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PROGRESSIVE ELECTRONIC

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Progressive Electronic definition

Born in the late 60's after the expansion of avant-gardist, modern, post-modern and minimalist experimentation, the progressive electronic movement immediately guides us into a musical adventure around technologies and new possibilities for composition. As an author or a searcher, the musician often creates his own modules and electronic combinations, deciding his own artistic and musical action. The visionary works of Stockhausen, Subotnick, John Cage ("concrete" music, electro-acoustic experimentation), La Monte Young, Steve Reich, Terry Riley (minimal, micro-tonal music) express a vision of total reconstruction in the current musical world. Luminous works such as "A Rainbow in Curved Air" (1967) and "Silver Apples of the Moon" (1967) bring an inflexion on opened forms and new ways to explore the essence and the physical aspects of sounds (through time and space). "Static" textures, collages & long running sounds, the power of technology previously exposed in ambitious classical works will have a major impact in "popular" electronic music.

After the artisan & innovative uses of magnetic tapes, feedback, microphones, etc., the instrumental synthesis, the elaboration of global sound forms and the psycho-acoustic interactions will be sublimated thanks to the launch of the analog synth. A great improvement happened in 1964 with the appearance of the first modular synthesiser (Moog). This material (or "invention") brings the answer to the technological aspirations of many musicians, mainly after the release of the popular "Switched on Bach" (Walter Carlos) and Mother Mallard's portable masterpiece (pieces composed between 1970-73).

At the beginning of popular essays in electronica, the pioneering technologies (in term of recording and sound transmission) will not be abandoned. For instance, "Tone Float" (1969) by Organisation (pre-Kraftwerk), "Zwei Osterei" & "Klopzeichen" (1969-70) by Kluster and "Irrlicht" (1972) by Klaus Schulze will carry on the domestication of the electric energy and the use of refined harmoniums, organs and echo machines. During the 70's decade, European groups & musicians such as Eno, Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream will make their name in the music industry thanks to an abundant use of analog synthesisers and original electronic combinations. After weird, mysterious experimentation on conventional acoustic & electric instruments, Kraftwerk enjoyed huge success in popular music thanks to "mechanical electronic pop music". "Trans Europe Express" (1977) and "The Man Machine" (1978) figure as two commercial classics. The German spacey electronic scene launched by Tangerine Dream with their outstanding "Alpha Centauri" (1971) and Cluster "I" & "II" (1971-72) will have echoes everywhere, starting from the Berlin underground electronic scene (the Berlin School) with Klaus Schulze ("Timewind" 1974), Michael Hoenig ("Departure from the Northern Wasteland" 1978), Ashra ("New Age of Earth" 1976), Conrad Schnitzler's buzz-drones and repetitive electronics ("Zug", "Blau", Gold" 1972-74) . After several innovations always from Germany we notice the dark, doomy atmospheric manifests of Nekropolis (Peter Frohmader) in "Le culte des Goules" (1981), Asmus Tietchens in his colourful and engaged "Biotop" (1981) and the semi-ambient "Hermeneutic Music" (1988) by Lars Troschen (sound sculptor and synthesist).

In France, the "hypnotic" and "propulsive" electronic essays of Heldon ("Electronic Guerrilla" 1974) and Lard Free ("Spiral Malax"1977) introduce an inclination for industrial, urban and post-modern sound projections. The French "avant gardist" Philippe Besombes takes back the inspiration of " concrete music" (Pierre Henry.) and mixes it to a hybrid rocking universe (published in 1973, "Libra" figures as a true classic). Bernard Xolotl in "Prophecy" (1981), "Procession" / "Last Wave" (1983), Zanov (Green Ray, 1976) and Didier Bocquet (Voyage cerebral, 1978) will follow the musical path anticipated by Klaus Schulze in his kosmische electronic symphonies.

At the end of the 70's until the debut of the 80's Albums as "ambient 1: Music for Airports" (Brian Eno), "Cluster & Eno", "Deluxe" (Hans Joachim Roedelius side project called Harmonia) will announce the emergence of the famous ambient movement, musically characterised by gorgeous shimmering atmospheric textures.

During the 80's, Maurizio Bianchi will be in search of the absolute industrial "post-nuclear" sound tapestry. His visionary musical experience is based on cyclical loops, abrasive concrete noises and vertiginous piano dreamscapes. ("Symphony for a Genocide" 1981 and recently the mesmerising "A.M.B Iehn Tale" 2005). Before M.B and the industrial-bruitist wave, the 70's Italian specialists of electronic experiments had been (among others) Francesco Cabiati (Mirage, 1979), Francesco Bucherri (Journey, 1979), and Francesco Messina for representative, lyrical and spacey orchestrations and also Futuro Antica (D'ai primitivi all'elettronica, 1980) or Telaio Magnetico (Live' 75) for tripped out minimalism.

In the early 1980s and after following the kosmische path of classic Klaus Schulze, The Bay Area / Los Angeles school of electronic created the so called "alchemical" / "Sacred" space music. The music offers a dynamic combination between ancient-traditional music of the West and synthesised sonic soundscapes. The most representative artists of this movement are Michael Stream (Lyra Sound Constellation, 1983) Robert Rich (Numena, 1987) and Steve Roach (Dreamtime Return, 1988).

In the early 80s Ian Boddy (Spirits, 1984 / Phoenix, 1986) and Mark Shreeve (Assassin, 1983 / Legion, 1984) unique spacedout synthesised sagas represented the british answer to the challenging Berlin kosmische school. Their music embodies timbral drone sequences, systematic arpeggiations and synth-pop textures.

Young contemporary bands and artists in electronic experimentation took their inspiration from the 70's "kosmische" analog synth psychedelica of Klaus Schulze, Conrad Schnitzler, Tangerine Dream, etc. In the spaced out synthesisers spectrum, modern Japanese artists as Yamazaki Maso (noisy avant garde experimentor who contributes to the Kawabata's projects named Andromelos, Christina 23 onna and Father Moo & the Black sheeps) or Takushi Yamazaki (Space Machine) are key figures. The minimal, moody / lysergic epic soundscapes of Omit (Clinton Williams), Cloudland Canyon, Astral social club or Zombi also contribute to the renewal of the "cosmic" synth genre. Many modern electronic artists have taken an original musical direction, surfing on post-krautrock ambient waves (Aethenor), on spherical "abstract" ambient minimalism (Pete Namlook, Biosphere, Robert Henke) or on trancey, (post) industrial drone hypnosis (Alio Die / Amon / Nimh for the italian side and Andrew Chalk with his respective projects Mirror, Monos and Ora).

To sum up things, the progressive electronic subgenre is dedicated to intricate, moving, cerebral, intrusive electronic experiences that get involved in "kosmische", dark ambient, (post) industrial, droning, surreal or impressionist soundscapes territories.

