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BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME

Tech/Extreme Prog Metal • United States


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Between The Buried And Me picture
Between The Buried And Me biography
Founded in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA in 2000

Originally formed in 2000 by members of Prayer For Cleansing, Between the Buried and Me play an unpredictable combination of countless styles, generally centering around an extremely complex variety of metalcore with death metal influences. Their constantly shifting song structures and tight musicianship have combined with intense agression and remarkable variety to gain them a noteworthy following. Their style of extreme metal was introduced on their debut album in 2002 and began to gain increased attention with 2003's The Silent Circus. The aftermath of this release saw drastic lineup shifts in the band, with only vocalist/keyboardist Tommy Rogers and guitarist Paul Waggoner remaining from their previous lineup. The group's new cast of musicians included Glass Casket guitarist Dusty Warring and drummer Blake Richardson, as well as bassist Dan Briggs, recording and releasing Alaska in 2005 to critical acclaim.

In 2006, the band released an album comprising of bands that influenced Between the Buried and Me.

Their 2007 release, Colors, was also released to much critical acclaim and saw most of the metalcore/hardcore influence in their sound done away with.

The band also released their first ever DVD in 2008, Colors_Live, a live DVD featuring the whole of the album Colors played from beginning to end.

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BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.96 | 79 ratings
Between The Buried And Me
2002
3.57 | 99 ratings
The Silent Circus
2003
3.56 | 142 ratings
Alaska
2005
2.90 | 75 ratings
The Anatomy Of...
2006
4.04 | 374 ratings
Colors
2007
4.04 | 285 ratings
The Great Misdirect
2009
4.14 | 288 ratings
The Parallax II - Future Sequence
2012
3.95 | 281 ratings
Coma Ecliptic
2015
3.73 | 71 ratings
Automata I
2018
3.92 | 95 ratings
Automata II
2018

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.50 | 8 ratings
Coma Ecliptic: Live
2017

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.36 | 45 ratings
Colors LIVE
2008
3.94 | 18 ratings
Future Sequence: Live at the Fidelitorium
2014

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.71 | 7 ratings
Best Of
2011
0.00 | 0 ratings
Snapshot
2013

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Demo
2001
3.83 | 95 ratings
The Parallax: Hypersleep Dialogues
2011
0.00 | 0 ratings
Bohemian Rhapsody / Vertical Beta 461
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Tank / Rapid Calm - Split Single with The Dear Hunter
2018

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Between The Buried And Me by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2002
2.96 | 79 ratings

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Between The Buried And Me
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

4 stars The debut album by progressive metal powerhouse Between The Buried and Me is a textbook example of a debut putting a band's potential on full display while simulaneously showing a lot of room to grow. Rather than prog metal, this definitely feels more in line with metalcore in its general sound, but it manages to avoid being generic both through the impressive instrumental talents of the band, and the labyrinthine nature of their songs, shifting wildly with reckless abandon, at times only sticking with a set riff for mere seconds before transforming. This proves to be both a positive and negative, as while it sometimes works, there are other times where it feels very much clear that the band still don't quite know how to write effectively at points, leading to certain songs feeling quite aimless.

More Of Myself To Kill immediatley displays the wild nature of the compositions, with immediate screaming and switching between 2 separate riffs a couple of times before changing tempo immediately, becoming progressively slower until it resembles slow, chugging djent. Throughout, the drumming is what stands out most to me, going between fast bursts, but never sounding like more of the same, constantly changing time signature and being able to sound amazingly precise and loose at the same time. The song then becomes slower and introduces some clean vocals, which while nothing special, still work really well here, and provide some beauty to the relentless nature of what came before, all before building back up into amazing intensity, but now with some actual riffs to back it up, giving something to latch on to. One issue with this song and future ones is that I do find the harsh vocals to often sound quite poor, and while that works in the context of the very raw sound going on here, I still think that this would sound much better with better vocals and production. Arsonist starts off even stronger, with the first section of the song containing an absolutely incredible riff, with the harsh vocals serving more as mad screams of anger rather than anything coherent, which actually works quite well here. I also find the breakdown halfway through to be amazing, as it somehow intensifies the song further. Aspirations is a definite improvement, showcasing both some parts even more intense and brutal than before, particular in the vocal department, as Tommy Rogers sounds like he's tearing his throat out here, and that moment of softness near the end ties everything together amazingly. What We Have Become is definitely one of the weakest songs here, as it does nothing particularly interesting and becomes very dull very quickly.

