October 05 2013
Location: SFcaUsA
Status: Offline
Points: 14717
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote siLLy puPPy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 08:11
^ It's one of the most complex prog albums ever made. It's certainly an acquired taste and one of the Holy Grails of prog. If  you've been listening to prog rock long enough, you'll eventually gravitate to more complex arrangements and end up loving albums like this that have more ideas stuffed in one track than most artists will muster up in an entire career. At least that's what happened for me. I hesistated reviewing for years because it would give me a different impression every time i listened to it. Sometimes i'd find it boring and other times it would blow me away as the best masterpiece ever made. It took about five years before it simmered down and emerged as one of the highlight masterpieces of all of prog rock.

https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy
Back to Top
Psychedelic Paul View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 16 2019
Location: Nottingham, U.K
Status: Offline
Points: 34711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 10:44
Caravan - Nine Feet Underground / For Richard - Live 2003 - 35th Anniversary Concert
Back to Top
Mortte View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member


Joined: November 11 2016
Location: Finland
Status: Offline
Points: 5538
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Mortte Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 11:27
Originally posted by siLLy puPPy siLLy puPPy wrote:

^ It's one of the most complex prog albums ever made. It's certainly an acquired taste and one of the Holy Grails of prog. If  you've been listening to prog rock long enough, you'll eventually gravitate to more complex arrangements and end up loving albums like this that have more ideas stuffed in one track than most artists will muster up in an entire career. At least that's what happened for me. I hesistated reviewing for years because it would give me a different impression every time i listened to it. Sometimes i'd find it boring and other times it would blow me away as the best masterpiece ever made. It took about five years before it simmered down and emerged as one of the highlight masterpieces of all of prog rock.
I have listened prog from the eighties, but to me has happened backward "development". I think I liked much more complex prog in the eighties than today, today I like more great melodies and strong atmospheres than very complex structures (of course this has some exceptions for example Magma). Itīs very possible if I hadnīt listened seventies Rush in the eighties & had found it recently, I wouldnīt like it. I think you just have to accept every prog listener would not love Hatfield. But anyway, I will try that second some day and also give more listens to that first (it hasnīt been totally bad).
Back to Top
Psychedelic Paul View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 16 2019
Location: Nottingham, U.K
Status: Offline
Points: 34711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 12:05
My Hatfield & the North review isn't written in stone, so if I listen to The Rotter's Club album again and change my initial opinion of the album, I can always edit my rating or review. Smile
 
I'll give Matching Mole's two albums a wide berth though. Smile I didn't like them at all. Thumbs Down
Back to Top
siLLy puPPy View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
PSIKE, JRF/Canterbury, P Metal, Eclectic

Joined: October 05 2013
Location: SFcaUsA
Status: Offline
Points: 14717
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote siLLy puPPy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 12:52
^ cool. Some of the Canterbury stuff is the most convoluted and complex of all prog which is why it is considered amongst hardcore proggers as the zenith of prog rock expressions. It's sorta like the cream of the crop for Olympic marathon proggers!

Caravan is definitely the right place to start for beginners. It's the most poppy of the Scene whereas the jagged soundscapes of Hatfield, Moving Gelatine Plates and Matching Mole are some of the most demanding.

The middle range includes artists like Gong, Hillage, Supersister and Soft Machine.

What's cool about the Canterbury Scene is that it connects a disparate style of musical expression with an intangible "feel" through jazzy chord progressions that is instantly identifiable when you listen to it but is almost impossible to express in words.

Although it could easily be lumped into the greater jazz-fusion category, the Cant Scene defiantly exists in its own little world that despite reaching a sort of musical cul de sac in the 70s which limits newer artists to imitating the early pioneers, still exudes a charm unlike any other sound and perhaps the most successful style of prog that creates warm and inviting emotional connections coupled with some of the most brutal complex technical workouts in the prog universe.

