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BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT)

Jazz Rock/Fusion • Czech Republic


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Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) picture
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) biography
Founded in Czechoslovakia in 1968 - Disbanded in 1990 - Reformed from 2004 to 2016

Lead by ace guitarist Radim Hladík, BLUE EFFECT were one of the major progressive bands in Czechoslovakia; they were to their own country what OMEGA were to Hungary, or SBB to Poland. They started out in 1968 with a couple of early R&B-oriented albums. However, the Czech governement strongly disapproved of English names at the time, so the band switched to MODRÝ EFEKT and later to simply M.EFEKT. After these two albums, their material veered towards jazz rock and by the early 80's, following sereval personnel changes, their music had become a little less prog, more accessible. They released their last album in 1981 and then quietly disappeared.

Of particular interest to prog fans are three albums: "Modrý Efekt & Radim Hladík" (1975) which features an energetic mix of YES-like symphonic rock with some fusion; the overall effect will likely remind you of FINCH or CRUCIS. Emphasizing Hladik's brilliant soloing, this was the album that established him as "the" Czech guitarist par excellence. However, it is "Svitanie" (1977) that is considered the band's true masterpiece. With its sinewy bass lines and bold keyboard/guitar melodies, it is still quite YES-influenced but it also has a definite Czech flavour that makes it unique. Finally, there is the bolder, more complex and not so YES-like album titled "Svet Hledacu - World of Searchers" (1979); this one is characterized by many sudden tempo shifts and emphasizes the flux between the spacey synths and Hladik's biting guitars. Except for this album, whose 5 official tracks are all sung, the band's répertoire is mostly instrumental.

Primarily recommended to fusion lovers but YES fans will also likely find something to sink their teeth into.

: : : Lise (HIBOU), CANADA : : :

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BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) discography


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BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.25 | 70 ratings
Meditace [Aka: Kingdom Of Life]
1970
3.64 | 69 ratings
The Blue Effect & The Jazz Q Prague: Coniunctio
1970
3.30 | 71 ratings
Nová Syntéza [Aka: New Synthesis]
1971
3.68 | 65 ratings
Nová Syntéza 2 [Aka: New Synthesis 2]
1974
4.27 | 160 ratings
A Benefit Of Radim Hladík [Aka: Modrý Efekt & Radim Hladík]
1974
4.29 | 151 ratings
Svitanie
1977
4.32 | 135 ratings
Svět Hledačů
1979
4.11 | 97 ratings
33
1981

BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.89 | 9 ratings
Blue Effect & hosté - Live
2008

BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.67 | 6 ratings
Live And Life
2008
4.20 | 5 ratings
Acoustic/Time
2011

BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 7 ratings
Beatová Síň Slávy
2004
4.75 | 27 ratings
1969-1989
2009

BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.20 | 5 ratings
Snakes (Edice Mikrofóra)
1969
3.19 | 8 ratings
Slunečný hrob
1969
3.75 | 8 ratings
Nězná / Záhada jmelí
1983

BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 33 by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1981
4.11 | 97 ratings

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33
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars Being in 1981 and still cruising high on the progressive rock scene, this is Blue Effect with their sadly last effort. Playing is very proficient, the atmosphere may be less tight and more nostalgic, also more polished than previously. Nevertheless, compositions are as good as on previous 2 albums. With one keyboardist gone, this album has better balance between guitar and keyboards.

All tracks are at least 7 minutes long and symphonic. The first track is surprisingly aggressive in the beginning with raw guitar and constantly changing drums before keyboards become more prominent. When vocals emerge, the sound is already quite radio-friendly, however keyboard soon throws in good synth licks. The melancholic part afterwards is stunning and contrastful to the previous dynamic part. After that, the kind-of first part comes back with another repetition.

"Avignonské slečny z Prahy" has some Banks keyboard echoes and excellent guitar soloing on otherwise moderately paced song.