Philippe BLACHE


The responsibility for the psych/space, indo/raga, krautrock and prog electronic subgenres is taken by the PSIKE team,
currently consisting of

- Meltdowner
- siLLy puPPy
- Rivertree
- Tapfret
- HarryAngel746

Progressive Electronic Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Progressive Electronic | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.27 | 353 ratings
MIRAGE
Schulze, Klaus
4.23 | 1011 ratings
RUBYCON
Tangerine Dream
4.22 | 337 ratings
TIMEWIND
Schulze, Klaus
4.17 | 876 ratings
PHAEDRA
Tangerine Dream
4.83 | 12 ratings
BARDO
Oöphoi
4.56 | 19 ratings
DECONSECRATED AND PURE
Alio Die
4.42 | 24 ratings
ARCHITEXTURE OF SILENCE
Alpha Wave Movement
4.26 | 45 ratings
IN COURSE OF TIME
Zanov
4.12 | 162 ratings
EPSILON IN MALAYSIAN PALE
Froese, Edgar
4.28 | 35 ratings
HORSE ROTORVATOR
Coil
4.35 | 27 ratings
LONG LOST RELATIVES
Syrinx
4.57 | 15 ratings
OMICRON
Breidablik
4.06 | 277 ratings
X
Schulze, Klaus
4.16 | 61 ratings
INTEGRATI... DISINTEGRATI
Leprino, Franco
4.20 | 43 ratings
CATCH WAVE
Kosugi, Takehisa
4.22 | 37 ratings
TUSSILAGO FANFARA
Anna Sjalv Tredje
4.52 | 15 ratings
HONEYSUCKLE
Alio Die
4.76 | 10 ratings
BACK FROM BEYOND
MacFarlane, Ian
4.76 | 10 ratings
A TAPESTRY FOR SOURCERERS
Five Thousand Spirits
4.29 | 26 ratings
LOVE'S SECRET DOMAIN
Coil

Progressive Electronic overlooked and obscure gems albums new


Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Progressive Electronic experts team

TIME REPLICATED
Bownik, Adam Certamen
SYNTHETIK 1
seesselberg
SYNTHESIST
Grosskopf, Harald
HELDON IV - AGNETA NILSSON
Heldon

Latest Progressive Electronic Music Reviews


 Encore (Live 1977) by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Live, 1977
3.99 | 267 ratings

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Encore (Live 1977)
Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nº 591

Tangerine Dream is a German progressive band led by Edgar Froese, the only remnant member of the group's original formation, until his dead, and together with Kraftwerk, they were the great exponent of what is called the Progressive Electronic Music. With a career spanning over fifty years and dozens of albums released, Tangerine Dream is one of the most influential bands in and out of the progressive rock, with many artists and bands clearly inspired by their sound.

The band's career is divided into several phases. The first one, also called "The Pink Years", started in 1970 and ended in 1973. It marks a sonority clearly inspired by Pink Floyd, phase Syd Barrett, with several keyboard and sound effects interventions and close to the German progressive scene called Krautrock. Highlight for "Alpha Centauri" of 1971, "Zeit" of 1972, (a double disc with a bold proposal of an "electronic space symphony") and "Atem" of 1973, which even included tribal elements in some of its tracks. The second phase, also called "The Virgin Years", between 1974 and 1983, is considered by many to be Tangerine Dream's golden phase. It marks a turn in the sound of the band, which even though betting on long suites, marks a greater sonic independence, in which the band acquired their own identity and a greater and better use of keyboards, synthesizers and sound effects in some tracks, a slightly more accessible proposal, even if still quite experimental. Highlight for the albums "Phaedra" of 1974, "Rubycon" and "Ricochet", both of 1975, "Stratosfear" of 1976, "Encore" of 1977 and "Force Majeure" of 1979. "Encore" is the subject of this my review.

During the 70's, Tangerine Dream's live concerts were quite unique. Because of the delicacy of the analog equipments, the German trio improvised every evening a new show. Certainly, many lines got closer, but Tangerine Dream espoused on the spot the main lines of long concerts where the sequential fury supported the ferocity of synths, keyboards and Mellotron, as well as the rather rock approach Froese's guitar. And, "Encore" is surely one of the best examples of that.

"Encore" is the second live album of Tangerine Dream. This time, is a double live album that was recorded during the band's North American tour, of March-April 1977. But, unlike "Ricochet", which though is technically a live album had basically no audience presence, on "Encore" the audience makes their presence known at certain points, lending the recording proper live ambience. I think this album probably will hold its greatest appeal for those who picked it out of its chronological context with the other 70's albums. If you did track the band's output chronologically, chances are that by the time you reach "Encore", you may find it the grand summary of this great line up and of this style of music.

"Encore" is supposed to be the definitive Tangerine Dream's album among many fans. It was the last album featuring Peter Baumann. During the tour, he informed Froese and Franke that his private obligations no longer allowed him a full-time collaboration with the band and he left in 1977 for good and started working as a solo artist and a producer.

"Cherokee Lane" is probably the most conservative of the four tracks in terms of duplicating previous work. The Mellotrons are all over the place, creating that hauntingly beautiful and mystical mood that none other than Tangerine Dream at their best could do. "Monolight" provides a greater departure. It begins with a classical grand piano gradually given auxiliary support by some other keys. After that, the track is classically styled and represents the most thoroughly composed moment on the album, weaving through major and minor keys with the main melody played on Moog. "Coldwater Canyon" is Froese's track title. It's an intense, upbeat and a rocking track that features Froese in top form on guitar. He releases his guitar work in a pure improvisation, such as a rock star. It's a cutting edge track which distances itself from the band's repertory, although keyboards pads, sequences and hatched percussions didn't lie about their origins. The last track "Desert Dream" encloses the album in a purely atmospheric style, shifting from dark, experimental passages to beautiful and ethereal parts with tons of Mellotrons and an Eastern feel that fits the title of the track. It ends recalling the steams of "Invisible Limits" of "Stratosfear". This is a nice swan song for a legendary line up.

Conclusion: Tangerine Dream's USA live tour of 1977 resulted in this excellent "Encore". The title would unfortunately proved to be very fitting, as it was the last album to feature Baumann and the last where the classic band's sound still was fully intact. "Encore" reflects the unique magic of Tangerine Dream's concerts in that era. Every evening was a different happening which delighted the fans. It was pure improvisations on sound effects and surprising laser plays that gave unique moments, engraved in our contemplative memoirs. The set is uniquely Tangerine Dream, however, with similarities to other prog rock bands of that era. "Encore" was an enormously worthy way to end their classic years, consisting of four side long tracks that blend new ideas and material with older themes. "Encore" was Tangerine Dream's last masterpiece and is one of the strongest proofs of the genius that the band possessed from 1972 to 1977.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 The Child Garden by MORLOCK, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.00 | 2 ratings

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The Child Garden
Klaus Morlock Progressive Electronic

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Sad to say this is altogether the first PA review for this artist residing in Los Angeles. The mysterious background of Klaus Morlock and his music is a very peculiar case mixing fact and fiction. For starters, the name may be a pseudonym. The main thing is that he has made soundtracks to unexisting horror films, at least 12 albums between 2014 and 2020. His Bandcamp page is thoroughly well done and gives access to his digital albums. Many of them are easily found also from Youtube. I jump straight into one of them, without being able to evaluate it against Morlock's other output.

Isn't that cover art a Renaissance era painting, perhaps by Sandro Botticelli or Hieronymus Bosch? The Child Garden is Klaus Morlock's second album. According to Bandcamp, "Evidence for the existence of the Child Garden cult dates back to the 14th Century. However, this album is a musical expression of the strangeness that befell the West Country during the scalding summer of 1976." What has the year 1976 to do with this music remains another mystery.

