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ÄNGLAGÅRD

Symphonic Prog • Sweden


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Änglagård picture
Änglagård biography
Founded in 1991 in Stockholm, Sweden - Disbanded in 1994 - Reformed briefly in 2002/03 - Active since 2008

Änglagård were a short-lived band who nonetheless generated critical acclaim and a loyal following in the early nineties with their brooding Mellotron and synth heavy sound that also featured virtuoso percussionist Mattias Olsson and classically trained flautist Anna Holmgren.

The band was formed in the summer of 1991 by guitarist and lead vocalist Tord Lindman and bassist Johan Högberg. The pair placed ads to form a band in the vein of the seventies progressive bands such as Yes and King Crimson, which were successfully answered by keyboardist Thomas Johnson and guitarist Jonas Engdegård. Drummer Olsson and flautist Holmgren were soon added and by the following spring the band were touring and logging studio sessions that would yield the well-received album Hybris. The release was followed by an American tour which included an appearance at the 1993 Progfest in Los Angeles. By 1994 the band had released their second and final album Epilog, followed again by an appearance at Progfest. This would prove to be the band's final performance. The Progfest recordings were engineered and released in 1996 as the live requiem Buried Alive.

⭐ Collaborators Top Prog Album of 2012 ⭐

Founding member Lindman went on to a career in the film business after the demise of the band, while the remaining members reformed briefly to tour in 2003, but are currently on indefinite hiatus. Olsson has since had a hand in the formation of Nanook of the North and has played in Pineforest Crunch and the Par Lindh Project, among others. Johnson has also appeared on studio released for the post-rock project Reminder.

Änglagård's sound is rich in mellotron, Hammond and piano, and a brooding wash of guitars and bass/bass pedal accented by Holmgren's moody and precise flute. The band's compositions are characterized by long, often instrumental tracks with significant tempo shifts and sometimes intense guitar flourishes. The Epilog album is instrumental in its entirety, and many of the tracks are distinguished by striking passages from Johnson's grand piano. Early Porcupine Tree also comes to mind, particularly when listening to Epilog.

Änglagård deserves a place in the Archives for their admirable effort in carrying the banner of lar...
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ÄNGLAGÅRD discography


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ÄNGLAGÅRD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.38 | 1657 ratings
Hybris
1992
4.09 | 638 ratings
Epilog
1994
4.27 | 1054 ratings
Viljans Öga
2012

ÄNGLAGÅRD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.62 | 151 ratings
Buried Alive
1996
4.67 | 83 ratings
Prog På Svenska - Live In Japan
2014

ÄNGLAGÅRD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.81 | 31 ratings
Made In Norway
2017

ÄNGLAGÅRD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.86 | 7 ratings
23 Years Of Hybris
2015

ÄNGLAGÅRD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

ÄNGLAGÅRD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Prog På Svenska - Live In Japan by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover Live, 2014
4.67 | 83 ratings

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Prog På Svenska - Live In Japan
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars An excellent live album full of technical precision yet enough feelings to dive in. I've seen the first live band's performance after a long time, in February 2013 in Sweden, Stockholm. The performance was absolutely absorbing and pleasant.

The sound is very good, too. Live versions bring additional life and dynamism to the music and don't stay behind their studio versions. My only complaint is a different sound for the long awaited organ solo in "Jordok". The nice first symphonic track is a great warm-up full of bombastic sounds. All three studio albums are equally represented.

Go and get this fantastic celebration of some of the best 90's traditional progressive rock music!

 Epilog by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover Studio Album, 1994
4.09 | 638 ratings

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Epilog
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars The second gem by Änglagård does not stay much behind the first ingenious release, it is full of great melodies, melancholy feelings, tasteful and complex playing and no vocals this time.

The album greets the listener by a 2-minute keyboard/violin solemn track before Höstsejd starts with a typical Änglagård sound: Keyboards (Hammond/Mellotron), loud bass, clever guitar and dynamic drums. This track is quite introspective but retains the drama thanks to the ominous Hammond motive. At the 3rd minute, a progressive rock moment with decorative guitar/keyboard take over. Another evidence than even loose jam-like sounding instrumentation is actually thought out and planned to the last detail. Folk inspiration is prevalent in the soft middle part. Worth mentioning is also a piano/flute duel full of melancholy. The composition ends in an experimental way and a bit abruptly.

