Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

HÖYRY-KONE

RIO/Avant-Prog • Finland


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Höyry-Kone picture
Höyry-Kone biography
Founded in Helsinki, Finland in 1991 - Disbanded in 2001

Very good band from Finland with an intricate music that ranges over classic prog, jazz, blues, techno, and more. There is intensive use of endless instruments. The compositions make use of a great variety of unpredictable arrangements that make the sound difficult to describe. Extremely creative and insanely courageous. I can't stop recommending this band. Recommended to demending ear listeners.

See also: HERE

HÖYRY-KONE forum topics / tours, shows & news


HÖYRY-KONE forum topics Create a topic now
HÖYRY-KONE tours, shows & news Post an entries now

HÖYRY-KONE Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to HÖYRY-KONE

Buy HÖYRY-KONE Music



More places to buy HÖYRY-KONE music online Buy HÖYRY-KONE & Prog Rock Digital Music online:

HÖYRY-KONE discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

HÖYRY-KONE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.87 | 71 ratings
Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa
1995
4.26 | 150 ratings
Huono Parturi
1997

HÖYRY-KONE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

HÖYRY-KONE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

HÖYRY-KONE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

HÖYRY-KONE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

HÖYRY-KONE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Huono Parturi by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.26 | 150 ratings

BUY
Huono Parturi
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars Things remain wildly unpredictable and utterly bizarre on HUONO PARTURI (Bad Haircut), the second and final album of HÖYRY- KONE's (Steam Engine) ten year run. With an eerie radioactive cover that looks like some sci-fi horror scene from a 60's B-movie, the music contained within however crafts another eleven tracks of true avant-garde weirdness as one of Finland's finest takes a whole bunch of disparate ingredients such as King Crimson-esque prog, heavy alternative metal, chamber rock in opposition, Gregorian chants, gypsy folk with touches of jazz and classical infused throughout and stews it all down into one of the most satisfying musical alchemical experiences in all of experimental rock.

HUONO PARTURI finds the band returning with the same core members of Jussi Kärkkäinen, Hänninen, Jarno Sarkula (bass), Tuomas Hänninen (guitar), Topi Lehtipuu (vocals, violin), Jukka Hannukainen (vocals and keys) and Marko Manninen (cello) but with a whole new set of supporting characters conjuring up one strange eclectic mix of prog gymnastics. Despite the new crew on board, this second offering very much continues the unique sound that HÖYRY-KONE set forth on the debut however this time around it all sounds a little more streamlined and less frenetic without the incessant zigzagging but be assured that this is by no means even remotely close to being considered an accessible album.

This album starts off very strangely with a track that is completely out of place with the rest, namely a modern day interpretation of "Beata VIscera" which was composed all the way back in the 12th century by Pérotin. After this unusual opening chorus of Gregorian chants, the album jumps straight into a heavier rock and metal format with jittery guitar angularities reminiscent of the King Crimson "Red" era, however as with the debut album finds classically infused chamber prog a la Univers Zero that weaves into the heavier rock which creates a larger than life dynamism especially as the rhythmic stomps tend to gravitate towards gypsy folk and polka music.

"Baksteri" sounds like a form of progressive klezmer actually and even though no musicians are credited there are various horn sounds such as a tuba as well as what sounds like a clarinet. The title track delivers a hefty metallic intro with stomping angry guitars but then morphs into an avant-garde gypsy folk sound with Topi Lehtipuu's operatic vocal style that reminds me most of the passionate romantic vocalists of the 70s Italian prog scene. For the most part HÖYRY-KONE continues the dual lead guitar with the violin and cello creating bizarre counterpoints with the vocals. It's almost as if different sections of the band created separate composiitons and then they sort of found a way to make them all do nasty things together. Not an easy task but HÖYRY-KONE makes it all sound so effortless.

Once again highly technical workouts are teased into playful bouts of surprise but never supplanting any sort of melodic development that while avant in nature, always dominates the soundscapes. While described by many as the Finnish version of King Crimson, the truth is HÖYRY-KONE has a sound completely their own and is distinct even from the band Alamaailman Vasarat which was the next step for many of the members after this band broke up in 2002. From tender Gregorian chants to the angry metal stomps of "Tottele" and "Laahustaja," HÖYRY-KONE didn't disappoint and suffered no sophomore slump. Very few bands have mastered the skill to mix so many disparate influences and make it sound so natural.