The brief (31:41) album has thirteen tracks. 'Quick, Said the Bird' contains some birdsong effects added to the ghostly, heavily echoed soundscape of layered keyboards. The melody is very melancholic. 'Alison Is Mine' has a threatening atmosphere finished with cinematic voice snippets. The thumping drum beat suddenly ends and we're into something like early kosmiche Musik. 'First Gathering' is a mesmerizing tune full of sad Mellotron sounds, especially the flute tone. The next short track features a frail male singing, and it sounds -- like much of the entire album -- deliberately worn-out, as if the music came from ancient times. No old instruments are used per se, the instrumentation lists only keyboards, organ, bass, percussion and effects.

The music is soaked with melancholia, mystery and a strange feeling of everything having to do with ancient religious myths or something. I find it difficult to make exact musical references as I don't actively listen to this kind of music. If I remember right, Miranda Sex Garden is something similar, and as I referred earlier, there are some allusions to spacey Krautrock such as the early 70's Tangerine Dream or Klaus Schulze, only in a more Gothic setting and with effects of human voices and others. Dead Can Dance may have some kindred spirit but is much closer to accessible pop. Whether or not a real Mellotron is used, that is one of the dominant "worn-out" sounds.

I can't say I'd wish to listen to this stuff much longer. In the end, in all its cold and echoey strangeness, it's like a fever dream that makes you feel nauseatic. In theory the rating could be almost anything from excellent to poor, depending on how you look at it. It definitely would be interesting to read other progheads' receptions for Klaus Morlock albums.

 The Man-Machine [Aka: Die Mensch-Maschine] by KRAFTWERK album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 418 ratings

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The Man-Machine [Aka: Die Mensch-Maschine]
Kraftwerk Progressive Electronic

Review by Dapper~Blueberries

4 stars If we are talking about artists from the 70s era of German experimental music, while Faust and Can advanced rock music forward, none were more influential in the realm of electronic music as Kraftwerk was. You could argue that mantle goes towards Tangerine Dream, and that is true that they did influence a great deal of artistic electronic music that was certainly very spacey and ambient, but none were influential to many artists in the future that'd inspire a ton of genres from trip-hop to French electronic dance music, to even the broad strokes of synthpop than Kraftwerk. Started as a krautrock and drone band, and after their successful album of Autobahn, they quickly became their own with their unique brand of electronic music that combined the eccentric pop of the time with the broad progressive strokes the underground German scene had at the time. It created a unique and highly influential musical landscape for the band to explore. It was robotic, but not soulless. I will say they are not my favorite band that came out of the German experimental music scene, but I do have the highest respect for them, even more so after I heard this album. Before getting into this album I expected my usual Kraftwerk affairs, similar to the stuff that I'd heard from Autobahn or the album they'd release after this one, Computerwelt. It was none of those, but possibly prototypical versions of genres that hadn't existed yet.

Die Mensch-Maschine is a fairly short album but has a lot to unpack. Die Roboter is the first song on the record, and with it, we get a mix of electronic music with disco strangely enough. If you couldn't already tell by the sounds of this song, then I suggest you listen to Daft Punk for a bit, since this song is pretty much the future of euro step music. Incredibly bouncy synths, robotic voices, electro steps, and a whole wide range of unique additional flairs make this a clear shot example of being ahead of the curve. I have no idea what the German experimental scene was on, but it almost was like they could see into the future with the songs they created. The robotic personas Kraftwerk would utilize are fun and unique for the time, and they had some fun portraying themselves as machines less than flesh. While that may sound quite saddening, it was what made them drive their music forward. This is their national anthem, a robotic, distant, cold, calculated, yet still so rich in energy song that is incredibly fun to listen to.

Kraftwerk was also big into the themes of space, as evident with Spacelab. A lot of celestial keyboard works bounce around through many vibrant melodies and sounds that wrap the listener around in a cool and collected state of mind. The rhythm laid down here sets the mood for the entire song, being this cool and collected piece of music that might have some more up its sleeve. Ethereal, bright, and brimming with excellency. A classic Kraftwerk song.

Metropolis is another example of what a classic Kraftwerk song sounds like. Deep in the synthpop on this one, we get even more vibrant electronic dance music that is uniquely inspirational. In a modern context, I get a lot of vibes from French electronic musicians like Daft Punk and Étienne de Crécy, however more laid back as the music expresses itself with only one word repeated through the song: "Metropolis". This is a metropolis of sound and styles that salivates every aspect of its core and shows off the humanity Kraftwerk has deep within its robotic shells. Kraftwerk for me has always been a band that features an optimistic tint to their glasses with their more industrial style of music, and it's an aspect of the band that I think works for them in spades. Metropolis is an example of such. It's fun, and built from the ground up to be fun, but without it being borderline commercial. It is a form of music that I slowly but surely love with each passing moment.

That isn't even the best part. All those songs are great but none compare to my favorite song off this record, Das Model. What can I say about this song? Well for starters it is incredibly unique for its time. I have an itch that this song is what inspired most of the sounds from the 90s era of video games, specifically with the Sega Genesis and Super Nintendo. I wouldn't be surprised since they were inspirational to one of the bigger known Japanese synthpop groups, Yellow Magic Orchestra, who also had an equally odd robotic feel to their personas. I also dig how tongue and cheek the lyrics are. It's very much trying to take a stab at how companies commercialize people's talents for profit, slowly burning up the people they're exploiting. Kraftwerk seems like a resilient enough band for them to not overheat since they're still around today, but even then with their popularity it definitely must've been hard to cool down. It is a song filled with vibrancy and uniqueness but tells a story that anyone no matter what field they are in could relate to.

Afterward, we get the longest song off the album, an 8-9 minute tune called Neonlicht. This is the only song off the album I have issues with, and it's the length surprisingly enough. The first half of the song is a beautiful, almost pre- Vaporwave style of music with beautiful singing and a crisp sound to boot. Afterward is where the song started to become an issue for me. They start to repeat this melody over and over again for 5-6 minutes, and it gets rather annoying. Nothing new happens in that repetition of patterns, and what once felt like a beautiful song about the lights in the city, soon became a repetitive hazard. I think they should've ended the song at 3:10. It'd make the album even shorter, and it'd make the song short, but it'd make the album a possible masterpiece for me. The first half is great and stellar, but the second half could've been something more.

The album does end on a high note with the title track, Die Mensch-Maschine. You hear that melody right? That right there is what you'll hear in quite a bit of rap songs nowadays, and can you blame the artists that use this little harmony? It is immaculate and strange, yet so right with the mood of the song. It'd be more bizarre to NOT try and use that for an equally influential genre of music such as hip-hop and trip-hop. This is what I love about the German experimental scene. Acts like Kraftwerk, Faust, Can, and so many others have inspired so many artists and genres that even the most basic melody can inspire millions to try their hands on the wheel, resulting in some of the biggest genres in the world. We gotta thank Kraftwerk for that, that's for certain.

I am surprised that this became one of my favorite Kraftwerk records, but how could you not love it? While imperfect due to Neonlicht, all the rest of the songs here are stellar in conveying moods, themes, and beauty in an otherwise robotic shell. I do not doubt in my mind that Kraftwerk is one of the most influential artists to come out of the 70s German scene. Their music inspired so much for decades upon decades that their influence can still be seen today. What a revolutionary work of art.