"Skogsranden" is my least favourite out of 3 long compositions on this album. I want to highlight use of Moog and clever use of 3/4 or 6/8 patterns. It also features one of the most peaceful Änglagård flute solos. Similar to "Höstsejd", the end is a bit unstructured.

"Sista somrar" was meant to be a very fine symphonic and good-bye Epilog by the band. The composition develops slowly before it reaches a dynamic cresciendo. Excellent emotional guitar lead in the mid-section is memorable as well as symphonic Hammond reminiscent of early 70's arrangements. Late in the 9th minute, a fantastic dreamy irregular motive breaks in - in vein with "Finch" or "Focus" however, it is suppressed soon by a heavier section. The compositon remains melancholic owing to its title and leaves the listener with pain in heart but joy in ears.

"Saknadens Fullhet" is a short calm piano-driven track to wish all the best.

Bonus track has a live "Rösten" version with dominating flute and Mellotron.

Highly recommended for fans of Scandinavian prog-rock.

 Hybris by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover Studio Album, 1992
4.38 | 1657 ratings

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Hybris
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars Änglagård's first album comes from another planet; it is a shower filled with refreshment after relative still waters at the and of 80's and beginning of 90's.

It took the progressive rock music by storm, find new admirers, revived the old ones and surprised even those active ones.

The album is incredibly tight, thought out to the latest detail, cohesive, inspirational and creative.

All players are masters of their instruments: Loud Rickenbacker bass, emotional guitar with different faces, equlibristic drumming and effective flood of Hammond organ + Mellotron.

The voice of the singer is weak in terms of intensity but conveys fragility and suits this kind of music; thankfully, the music is mainly instrumental.

Anekdoten could be considered as Änglagård 's peer but in my opinion, Änglagård are a tid ahead in terms of compositional skills.

The first track "Hybris" epitomizes the traditional revival of progressive rock in the 90's: Paying hommage to old masters while bringing enough creativity and input to the table.

Dramatic, dark and melancholic atmosphere opens up this masterpiece composition. The instrumental interplay brings instant joy into ears of the listener especially thanks to virtuoso drums. Folk influences are offered, too.

The quiet acoustic guitar/flute section is compensated by one of the most memorable church-organ-like solo - pity that it is not a genuine pipe organ. The climax is reached shortly afterwards with keyboard and guitar escapades. New ideas keep coming even late into the tenth minute, no repetitions but new motives planned until the latest detail.

"Vandringar i vilsenhet" is a first sung song with plenty of Hammond organ and dark Mellotron section in the middle. Musicians succeed in graduation the tension until a Genesis-inspired moog section comes. The finale is marked by deep bass pedal and a combination of organ+mellotron resuting in another strong music experience.

"Ifrån klarhet till klarhet" starts like a bad joke with juvenile replay to quickly upgrade to a bombastic dynamic overture with loud bass guitar and pleasant acoustic and electric guitar playing. The voice is less fragile than in the second song but still tender. The soft acoustic guitar creates space to re-breathe.

"Kung Bore" is the most melodic effort on the album and as typical for the band, also the most melancholic one. The melancholic motive is outstanding and repeated in the end to a great effect. Singing reaches best quality on the record. The folk influence is considerable in the middle section. A fantastic composition full of emotions!

The bonus track "Gånglåt från Knapptibble" has a bit worse sound quality but does not stay behind in terms of emotions and quality. It shows a great use of synths, mellotron and Hammond organ.

This album is one of the best progressive efforts of the 90's and you must not miss this one!

 Prog På Svenska - Live In Japan by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover Live, 2014
4.67 | 83 ratings

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Prog På Svenska - Live In Japan
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by Neo-Romantic

5 stars Prog på Svenska ? Live in Japan

My initial impressions upon first listen is that in spite of the member changes from one album to another, this band can still play very well together. This performance demonstrates their individual and collective talents very well. It takes a lot of preparation to properly perform these pieces, and playing them live is even more challenging than recording them in the studio; if someone makes a mistake or the balance is not good, you're stuck with the result, unless you edit the recording later. Änglagård's challenging music makes the risk factor of live performance very high, but with great risk comes great reward.