"Občasná pánská jízda" has an astonishing start with fantastic keyboard chords sequence. A funk/disco drumming part with Moog soloing while layers of background keyboards are present make all keyboard fans feel happy. Throughout the entire composition, the feeling of breaking up and melancholy remains.

The last track could be a metaphore to the ending existence of Blue Effect with its title "the friendship is coming to its end". It is a calm symphonic track with strong vocals. Extended guitar solo increase the heartbeat before the fantastic main motive is repeated. Noteworthy is absolutely rhythmically complex and wild keyboard/guitar section in the middle.

This is a very decent end of this quintessential progressive rock band (at least in the former Soviet block.)

 Svět Hledačů by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1979
4.32 | 135 ratings

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Svět Hledačů
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars Blue Effect reached their compositional and instrumental peak and the artistic symbiose on this masterpiece of progressive rock. In support of a missing bass player, there are two talented keyboard players who create a multi-layer sound with a multitude of keyboards. The guitar being edgy, acoustic, mellow and symphonic, Radim was a man of several guitar faces. Vocals are provided by the two keyboard players and sometimes indistinguishable.

King Crimson and Yes come to the mind, however B.E. were already since long time having their own sound. Best moments are when all instruments play. There are no self-indulgent moments, everything including soloing has its place. No other album, apart from 33, is so well balanced with layers, soloing and "improvisation".

The first track may be the most representative one on the album with mature mood set. "Hledám své vlastní já" is a keyboard-based ballad-style piece.

"Rajky" is an incredible track with astounding complexity, sequence of chords and continuing development. What a symphony of keyboards and progressive guitar! Some King Crimson inspired moments appear here. Anxious vocals only kick in after the first 3 minutes. Guitar exhibition later is mesmerizing. Drums have a special place in the mix and add more colours.

The next track, "Zmoudření babím létem", has a great dark symphonic motive before calming down into a mellow electric piano and synth territory, then comes an organ a la early Banks and a mid-70's disco beat with complex fill-ins, however the guitar storm and another drummer pattern are pulled out to astonish the listener even more. Another excellent number.

The last triumphant track is another ouverture of surprising chord sequences and instrumental layers although less dynamic than on the previous two tracks. We are graced by a drum/guitar experimental solo before changing to a keyboard led symphonic section with the known motive.

A very high quality album, indeed and excellent one to start with for this band.

 Svitanie by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.29 | 151 ratings

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Svitanie
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars Svitanie was the only B.E. recorded in Slovakia and not Czech Republic (although technically still Czechoslovakia) and that determined the lyrics and song names that had to be in Slovakian, a strange rule by the recording company.

Fedor Freso from previously Collegium Musicum appeared in the band for a year or so, resulting in this unique album which features his academic and complex bass playing which has and never be at that level in this band. Keyboard sounds have been updated to include modern sounds such ARP, electric piano while still employing organs. Guitar playing is muscular and forms a tight duo with drums. Placed between fusion and progressive rock, it is also the last album with any jazz influences.

The first composition, "Vysoká Stolička, Dlhý Popol" lets the listeners know that Focus and Finch traces from the previous album are more distant, and now it's YES and Collegium Musicum that come to mind. Organ play has never reminded C.M. until this album - the sequence of chords, the sound and majesty of organ does it. The track is an instrumental workout full of alterations, excitement and highlights on all instruments with great compositional qualities.

"Ej, Padá, Padá Rosenka" is a Moravian folk-based song and became a constant trademark hit of the band, High vocal of Freso is so different from Semelka/Novotny tandem. It is the most accessible track here.

"V Sobotu Popoludní " is firmly rooted in the YES territory. The drummer is excelling here with various odd time signatures but the keyboard and guitar are creative, too.

"Svitanie" is a long, perhaps overly long, final track with a lot of symphonic traces. It contains even a bluesy section.

An awesome album in the league with contemporary Fermata albums.