 Deus Arrakis by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.15 | 42 ratings

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Deus Arrakis
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars The project the Maestro was working on when he died, it's nice that his team and collaborators saw it to its completion and release.

1. "Osiris (Parts 1-4)" (18:28) though it starts out somewhat simply, almost New Age-y in its pace and sound palette, these are definitely Klaus Schulze key changes. Even moving into the second movement we get little change or development. As a matter of fact, it might be pointed out that there is considerable simplification and reduction of inputs until the introduction of a new, buzz-saw-like synth into the sequence in the ninth minute. Then, a few new chord/key changes from the baseline synth wash occur before we enter the third phase when the chord sequences begin to rise on the pitch scale and the floating saw-synth takes on a more prominent role. We also hear the addition of an oboe-like instrument and more layered weave of sequenced sounds moving around the soundscape. Cello seems to join in as well--though the long-held notes seem more synthesized than acoustic or electrified. The final section, Part 4, is the most dramatic and dynamic one minute of the whole suite! Overall, the song is pleasant but under-developed; the melodies and Schluzian key shifts alone can do nothing to make it anything special. (34.25/40)

2. "Seth (Parts 1-7)" (31:47) spacey old synths float through the airwaves for the first two minutes. The second part is just slow-moving waves of synth washes. The third and longest movement of the suite is made up of an upbeat click-and-pop rock-beat sequence with layers of other individual synths woven into the mix beneath which the synth wash chords shift, leading the music into interesting directions. There is an actual structure and repeating flow to this section which makes it feel like a song. The end of the third part finds the addition of some guitar-like sounds and other incidentals while the pace and chord-melody structure remain fairly consistent. For the fourth Part, we find all sequence and flow interrupted by the treated saw synth and cello playing within a field of space- radio noises. It's pretty cool but I don't get what it has to do with either the previous movement or the topic of Seth. Part Five is the second longest movement. It finds a 1980s synth sequence overriding and, eventually, replacing the radio-cello motif of Part 4--though the beautiful and plaintive cello does manage to remain and contribute significantly (and contrarily) to the effectiveness of this rather ambiguous motif. (Two themes being presented simultaneously, seemingly at diametrically opposed purposes, makes for an interesting if contentious listening experience.) Part 6 is, again, taking us in a different direction: this one back to gentle, slowly shifting synth washes over which some of those space radio noises flit and flash. After about a minute, the cello again joins in--this time sounding more effected by reverb, delay, sustain other engineering effects--and also supplanting the space-radio "bugs"--getting quite expressive and speedy the further we go into the movement. (It's quite exciting, this virtuous cello player!) The seventh and final movement, Part 7, is three minutes of saw synth and lower register treated-cello play. Very pacifying--as if trying to put its listeners to bed--though the rather sudden/quick fadeout is a bit disconcerting--as well as a bit of a surprise The contributions of the lovely cello certainly do make this composition more engaging and enjoyable. In fact, this piece, "Seth," feels far more symphonic in its form and intent than the opener, "Osiris." I like this one very much! (59.5/65)

3. "Der Hauch des Lebens (Parts 1-5)" (27:08) low droning note opens this before synth glass-bell-horn joins in with ethereal voices whispering around in the background. Three minutes of this Blade Runner-like soundscape changes to add more quotidian incidental sounds (like street and/or playground & circus/fair voices) while a more common organ-like synth delivers slowly morphing chords beneath. The end of Part 2 slips into a more eerie, sinister scape before the organ chords shift to a new, more ambiguously evocative progression. It's pretty but it's also cold, lonely, unsettling. Part 3 sees the appearance of a more typical KS computer sound sequenced in a way that any Berlin School devot'e would, all the while the gentle "organ" synth continues providing its soothing, if sometimes disconcerting chord washes beneath. It sounds very familiar ' la Laurent Schieber's SEQUENTIA LEGENDA work over the past decade. The longest movement of the suite, Part 3 also sees the development of more speed and dynamics as well as layering of other subtle instrumental lines into the musical weave. By the halfway point in the suite, we are feeling very much immersed in a classic Klaus Schulze piece of music--maybe even one going back to the late 1970s or early 1980s. A few sudden and usually quick "surprise" chords alert us to the "newness" of the piece, but, overall, we find ourselves feeling quite comfortable in the familiar weaves of Sancta Klaus. Part 4 finds us being stripped of all worldly fabric to leave us in the heavenly, love-affirming chord progression of the synth wash chords. In fact, it's so comforting that I find myself moved to tears. Such is the power of simple chords, especially those magical major and minor seventh chords, for therein are contained the summation and spectral range of the human emotional experience. Beautiful ' with just enough edge to remind us that we have not yet, in fact, left this mortal coil--that we are still committed to confronting the foils and spoils of our --which is precisely what the fifth movement does: it slowly brings us back from our heavenly, out-of-body Preview, gently depositing us back into the Earthly bodies to which we have volunteered our attention. Yes, this is the Breath of Life! And we were just taken on a guided tour down the River Styx, through Bar-do, to the Mists of Avalon, and back to Middle Earth! How masterfully Klaus (and his collaborators) have engineered our conscious experience through the purposeful manipulation of sound! Ingenius! No wonder we hold the Maestro's esteem up to such lofty heights! (52/55)

Total Time 77:23

What amazes me about this album of music is the demonstration of Klaus Schulze's skill: from the Understated (and perhaps, underwhelming) simplicity of the first suite, to the complex, mutli-part story-telling of the second, to the psycho-spiritual manipulation of the third. I am so grateful for this man's contributions to my life, to my love and appreciation for the possibilities of all things musical (and emotional). Three cheers for the King. Long live the King!

A-/five stars; a marvelous exposition of Berlin School Electronica from the master himself--a truly wonderful addition to any and all music collections.

 Live '75 by TELAIO MAGNETICO album cover Live, 1995
3.80 | 19 ratings

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Live '75
Telaio Magnetico Progressive Electronic

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars While the "enjoyment factor" plays the biggest part in my rating of an album there are many Avant albums that I own that I have given 4 stars to that I really have had difficulty with, yet I can't deny being so impressed with the compositions they came up with. "Live '75" is a great example of this. Under Electronics here and most sites but under Avant in my house. This is electronic sounding for sure but man you'd be hard pressed to find a more "out there" album and it's live! Led by Italy's leading Avant composer Franco Battiato he picked five other like minded performers and took the show on the road in the south of Italy for a couple of months then they were gone, just like that. Of the six we get two singers male and female who are very adventerous and really use wordless melodies for the most part. A ton of echo in this vocals at times to the point it's scary, like in a psychedelic nightmare.

These are dense and abstract soundscapes where vocals often lead the way with Battiato on electronics, a former I GIGANTI member on farfisa organ, an AKTUALA musician on vibes, percussion, cymbals and tablas, an unknown on oboe and soprano sax and the two singers who often steal the show. A supergroup for sure.

It's hard for me a non-musician to fathom what went into these live shows. As I said before I'm just blown away at the compositions even though they are so difficult to digest. I kept thinking there's probably one poor soul who took LSD having no clue what he was about to experience. This is dark and frightening at times while at others it feels like they are just trying to get on my nerves with the soprano sax and oboe blasting away in the dense music with electronics and farfisa adding layers. Just a crazy sounding album and I believe quite unique.