Oh yeah, great stuff indeed!


https://rateyourmusic.com/~siLLy_puPPy
Back to Top
Psychedelic Paul View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 16 2019
Location: Nottingham, U.K
Status: Offline
Points: 34711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 13:02
^^ I totally agree with Caravan being the most easily approachable and easy-to-listen-to music out of all of the Canterbury Scene bands, because they were the first Canterbury Scene band I really got into before I even knew there was such a thing as the Canterbury Scene. Smile
 
I'd also agree that Matching Mole are one of the most challenging and demanding of all of the Canterbury Scene bands, even more so than Hatfield & the North. Smile


Edited by Psychedelic Paul - January 23 2020 at 13:03
Back to Top
Mortte View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member


Joined: November 11 2016
Location: Finland
Status: Offline
Points: 5538
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Mortte Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2020 at 22:05
^I like first Matching Mole much more than first Hatfield, although itīs not also my most favourite from Canterbury.
Back to Top
Psychedelic Paul View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 16 2019
Location: Nottingham, U.K
Status: Offline
Points: 34711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 27 2020 at 10:17
I noticed they'd got both of Hatfield & the North's albums in my local FOPP record store today in Nottingham for just Ģ7 each, but they'd got nothing by National Health, although they said I could order both National Health albums at Ģ14 each. It's a pity it wasn't the other way around. I would have been more that happy to have paid Ģ7 each for National Health's two albums. Smile
Back to Top
David_D View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: October 26 2010
Location: Copenhagen
Status: Offline
Points: 13528
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote David_D Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 20 2023 at 05:47

My Canterbury faves are:

     The Soft Machine  - The Soft Machine  (1968)

     Caravan  -  In the Land of Grey and Pink  (1971)

     Khan  -  Space Shanty  (1972) 

     Gong  -  Shamal  (1975)   

                      quality over quantity, and all kind of PopcoRn almost beyond
Back to Top
Psychedelic Paul View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 16 2019
Location: Nottingham, U.K
Status: Offline
Points: 34711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 20 2023 at 08:11
Originally posted by David_D David_D wrote:


My Canterbury faves are:

     The Soft Machine  - The Soft Machine  (1968)

     Caravan  -  In the Land of Grey and Pink  (1971)

     Khan  -  Space Shanty  (1972) 

     Gong  -  Shamal  (1975)   

I posted this thread so long ago that I'd totally forgotten about it. I thought it was your thread, or am I just losing the thread (again!?). No, don't answer that. Tongue
Back to Top
Psychedelic Paul View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 16 2019
Location: Nottingham, U.K
Status: Offline
Points: 34711
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 21 2023 at 03:23
 3 stars 1975: Hatfield & the North - The Rotters' Club - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvtMst6bN4A

HATFIELD & THE NORTH were a two-album Canterbury Scene band, named after the well-known A1 Motorway sign on the Great North Road from London to Edinburgh. Their first eponymously-titled album passed by virtually unnoticed at the time of its release in 1974, but their second album "The Rotters' Club" (1975) is much better-known. The line-up for this second album featured Dave Stewart on keyboards, Phil Miller on guitar, Richard Sinclair on bass and lead vocals, Pip Pyle on drums, a 4-piece brassy horn section and a 3-piece female choir of Barbara Gaskin, Amanda Parsons & Ann Rosenthal, collectively named The Northettes.