 A Benefit Of Radim Hladík [Aka: Modrý Efekt & Radim Hladík] by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.27 | 160 ratings

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A Benefit Of Radim Hladík [Aka: Modrý Efekt & Radim Hladík]
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars The first masterpiece by the band where the compositional but mainly playing abilities by the band flourish. For the fans of dynamic instrumental progressive rock, this is the album by Modry Efekt/Blue Effect to listen to. Guitar is dominating, more than it would be on the consequent albums. You can hear influences by Focus/Finch(especially when it comes to drumming, guitar playing and flute), King Crimson, slightly perhaps Yes. The drummer plays solid albeit not inventive.

"Boty" is an excellent starting track with different sections and versatile guitar playing between progressive rock, rock'n'roll, acoustic guitar. "Cajovna" is the most popular Blue Effect track, very moody and captivating due to its use of layered guitars. "Skládanka" is the most Focus influenced track with flute and vocals strongly reminding the Dutch band, only missing is the organ. "Ztráty a nálezy" features very melodic and symphonic high pitched guitar. "Hypertenze" is the peak of mid-70's Blue Effect instrumental emotions with stormy jam and multitude of styles ranging from jazz-rock to heavy progressive rock. While the track may stretch for a bit too long, it flows nicely. At the vocal end, Focus style comes to the stage again with symphonic end that Focus would use to finish their epic tracks. There is a saxophone solo thrown it, too.

The bonus track are les essential but one of them, Armageddon, is likely a predecessor of "Skládanka" with suiting vocals by the keyboard player. "Clara" has a fantastic bass line that must have been inspired by fusion.

 Nová Syntéza 2 [Aka: New Synthesis 2] by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.68 | 65 ratings

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Nová Syntéza 2 [Aka: New Synthesis 2]
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars Coming even closer to the golden era and their progresive rock trademark sound, this is the first album that is recommended to any progressive rock listener. Echoes of jazz-rock are still present, unique colourful vocals, some more exotic keyboards like harpsichord and good composiions are the selling points of this album. The title track has them all in one, in its 22 minuts.

The second track with the philosophical name has nice harmony vocals and typical melody hooks that would reappear in next albums. There is a nice dynamic instrumental section with guitar, trumpets, hoboes and percussions and even a sinister organ solo in the end that is really impressive at the verge of updating their sound.

The third track is a light and reflective number whereas the last track alternates between pop-jazz first part with vocals and wild guitar led instrumental jazz-rock trip separated by mellow guitar and piano.

A good album but much better is to come :-) 3.5 stars

 Nová Syntéza [Aka: New Synthesis] by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.30 | 71 ratings

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Nová Syntéza [Aka: New Synthesis]
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars Maintaining orchestral ambitions, or more big band?, the band develops the sound to be more melodic and steers away from avantgarde, the instruments are more in accordance and there are actually memorable tracks. Already the first one "Ma hra" has a great inspiring motive with every instrument well thought out and no chaos leaving behind. Listen to more prominent rock instruments and double guitar in the second half of the composition with devilish guitar solo a la fusion McLaughlin. Jazz-rock tendencies continue on the second track.

"Popinavy brectan" is quite close to the American jazz-rock scene even throwing in some blues guitar and funk elements. Jazzy guitar and chords are delicious. The last track tries combining blues and jazz-rock and shows unique position of Hladik sounding like a jazz guitarist. The title track being in the end allows instruments like piano and organ to enter and is the most adventureos track with violin, soft and hard-rocking moments. The electric guitar high-pitched here.

I find this album better than the previous one because of improved compsoitions and presence of direction.

However, the sounds is still quite a few steps away from the classic Blue Effect sound.

 1969-1989 by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2009
4.75 | 27 ratings

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1969-1989
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars There are enough reviews for studio albums so I will only cover the bonus tracks here.