Again I keep going back to what it must have been like to have been their in person. I can't imagine though I've tried. This wasn't released until 20 years after it was recorded. 42 minutes of music divided into five sections. Kind of samey in that it's pretty much adventerous soundscape music with a similar vibe on each part. An awesome example of those insane vocals is the latter part of "Part II", I mean just bonkers. What I love about music like this is that each listen is a new discovery. So much going on within each track and it is the ultimate headphone album. We do get some crowd noise but almost always in the form of applause to end some of these sections. Other than the guy on cid screaming as he runs out of the back of the building.

This might be worthy of being in my top Avant albums list. The more I listen the more I'm thinking so. Again just shaking my head as I listen right now to this powerful recording.

 Mosaique by SCHROEDER, ROBERT album cover Studio Album, 1981
3.35 | 12 ratings

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Mosaique
Robert Schroeder Progressive Electronic

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Robert Schroeder could be thought as an apprentice of KLAUS SCHULZE, whose electronic music label Innovative Communication released most of his albums from the debut Harmonic Ascendant (1979) to Pegasus (1989). Since the latter, Schroeder has made only three albums in this millenium; in the 80's he released one album each year except in 1986. This third album, produced and mixed by Schulze, consists of four tracks and features four guest musicians (on guitar, bass and drums).

'Mosaique' (12:03) proceeds gradually in a Schulzean way but repeats angular and sharp synth sounds I'm not fond of. Somehow I'm thinking of Jarre's album Zoolook (1984). Charly Büchel's electric guitar part is angrily distorted, like the one at the end of Pink Floyd's 'Keep Talking'. 'Utopia' begins with repeated synth patterns and the same pig-sounding guitar, but the 6-minute piece turns out to be quite progressive.

The shortest piece 'Aix-la-Chapelle' (4:25) features two drummers giving the music a feeling of a military march. A fairly nice, unexpected "surprise track", although the repeated synth melody remains rather boring. This far I'm personally not very impressed by the album. The preceding ratings without reviews suggest it to be better than the two earlier albums. Well, perhaps this one has more progressive rock elements attached to electronic music. The final track 'Computervoice' (12:33) is a good example of this fusion and for all its sonic dynamics it's the obvious highlight. In its latter half, the synths have airiness and moody melodicism, which is not much the case on other tracks of much colder nature. This is an excellent track but since I'm not so keen on the first two pieces featuring that pig-guitar, I have to stick to three stars.

 Ego Therapy by SURYA KRIS PETERS album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.00 | 2 ratings

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Ego Therapy
Surya Kris Peters Progressive Electronic

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars SURYA KRIS PETERS is the moniker for the solo project of German musician Christian Peters. In 2007 he founded the seemingly still active stoner rock band Samsara Blues Experiment, in which he plays guitar. There are three S.K.P. albums this far. Ego Therapy -- released only digitally -- is the second one, in between The Hermit (2016) and O Jardim Sagrado (2020). Peters plays electric guitar, modular synthesizer and keyboards, and he's accompanied by Jens Vogel on drums and percussion.

Especially for the 15-minute opener 'Angels in Bad Places', the subgenre might have as well been Krautrock instead of Progressive Electronic. The music is very, very trippy. Popol Vuh and Klaus Schulze are mentioned as influences in the artist bio, but unlike with those, in this music the electric guitar and percussion are central. However, the ever present synth carpet is very thick and layered, in the style of Ash Ra Tempel, Amon Düül II or even the early Tangerine Dream.

Most of the 53-minute album's ten tracks are roughly between two and five minutes. The title piece has some New Age -like meditative spirit in the slow tempo synth washes. The rhythm pattern of the acoustic percussion creates a hypnotic feel, and the electric guitar is used sparingly. If you removed the slightly distorted guitars, the faster-paced and more drums-heavy 'Beyond the Sun' could serve as an instrumental backing track for an early 80's synth-pop artist. Six minutes' length is perhaps more than enough for this. The album keeps operating between psychedelic Krautrock and electronic music, at times reminiscent of Tomita, at times the poppier side of Jean Michel Jarre. Also a psychedelic Pink Floyd influence can be heard. The guitar is present to a varying degree. In the heart of the 2½-minute 'Wizard's Dream' is an improv-styled guitar playing. One negative notion I have about this album is that the guitar sound tends to stay rather similar all the way: a bit gritty and distorted, typical for stoner rock. A good thing is that the latter half of the album shifts the emphasis more on synths and and electronic music, further from Krautrock.

The relatively catchy, synth-centred 'Gemini IV (The Sky Is Open)' contains astronaut's voices. 'Sleeping Willow' also concentrates on synths, this time with a slight Vangelis resemblence, and 'A Fading Spark' (1:56) is rooted on a sharp- toned synth riff. The closing piece 'Atomic Clock' (8:14) makes me think of the latter half of the Tangerine Dream track 'Through Metamorphic Rocks' (on Force Majeure, 1979). Due to the increasing variety in style, my 3½ stars deserve to be rounded upwards.

 Oracle by SHREEVE, MARK album cover Studio Album, 1986
2.00 | 1 ratings

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Oracle
Mark Shreeve Progressive Electronic

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
2 stars Mark Shreeve, 2 June 1957 -- 31 August 2022(!), was a British electronic music composer. His discography of 15 albums is sadly totally unreviewed here, just a handful of practically useless ratings without reviews. There are reviews for the electro-band REDSHIFT which he founded in 1996 with his brother Julian Shreeve, James Goddard and Rob Jenkins. Having only listened to a couple of Redshift albums (lengthy pieces of music comparable to Tangerine Dream and Klaus Schulze), I didn't know what to expect from this album I found from Youtube.

Oracle is the eighth album of Mark Shreeve. It starts with the highly energetic 'Blade Runner' which doesn't really have much to do with the marvelously sensual VANGELIS soundtrack. Vangelis never "rocks" like this piece. [In addition to the catchy Blade Runner theme, his album Direct (1988) Vangelis did approach this kind of a pop direction, but certainly not to a degree of this music.] It seems Shreeve has sampled details from 'Welcome to the Pleasure Dome', the 1984 hit of Frankie Goes To Hollywood, to a great effect. Also 'Myriad of Colours' has a powerful drive and even a fuller soundscape. Heavy drum programming and all kinds of synth crashes that make the ones in 'Owner of a Lonely Heart' sound lame. Very catchy this is, but frankly too hyperactive for me to enjoy without reservations. Think of adrenalin-fuelled early THOMAS DOLBY without vocals.

'Mephisto' (the longest track of the seven, at 7:12) continues with the rhythmically and sonically muscular direction. I begin to miss more dynamic variety and, most of all, more sensitivity. The second vinyl side begins with 'Shadowplay' that brings nothing new to the table. BTW, Chris Franke of Tangerine Dream is guesting on it.

Admittedly the music is well produced, much better actually than a lot of synth-centred popular music of the time. But sad to say, the term over-produced wouldn't be out of place here. 'The Ice Queen' gracefully slows the tempo and thus gives the moody melody the deserved attention. Shreeve's cool guitar playing is a nice additional ingredient to the synthetic soundscape. 'After the Silence' is fairly similar to 'The Ice Queen'. The use of synthesizers is delicious here, from the trumpet-like melody line to a particular bright riff that reminds me of a song on the album Il Sole Nella Pioggia (1989) by ALICE, the Italian singer. Oracle's final piece 'Thunderdome' perhaps namely nods to the second Mad Max movie (1985). Stylistically it's a return to what was heard before the previous slower pieces.