HUONO PARTURI may have resulted in some bad haircuts but it certainly didn't affect the creativity or instrumental interplay of the musicians involved. This music is utterly fascinating in how cleverly crafted it all is and how the band can effortlessly fuse heavy metal with avant-prog, chamber rock and more folk oriented genres. This band is one of the true under the radar gems out there and perhaps the strangest beast ever to emerge from the Finnish prog scene. For my money i prefer the debut album just a smidge over this one but there is no denying that HUONO PARTURI is not as brilliant and demanding as its predecessor despite it being the slightly more accessible and significantly heavier of the two.

 Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.87 | 71 ratings

BUY
Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars One of the more extremely wild and bizarre bands to come out of Finland's progressive rock scene was the eclectic and impossible to categorize HÖYRY-KONE (Finnish for Steam Engine) formed in 1991 and only released two albums before sort of morphing into the band Alamaailman Vasarat (Finnish for Hammers of the Underworld). Founded by Jussi Kärkkäinen (guitar) and Teemu Hänninen (drums), the band went through various changes before the lineup settled with Kärkkäinen, Hänninen, Jarno Sarkula (bass), Tuomas Hänninen (guitar), Topi Lehtipuu (vocals), Jukka Hannukainen (vocals and keys), Nina Lehos (oboe), and Marko Manninen (cello) who all played on the band's debut album HYÖNTEISIÄ VOI RAKASTAA (Insects Can Love).

HÖYRY-KONE was truly in a world of its own. With a musical appetite perhaps only matched by the American bands Mr Bungle or Estradasphere, these Finns found a way to mix and meld the angular sonic storms of King Crimson, the chamber rock in opposition of Univers Zero, quirky Zappa-esque arrangements, gypsy folk, polka rhythms, heavy metal, opera and unpredictable jazz and classical fusions. This was a band all about left field stylistic shifts that can only be explained as unrestrained and utterly unpredictable where every track takes you on a completely new demented journey. Add to that the excellent instrumental interplay that is impeccably delivered and it's a no brainer that this is one of the most unique musical journeys out there.

Starting out as some sort of post-punk polka prog with avant-choral vocals on "Örn," the stylistic shifts waste no time with the following "Raskaana" which showcases a mopey avant-prog musical workout with lyrics sung in a lackadaisical manner. All titles and lyrics on the album are performed in the band's native Finnish, but the intro track continues as it bursts into a spastic free flow of what sounds like the Talking Heads freaking out on drugs but then reverts back to a rather chilled pace again. "Pannuhuoneesta" is perhaps the freakiest of all with a series of bizarre sonic weirdness before adopting a polka-esque gypsy swing groove that implements a series of stop / start stylistic shifts that sound like a swarm of angry hornets. The vocals on this one are spoken.

While the dreamy placidity of "Luottamus" is a more mellow violin dominated slower number, "Kaivoonkatsoja" and "Hyönteiset" break out the heavy metal twin guitar heft although the orchestral touches of the violin, cello and oboe are never far behind. Of all the tracks on board "Hätä" is the one that comes closest to King Crimson's "Red" period with the crisp dissonant angularity of the guitar performances with a beefed up bass bravado that provides the anchoring support while the guitars freeform and drift in and out of the overall groove fo things. It also displays some of the most frenetic time signature workouts in an album that is stuffed to the gill with progressive excesses.

"Myrskynmusiiikkia" which translates into "Storm Music" is very much a turbulent cacophonous roar of the guitars but also offers glimpses of calm between the storms with Topi Leehtipuu's outstandingly clean operatic vocals that take the album to a completely different level. His style of singing is closest to the symphonic prog greats of the Italian rock scene and balances the rough and tumble experimental instrumental touches with a connection to the more melodic strains of the Rock Italiano Progressivo scene. The track concludes with the same raucousness that began but the true breakdown into pure chaos emerges with the ending "Hyönteiset" which wends and winds with weird vocals styles trading off and then climaxes with a thrashy metal guitar attack, a few seconds of silence and then a spastic explosive delivery of pure avant-garde chaos.