This album, the 9th album in the album collection, consists of 4 logical parts: 1.) Rock and blues-rock tracks sung in Czech and English from the end of 60's. 2.) Pop-leaning sung tracks from the 70's. 3.) A couple of 80's tracks highly supported by keyboards and electronic drums. 4.) 3 live tracks.

I like the second and fourth part most.

The first six tracks are catchy, infectious and inspired by British psychedelia, mersey-beat but also blues-rock, a nice testament of that period in Czechoslovakia.

The 70's tracks have a distinct emotional and competent vocals by Oldrich Novotny. Another element is the rising power of synthesizers. On some tracks, like "Nezna", they nicely create atmosphere, not unlike on Banks' compositions. "El Dorado" is the most commercial of the tracks. Hladik shows that even in the pop-rock outfit, he can showcase his guitar playing abilities.

The 80's tracks are less developed and distinctive only thanks to electronic drums and keyboards, they don't bring much artistic quality, though with an exception of quality guitar. The re-edition of "Cajovna" sounds mechanical and therefore even more sorrowful than usual.

For the progheads, the emotional climax arrives in the end on the two last live tracks that were never release on regular studio albums. The guitar-bass storm by Freso and Hladik create a perfectly dramatic composition with the support of organ and solo guitar. "Prosim" is an excellent testimony of late 70's band abilities with a missing bass player and two keyboardists, a.ka. 1979. A bit reminiscent of SBB. The tight keyboard duo, guitar and drums are exceptional. Keyboards build up mulitple layers. The passionate vocal brings anxiety and nostalgy typical for the late Blue Effect.

This is an excellent addition to all the studio albums and highly recommended to all proggers.

 The Blue Effect & The Jazz Q Prague: Coniunctio by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.64 | 69 ratings

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The Blue Effect & The Jazz Q Prague: Coniunctio
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars The second album by Blue Effect brings more ambitions on board. Perhaps inspired by jazz-rock attempts from the US, perhaps being self-invented, the band tries combining rock and more traditional jazz approach with subtle traces of psychedelia and heavy doses of avantgarde.

Organ, brass instruments, flute and orchestra is joining the band to record an album of good music freedom but not terrific cohesiveness.

Rock instruments are sometimes too overshadowed by orchestra and brass instruments, the flow is well organized and can even seem chaotic at times. Among best moments in the first suite "Coniunctio 1" are solo flute moments, the beginning aggressive guitar and saxophone duet, among worst ones are avantgarde organ and piano, however, a better organized piano/guitar section comes to the rescue in the 15th minute.

After this sonic experimentation, the second track "Náv?teva u tety Markéty, vypití ?álku čaje" is a balsam for ears clad in a more traditional rock outfit with first hints ot progressive rock: unusual time signatures, no clear song structure and contrastful flute and rocking sections. Some agressive King Crimson-like can be already heard as early as on this album as well as very tasty masterful soloing by Hladik which he would become famous for. After hearing this track in 1971, you would realize how gifted and proficient this young lad was and he belonged to the best ones in Czechoslovakia. "Asi půjdem se psem ven" is similar to the first track, quite experimental and avantgarde, in fact, only the drummer is audible from the rock combo. Absolutely forgettable track. "Coniunctio II" offers a more digestable edition of the title track well rooted in the 4/4 rhythm with mulitple fill-ins and organ/flute/guitar/saxophone making seamingly unorganized solos. This is actually more formidable even for a rock listener for its rich sound. Besides that, there is almost no compositional value in this track.

Giving 3 stars because of ambitions and historical value, however this album is an acquired taste.

 Meditace [Aka: Kingdom Of Life] by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.25 | 70 ratings

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Meditace [Aka: Kingdom Of Life]
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

2 stars Some of the most memorable and catchy songs by Blue Effect were born on their debut album since this work is still miles away from progressive/artrock and jazz rock. Blue effect added themselves in the "bigbeat" Czechoslovak movement that was particularly strong in and around Praha (Prague).