So, if you want some really catchy and bold synth-centred instrumental music, try this one. I feel disappointed to the album whole, because production-wise there would have been opportunities to make a great and dynamic album. Two or three stars? Maybe two's enough, despite all the strengths heard on this album.

 Mountain Music by POTTER, NIC album cover Studio Album, 1984
2.13 | 4 ratings

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Mountain Music
Nic Potter Progressive Electronic

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

2 stars -- First review for this album --

Nic Potter's name is recognized by all connoisseurs of VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR in which he played bass in the early 70's and in '77-'78, as well as on several Peter Hammill solo albums. But fewer are aware of his solo output that perhaps surprisingly falls under the category of Progressive Electronic. Although at least on ground of this album, the only one I've listened to, the term 'progressive' is frankly very questionable.

Mountain Music is Potter's debut album (some sources say it was released already in 1983). It is almost entirely played by Potter on bass, synths and piano. Huw Lloyd-Langton plays guitar on two tracks and John Ellis on one. The VdGG partner Guy Evans appears on percussion on three tracks. 'Morning Suite' is a dreamy and slightly melancholic piece centering on soft synth sounds. It reminds me of PETER DAVISON's similar-toned electronic/New Age album Winds of Space (1987). The second, guitar-featured piece 'Paradise Journey' is more upbeat with programmed percussion which is a bit too dominant, but the repeated melody is fairly nice.

'Tropical Tones' returns to the softer sounds. I'm not saying the synth sound would be similar but in a way I'm thinking of the instrumentals on A Curious Feeling (1979) by Tony Banks. 'Middle Street Dream' builds a dreamy, bright-toned synth melody on top of a clinical rhythm pattern, despite the presence of Evans. 'Night Falls Over Europe' is again more upbeat number. One could think of the synth-centred film music of GIORGIO MORODER (Midnigh Express, for example). There's an urban, nocturnal "noir" atmosphere. 'The Forest' on which John Ellis plays perhaps the album's most distinctive electric guitar participation continues in the same style. The programmed drums are on the foreground. Sadly too much so, on the album whole.

With eight tracks of regular song length, the album is also rather short (32:24). I'm afraid it's more of a curiosity -- with a certain nostalgia factor if you have lived the early eighties and listened to the synth music of the time -- than a musically enduring work of art. The melodies are often quite nice, to say the least, but the compositions do not have much of a progress. The featured co-musicians do only a little to widen the album's sonic pallette. The synth work and programmed sounds are at times similar to what Peter-John Vettese did on Jethro Tull albums The Broadsword and the Beast (1982) and Under Wraps (1984). This instrumental album remains a bit hollow, and if Nic Potter had collaborated with some vocalist -- in the Jon & Vangelis manner -- the results might have been more interesting. 2½ stars rounded down.

 Chrysalide by MOULINIE, MICHEL album cover Studio Album, 1978
4.05 | 2 ratings

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Chrysalide
Michel Moulinie Progressive Electronic

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Michel Moulinié (1945 - 2022) was a guitarist/ multi-instrumentalist from France. He played guitars on Ange's leading figure Francis Décamps' solo debut Histoire de Fou (1979), but a year before that he released his own album Chrysalide which has remained his only one. At the moment Discogs lists eleven vinyls on sale, from 33 euros upwards. No re-releases have been made. As usual with my recent premier reviews, I'm listening the album from Youtube.

So, despite being categorized here as Progressive Electronic, this album is basically not about synthesizers. The main instrument is an electric 12-string guitar. Only bass and violin are mentioned too, but the spacey soundscape admittedly could be described as electronic music, no matter how and with what instruments the music is produced exactly. Probably the best reference of all ProgArchives artists is the ASHRA frontman MANUEL GÖTTSCHING and his solo debut Inventions for Electric Guitar (1975). There's a Krautrock-related, thickly psychedelic feeling in Moulinié's album.

'Le Ballet des Mouches' endlessly repeats and variates, in a minimalistic manner, a 12-string & bass riff, and there's electrified, early MIKE OLDFIELD (Tubular Bells) reminding guitar soloing in this progressive ambient piece. On the background there's a spacey soundcarpet that sounds a bit like a Mellotron -- undoubtedly played on violin. 'Les Cordes de la Mer' is built in a similar way rooted on repetition. I'm not an expert in this field of music, but I believe the names of artists such as TERRY RILEY and even PHILIP GLASS can give you some orientation.

No point describing each of the five tracks in detail; the hypnotic repetition of minimalism meets Kosmische Musik (Ashra, even the early Tangerine Dream to some extent), starring a guitarist with a Steve Hillage -like psychedelic touch. A regular music listener would undoubtedly completely lack the patience for listening to this abstract, monotonous-on-the-surface stuff for 37 minutes, but it's a unique and at least potentially fascinating one of a kind, recommended to advanced listeners who have an acquaintance in ambient music, electronic music / Kosmische Musik and the musical ideas of minimalism. The bizarre cover art really fits the music!