And the reward of this concert, in my opinion, is indeed very great.

To summarize the strengths of this concert, I would say that their performance is very balanced, musical, and technical.

*Balanced: They play in sync very consistently, and the sounds of each instrument blend together very well. I never felt like the flute was getting covered by the more naturally powerful instruments (drums, electric guitar), the bass could be heard at an appropriate volume, and each of the percussion instruments could be clearly heard.

*Musical: I love how you can tell this is obviously a live recording when you hear it. You can hear certain nuances that let you know these musicians are really playing their instruments on stage together in real time. I emphasize this because some listeners may want to remember that these are actual human beings playing challenging music together and executing a great team performance. Additionally, I truly appreciate the changes in dynamic level (loud and soft, crescendo and decrescendo) and changes in rhythm (slight accelerando and ritardando to let certain phrases "breathe" a little for musical effect).

I also appreciate how they adapted these pieces for a live setting. For example, in the studio version of "Längtans klocka", at one point the character of the sound in the "folk music" section is similar to an old recording (like a phonograph record). This would be very challenging to bring to a stage without some additional sound manipulation, so the choice they made in using the saxophone to play this section was actually very enjoyable, even though it was different from the original. I appreciate their creativity in adapting certain things to fit the stage without sacrificing the quality of their art.

Another good example of how they adapted their music for their band at that time can be heard in Kung Bore. The drum fills in the later part of the song are different from the Hybris album recording. I'm totally okay with this, and actually appreciate that their new drummer has a chance to put his unique musical fingerprints on the performance. Bold choice, and I greatly appreciate it.

The ability to play and balance so many dense layers of musical material sets Änglagård's musicians apart as elite artists, in my opinion. I was pleasantly surprised at how much music five people could play at once, and it still sound good! At the end of "Längtans klocka", I found myself thinking, "How are there only five people on stage?" They figured out how to play and blend so many layers and textures, which is very rewarding to hear. Also, given that Hybris was recorded with two guitarists back in 1992, I was curious if this album's pieces would sound like they were missing something since there was only one guitarist on stage for this concert. Thankfully, I didn't feel like anything was lacking. The sound was fine, and the pieces were quite enjoyable to hear in this context.

*Technical: It has already been well-documented in studio album reviews that Änglagård is a very talented group of musicians, so I won't say too much about that at this moment. All I want to mention is that as a musician myself, I understand and appreciate the preparation required to play music that is this challenging. Each piece is demanding, having very specific technical nuances that require a lot of skill and focus to play each time you get on stage. I give them a lot of credit for playing these pieces with as few errors a possible. And I appreciate that the challenge of playing the correct notes did not prevent them from focusing on "making music". It isn't just about playing the right notes; it's also about making these phrases and sections sound natural, flow into each other like a great story or a river, and share authentic human emotional expression. They did all of these things, and that is the mark of a truly professional group of artists.

I give top marks for these wonderful musicians. They not only played the notes correctly, but they made the musical phrases connect very well and played in great balance with each other. Thank you for your great concert and great contributions to music, Änglagård!

 Viljans Öga by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.27 | 1054 ratings

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Viljans Öga
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nº 219

'Viljans Oga' is the third studio album of the Swedish symphonic progressive rock band Anglagard and was released in 2012. As happened with 'Epilog', 'Viljans Oga' is a completely instrumental work influenced by the progressive music of the 70's, of Genesis and King Crimson. But, it's also deeply inspired in the classical music. Still, Anglagard's music is also strongly influenced by the Swedish folklore music with its recognizable Scandinavian melancholy.

Anglagard is part of a whole breed of young progressive rockers. Like some other Sweden bands, like Anekdoten or Par Lindh Project, they write lengthy symphonic pieces and they sound like many of the big 70's acts but they always play with a very tough and own sound. Anglagard got itself noticed in the small international circles of progressive rock in the 90's, when they were formed. In twenty years they only released three studio albums and two live albums, until now.

In relation to the line up on the album, it has some changes in relation to the last line up presented on their previous album, their debut live album 'Buried Alive', in 1996. The guitarist Tord Lindman left the band and wasn't substituted. The bassist Joahn Hogberg also left the band but was substituted by the new bassist Joahn Brand. So, the line up on the album is Jonas Engdegard (guitars), Thomas Johnson (piano, mellotron and synthesizers), Anna Holmgren (flute and saxophone), Johan Brand (bass and taurus pedals) and Mattias Olsson (drums, percussion and noises).