The ingredients are British invasion of mid 60's, subtle blues rock influences and contemporary pop scene in Czechoslovakia. The line-up already contains two long-standing members, Vlado Cech on drums and Mr. Hladik with not so distinctive guitar playing as later after 1974. Moreover, this is a vocal album, more than any other album by Blues Effect.

"Paměť lásky" and "Blue effect street" are cleverly done pop/rock songs that won't hurt any body with then compliant guitar playing and friendly vocals."fenix" is a great passionate vocal number showing emotions. Blues rock tendencies are visible on "Stroj na nic", "Little girl" that sounds like a British clone with great flute, while "Desert flute" is a not do mid 60's British melody hooks with psychedelia traces. "Blues about stone" may be the most interesting track for the proghead with equal amount of passion, convinction and tasty guitar performance. Other pop-rock tracks follow with guitar being the major attraction.

While this is a good album for a blues and 60's pop/rock listener, it does not reveal much to a progressive rock listener, therefore 2 stars, all other albums will get a better rating ;-).

 The Blue Effect & The Jazz Q Prague: Coniunctio by BLUE EFFECT (MODRÝ EFEKT) album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.64 | 69 ratings

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The Blue Effect & The Jazz Q Prague: Coniunctio
Blue Effect (Modrý Efekt) Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars There were two great early prog rock bands that emerged in the former Czechoslavakia in the city of Prague, capital of the current Czech Republic. MODRY EFEKT (or Blue Effect) began merely as a blues rock band but displayed meagre progressive touches on their debut "Meditace (Kingdom Of Life)" whereas JAZZ Q PRAHA formed all the way back in the early 60s were predominantly inspired by the late 50s avant-garde jazz greats such as Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor and the great Sun Ra. While MODRY EFEKT managed to release their debut album the same year, this collaborative effort between the two groups would be JAZZ Q PRAHA's debut appearance and the album had such an impact on both bands that it would forever steer their cross-pollination efforts into entirely unforeseen musical arenas. This album is unusual in many ways.

First of all only the first and last tracks are the only collaborative efforts that feature both bands playing together. The second track is a MODRY EFEKT only affair and the same goes for JAZZ Q performing the third. Secondly, this album came out all the way back in 1970 behind the Iron Curtain where almost every aspect of an artist's creative process was controlled by the state. It is an astounding miracle that these two bands could have created something this utterly wild and complex at this early stage of progressive rock's history when many of these tracks remind the listener of contemporary and future acts. Most likely this is because the album is entirely instrumental with no lyrics so censorship was unneeded since there are no references to politics. This music is insanely advanced and is one of those crazy complex prog albums that will require many jazz, prog and classical appreciation classes to master any intelligible understanding on much of the album's run.

The album is only 39 minutes and 45 seconds in length but the beginning track "Coniunctio I" swallows up 19 minutes and 15 seconds of its real estate. This is by far the most demanding track on the entire album as it begins with screeching saxes and erupting organs swirling around in a cacophonous din before it finally cools down into a bass driven groove with a 60s psychedelic rock vibe complete with echo effects and ghostly guitar licks. After a couple minutes or so it turns into a heavy rock sequence that offers a taste of heavy blues rock with a sizzling sax that spirals out of control into free jazz territory along with some kind of whistling noises and frenetic organ counterpoints. Wow! There's nothing i can think of from this period of prog history that matches the intensity of this track and were only about five minutes in which enters i swear a louder version of Miles Davis' "Bitches Brew" which ironically came out the same year only half a globe away (before the internet or even legal access to American music) as a bass groove chugs along and keyboards dance Voodoo rituals around the bass driven campfire. After seven minutes it erupts into a bluesy guitar rock frenzy as Radim Hladík delivers one of the most demanding guitar solos of the era. Even Jimmy Page or Hendrix didn't get this heavy. After eight minutes it changes abruptly to a pastoral symphonically embellished flute solo that slowly ratchets up the tension into a jazzified melody with an oscillating keyboard effect and some kind of bells. The mood remains placid and subdued for a while as a jazz bass line finally enters and eventually sounds more like hard bop but then a Thelonious Monk style piano run casually strolls into the picture and then goes plain nuts but finally at the 14 minute mark an ostinato bass line hypnotically entrances while a fluttery flute line plays over it but after a couple minutes it ventures into a segment that reminds me of that frenetic part of Pink Floyd's "Saucerful Of Secrets" before the organ solo part begins. This track is phenomenal! At this early stage it has everything prog all rolled up into one. It has symphonic aspects, psychedelia, dissonance, heaviness, pastoral segments, blues, jazz, classical. Wow! A masterpiece of the ages.