Fire For A Dry Mouth is by far one of the angriest songs the band has ever put out, each moment simply radiating pure fury, bordering on becoming scary. The mix on this song actually works quite effectively as well, with the final minute accentuating the bass and providing a different sound to everything else. The 2 minute intro to Naked By The Computer is excellent, both being incredibly beautiful and making for a perfect transition into the madness of the remaining 3 minutes. The song carries more emotional weight than the others as well, with both the lyrics and the music contributing to this, especially the breathtaking final minute. Use Of A Weapon is another lower point on the album, simply because at this point, something new has to be done in order to stand out from the insanity of everything else, and this song simply doesn't do anything special. Shevanel Cut A Flip on the other hand is definitely one of the highlights of the album starting off just as intensely, but with a certain unhinged nature to it, especially noticeable in the random restaurant conversation thrown in before jumping right back in. I find this to be the first proper example of the quirkier side of the band that would be explored in much greater depth on future albums. The best moment for sure however is the gradual removal of all heavy elements until the song becomes absolutely beautiful, keeping nothing more than a minimalistic drum beat and lovely, interweaving acoustic guitar work, as the clean vocals come in and help create my personal favourite moment on the album, along with an incredible way to close it off.

Overall, while I initially had little praise to give this album, after giving it a few listens, it's grown on me immensely. While it's definitely rough around the edges, both the skill of each band member, and the complex, high quality compositions really stand out after a few listens, where everything no longer just sounds like meaningless noise. The album has an excellent duality between looseness and precision, having a very messy, yet calculated sound to everything. While this is the last place I'd recommend someone start listening to BTBAM, I cannot deny the fact that this album is very good, despite the lack of polish it has.

Best songs: More Of Myself To Kill, Naked By The Computer, Shevanel Cut A Flip

Weakest songs: What We Have Become, Use Of A Weapon

Verdict: While a very unpolished album in many respects, everything still somehow falls into place to make a largely great album. I'd recommend this to fans of chaotic, brutal, raw music, as this album contains all the stuff that would be enjoyable for such a crowd.

 Automata I by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.73 | 71 ratings

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Automata I
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME return in 2018, three years after their progressive metalcore extravaganza "Coma Ecliptic," and unleash a completely new strategy as far as marketing their new product. While the band's albums have always run on the lengthy side more often than not exceeding the sixty minute mark, for this followup, BTBAM released their new material as a two-part combo that was released as two separate albums four months apart. This first installment AUTOMATA I came out on 9 March 2018 with "Automat II" following on 13 July 2018. While this was an irritant for many to have to wait for the conclusion of a metal tale that is essentially two chapters of the same book, others like myself simply waited until both were released so that i could listen to them instantly in their proper order.

While linked by the daedal conceptualization that revolves around the ability to view the dreams of others, the two albums stylistically differ quite substantially from one another. AUTOMATA I nurtures the more traditional sound that BTBAM has crafted subsequently as the band has crafted more progressive metal elements into their metalcore bombast whereas "Automata II" is the much more experimental of the pair. Both albums are relativity short by BTBAM's standards and serve more like two separate EPs but they have been marketed as two bona fide albums that constitute a greater whole. AUTOMATA I clocks in at 35:13 and "Automata II" at 33:12. With so many bands releasing an album with an extra disc of bonus material, it's surprising that BTBAM went the opposite direction and split this essentially single album into half.

