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THE REMOTE VIEWER

Coil

Progressive Electronic


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Coil The Remote Viewer  album cover
3.28 | 6 ratings | 1 reviews | 40% 5 stars

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Studio Album, released in 2002

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. Remote Viewing 1 (19:31)
2. Remote Viewing 2 (7:59)
3. Remote Viewing 3 (21:13)

Line-up / Musicians

- Cliff Stapleton, Jhonn Balance, Mike York, Ossian Brown, Peter Christopherson / All instruments, electronics and effects

Releases information

Treshold House

Thanks to philippe for the addition
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COIL The Remote Viewer ratings distribution


3.28
(6 ratings)
Essential: a masterpiece of progressive rock music(40%)
40%
Excellent addition to any prog rock music collection(20%)
20%
Good, but non-essential (40%)
40%
Collectors/fans only (0%)
0%
Poor. Only for completionists (0%)
0%

COIL The Remote Viewer reviews


Showing all collaborators reviews and last reviews preview | Show all reviews/ratings

Collaborators/Experts Reviews

Review by Dobermensch
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars A queasy sickening feel permeates 'The Remote Viewer'. It's a beat-less, bass heavy throbbing nightmare. The kind of sounds you hear when you're full of the flu lying in bed feeling like you just wanna die.

A Hurdy-gurgy of all things is at the forefront of this recording and is basically destructured into a pulverised blobby mess. High pitched horns protrude and stab violently in this most melancholic of tunes. There's no vocals present on this one - nor guitar nor drum. Most of what you'll hear is almost like a deformed bagpipe droning sadly amongst a a satisfying deep bass.

Seriously chopped up vocals are intoduced in part II. In a way it's almost like listening to 'Roadrunner' and 'Wile E. Coyote' having a fight . Similar to 'Nurse With Wound's' 'Creakiness' but less repetitive. Splats and throbs of bass noise give things a turn for the worse for my mental well being. Suddenly everything sounds more malevolent and creepy as this tune heads towards its seriously disturbed end.

The 21 minute part III - reprises the sounds of part I introducing middle eastern bongos which are gradually electronically warped into a very distict Coil sound of bloops and bleeps. This is less dramatic and urgent than Part I and does chill out nicely after 10 minutes leaving you wishing you were on a picnic in a forest somewhere. That is... until a of note circular bass line pops up - where you'd expect to see a farmer with a gun stomping towards you. And your picnic! Yikes!

Very odd electronic wails and screeches (tastefully done) envelope the entire track leaving a feeling of malaise as intermittent bass stabs and almost glitch-like high pitched electronica see the album out.

One of Coil's more obscure albums - a stop-gap between a flurry of live albums that would follow and 'Musick to Play in the Dark Pt2' which appeared two years earlier. Strangely it's the first time I've used the expression 'Folk-Drone' as a genre of music. Unfortunately that's the best I can come up with guys.

A good album and one that is instantly recognisable in their catalogue, but is just a bit too morose for repeated listenings.

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