"Náv?těva u tety Markéty, vypití ?álku čaje" is performed only by MODRY EFEKT and along with the next track by JAZZ Q PRAHA provides a centrifuge effect that allows the listener to distinguish which elements of the first track were provided by each band. It also allows a break in the freneticism and over-the-top complexity with a significantly more light-hearted bluesy rocker in a psychedelic rock framework that utilizes a beautiful flute to weave a melody like a fluttering butterfly through the track's shorter six minute time run. If you are familiar with MODRY EFEKT's debut then you will realize that the blues rock, the melodies and the psychedelic parts of CONIUNCTIO are in their camp and this second track provides all of those musical elements and creates a beautiful flute dominated psychedelic rock track that also becomes heavy with guitar and soloing. In fact, it sounds a lot to me like many of those Focus tracks such as "Eruption" on their second album only with more erratic rocking parts.

"Asi půjdem se psem ven" is solely performed by JAZZ Q PRAHA and like the MODRY EFEKT track gives an insight into which aspects of CONIUNCTIO belong to the band's signature sound. This track is straight out of the jazz playbook which starts off somewhat straight forward but soon spirals out into avant-garde jazz heaven and reminds me a lot of some of the space jazz that Sun Ra & his Space Arkestra were pumping out in the mid to late 60s. The time signatures of each instrument all exist in their own musical world and the combo thereof results in a cacophonous din that apexes in a frenetic John Zorn type of saxophone frenzy a good decade or so before he was assaulting eardrums with his own similar style.

"Coniunctio II" continues the collaboration of the first track but is completely different. It begins with a sumptuous flute melody but is backed up by a jarring dissonant guitar counterpoint and quickly picks up and becomes a rather Hendrix-esque guitar jam type sound with a Tullish flute accompaniment and at this point is the most normal sounding track of the album. It remains jammy sounding but ratchets up the tempo, dynamics and finds more instruments joining in until it reaches a cacophonous crescendo but at the heart of it remains a bluesy rock jam despite all the horns whizzing away at light speed.

CONIUNCTO is one of my favorite albums ever to have emerged from the old Soviet dominated Eastern European block and it doesn't get any proggier or complex than this one. This album titillates not only in a musical sense as it simultaneously pleases and assaults the senses but is fascinating to experience such a great work from the "forbidden" part of the world where the likelihood of a prog masterpiece emerging was virtually nil and only mere months after King Crimson, East Of Eden, High Tide, Marsupilami and other British prog bands were getting started. This album also shows the strong promise of collaborative efforts. Often these sorts of projects end up becoming watered down but the two bands found the right dynamic synergy to push each other further, the results of which steered MODRY EFEKT's path more towards jazz and likewise JAZZ Q added more rock elements when they would finally release their debut three years later. This one is an absolute under the radar masterpiece. Be warned though that this is nearly a 10 on the progometer as it is dense, complex and often impenetrable especially when the JAZZ Q elements are on full steam. This album has all the elements of early prog rolled into one package. It's heavy at times, it's pastoral and symphonic at times, it's psychedelic, it's jazzy, it's bluesy. It can be highly melodic with happiness inducing hooks or it can be dismally frightening with dissonant avant-garde jazz outbursts. One of my faves.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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