Since the band has enjoyed a rather stable lineup of the same five members ever since 2005's "Alaska," BTBAM has consistently evolved their progressively tinged metalcore into ever more sophisticated progressive and experimental extreme metal that simply builds upon what came before. For those familiar with "Coma Ecliptic," AUTOMATA I continues the same intricate weaving of pummeling guitar riffs, progressively designed compositions with time signatures run amok and the ever changing dynamics and tempos that jump from bombastic progresso-core madness with the expected screamed vocal style to the softer passages that implement clean guitar sweeps, soaring atmospheric embellishments and melodic clean vocals that hypnotize before the pendulum swings back to the erratic distortionfest and metalcore mania.

AUTOMATA I consists of six tracks that lyrically tackle the concept of dreams being broadcast for the purpose of entertainment. While the lyrics themselves are quite nebulous in their intricate design, the album allows the listener to explore the ramifications of such technologies that could possibly be used to induce, record and even weaponize dreams for the purposes of overall control. Musically, AUTOMATA I delivers the usual extraordinary daring and tight musicianship that isn't afraid to tread some of the most progressive pastures that the band has embarked upon to date. The secret of BTBAM's longevity is that the band has successfully gaged the evolutionary threshold of the fanbase and only deviates a certain degree as not to alienate the followers.

To the uninitiated AUTOMATA I may not sound significantly different than the series of progressive metal dominated albums that have emerged since 2012's "The Parallax II: Future Sequence" but careful repeated spins finds AUTOMATA I has plenty of its own personality to set it apart from its predecessors. Of course, this album displays the unmistakable unique style that only BTBAM can generate, that is that intense surreal swirling about of the most extreme metal with atmospheric psychedelia and angular convoluted progressive rock in all its escapist tendencies.

Within the six tracks, the pacing is impeccably designed. The dynamic shifts from aggressive to serene allow the attention span never to wander far and the excellent production allows every tiny sound to come to life which makes this a bona fide 21st century musical sci-fi experience. While "Condemned To The Gallows" starts off with clean guitar arpeggios with lush keyboards and electronic vocal effects, the album ratchets up quickly to the metalcore crescendos that weave in and out of the musical flow. While every track holds up well and integrates into the larger framework, the highlight comes from the closing dual pomp of the brief ambient "Gold Distance" in conjunt with the ten minute finale "Blot" which goes for the gusto with some of the craftiest mix of sitar sounds, eccentric keyboard riffing and superb guitar riffs and soloing as it sallies forth down an extreme labyrinthine journey with some of the most soaring melodic vocal deliveries on the album.

There seems to be a general consensus that AUTOMATA I is the weaker of the two installments, however after several spins of these two well-crafted mini-albums, i have come to the conclusion that these two segregated segments of the overall storyline are of roughly equal standing. While "Automata II" is the one that takes BTBAM into completely unexplored arenas including the territory of swing jazz that falls into the Diablo Swing Orchestra camp, AUTOMATA I as a traditional BTBAM progressive metal album is simply outstanding in its delivery from beginning to end. Perhaps the main complaint would be that it plays it too safe and doesn't deviate too far from previous albums, but despite snuggling up in its comfort zone, nevertheless cranks out six seriously fine-tuned compositions that shows that the band are still on top of their game and in full control of their musical output. This is an excellent followup to their their never-ending progressive metalcore legacy.

 Automata II by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.92 | 95 ratings

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Automata II
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME have returned after a three year hiatus that follows 2015's 'Coma Ecliptic.' Instead of releasing a single lengthy album which has pretty much been their formulaic approach for most of the band's almost two decade career, in 2018 BTBAM return with a completely new approach and that is take what could easily be a single album with a theme that lyrically tackles the concept of dreams being broadcast for the purpose of entertainment and divides it into two separate albums. The first of these albums 'Automata I' was released on 9 March 2018 and continued the more traditional sounds that BTBAM has crafted ever since they launched a more sophisticated progressive metal infused version of their metalcore sound. This second edition AUTOMATA II had to wait four months to find its way into the fans' musical conclusion of what was launched earlier in the year. This one came out on 13 July 2018 but personally i waited until both were released so i wouldn't have to have that annoying four month gap. Sort of like binge watching a TV series after it has ended.

