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Children & Prog

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Sagichim View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Sagichim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Children & Prog
    Posted: November 13 2012 at 09:39
My wife says she's afraid our kids would turn out crazy if I'll keep playing prog in the house.
"One good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain.."
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dtguitarfan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 10:57
I don't play my music in the house much. But my wife had this conversation with my daughter Lilly in front of me:
"Lilly, what kind of songs does mommy like?"
"Mommy likes *in a high sing-song voice* pretty songs!"
"What kind of songs does daddy like?"
"Daddy likes *in the deepest voice she can muster* LOUD SONGS!"

I laughed. My son is always asking me to play my loud songs since that conversation.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 11:05
My 4 year old nephew loves the album DUKE and the song SLEDGEHAMMER. Lol.

Love that he even Dances to it!!!
How Transatlantic's Kaleidoscope beat IQ's The Road Of Bones in the Prog album of the year category at this years Prog awards (2014) is beyond me.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote smartpatrol Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 11:33
Originally posted by Epignosis



This past week, it's been Foxtrot.

He used to love when I played "Can-Utility and the Coastliners" for him on guitar, but I think he's forgotten it.  There's a video we made of us somewhere "playing" that song together.

Earlier I asked him what his favorite Foxtrot song was.

He said, and I quote, "I like number six, but it's a long song!"

Approve Hug


This alone makes you an amazing father
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Post Options Post Options   Quote smartpatrol Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 11:35
My parents play(ed) a lot of Rush and Yes as I grew up. And because of that, I love all the bands I love now. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote HarbouringTheSoul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 13:37
Originally posted by thellama73

Originally posted by HarbouringTheSoul

I know that when I was a small kid, I thought that all songs adhere to a rigid formula: Intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, verse, chorus, outro. I was utterly shocked when a song played on the radio that consisted only of verses. I remember asking my parents: "Where's the chorus? That's not a real song!"


Was it a Bob Dylan song? He has lots of those.

I don't remember what it was, except that it was vaguely 60s-ish, but it wasn't Bob Dylan. Maybe Kinks or Beatles.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 13:44
I too grew up on Radio Luxembourg, and especially loved Stuart Henry's contempory rock chart show. It played all the stuff I loved, whilst on Radio One we had good old Tommy Vance with the Friday Rock Show.

My son loved Marillion when we saw them a few months ago. He also has a soft spot for Gabriel. He appreciates good music, but is also listening to crap such as that bloody awful Gangnam Style thing. ah well, he is only 11, but I hope he has been infused with enough decent music to really appreciate it as he gets older.

My son is also autistic, so does tend to analyse quite a lot. Again, I see this as being a virtue as he develops into an adult.


In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote menawati Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 13:52
Originally posted by Epignosis


He said, and I quote, "I like number six, but it's a long song!"

I heard Willow Farm as a young kid and it scared me, there's just something dark and slightly worrying about that section. Nightmares of flutterbies coming to get me Pinch
They flutter behind you your possible pasts,
Some bright-eyed and crazy, some frightened and lost.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 13:58
As I've mentioned before, I have successfully played Magma's Köhntarkosz at work with something like 25 kids jumping madly about like a tiny Uruk Hai army. Priceless and quite simply something I'll never forgetLOL
A lot of the music you subject children to, also has to do with what you yourself bring into it. Meaning if you jump and dance and bring them into the midst of the beat, they'll most likely get it straight away. If you sit around and wait for them to magically understand what the meaning behind Tales from Topographic Oceans is, you may just be setting yourself up for failure...

Lastly - most kids tend to dig Demon Fuzz:
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote thellama73 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 14:02
I agree that Willow Farm is creepy. It's probably why it's my favorite part of Supper's Ready.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote geneyesontle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 20:30
Originally posted by Gallifrey

Originally posted by geneyesontle

I am a teenager and I wasn't always raised with prog. I used to go to sleep with little lullabys like Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. My first experience to prog was Supertramp. I was also raised to Sting before I Got interest to music. Ahhh, childhood memories.

Supertramp was one of the first for me as well. One of those sort of bands that non-prog fans love without really knowing it's prog. My parents used to play them all the time. I remember acquiring some of my dad's old records a few years ago and being shocked that I knew basically all the lyrics to Breakfast in America, despite it only being played really when I was age 4-6.
 