HYÖNTEISIÄ VOI RAKASTAA is an amazingly wild roller coaster ride of disparate sounds that conspire to make an utterly brilliantly unique album and one that offers enough variations as well as a nice mix of the melodic and off-kilter avant-garde to create a satisfying listen that never gets old. While HÖYRY-KONE would tame things down a bit for the second release "Huono Parturi," the band goes for the avant-garde jugular on this wild and wacky first offering. While many prefer the tamer sophomore album, i am absolutely blown away by this uncompromising mix of relentless adventurous juggling of styles. While similar only in its uncompromising idiosyncratic delivery system with bands like Mr Bungle, Estradasphere and even Zappa, the truth is nobody has ever sounded like HÖYRY-KONE. This was a one of a kind act! This album was deliciously designed for the musical adventurous and if that's what you've been craving then this will satisfy every step of the way.

 Huono Parturi by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.26 | 150 ratings

BUY
Huono Parturi
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Höyry-Kone beginning this album with an adaptation of Beata Viscera, a piece of 12th Century music by Pérotin. Giving way from monastic chant into the frenzied Univers Zero-influenced chamber prog of Höyry-Kone may be a shock to the system, but it's hardly the only surprise you'll get listening to the various twists and turns on the album. Take the second track Terva-Antti Ku Häihin Lähti - kicking off with a dark guitar-dominated range reminiscent of Larks' Tongues In Aspic before an invasion of violin takes the lead, with the two battling it out for control over the rest of the composition. If this is the last of Höyry-Kone's studio albums, let us be glad they lasted long enough to give us this.
 Huono Parturi by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.26 | 150 ratings

BUY
Huono Parturi
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by Norbert

5 stars Huono Parturi is the second studio album by Finnish progressive /avantgarde rock band Höyry-Kone. The title of the album means "Bad barber", just look at the album artwork... The album featuring 11 tracks is about 49 minutes long, at least my copy. I have the one relasesed by Nordic Notes in 2013, I had to wait some time to get my hands of a copy of Huono Parturi. The music is performed by the often operatic male vocals, two guitars, bass, violin, cello, flute, drums (Anders Nordin from Anekdoten makes a guest apperance in two tracks beside Teemu Hänninen, the band's drummer), plus the wind ensemble in the purely jazz track called Baksteri. Beside cello player Marko Manninen the trained tenor singer and violinist Topi Lehtipuu deserves a special mention, but the musicianship is outstanding on this album. The album starts with a beautiful rendition of Beata Viscera by Perotin the Great. He was a composer of the 12th, early 13th century, one of the earliest known composers. Topi really shines here, I think Perotin would be pleased with this performance. Terva-Antti Ku Häihin Lähti suddenly explodes after the Perotin piece, and the other tracks of Huoni Parturi with the exception of the mentioned Baksteri are in more in less in the vein of the explosive second track. The music is somewhat similar of King Crimson and some classic avantgarde artists like Zappa or Univers Zero, but far heavier, than any of the mentioned artists, and Höyry-Kone certainly had the sound of their own. Some of the tracks are instrumental, some of them are supported by the gorgeous vocals of Topi Lehtipuu, but really all compositions are very impressive. Weird, quirky, really powerful and playful, an absolutely fantastic album, one of my 10 favourite albums of the Nineties.
 Huono Parturi by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.26 | 150 ratings

BUY
Huono Parturi
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by ScorchedFirth

4 stars (8/10)

Things didn't get any less bizarre on Höyry-Kone's second album, "Huono Parturi". In fact, they took a lot of the ideas and approach from "Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa", added a bunch more, and pushed it to another level. This time around, the band seems a lot more together too, and the material is a lot more memorable as a result.

Much like 70s Finnish proggers Haikara, Höyry-Kone draws inspiration principally from King Crimson (though probably Haikara too), but Höyry-Kone also branched out enough to make it into the Avant-garde. However, more important than sonic similarities, the levels of creativity and willingness to experiment also remind me of KC. There is just such a feeling of freedom about this album, like they were just going to do whatever they wanted. Oh, and it sounds great too; that always helps.