While 'Automata I' was more of a continuation of the progressive metalcore cauldron of complexities that has been a BTBAM staple ever since 2012's amazing 'The Parallax II: Future Sequence,' AUTOMATA II is the far more experimental of the two having been compared to albums like 'Colors' for its unapologetic labyrinthine journey into as many musical styles possible. While there are grains of truth to this comparison, AUTOMATA II in reality is unlike any other BTBAM release as it finds fertile new grounds to construct its esoteric and eccentric musical edifice upon. While each album essentially an EP length by BTBAM standards, they have been marketed as bona fide full albums that provide two sides to the unifying concept that revolves around the unnerving thought of dreams being broadcast simply for the purpose of entertainment. While the lyrics are vague and only poetically and pointillistically fortify the overall theme, the album does confront the listener with the uncomfortable possibilities of covert technologies being used for behavior control and other means. 'Automata I' clocks in at 35:13 and AUTOMATI II at 33:12.

While AUTOMATA II is the shorter of the pair, it is without doubt the more experimental and adds myriad elements to its four tracks that have never been explored by the band. While the opener 'The Proverbial Bellow' opens with the immediate jarring freneticism of angular guitar riffs and organ runs, the thirteen minute track evolves quickly as it shifts into Pink Floydian space rock that echoes to aspects of 'Dark Side Of The Moon' albeit with a more caffeinated tempo. Despite being just a mere slice of the never-ending changes that emerge, the track shifts from the lushly embellished metalcore outbursts to the clean vocal progressive metal effluences that trade off without warning. Instantly noticeable is how AUTOMATA II takes extreme liberties in virtually every aspect of the musical procession with traditional BTBAM elements shapeshifting into bizarre new creations as well as completely new sounds. 'Glide' begins with a Mediterranean Cafe style accordion piece that segues into a lush classical piano and back again. While only a short intro for 'Voice Of Trespass,' it is unlike anything BTBAM has ever attempted.

'Voice Of Trespass' is also quite the surprise as it tackles the familiar swing jazz metal that fans of Diablo Swing Orchestra will know quite well. In fact, it sounds a little too much like DSO with a series of gypsy grooves, vocal calls and responses and Django Reinhardt-esque guitar riffs alongside the sultry swing timbres emerging from the baritone sax, trombone and trumpet. A true surprise and although a little too DOS derivative for its own good, still performed exquisitely well. The closer 'Grid' is the highlight (both albums save the best for last) as it concludes this double album journey with an alternating mix of some of the heaviest metalcore aspects with clean vocal dominated alternative metal passages and sweeping guitar licks that could fit into the best modern neo-prog album's agenda. However despite the silkiest sweetness generated by the clean vocal segments, 'Grid' contains some of the most bombastic extreme metal sequences of the entire two album experience and its rather unique how quickly and frequently these two extremes trade off, mix and meld on their musical playground.

So after all is said and done, despite the horrible decision to separate the release date of each of the two albums and frustrate the fans of this instant gratification world we have constructed, the two albums that have emerged won't disappoint as each has its own distinct personality while hosting a unifying concept that inextricably binds them like fraternal twins with different birth dates. BTBAM prove themselves to be masters of their own unique brand of progressive extreme metal and only continues to build upon the edifice of the more metalcore based foundation that launched their career nearly two decades ago. While there seems to be a general consensus that AUTOMATA II is the better of the two albums because of its more bold and daring attempts to break free from the established BTBAM paradigm, i personally find the two albums to be on equal footing. 'Automata I' may be the less experimental but it is the better album in terms of ratcheting up the band's already established paradigm in a more consistent manner whereas AUTOMATA II despite the deviation from the norm also has moments that find the band sounding more like other bands than themselves. For me this all balances out so as a whole i find both albums of this concept to be excellent but flawed. One thing is for sure, BTBAM are in no danger of burning out soon.