'Viljans Oga' has four tracks. All music was written and arranged by Anglagard. The first track 'Ur Vilande' has an acoustic pastoral introduction lead by Anna Holmgren's flute and Mattias Olson's vibraphone, assisted by the cello and the piano. The theme develops in a suggestive status of the classical music. Then, the track develops gradually and naturally, very peaceful and masterfully supported by Olsson's magnificent drumming and Endegard's guitar. It has also some occasional mellotron eruptions in the early King Crimson's vein. This is an excellent way to reinterpret the classic progressive rock. The second track 'Sorgmantel' with about twelve minutes long is, imagine, the shortest track on the album. It contains a few upbeat musical moments and it's probably the most melodic number on the all album. Curiously, the music flows smoothly and continuously in spite of the very often tempo changes. The second part on the track ups in terms of intensity, with a very powerful organ work and some dramatic flute parts. The striking contrast between the mellotron and the distorted guitar is magnificent. Once more we are in presence of the classic rock at its best. The third track 'Snardom' which opens the theme with a dramatic and energetic way propelled by Olsson's drums and some spiced synthesizer sounds is a song dominated by Anna Holmgren's flute and Johan Brand's bass line that take the centre of the musical stage. Some of the quieter moments of the song have some more fluid melodic sections, featuring a very lovely guitar performance. This is a more energetic song than the two previous tracks. But it's perfectly in the same vein of those tracks, contributing to the perfect music balance of the all album. The fourth track 'Langtans Klocka' brings to the album an autumnal tone with an extremely elegant and almost classical style. This is a track with excellent guitar riffs twined by some beautiful bass lines and a great drum performance. The guitar and flute works provide occasionally solo spots on the song very well supported on the back by the keyboards. The track's rhythm, stop and start, so common and typical on Anglagard's music, are even more evident than in other previous numbers. This song continues the general mood of the all album and represents a perfect and natural way to close the album.

Conclusion: My first contact with Anglagard's music was more than ten years ago, here on Progarchives. And, again, I'm deeply thankful to this music site. Till those years the band had only released 'Hybris', 'Epilog' and 'Buried Alive'. So, as many of we know, in those years we were convinced that 'Buried Alive' would have been the swan's song of Anglagard. Fortunately, the future would prove this wasn't true. Against all expectations, Anglagard would come to release their third studio album, 'Viljans Oga'. So, after have heard 'Viljans Oga' for several times, I remain, again, deeply impressed by another album of this band. In my humble opinion, 'Viljans Oga' takes up where 'Epilog' left off way back in 1994, but with even more maturity, both in the composition and in the performance. This time the major influences are, in my perspective, King Crimson and the classical music. But, to complete entirely the all picture, the usual familiar and typical Scandinavian very dark and pastoral mood tinged by a very special touch of Scandinavian folk coupled magnificently with the prog music of the 70's and the classical music, and added with a very cohesiveness in the writing, which gives to Anglagard's music a very unique, intricate and beautiful sound. With this fantastic album, I would dare to say that Anglagard rose from the ashes just like a reborn phoenix. I sincerely hope that they can keep on shining at their highest and still illuminate us for many years. It's always a pleasure to know that prog is still alive.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Epilog by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover Studio Album, 1994
4.09 | 638 ratings

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Epilog
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nº 218

"Epilog" is the second studio album of the Swedish symphonic progressive rock band Anglagard and was released in 1994. In relation to their debut studio work "Hybris", which had lyrics written in their original mother tongue Swedish, "Epilog" is a completely instrumental work. It's a very dark album, and despite be also influenced by the progressive rock music of the 70's, it's a musical work much more inspired in the classical music. And, I also think that it's a more personal work of Anglagard. Curiously, the name of the album almost was fatal to the band. For many years we thought that it would be their last studio work. Fortunately they would return in 2012 with another studio album, "Viljans Oga".