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Progressive Electronic bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
12 FOLLOWERS United States
6LA8 Pakistan
A LA PING PONG Germany
ACI Germany
AEON France
AETHENOR Multi-National
AFTERLIFE United States
ILDEFONSO AGUILAR Spain
PEKKA AIRAKSINEN Finland
AIRSCULPTURE United Kingdom
ALBERGO INTERGALATTICO SPAZIALE Italy
ALIO DIE Italy
ALLEGORY CHAPEL LTD United States
DAEVID ALLEN & MICROCOSMIC United Kingdom
ALLUSTE Italy
ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT United States
ALTO STRATUS United Kingdom
AMBER ROUTE United States
AMON Italy
PETER ANDERSSON Sweden
ANDROMELOS Japan
ANNA SJALV TREDJE Sweden
ARC United Kingdom
ARECIBO United Kingdom
ARPANET United States
EDWARD ARTEMIEV Russia
ARZATHON Sweden
ASCOIL SUN Finland
ASHRA Germany
ASTRAL TV Denmark
THE ASTROBOY Portugal
ATOMINE ELEKTRINE Sweden
AUBE Japan
AUTOMAT Italy
AWENSON France
MARVIN AYRES United Kingdom
HARVEY BAINBRIDGE United Kingdom
AIDAN BAKER Canada
SIMON BALESTRAZZI Italy
BAFFO BANFI Italy
RICHARD BARBIERI United Kingdom
BASS COMMUNION United Kingdom
JOHN BATTEMA United States
BAUMANN / KOEK Germany
PETER BAUMANN Germany
BEAR BONES LAY LOW Venezuela
BOBBY BEAUSOLEIL United States
CARLOS BELTRÁN Mexico
LÁSZLÓ BENKÖ Hungary
PHILIPPE BESOMBES France
BETWEEN INTERVAL Sweden
BEYOND BERLIN Netherlands
MAURIZIO BIANCHI Italy
BIG ROBOT Norway
BIOSPHERE Norway
BITCHIN BAJAS United States
BIZARE KO.KO.KO. Austria
BLACK UNICORN United States
TIM BLAKE France
BLUE MOTION Switzerland
BLUE SAUSAGE INFANT United States
WOLFGANG BOCK Germany
DIDIER BOCQUET France
IAN BODDY United Kingdom
GASTON BORREANI Italy
ADAM CERTAMEN BOWNIK Poland
BOYS OF SUMMER Ireland
BREIDABLIK Norway
OLIVIER BRIAND France
MICHAEL BRÜCKNER Germany
FRANCESCO BUCCHERI Italy
HAROLD BUDD United States
MICHAEL BUNDT Germany
FRANCESCO CABIATI Italy
ROBERTO CACCIAPAGLIA Italy
SAMUEL CADIMA Portugal
CALDERA United States
TOM CAMERON United States
DALLAS CAMPBELL United States
JAVI CANOVAS Spain
CELLULOID United States
CELLUTRON & THE INVISIBLE United States
ANDREW CHALK United Kingdom
JOHN CHRISTIAN United Kingdom
CHRISTINE 23 ONNA Japan
CHURCH OF HED United States
THE CIRCULAR RUINS United Kingdom
MICK CLARKE United Kingdom
CLOUDLAND BALLROOM Ireland
CLOUDLAND CANYON United States
COIL United Kingdom
COMA VIRUS Germany
PASCAL COMELADE France
COMPUTERCHEMIST United Kingdom
CON HERTZ Germany
CONTRASTATE United Kingdom
COSMIC DEBRIS United States
COSMIC GROUND Germany
COSMIC HOFFMANN Germany
CRAWL UNIT United States
CREMATOR United Kingdom
CROP CIRCLES France
CROWS LABYRINTH Netherlands
CULTURAL NOISE Austria
FRANCESCO CURRÀ Italy
CYBOTRON Australia
DEAD VOICES ON AIR United Kingdom
DEATHCOUNT IN SILICONE VALLEY United Kingdom
JEAN-MICHEL DESBOUIS France
DEUTSCHE WERTARBEIT Germany
NICOLAS DICK France
DIN A TESTBILD Germany
DIONNE - BRÉGENT Canada
SERGEI DJOKANOV Bulgaria
DR. PHILTER BANX Canada
DR. SPACE'S ALIEN PLANET TRIP Denmark
HEINRICH DRESSEL Italy
DROKK United Kingdom
DSR LINES Belgium
WOLFGANG DÜREN Germany
DYNAMO SNACKBAR United Kingdom
E-MUSIKGRUPPE LUX OHR Finland
EARTHSTAR Multi-National
EDEN France
ELEKTRIKTUS Italy
ELICOIDE Italy
EMERALDS United States
J.D EMMANUEL United States
ENDOPLASMIC FLOW Multi-National
BRIAN ENO United Kingdom
ENVENOMIST United States
EXPO 70 United States
F.G EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY Switzerland
FRANCO FALSINI Italy
FANGER & SCHÖNWÄLDER Germany
FARBFELDE United States
FASER Germany
FATHER MOO & THE BLACK SHEEP Japan
FFWD United Kingdom
FHIEVEL Italy
FILTER-KAFFEE Germany
JONATHAN FITOUSSI France
FIVE THOUSAND SPIRITS Italy
FLAMEN DIALIS France
FLUXUS United Kingdom
FORMA United States
FOVEA HEX Ireland
FREE SYSTEM PROJEKT Netherlands
FRIPP & ENO United Kingdom
EDGAR FROESE Germany
JEROME FROESE Germany
PETER FROHMADER Germany
FUTURO ANTICO Multi-National
GALACTIC EXPLORERS Germany
MICHAEL GARRISON United States
MORT GARSON Canada
GRAHAM GETTY United Kingdom
SACHA GIBSON United Kingdom
BRUCE GILBERT United Kingdom
GIRÓN Spain
GNOHGNUHGNLUS (DOLULUS) Switzerland
MATHIAS GRASSOW Germany
GRAUGLANZ Germany
GREGOR CÜRTEN & ANSELM ROGMANS Germany
RANDY GREIF United States
RAGNAR GRIPPE Sweden
HARALD GROSSKOPF Germany
SVEN GRÜNBERG Estonia
GEORGES GRÜNBLATT France
JEAN GUÉRIN France
PHILIPPE GUERRE France
CARLOS GUIRAO Spain
BRUCE HAACK Canada
HALL OF MIRRORS Italy
PETER MICHAEL HAMEL Germany
HARMONIA Germany
STEVE HAUSCHILDT United States
HEADSHOCK United Kingdom
TIM HECKER Canada
HELDON France
HEMMELIG TEMPO Norway
ROBERT HENKE Germany
JACK HERTZ United States
MICHAEL HOENIG Germany
HOLLAN HOLMES United States
HORSE PALACE Canada
HARUOMI HOSONO Japan
PETER HOWELL & THE RADIOPHONIC WORKSHOP United Kingdom
EPPIE E. HULSHOF Netherlands
HYDRAVION France
HYDRUS Italy
HYPNOSPHERE Germany
GIUSEPPE IELASI Italy
INVOLVED United States
IVERSEN Norway
JAZZCOMPUTER.ORG France
JENZEITS United States
JESDAT Spain
JIHEL France
GUSTAVO JOBIM Brazil
EDDIE JOBSON United Kingdom
FRYDERYK JONA Germany
JONAS MUNK & NICKLAS SØRENSEN Denmark
JONATHAN Germany
ARIEL KALMA Australia
JÜRGEN KARG Germany
KASHMIR Switzerland
KHA - YM France
BERND KISTENMACHER Germany
KITARO Japan
KL(AÜS) Australia
KNITTING BY TWILIGHT United States
JEFFREY KOEPPER United States
KOROIEV Spain
KOSMOGON Sweden
KÖSMONAUT United States
TAKEHISA KOSUGI Japan
ESA KOTILAINEN Finland
KRAFTWERK Germany
MIHA KRALJ Yugoslavia
KLAUS KRÜGER Germany
KUBUSSCHNITT Germany
LA PONTO ENSEMBLO Multi-National
RICHARD LAINHART United States
LAMBWOOL France
PASCAL LANGUIRAND Canada
LAOZI Georgia
TEDDY LASRY France
STÉPHANE LEMAIRE France
IGOR LEN Russia
FRANCO LEPRINO Italy