 Colors by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.04 | 374 ratings

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Colors
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by wheres my prime 4

5 stars

This album is one hell of an experience, and this album isn't afraid to remind you. It gets you pumped up by its brutal energy and masterful technicality and calms you down by its somber& beautiful acoustics and even utilizes some jazz and even bluegrass influences, making the albums kaleidoscope more musically diverse and progressive.

The energy and soul can be felt throughout every single track. From the build-up from 'Foam Born (A) The Backtrack following towards the complex and formulated masterpiece that is '(B) The Decade of Statues'.

The building riff that comes after the drums & bass and the chilling guitar harmonies in 'Informal Gluttony' give me goosebumps every single time I listen to it and so does the dooming outro with the repeating lyrics "Feed me fear.. (informal..) Feed me fear.. (gluttony..)"

Sun of Nothing is a beautiful progressive piece about a man contemplating his own life and leans towards the voyage of death. There is a lot of emotion in this track, whether it could be due to its serious topic (which they handle it very professionally) or the many progressions from absolutely crushing to acoustically gloomy but still full of hope.

From a such a chaotic outro the song follows into the next song 'Ants of the Sky'. A complex song that knows when to stop its complex madness to seek into its major blues &jazz influences and becoming more intense and slowly creating the anticipation for the hopeful and blessed chorus around 8-minute mark.

'Prequel to a Sequel" feels happier than the rest of the songs but isn't afraid to show its inner magniloquent nature. I don't go back to this song as much as the ones before this, but every chance I give to it I begin to appreciate it more.

From the jazzy and beautifully chilling 'Viridian' goes into the monstrous finale that is 'White Walls' The song embodies the feeling after finally finishing a book you really enjoyed or watching the ending credits of an amazing movie and the end of the song replicates this feeling, almost as if they wanted to capture that feeling for the listener. Everything from the chillingly crushing riff to the amazing outro solo around the 10-minute mark.

GENERAL RECOMMENDATION RATING: 5/5 PERSONAL RATING: 97.87/100.00 A must - listen to any fan of complex pieces or any prog head of that matter

 Automata II by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.92 | 95 ratings

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Automata II
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by tempest_77

5 stars Automata II is definitely the better half of the Automata series. There's a lot more variation in the sounds and it feels more explorative than the first record, including what sounds like a banjo on the opening track. The album is also less heavy handed in the death metal realm than Automata I, with few blast beats, and more melodic and/or innovative passages behind the death metal vocal sections.

"The Proverbial Bellow" is the longest track in the Automata series at almost 13 and a half minutes. It's a sprawling piece with great energy and diversity, and opens with a heavy riff backed by organ, almost reminiscent of Haken on The Mountain. The opening section is carried up and down varying levels of energy, before finally breaking into a blast beat part in classic Between the Buried and Me fashion. The whole opening sequence of this piece is one of the greatest moments of either album, as it brings in new energy but maintains their classic sound. This song really shows some great exploration, with a whole section that sounds quite like Porcupine Tree in their psychedelic moments. It's filled with exhilarating guitar riffs, and an energy that flows between the constantly changing grooves. The death metal sections are still more prominent than on Coma Ecliptic, but the overall sound is still more melodic than their earlier albums. Definitely a high point in the Automata series, and the most progressive in terms of extended and detailed composition, though that's pretty much due to its length. The energy comes down near the end into a beautiful soft piano section, over which Tommy Rogers' distant voice emotionally sings, "Please pick up / Pick up the phone / It's been ringing." This section releases into a full band, melodic chorus, similar to some of Spock's Beard's choruses. The chorus leads into a heavily composed section, with odd time signature riffs doubled between two guitars, and reinforced by the organ?again showing some similarity to Spock's Beard?before shifting back to 4/4 for a guitar solo. Waggoner does a great job combining the technical side of the solo with true feeling, echoing solos like Tosin Abasi's on Tempting Time. The solo ends with a seemingly abrupt break of militaristic snare drum, similar to the end of California Über Alles, only much much shorter, before the band crashes into a final hit for the ending. The organ sustains its chord, and fades into...