The core sound to this album consists of a raucous blend of harsh guitars and impressive violin/cello, along with pounding complex rhythms and interspersed with occasional booming male vocals and quieter sections. Well, that still doesn't really encapsulate the core sound, but then there are quite a few songs that are nothing like it anyway. For instance the first song, "Beata Viscera", is a serene Latin opera, completely unlike the rest of the album, and goes on for about 7 minutes. Unlike some other reviewers I definitely enjoy this song, but it is a complete misdirect as to what the rest of the album will sound like. It's even in a completely different language (the rest of the vocals are in Finnish).

After the opening, the album launches headlong into madness with "Terva-Antti Ku Häihin Lähti". The first time I listened to this album, I had turned up the volume quite loud to listen to the quieter parts of the first song, so the harsh strike of the opening riff actually made me jump when it caught me completely by surprise. This song is a dramatic string fuelled gallop, where the guitar sounds like it's in pain at times, the way it screeches. Whilst no song on here could be fully representative of such a diverse album, it nonetheless does give a better indication of what the rest of the album will sound like. The next song, "Karhunkaato", also really rocks. The strong male vocals return, and the violin guides complex rhythms that still manage to be strong and driving.

Things don't let up with "Lumisah", another quite heavy song. The percussion really crashes here and the violin floats around sinisterly as it so often does on this album. Weird but headbangable (yes that definitely is a word)! For me, headbanging then turns to a sort of enjoyable bemusement, with the good humoured interlude "Baksteri". It's a Silly little piece of old school jazz that (at less than two minutes) manages to be a fun interjection without outstaying it's welcome. It provides a brief but welcome break before just ending strangely and without much ceremony.

The title track, "Huono Parturi" takes us back to the hard rocking mix of harsh Frippish guitar riffing and slithering violin. Once again Topi Lehtipuu shows great strength with his vocals, and good range too. As with the rest of the album, Höyry-Kone play very well as a unit, often stopping and starting together, or paying intricately across each other without ever getting into a mess. This leads into another two minute interesting little track, which again is completely different to the rest of the album. "Ullakon Lelut" is an atmospheric ethereal piece, that holds attention intensely, and again is just the right length. It also serves as proof Höyry-Kone can be subtle as well as bold.

Once more, just when they've set you into one mood that's when they slam you in the face with the aggressive heavy stuff, in this case "Tottele". I Think I can hear some growling noises in the background at certain points, which is fun. I also like the thick distorted bass soloing on this song, which puts me in mind of John Wetton. "Tottele" is another short song, but heavy and mad this time, so it feels like a hit and run. The album then continues with "Kala" and "Laahustaja", both of which take their time a bit more and move between slower, quieter, calmer sections and more exciting sections, in quite a natural manner (not an easy feat for weird music like this). "Laahustaja" also features some enjoyable guiding contributions from the flute which I liked.

After an exhausting journey, things finally conclude with "Laina-Ajalla". There are some high quality vocals here, Finnish does really accent the delivery in a good way, I think. It does mean I have no idea what the song is going on about, though according to google translate, some sort of photographer. The other songs appear to be about tipping bears, attic toys and fish, so I can only assume all manner of spectacular nonsense is being sung about. There is some more guitar torturing (definite squeals) and the song (and indeed the album) ends with a crescendo of wailing vocals before fading away to some odd noises. Phew!

Late 90s Finland might not be an obvious place to look for imaginative and exciting Avant-Prog, but this album really impressed me, and you should definitely check it out. It's full of ideas, and great inventive musicianship from all instruments. Even the percussion has some odd sounds (e.g. metal clinks). The mix of shorter pieces and heavy bombardment, along with the variety of music on offer make this a brilliant album to get into. It's such a shame Höyry-Kone ended things here; goodness knows where they would have gone next!

 Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.87 | 71 ratings

BUY
Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by ScorchedFirth

3 stars (7/10)

Well the Finnish certainly can be an odd bunch, can't they? Höyry-Kone ('steam-engine' to us English-speakers) popped up in the nineties with an odd mixture of sounds that has rightfully earned them a place in the RIO/Avant-Prog subgenre. On their first album, "Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa", you can hear quite a lot of things. You can hear bits of jazz, in the instrumentation and in the approach. You can hear the influence of other eclectic prog bands, especially King Crimson, and not just the 70s stuff either (a lot of the interwoven rhythmic riffs call to mind KC's 80s classic "Discipline"). You can hear classical, and even some dance/techno-like segments, plus a large number of other ingredients, all thrown together in an intentionally eccentric bundle.