LEROUGE France
NED LAGIN & PHIL LESH United States
CECIL LEUTER France
LIGHTWAVE France
LIIR BU FER Italy
LILIENTAL Germany
OKSANA LINDE Venezuela
JOHN LIVENGOOD France
LOGIC GATE United States
LONG DISTANCE POISON United States
LOOM Germany
BERTRAND LOREAU France
RÜDIGER LORENZ Germany
LORQ DAMON United States
LULL United Kingdom
LUNAR MIASMA Greece
TOR LUNDVALL United States
LUSTMORD United Kingdom
LYDHODE Norway
BJØRN LYNNE Norway
IAN MACFARLANE Australia
MAEROR TRI Germany
MAGINA Portugal
PEPE MAINA Italy
MAJEURE United States
MAKO Austria
ERIC MALMBERG Sweden
MAR-VISTA France
MARIBOR Italy
RUNE MARTINSEN & ØYSTEIN JØRGENSEN Norway
ANDREA MARUTTI Italy
MEERKAT Italy
WOLFGANG MERX Germany
METATAG Norway
EMERSON MEYERS United States
MICKIE D'S UNICORN Germany
CLAUDIO MILANO Italy
THE MINISTRY OF INSIDE THINGS United States
JAVIER MIRANDA Spain
DIETER MOEBIUS Germany
MOKSHA United Kingdom
MOLNIJA AURA Italy
CLARA MONDSHINE Germany
MONOTON Austria
GEN KEN MONTGOMERY United States
MOORE / MYERS United States
KEN MOORE United States
STEVE MOORE United States
MORA-TAU Japan
KLAUS MORLOCK United States
SCOTT MOSHER United States
MOTHER MALLARD'S PORTABLE MASTERPIECE CO. United States
MICHEL MOULINIE France
MOUNTAIN OCEAN SUN Japan
MOUNTAINS United States
THE ALMAN MULO BAND United Kingdom
JONAS MUNK Denmark
MUSHY Italy
IAN NAGOSKI United States
PETE NAMLOOK Germany
NAUTILUS Germany
NAZI UFO COMMANDER Italy
NEMESIS Finland
NEPTUNE TOWERS Norway
NEURONIUM Spain
NEVER KNOWN Italy
NEWCLEAR WAVES Italy
THE NIGHTCRAWLERS United States
NIMH Italy
NIMH + M.B Italy
NISUS Belgium
NODE United Kingdom
NUMINA United States
OMIT (CLINTON WILLIAMS) New Zealand
ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER United States
OÖPHOI Italy
OSCILLOTRON Sweden
OSE France
P'COCK Germany
P'FAUN Germany
PALADIN United Kingdom
PANABRITE United States
STEPHEN PARSICK Germany
PEAK Australia
PETER M. Italy
PHROZENLIGHT Netherlands
RICHARD PINHAS France
CHRISTOPHE POISSON France
POLE France
BRENDAN POLLARD United Kingdom
TJ PORTER Canada
COLIN POTTER United Kingdom
NIC POTTER United Kingdom
ROGER POWELL United States
DAVID PRESCOTT United States
THE PRESENT MOMENT United States
DAVID PRITCHARD Canada
PROPELLER ISLAND Germany
PRZEMYSLAW RUDZ Poland
PULSE EMITTER United States
PYTHAGORON United States
QUAESCHNING & SCHNAUSS Germany
QUARKS Chile
RADIATION Russia
RADIO MASSACRE INTERNATIONAL United Kingdom
LUTZ RAHN Germany
NIK RAICEVIC United States
RAINBOW GENERATOR Australia
RAINBOW SERPENT Germany
RAISON D'ETRE Sweden
RAPOON United Kingdom
REALTIME Germany
TOM RECCHION United States
REDSHIFT United Kingdom
JONAS REINHARDT United States
ALEJANDRO VILLALÓN RENAUD Mexico
ROBERT RICH United States
CHRISTIAN RICHET France
WOLFGANG RIECHMANN Germany
STEVE ROACH United States
HANS-JOACHIM ROEDELIUS Germany
HENRI ROGER France
ROGUE ELEMENT United Kingdom
ROGUE SPORE Ireland
THOMAS RONKIN United States
MIGUEL A. RUIZ Spain
SAB Japan
SAFIYYA United States
SANGIULIANO Italy
SANKT OTTEN Germany
SATAN ALFA BEEL ATEM Japan
SAYER United States
GÜNTER SCHICKERT Germany
SCHLOSS TEGAL United States
CONRAD SCHNITZLER Germany
EBERHARD SCHOENER Germany
ROBERT SCHROEDER Germany
KLAUS SCHULZE Germany
SEESSELBERG Germany
SEQUENTIA LEGENDA France
SERGE RAMSES France
MARK SHEEKY United Kingdom
SHOGUN KUNITOKI Finland
MARK SHREEVE United Kingdom
FREDERICH SHULLER Romania
SIJ Ukraine
SIL MUIR Italy
THE SILVER SURFER Spain
THE SILVERMAN United Kingdom
SINIAALTO Finland
SINOIA CAVES Canada
JAKOB SKØTT Denmark
SKYRAMPS United States
SLOWS United Kingdom
SOFTWARE Germany
SONISK BLODBAD Multi-National
SOUNDS OF NEW SOMA Germany
SPACE ALLIANCE Italy
SPACE ART France
SPACE MACHINE Japan
SPACE SWEEPER United States
SPACECRAFT France
SPERM Finland
STARDRIVE United States
THE STARGAZER'S ASSISTANT United Kingdom
MICHAEL STEARNS United States
STELLARDRONE Lithuania
STUDIO KOSMISCHE United Kingdom
SUBINTERIOR Italy
SURYA KRIS PETERS Germany
SUSPIRIUM United Kingdom
SYRINX Canada
JUTA TAKAHASHI Japan
TANGERINE DREAM Germany
TANGRAM Hungary
TELAIO MAGNETICO Italy
DR. FIORELLA TERENZI Italy
TETRA Canada
THANECO Greece
THOUGHT BUBBLE United Kingdom
THOUGHT GUILD United States
THREE SUNS Austria
THROBBING GRISTLE United Kingdom
ASMUS TIETCHENS Germany
TIPU SABZAWAAR Multi-National
TOMUTONTTU Finland
TÖNEN United States
TONTO'S EXPANDING HEAD BAND United Kingdom
TORTURE GNOSIS Multi-National
TOTAL STATION Russia
TRANCE United States
TRANQUILLITY Germany
TRANSPARENT ILLUSION United Kingdom
ROLF TROSTEL Germany
UDDER MILK DECAY United Kingdom
MATTEO UGGERI Italy
UMBERTO United States
UNATTA United States
URNA Italy
VAKO Spain
VANDERSON Poland
JOEL VANDROOGENBROECK Switzerland
PATRICK VIAN France
VIDNA OBMANA Belgium
VIETGROVE United Kingdom
VLUBÄ Argentina
VOICE OF EYE United States
VOLT United Kingdom
ADELBERT VON DEYEN Germany
VON HAULSHOVEN Netherlands
ADRIAN WAGNER United Kingdom
RICHARD WAHNFRIED Germany
IGOR WAKHÉVITCH France
WAVEMAKER United Kingdom
WAVESTAR United Kingdom
PHILLIP WERREN Canada
WHITE NOISE United Kingdom
KEITH FULLERTON WHITMAN United States
PATRICK WIKLACZ France
TERJE WINTHER Norway
WINTHERSTORMER Norway
WO0 Serbia
BERNHARD WÖSTHEINRICH Germany
RENÉ VAN DER WOUDEN Netherlands
X-TG United Kingdom
XIU Italy
BERNARD XOLOTL France
YELLOW MAGIC ORCHESTRA Japan
YEN POX United States
YETI RAIN United States
YOU Germany
ZA SIÓDMA GÓRA Poland
ZADRI & MO France
EDWARD M. ZAJDA United States
ZALYS France
ZANOV France
ZED France
ZOLTAN United Kingdom
ZOMBI United States
ZORCH United Kingdom
ZOVIET FRANCE United Kingdom
ZYGOAT United States
ZYTOSPACE Spain

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