"Glide" is a very quirky piece; it's an carnival/cabaret style song that starts with an accordion section. It shifts to a more laid-back piano section, backed by organ, and then repeats both, this time with added percussion and vocals. It's a short piece, but it serves as a wonderful prelude to the next song, as it switches to an upbeat swing feel at the end, and segues into...

"Voice of Trespass," clocking at 8 minutes, is the weirdest song on either Automata record, and also probably my favourite. Imagine a swing song from a musical. Then add death metal. That's Voice of Trespass. The song starts with the same feel as the end of Glide, but with a heavy down-tuned guitar leading the way. Complete with a horn section and a classic swing turnaround, the intro comes down into a more traditional feel, with hi-hat and bass filling the space. When the piano comes in at the top of the verse, it almost feels like flat out swing, but snarl in Rogers' vocals reminds us that this is the heaviest swing song we've ever heard. It's reminiscent of The Dear Hunter's Act II and Act III, where Casey Crescenzo mixes jazz, swing, tango, and more into the band's post-hardcore-tinged progressive rock. And that's just the first half of the song. The second half of it switches into a straight 4/4 section with another blast beat part, and eventually comes down into slow, heavy, doom metal-esque section. It's a great release of tension after the whole piece has constantly kept moving under the relentless swing feel. The vocals in this section recall the previous Automata record ("We are hollow / Condemned to the gallows"). The song ends with double time section that reintroduces the horn section, and eventually climaxes with the drums adding a rapid double bass part to the beat. With its heavy riffs and hit sections every four bars, its almost reminiscent of Thank You Scientist, another post-hardcore/prog rock that fuses their sound with jazz, particularly funky jazz fusion. The song ends with an distorted ambient section of people's voices under a piano part. The piano holds a final chord, which leads into the drum build up for...

"The Grid" starts out with a melodic section, similar to the end of "The Proverbial Bellow". The death metal is quickly introduced, and before the energy drops briefly, they mix the two together for an interesting effect. The first half of the song features a few brief mid-volume sections with a lot of tension, reminiscent of verses in certain Tool or TesseracT songs, combined with the band's melodic death metal sections, along with a few melodic clean vocal choruses. The first part of "The Grid", just under 6 minutes long, is definitely the least explorative part of the record, in the sense that it is most similar to their previous material on Automata I and Coma Ecliptic. That's not necessarily a bad thing, though: there's a reason Between the Buried and Me are a progressive death metal band. The second melodic chorus closes out the first section of the song, as the second section starts with an acoustic guitar alone, setting a significant contrast from the first part. A piano and clean electric guitar come in, reinforcing the acoustic, as do the vocals, with the final line of the song, "We are in this together," sung for the first of several times. The drums build up and come in, playing a swung 4/4 (or just 12/8, who knows) feel, but they come in with just the bass?no distorted guitars?indicating the beginning of a gradual and dramatic build up. The harmonies and backing vocals come in, along with atmospheric strings, until, almost at the 8 minute mark, the lead guitar finally comes in, with Waggoner playing another wonderfully emotional solo, even better than the one in "The Proverbial Bellow", which is harmonised by Waring. The song climaxes and comes to a final crash, clocking in just under 10 minutes, with the guitar sustaining and ending the album with snarly distortion fading out. The ending is the only part of the album I thought wasn't the strongest; I think they should have brought in the rhythm guitar and extended the ending from where the acoustic guitar started. They had an opportunity to make it really anthemic and epic, which I think they missed a bit. However, being a progressive death metal band, ending with an atmospheric section like that, which is almost reminiscent of some of Plini's earlier, less heavy work, is a bold move, which I have to commend them for.