The opening song "Share It" sounds strangely familiar, even upon first hearing. This upbeat jaunty Jazz-Rock number is very reminiscent of both Caravan and Camel. There's no doubting that Hatfield & the North are an English band from Richard Sinclair's clear-cut vocals, which sound as English as fish & chips. The obscure lyrics are a riddle wrapped in an enigma though, but that only adds to the quaint English charm of this catchy tune . Here's a brief opening taster of the lyrics:- "Tadpoles keep screaming in my ear, Hey there! Rotter's Club! Explain the meaning of this song and share it" ..... The bizarre meaning of this particular song will perhaps forever remain shrouded in mystery, when even the singer sounds baffled by the abstruse lyrics. And now for a little instrumental lounge music with "Lounging There Trying", which sounds like the kind of sophisticated improvisational Jazz you might listen to whilst coolly sipping a gin and tonic in a trendy cocktail lounge. There's no clue as to what the strangely-titled "(Big) John Wayne Socks Psychology on the Jaw" might be all about, because it's a brief 43 second instrumental, and the slightly discordant music bears little relation to the bizarre song title. This leads us into the even shorter "Chaos at the Greasy Spoon", which does indeed sound chaotic and a bit of a tuneless mess to be absolutely honest, so it's something of a blessed relief that it's less than half-a-minute long. Next up is "The Yes No Interlude" which is not so much an interlude, but more of an extended 7-minute instrumental jam session, where the musicians throw caution to the wind with gay abandon and let loose with some wild and improvisational Canterbury Scene Jazz. We're back to more familiar territory with "Fitter Stoke Has A Bath", which sounds like a typical lively Jazz-Rock song that Caravan might have recorded, although the meaning of the weird song title and lyrics are just as obscure as Hatfield & the North's instrumental numbers. Here's a brief example of the totally nonsensical lyrics:- "Bing billy bong - silly song's going wrong, Ping pong ping, clong cling dong, Tie me up, turn me on, Bing billy bang, Desperate Dan, frying pan, Cling clong cling, Bong bing bang, Michael Miles, Bogey man," ..... Yes indeed! Song lyrics don't come much sillier than that! They sound like the kind of wacky lyrics you might have heard in a typical Eurovision Song Contest entry from the 1970's. There's a return to some kind of normality - or whatever passes for normal in the bizarre musical world of Hatfield & the North - with "Didn't Matter Anyway". This is a gentle Caravan-esque song floating on a mellow wave of flute and delicate keyboards. It's the most approachable and easy-to-listen-to song on the album. You can just relax and let the worries and cares of the day slip away listening to this gorgeous insouciant song, because whatever might have been troubling you, it probably "Didn't Matter Anyway".

It's time now to don a dinner jacket and order a dry martini - shaken not stirred - for the Side Two opener "Underdub", because it's another pleasant cocktail lounge diversion to while away four minutes of spare time whilst waiting for your dinner date to arrive for the evening. And finally, we arrive at the 20-minute long suite "Mumps" to close out the album. The music is divided into four parts with the kind of weird and crazy titles that we've come to expect by now:- 1. "Your Majesty Is Like a Cream Donut (Quiet)"; 2. "Lumps"; 3. "Prenut"; 4. "Your Majesty Is Like a Cream Donut (Loud)". The Jazzy Canterbury Scene music is just as eccentric and off-kilter as the titles suggest, featuring another wild excursion into uncharted realms, occasionally sounding atonal and disjointed, but always unexpected and totally unpredictable. It's an endlessly complex arrangement that deserves to be listened to several times to truly appreciate the musical diversity on offer here.

"The Rotters' Club" is undoubtedly an essential album for fans of the Canterbury Scene sound, but it's not so essential for Prog-Rock fans generally. The album won't be to everyone's taste, because this is wild and improvisational Canterbury Scene music that's nowhere near as approachable and easy to listen to as the more melodic and harmonious sound of Caravan and Camel for instance. "The Rotters' Club" album is not for the uninitiated. If you've dipped your toes into the Canterbury Scene with Caravan, then Hatfield & the North by contrast are like jumping into the deep end. Their complex music veers more towards the Jazz Fusion end of the musical spectrum, than the more traditional British Jazz-Rock sound. On the other hand, if you're in the mood for some uninhibited and unrestrained Jazzy flights of fancy, then head on up the Great North Road to the sound of Hatfield & the North

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 23456 14>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.274 seconds.
Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.