Does it work? Well, mostly, but not entirely. Despite the variety of influences, a lot of the songs actually end up feeling quite similar, and on top of that not every experimental idea is successful. I'm not overly keen on the more electronic/techno influenced sections, though they are luckily not that common. Also, some of the instruments can occasionally be a bit cheap-sounding, which gets a little distracting from time to time.

However there are some strong, memorable moments on this album. There are some really evocative passages of violin, and plenty of engaging odd rhythms to enjoy. The vocals in particular are a real draw, one of the more interesting things about Höyry-Kone. Often powerfully booming in a semi-operatic manner (just one of the many ways that Höyry-Kone call to mind fellow Finnish proggers Haikara), sometimes delicate, but always effective. I sometimes find myself singing small portions of the Finnish lyrics to myself, so it has even managed to cross the language divide, albeit anybody from Finland would probably find my butchering of their mother tongue quite laughable.

"Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa" is a decent collections of songs, songs which are usually short, complex, quirky, and can change quite quickly (which can sometimes be a good or bad thing). Not everything works, but this is definitely an interesting release, though somewhat overshadowed by Höyry-Kone's next album, "Huono Parturi". If nothing else, the band should be commended on their desire to try something new, because they have certainly achieved that.

 Huono Parturi by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.26 | 150 ratings

BUY
Huono Parturi
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars 4.5 stars. The only thing keeping me from pulling the trigger on 5 stars is that first track. It's the longest and is pretty much these male operatic vocals throughout. Other than that this album smokes man. Their second and last studio record shows them contrasting the heaviness with the more laid back sections to perfection. It's pretty cool that ANEKDOTEN's drummer Peter Nordins helps out on the kit.

"Beata Viscera" is that song I was talking about as we get these laid back operatic vocals and atmosphere throughout. I just can't get into this unfortunately. "Terva-Antti Ku Haihin Lahti" kicks in hard and we get strings too as drums pound. The flute also joins the party. "Karhunkaato" has a fairly solid sound to open then it settles with vocals before a minute. it picks back up a minute later when the vocals stop as contrasts continue. "Lumisaha" is a top three for me. It's uptempo and heavy before it settles back, but it's still heavy here with vocal expressions. Vocals after 2 minutes and it's still heavy as the tempo continues to shift. It's quite intense after 4 minutes. "Baksteri" is a short and somewhat silly instrumental. "Huono Parturi" is heavy to start then it settles with strings. Vocals before a minute.

"Ullakron Lelut" is a short and laid back melancholic instrumental. "Tottele" has an experimental intro then it kicks in hard. We get a very heavy rhythm here. "Kala" is a top three as well. It's fairly heavy early then vocals come in before a minute. It settles back 2 minutes in with strings. Vocal melodies come in as it settles back some more. It's building before 4 minutes then it kicks in. Vocals follow. "Laahustaja" opens with heavy guitar and a beat as strings join in. It settles with flute after 2 minutes. The flute continues but it turns heavy again as contrasts continue. It then kicks in hard after 4 minutes before settling a minute later. "Laina-Ajalla" is the final track and my last top three. Vocals and strings lead early then it turns fuller before kicking in with ripping guitar before 2 1/2 minutes. The vocals are back. Amazing sound !

 Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.87 | 71 ratings

BUY
Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars HOYRY-KONE were a Finnish band who released two albums in the mid-nineties. These guys are legendary in the Avant-Garde community. It doesn't hurt of course that these records are out of print and almost impossible to find. Also the band has indicated they won't be re-issued. Three of the members of this band went on to be part of ALAMAAILMAN VASARAT. That would be the drummer, cello player and flute / bass player. This is a highly entertaining and adventerous release with some humour too.