All in all, I think the two albums are really at their best when they are combined into a single entity; the dark, heavy, and undeniably death metal first record needs somewhere to release its energy, and it feels much more satisfying to have all of that tension and aggression pour out on the second record. The story doesn't feel as short, and the sounds on the two albums compliment each other wonderfully. I would definitely recommend anyone interested in the Automata series to consider them one album, and to listen all the way from the first record through this one.

While Automata II isn't perfect, I thought it was much better as an individual record than Automata I was. I gave Automata I 4 stars, and while Automata II isn't a solid 5 on it's own, I'm giving 5 stars anyways, because it definitely deserves an extra star over the first record, and when combined, the whole series is quite a masterpiece. I'd say Automata II is probably about a 4.4/5, and if the whole series were one record it would probably be a 4.6/5.

 Automata II by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.92 | 95 ratings

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Automata II
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by javajeff

4 stars Automata Part II is a big step up from Automata Part I, but the combined effort is still lower than their masterpieces. The Proverbial Bellow and The Grid are standard, well executed, Between The Buried And Me tracks that can fit with their best albums. Glide is a filler track, and the standout on this EP is Voice of Trespass which sounds like something Diablo Swing Orchestra would have created. I do not have an issue with them copying the style as it has been done by other groups. They did a stellar job with the track, creating the most complex arrangement on the EP. Most important with this release is that it has the energy that was missing from Automata Part I. Can it elevate Part I? Maybe. Now that we have a complete album, it will take some time to evaluate it as a whole. I really do not like this two part release process and wish they would have waited until the entire album was done. Also, I wish it was available on Bandcamp like their other albums. With all of that being said, it is another quality release that can only be marred by the stellar releases it follows.
 Automata I by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.73 | 71 ratings

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Automata I
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by javajeff

4 stars This is half of an album, so it is hard to judge until it is complete. But they put it out there, so it is fair game. I can start off by saying they are a favorite of mine that I listen to often. If you do not know about Between The Buried And Me, you must get Colors immediately. Automata: Part 1 is easily one of my least favorite Between The Buried And Me releases. It lacks the magic of some of the other albums, but that could be because it is just half of an album. It is a step down from Coma Ecliptic, and probably on par with the debut album or The Silent Circus. With that being said, more Between The Buried And Me is always a good thing. Automata: Part 1 is a good listen, although short, and has some quality tracks like Blot and Condemned to the Gallows. But we are back to the question of "What is it?" The second half of this album which is expected to drop this year can be a game changer. Maybe we end up with a masterpiece when the two halves are finally united. I am not sure if releasing albums in two pieces is a new type of cash grab or an artistic process. 3.5/5 stars for now.
 The Parallax II - Future Sequence by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.14 | 288 ratings

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The Parallax II - Future Sequence
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The Parallax II finds Between the Buried and Me plotting a strikingly fresh course after spending their previous few releases engaging in a controlled flip of their sound; whereas Colors had been a metalcore album infused with prog sensibilities, the Future Sequence finds the group putting prog metal first and foremost, with metalcore motifs and textures being merely part of a staggeringly diverse portfolio of tools and techniques available to them. Metalcore purists may feel somewhat left behind, but if you liked the prog elements on Colors you'll be well-served here. Conversely, if in the end you found that Colors wasn't quite to your tastes due to the residual metalcore influence, you may find that The Parallax II is more your speed.
 The Anatomy Of... by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2006
2.90 | 75 ratings

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The Anatomy Of...
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by thwok

4 stars THE ANATOMY OF... is one of those albums that really makes me wish that the ratings system allowed for half stars. I'm going to round up and give this covers album 4 stars for its progressiveness, and the high regard for BTBAM among reviewers. If "progressive music" is a definable term, it should describe groups that combine disparate elements in new and interesting ways. I don't know a lot of BTBAM's music, but they seem to fit the bill.