The line up on the album is Tord Lindman (guitar), Jonas Engdegard (guitar), Thomas Johnson (Hammond organ, mellotron and keyboards), Anna Holmgren (flute), Johan Hogberg (bass) and Mattias Olsson (drums, cymbals and percussion). Beyond the band's members, "Epilog" had also the performance by a handful of guest musicians: Asa Eklund (voice), Martin Olofsson (violin), Karin Hansson (viola) and Jan C. Norlander (flute).

"Epilog" has six tracks. All music was written and arranged by Anglagard. The first track "Prolog (Prologue)" is very short and as its name indicates, is the musical introduction on the album. This is a very beautiful way to open the album. It's a very calm classical piece of music, very delightful with a sad and melancholic Baroque atmosphere. Despite be short is absolutely brilliant. The second track "Hostsejd (Rites Of Fall)" is, on the contrary, the lengthiest track on the album. It's a song with pure moments of energy, very mellow moments with abrupt transition musical passages between calm and mellow parts and loud and wild parts. This is a song absolutely fantastic and one of the highlights on the album. The third track "Rosten (The Voice)" is a short song with about 3 minutes and 30 seconds. But, first of all, I must explain that my CD version of "Epilog" is the most recent, and this version has an extra CD with only one track, "Rosten". So, my review has also this new extra track. As the band explained, when "Rosten" was written for "Epilog" in 1993 was in its original version composed merely to mellotron. Before recording the album they decided to also use acoustic strings and flute. However, because some difficulties, lack of time and different perceptions of the music, they decided to not record it. Anyway, that decision was taken very late, because the cover of the album had already been printed including the title of the song. So, they developed an alternative solution which consisted of a mysterious sound stage. In 2003 when the printing editions of "Hybris" and "Epilog", the group had plans to record the song completely acoustic with strings, but that wasn't possible once more due to lack of time. So, only on this version it was possible. The final version of the song grew up and has several instruments with grandiose arrangements. "Rosten" is a magnificent piece of music, very grandiose, graceful and extremely beautiful with lots of mellotron. It's one of the most beautiful moments on the album, which is truly amazing, within its spirit and that adds even more quality to the album. The fourth track "Skogsranden (Eaves Of The Forest)" is another very complex piece of music. Again they show to us their roots in the classical music, starting the song in a very quiet way with flute and piano. But after a couple of minutes the song explodes with aggressive and abrupt musical passages. That happens through all the song and that reminds us that we are in presence of a band with a very complex progressive music. The fifth track "Sista Somrar (The Last Summer)" is another very complex progressive music. Like the previous track it starts very calm and soft until the song changes with a very strong and aggressive passage, and that will continue throughout the entire theme. Here, we can clearly see the perfect marriage and harmony between the classical and rock music, that Anglagard is perfectly skilled in doing. This is one of my favourite songs of them. The sixth track "Saknadens Fullhet (The Fullness Of Longing)" is a very short song composed and performed only for piano in a very classical music style. It's a very sad and melancholic song in the Scandinavian style and is a simple and beautiful way to finish this album.

Conclusion: "Epilog" is another incredible and beautiful album of this astonishing Swedish progressive rock band. Its music is less simple and naïve but more mature, complex and sophisticated than the music on "Hybris". If on "Hybris" the main influences were the progressive bands rock from the 70's like Genesis and King Crimson, here we have the classical music as the main domain. However, and as I said before when I reviewed "Depois Do Fim" of the Brazilian band Bacamarte, there are some similarities between these two great bands, because of some guitar sounds and especially due to the sound of the flute of Anna Holmgren. Perhaps "Epilog" isn't better than "Hybris" is, but it's surely a progression inside their music, I think. So, I highly recommend Anglagard for all fans of the classic progressive rock music with an open mind. Their albums are bright and represent some of the best music ever made in our prog world.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Hybris by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover Studio Album, 1992
4.38 | 1657 ratings

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Hybris
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nº 217

"Hybris" is the debut studio album of the Swedish symphonic progressive rock band Anglagard and was released in 1992. It became as one of the most influential progressive rock albums in the 90's, when many new bands, some of them Scandinavian bands especially Swedish, began to revive the style of progressive rock called the third prog wave.