Same story. My parents had Crime of The Century, Even In The Quietest Moments and Breakfast in America and they used to play these CD's, especially BIA. I used to check the booklet without even knowing some of the songs and reading the lyrics without even knowing what it means LOL. They also bought Crisis, What Crisis and ...Famous Last Words when I really discovered Supertramp and we went to see Roger Hodgson. Ahhh good times. When there is a world full of One Direction and Rihanna (c**p), I still trust Supertramp for a listen, along with other good pop artists. I really love them.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mongofa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 22:55

I used to listen to Neu!'s "Leb'Wohl" to fall asleep, but I always got jolted awake by the next track, "Hero"

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Polymorphia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 23:13
My parents showed me Yes when I was 11. That was my earliest introduction to symph prog. My dad is a jazz musician and much of the music I heard growing up was either jazz, jazz fusion, or Christian Contemporary (my mom's influence). As far as listening to music to go to sleep, however, I've actually only recently started to do that. I've found that classical music is great in this setting. I usually like something big like Brahms' 3rd, Messiaen's "Peomes pour mi", any of Stravinsky's ballets, Penderecki's Polymorphia, or Takemitsu's Requiem for Strings.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Prog_Traveller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2012 at 23:55
The only prog I sort of remember from my childhood is "The Yes Album." My father had it on vinyl and I remember the album cover(which I thought was spooky as a kid and even more so the back cover). It definitely fit the music although I don't really remember the music that much from that young age.

I didn't really get into prog until I was about 14 or 15 though.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Aquiring the Taste Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 14 2012 at 01:11
I grew up listening to my fathers' music , particularly Louis Armstrong.  Tin Pan Alley had established the song structure that dominated popular music which, to my young ears, sounded boring & predictable. Louise showed me that music could be much more exciting.
My younger son, from age 3 would ambush me when I got home from late shift ( around 11.30pm) claiming he couldn't sleep, but would try if I played him Voltures Blood & Smoke On The Water. Today he is a grown man whos collection of music is mostly Prog. & Jazz.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote martinprog77 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 14 2012 at 02:06
Originally posted by sagichim

My wife says she's afraid our kids would turn out crazy if I'll keep playing prog in the house.

LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLmy wife says the same thing. but my 5 years old  daughter seems to like yes and spocks beard  [ she even dances like crazy with ''Thoughts (Part II) '' LOL]
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Chris S Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 14 2012 at 02:42
My kids have grown up on Mike Oldfield, Van Morrison, Genesis, Floyd, Strawbs, Yes, Talking Heads etc.......I think I might have brainwashed themTongue they aint complaining, however there is some really good new music out there they have introduced me too also
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Post Options Post Options   Quote someone_else Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 14 2012 at 10:50
My daughter (17) has no specific liking for prog. She does not even have long time-favourite bands. But she seems to like the Beatles and Muse. But some years ago, Mussorgsky's The Gnome was played and studied during a music lesson at school, which gave me a fair chance to play her Pictures at an Exhibition at the time.
My wife (47) listens mostly to worship music and she has little liking for prog. Fortunately, she showed some appreciation for Big Big Train's The English Electric (Part One).
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Jim Garten Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 14 2012 at 11:15
Originally posted by smartpatrol

My parents play(ed) a lot of Rush and Yes as I grew up. And because of that, I love all the bands I love now. 


Consider yourself lucky - in 1967/1975 when my parents were in the age range 30-38, and I was between 4 & 12, they had a whole revolution in music going on all around them - think of the albums which were released when my parents were in their prime!

What did I get?

Bad country & western, Frankie Vaughan & Max Bygraves!

My wife and I have no children, but all our cats have been comprehensively raised on good music

Jon Lord 1941 - 2012
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Undercover Man Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 14 2012 at 12:00
Didn't grow up with prog at all.
Actually before i got into rock and metal, i listened to rap and sh*t like that, i hate most of that now.

Well, atleast my dad listened to some classic stuff like The Beatles and Pink Floyd, but i didn't really like it at first. That's completely changed now.
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