As the Allmusic review of this album suggests, these cover versions stick pretty close to the originals; I would have preferred more changes. The song choices result in a wide variety of styles throughout. The band clearly demonstrates that they can play it all skillfully. In particular, Tommy Giles Rogers should get his due. I'd argue that he's possibly the most versatile singer in the extreme metal world. Since I didn't know a lot of these songs before listening, I prefer unfamiliar tracks like "Territory" and "Malpractice" from the second half.

Incidentally, the CD includes interesting statements from the band members about why they chose these songs. BTBAM won't be one of my favorite extreme metal bands. Though I live for variety, their approach is too kitchen sink for my tastes. However, they are generally praised here at PA. That should matter in assigning a rating. If THE ANATOMY OF... leads listeners to seek out the original bands covered, that's a very good thing.

 The Parallax II - Future Sequence by BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.14 | 288 ratings

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The Parallax II - Future Sequence
Between The Buried And Me Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Luqueasaur

4 stars Shout from the top of your lungs, "we're not just crappy metalcore", BTBAM...: 8/10

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME's metalcore tendencies fuse with a hyperactive technical death metal to create dynamic tracks that stray far from generic metal on THE PARALLAX II. I was truly apprehensive about giving them a shot because their annoying fan base kept idolizing them and "metalcore" scared me. But, as Wicket puts it on his review, BTBAM has a particular way of making non-metalcore fans enjoy their music, regardless of the listener's distaste for the genre. Mostly because they just take certain characteristics of it; their music is rooted on metalcore, but it also offers several other influences that, all fused together, stray far from the sameness, fake emotionality or immaturity the genre can connote.

Over an hour long, its dynamism and metamorphic rhythms, patterns, arrangements, and melodies - albeit not really different among themselves - was able to keep me actively hooked and particularly entertained. Granted I had little idea of what was going on, mostly due to the confusing lyrics or disorientating, boastful wall of textures, but it genuinely a good experience. Assuming I had been tortured by a "musical crisis" (I was having a hard time genuinely enjoying music) and they took me out of it, it's safe for me to assume that their output is pretty entertaining.

The band clearly opted to separate their avant-garde (due to lack of better term) highly technical extreme metal expression on the longer tracks, which are pretty obviously the limelight of the album. Highly eclectic, sonically intense and offering a vast array of sounds, there's no sleepy moments while listening to them, mostly because if you ever felt lightheaded the powerful lead guitars or the melodic rhythm ones would blast you back to your place, awake and well. The shorter tracks are mostly there for conceptual purposes, functioning as a tool of cohesion. They offer profound lyrics, perfect as a tool of immersion on the context BTBAM constructs. Musically, though, they fall short, I don't feel the band works well with softer music.

All's good so far, but I do have a critic. I felt the concept was poorly expressed. The lyrics are convoluted and cryptical, I barely could understand the general idea they were trying to propose. In my opinion, concepts, at least at its very fundamental level, should be easily identifiable on the first spin. Naturally, there's no issue with details being harder to spot, but the problem is that both the very structure PARALLAX II is based upon, as well its details, remained shady to me even after I finished the album.

THE PARALLAX II should be listened in its entirety at once. I can't imagine trying to give the songs a shot on shuffle, or individually, I feel as if its magic and pompously noisy capacities wouldn't be enjoyed to the max if done so. And, pretty obviously, more than one listen is imperative to really absorb it (although roughly all prog albums are like that so I'm sure you're aware of this condition). Nonetheless, I highly recommend giving it a shot. At once, or not, as you will, really, but just don't let the "this is metalcore" or "this is too long" prejudices fool you. BTBAM is pretty dope.

Thanks to Bryan for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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