Anglagard got itself noticed in the small international community of prog fans due to the quality, originality and complexity of their music. Both of their two studio albums which were released in the 90's, this one and "Epilog" released two years latter in 1994, were voted albums of the year on the internet progressive newsgroups, and that put Anglagard as a cult band. This is one of those rare cases of obscurity combined with reverence. Many like to compare Anglagard with the American progressive rock band of Detroit, Discipline. Both are two bands that become legendary.

Anglagard's music is quite similar to the sound of the progressive rock bands from the 70's, because their music was strongly influenced by bands like Genesis, Yes, King Crimson, Gentle Giant and Van Der Graaf Generator. However, Anglagard's music is much more than that. Their music is also deeply influenced by the Swedish folklore music. The final result was the creation of a style with a well defined personality, within the recognizable Scandinavian melancholy.

The line up of the album is Tord Lindman (vocals, Gibson 335, nylon and steel acoustic guitars), Jonas Engdegard (Stratocaster, Gibson 335, nylon and steel acoustic guitars), Thomas Johnson (mellotron, Hannond organ B-3 & L- 100, solina, clavinet, pianet, Korg mono/poly, piano & church organ on electronic version), Anna Holmgren (flute), Johan Hogberg (Rickenbacker bass, bass pedals and mellotron effects) and Mattias Olsson (Sonor drumset, concert bass drum, Zildjian Cymbals, tambourines, vibraslap, po-chung, gong, castanets, line bells, cow bell, wood block, tubular bells, glockenspiel, bongos, bells, ice-bell, finger cymbals, waterfall, A-gogo bells, cabasa, claves, French cowbell, African drum and Effect-flute).

"Hybris" has four tracks. All music was written and arranged by Anglagard and all lyrics were written by Tord Lindman. The first track "Jordrok (Earth Smoke)" is a dark and melancholic instrumental song that reminds me the long and cold winter season in Sweden. It's a very complex and a totally progressive track with constant musical changes and where all the musical instruments have its function and where no one dominates. This is an incredible track to open this fantastic and unique album from a very special and unique band. The second track "Vadringar I Vilsenhet (Wonderings In Confusion)" is another extremely complex progressive track with great rhythm changes. It's the first track with lyrics in Swedish. However, unfortunately, it's impossible to me to understand what is said on the track. Tord Lindman's voice is nice and delicate and, for me, it improves the song. There are on this song some amazing individual performances by all band's members. This is another brilliant track. The third track "Ifran Klarhet Till Klarhet (From Clarity To Clarity)" has a surrealist begin with a kind of a carnival circus music sound. The music on this track sounds relatively complex, combining the great versatility of Anna Holmgren on flute, good guitar work, great mellotron sound, nice bass line and powerful drumming. This is another excellent catchy track. The fourth track "Kung Bore (King Winter)" is the highest musical moment on the album and is, in my opinion, one of the best songs composed by them, and it's also, probably, my favourite Anglagard's track. It's also a very complex song very nostalgic, with great vocals, some classical parts, good keyboards and an interesting rhythm section. This is a perfect way to close this very special and unique album.

My remastered CD version has a fifth bonus track, "Ganglat Fran Knapptibble (Marching Tune From Knapptibble)", which was recorded in 1993 for the English magazine Ptolemaic Terrascope who wanted to release a single to come with the magazine. This track features some music parts which also appear on "Epilog". As usual, I don't review bonus tracks. But, I must confess this is also a great song that doesn't compromise the high quality level of the entire album.

Conclusion: In my humble opinion, "Hybris" is one of the most innovative, surprising and original progressive rock albums ever made. Its music is completely progressive with a lengthy format, very complex and creative, and with abrupt passages and constant change of rhythms. However, it's at the same time very melodic. All of this makes of it a perfectly unforgettable work. As I said before, on "Hybris" we can discover so many varied and diversified influences on its music. They pass by influences from several progressive rock bands from the 70's such as Genesis, Yes, King Crimson, Gentle Giant and Van Der Graaf Generator, for instance. However, in my humble opinion, the main musical influences are clearly Genesis and King Crimson. Those influences are perfectly married with the influences of the Swedish folklore and the traditional Scandinavian melancholy. That makes of it a unique, original and surprising album.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Made In Norway by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover DVD/Video, 2017
4.81 | 31 ratings

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Made In Norway
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by arschiparschi

5 stars I was really excited when I read about the release of this Blu Ray/ DVD set. It was released by Änglagård's Fan club in the US so it may not be too easy to get hold of outside the US but it's no doubt worth any extra hassle. As stated before, the venue is small and the atmosphere is very intimate. No fancy lighting, no fast cuts or special effects, it's all about the music. With a lovely set that spans across all three albums (basically the same set as on the Live in Japan album with slight changes in arrangements and song length plus Vandringar I Vilsenhet, the drum solo El Ímpetu Del Bosque and Sista Somrar) there is a great representation of what makes their music so unique. I don't think I need to comment on the music too much, I've already watched and listened through it multiple times and there are still new things to discover and pay attention to. The performance is absolutely flawless, the two new members Linus Kåse on keys, soprano saxophone and vocals and Erik Hammarström on drums (unlike stated in the desciption above, Thomas Johnson and Mattias Olsson are not actually featured here) do a superb job and blend seamlessly into the overall sound. Despite the small size of the venue they actually employ all the analog instruments (two Mellotrons, Hammond B3, Fender Rhodes, a moog synth and even a piano), which adds to the great overall sound. Featured on two discs (one Blu Ray and one DVD with identical content) is the full two-hour concert as well as a Picture Gallery. Four cameras or so, mostly slow cuts, many close shots and a crisp sound make for pleasant listening and watching without distractions. There is a short teaser on youtube with a clip of Jordrök, in which you can see the basic setup and get an idea of what to expect. If you're a fan of Änglagård's music and haven't picked this gem up yet, I'd strongly recommend you do so. To me, this is one of the best music DVDs in recent years and a great addition to Änglagård's flawless discography.
 Made In Norway by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover DVD/Video, 2017
4.81 | 31 ratings

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Made In Norway
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy / RPI / Symphonic Prog Team

5 stars This is the first official video of the band in filmed in Sandvika, Norway February 21, 2015. The venue is very small probably not more that one hundred people there. So the cameras were very close capturing some really close shots of the musicians. The visuals are restricted to the basic lighting of any small clubs. But the best is the music and the discrete surround sound makes this video a very pleasant experience. I must say that the discovery of their "Hybris" album in 1993 was something special for me and I continued to follow the band even thought they made only 3 albums. In this 2 hours of music, we have a good representation of those albums, all epic songs of vintage 70's prog rock with their own style of symphonic based around the flute, guitars, and keyboards developing the melody with a solid rhythm section. The dark and melancholic atmosphere of their music must have been inspired by their long winter nights in Sweden and explain why bands coming out that country have a similar sound. So, the music here is great as we could expect and seeing this band played in front of a small crowd was like seeing a great band at their debut, but here, the band contrary to some bands that have become more popular and playing in front of larger crowd, are still living out their music of passion only.
 Hybris by ÄNGLAGÅRD album cover Studio Album, 1992
4.38 | 1657 ratings

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Hybris
Änglagård Symphonic Prog

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Debut album by this much praised swedish band. Hybris show taht the band is deeply rooted to the classic symphonic prog music of the 70´s. Obviously their biggest influence is King Crimson (around the time of Starless and Bible Black to be preciser), but there are also echoes of Yes, Gentle Giant and Genesis in several parts. This is mostly a instrumental album with a few vocals thrown in (all in their native language). Hybris is regarded as a classic by many ProgArchives colleagues, but I really don´t agree much with them. Maybe because I only recently heard it and it did not have the same impact on me as it may had if I had it in 1992. Who knows?

It is clear that the band has excellent musicians and their mix of retro and (then) modern sounds is quite refreshing. However, composition wise, they did not come up with very strong tunes. Ok, several parts are excellent, but unlike their heroes, rarely the melodies stick and most of the tunes seem like several pieces and bits put together without much care for a coherent whole or even flowing. The second part of King Bore is specially good, but again they failed to produce an epic stuff that is really convincing from start to finish. Which is really a shame, since it is clear they had all the chops and the right influences. The excellent production should have helped too. Vocals are only average, but fitting anyway, on the few occasions they do appear.

All in all I felt that Hybris is a pleasant album, but I can not rate it as high as several others did. To me is good album overall with very good parts on it, but that´s it. I´m going to listen to their latter material to see if they did fulfill the promise Hybris surely is.

Rating: something between 3 and 3.5 stars.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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