And speaking of humour the opening track makes me laugh. It's called "Om" and has an uptempo beat with these deep vocal melodies that come and go. At one point other vocal melodies trade off with the deep ones. Crazy stuff. A calm with vocals follow then operatic vocals are next then that beat returns and those deep vocal melodiies to end it. "Raskaana" has these lazy vocals and a beat. Guitar too. Things get chaotic for a while then back to the opening soundscape. "Hamaran Joutomaa" opens with angular guitar, crisp drumming and chunky bass. A change 1 1/2 minutes in then the drums return followed by vocals a minute later. It kicks in hard after 5 minutes and we get some excellent guitar too. "Pannuhuoneesta" is a short spoken word piece with weird sounds in the background. "Luottamus" has this pulsating sound with cello and a beat then vocals and aboe join in. A dreamy calm 3 minutes in.

"Kaivoonkatsoja" has a nice heavy undercurrant with guitar. Cello joins in. It's even heavier then it settles before 1 1/2 minutes. Kicks back in before 2 minutes and it's heavier a minute later. "Kosto" has these laid back vocals and a mellow sound. Things change 2 minutes in as it kicks in. Powerful vocal melodies follow. A calm before 3 minutes with cello then huge bass lines join in. It kicks back in before 5 minutes. Nice. "Hata" has these riffs that come in quickly. It does settle some but the bass and drums are still strong. It then picks back up. "Myrskynmuslikkia" is the longest track at almost 7 minutes. It has a heavy intro before settling with vocals. It kicks in at 3 minutes when the vocals stop. These contrasts continue. "Hyonteiset" is fairly uptempo with vocals and it turns heavy quickly.

Without question 4 stars and the next one is even better. Thanks Todd !

 Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.87 | 71 ratings

BUY
Hyönteisiä Voi Rakastaa
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by zravkapt
Special Collaborator Post/Math Rock Team

4 stars What a great album this is. The debut of Finnish band Hoyry-Kone. I prefer this one to the slightly more popular Huono Parturi. These guys sing in Finnish, and all the song titles are in Finnish, so apologies for not being able to put umlauts over almost every vowel. This album reminds me of Mr. Bungle, although the music here doesn't jump all over the place like it has a short attention span, like Bungle.

"Orn" starts almost funky with operatic vocals. Then some Crimson style guitar interplay before backwards effects. Later a more mellow section. Then some strong bass before it goes back to the funky opera part. "Hamaran Joutomaa" begins with Crimson like interlocking guitars. Later a nice melody on some instrument...a synth I guess. Singing starts. Later on goes into a different section thats more harder before some more Crimson style interlocking guitars. "Pannuhuoneesta" sounds like Bungle of the time. Very techno sounding.

"Luottamus" is a loungy jazz type of song. Nice melodic playing on violin and oboe. Good singing. Gets more orchestral with some acoustic guitar. "Kaivoonkatsoja" is an instrumental with metal riffing and symphonic violins. "Kosto" starts with acoustic upright bass, oboe, cello and vocals. Later almost slap style electric bass playing and drums. Gets more rocking with guitar near the end. Then just electric bass and cello.

"Hata" is another instrumental. Generally rocking, it changes throughout the song. I like the sound of the bass at the end. "Myrskynmusiikkia" starts out more rocking then goes into a part with vocals and tremolo guitar. Later bass, drums and violin. After some weird vocals. Goes back to vocals and tremolo guitar. Then full band again. "Hyonteiset" has a jazzy rhythm and acoustic guitar with vocals and violin/cello. The song ends and after a moment of silence some cacophony with tape speed altering.

This is great progressive rock from 1995. Although this is technically avant-prog, it's not very dissonant or atonal at all. Highly recommended. 4 stars.

 Huono Parturi by HÖYRY-KONE album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.26 | 150 ratings

BUY
Huono Parturi
Höyry-Kone RIO/Avant-Prog

Review by Diego I

4 stars At first it seems to be just another fundamental RIO album, but over the minutes, you're coming to fall in that Hoyry Kone it´s just not another band, the music is very radical, frenetic, soft and melodic, the corus and the soprano voice is contrasted by the density of the guitars, the bass and violins. Although it does not have much recorded music, this album perfectly reflects the full potential of these sweden guys, but not too experienced at least their record is not a disappointment, au contrarie, this album sounds very balanced, aggressive and sometimes why no, melodic... bravo for the Huono parturi. 8.5 of 10
Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives