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PAIN OF SALVATION

Progressive Metal • Sweden


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Pain Of Salvation biography
Founded in Eskilstuna, Sweden in 1984 (as "Reality") - Changed name in 1991 - Still active as of 2017

Pain of Salvation is widely known as one of the fundamental progressive metal bands from the second generation, which came around the mid 90's, but the fact is that the band is one of the oldest progressive metal bands still active. The band was formed by guitarist, singer and composer Daniel Gildenl÷w and friends in 1984, two years after Fates Warning, Three years after Queensr che and a year before Dream Theater, when Daniel was only 11 years old. At that time, the band was called Reality, but as Daniel got older he realized the band's name needed to changed, despite the band being basically the same. So, in 1991 the band officially changed from Reality to Pain of Salvation. Daniel, over the years, gave various different reasons for the change of name, but the common feature of all those explanations is the fact that the name symbolizes the balance between things of vital significance, such as good and bad, light and dark, life and death.

The band had numerous personnel changes, mostly during the Reality period and the early period of Pain of Salvation up until their second album. Since the release of One Hour by the Concrete Lake the band remained fairly stable, with only two important band member changes: when Kristoffer Gildenl÷w, Daniel's brother, left in 2006 due to being unable to attend to rehearsals because he lived in Denmark, and when Johan Langell, Pain of Salvation's drummer since 1989, left in 2007 in order to focus on his own family.

After having a reasonably stable lineup for some time, Pain of Salvation decided, in 1996, to search for a record deal with some record label, but first recruited the keyboardist Fredrik Hermansson to complete the band's intended sound. During the rest of 1996 they distributed various demo tapes in hope to get signed with any interesting label. In early 1997 the band started recording their debut album in Roasting House, a professional recording studio in Sweden, and in August of the same year Entropia was released in Asia by Avalon, a Japanese record label owned by the Japanese record company Marquee, with generally positive response feedback, eventually leading to another licensing deal, this time with Romanian label SC Rocris Discs still in late 1997.

Entropia can be easily considered as the band's most musically diverse release up to today, raging from mellow passages to crus...
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PAIN OF SALVATION discography


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PAIN OF SALVATION top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.11 | 557 ratings
Entropia
1997
3.92 | 526 ratings
One Hour By The Concrete Lake
1998
4.23 | 1234 ratings
The Perfect Element - Part 1
2000
4.23 | 1167 ratings
Remedy Lane
2002
4.09 | 872 ratings
Be
2004
3.19 | 594 ratings
Scarsick
2007
3.32 | 487 ratings
Road Salt One
2010
3.51 | 402 ratings
Road Salt Two
2011
3.21 | 138 ratings
Falling Home
2014
3.87 | 333 ratings
In The Passing Light Of Day
2017

PAIN OF SALVATION Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.42 | 307 ratings
12:5
2004
4.01 | 128 ratings
The Second Death Of Pain Of Salvation
2009
4.28 | 43 ratings
Remedy Lane Re:Lived
2016

PAIN OF SALVATION Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.39 | 216 ratings
Be Live
2005
3.95 | 113 ratings
Ending Themes - On The Two Deaths Of Pain Of Salvation
2009

PAIN OF SALVATION Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.82 | 44 ratings
Remedy Lane Re:Visited (Re:Mixed & Re:Lived)
2016

PAIN OF SALVATION Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.49 | 26 ratings
The Painful Chronicles
1999
3.64 | 31 ratings
Ashes
2000
3.20 | 112 ratings
Linoleum
2009
4.92 | 24 ratings
Remedy Lane Re:Mixed
2016

PAIN OF SALVATION Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Scarsick by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.19 | 594 ratings

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Scarsick
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by javajeff

4 stars I took a while to take in this album due to some lackluster reviews. It is not a masterpiece like the big three, but is far better than I expected. It has a couple moments that are far from perfect, but overall, it is still a very good album that I enjoy listening to. The only thing that really hurts this album is the masterpieces that are Remedy Lane, The Perfect Element Part 1, and Be as a means of comparison. Scarsick and Disco Queen are fantastic tracks, period. Enter Rain is a fine ending as well. There are many moments that compete with their best stuff, and more Pain of Salvation is a good thing. America is perhaps the most interesting track on the album, and that is saying something with Disco Queen on there. I am sorry I did not get to it sooner as I am a fan of the band. Comparing their catalog of albums, this is around the quality of One Hour By The Concrete Lake. I would still get the previous five efforts first, but Scarsick is still an excellent release.
 Road Salt Two by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.51 | 402 ratings

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Road Salt Two
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars Pain of Salvation went quite unpredictable with their 3 releases of 2010's abandoning experimentation and creativity of their previous releases and playing it more conventional with retro-sounds. Sounding as bad as it can, a gifted band can make a good release even when leaving their music genre when they stay focused and motivated. Pain of Salvation have delivered two quite enjoyable although not challenging albums with Road Salts. Their usual ear for melodies and creative arrangements is still there. The songs lost previous heaviness ending up mainly in rock/hard-rock territory that has several elements from the 70's. After 2 or 3 hearings of the album, you will remember some melodies and draw attention to one or two progressive instrumental shifts but there is nothing that could be called extraordinary.
 Ending Themes - On The Two Deaths Of Pain Of Salvation by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover DVD/Video, 2009
3.95 | 113 ratings

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Ending Themes - On The Two Deaths Of Pain Of Salvation
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars I like this live album far more than the acclaimed "12:5" because it closely characterizes the typical output by Pain of Salvation - progressive metal in its core with various elements of alternative metal or rock. The band is in a great form, loud, energetic, giving an excellent choice of tracks from all albums and even a cover version of "Hallelujah". Rhythm section is excellent, drumming progressive and vocals top notch. The tracks from "Scarsick" sound better than on the studio album and listeners should forgive the band to try forays into disco because it belongs to the show. A highly recommended live testament of the band in their initial era.
 The Perfect Element - Part 1 by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 2000
4.23 | 1234 ratings

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The Perfect Element - Part 1
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars Pain of Salvation has now been fully embraced in their original mix of sounds and influences - alternative/prog metal and rock. The album is arguably less progressive than the previous one but is not less ambitious. "Used" is a great aperitif with volume contrasts, progressive drumming and appropriate guitar lines. The vocal is excellent and can easily take lead over all instruments - listen to the high-pitched heavy-metal like screams. "Ashes" is perhaps the most famous and romantic song by Pain of Salvation and will appeal to a lot of female proggers; however I consider "Morning of Earth" to be a tad nicer, flowing. "Idioglossia" is a heavy number reminiscent of Dream Theater. The downside is a repeated reference to "Ashes", the pros are ambitious rhythmic patterns. "Her voices" is another great creative number with oriental hints. The fact that there are more reflective, slow numbers here than on other PoS albums is confirmed by "Dedication" that has a lot of acoustic flavour and "King of loss" that is a bit too long for what it offers. Let's not forget about "Falling" that has excellent guitar soloing and synth in the background. The last, title track has the greatest flow and development. Tender guitar chords suit the gentle but massive chorus and it reminds me a bit of Devin Townsend. Overall, it is a quieter but nevertheless high quality effort.
 One Hour By The Concrete Lake by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 1998
3.92 | 526 ratings

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One Hour By The Concrete Lake
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars This sophomore album starts more stereotypically like a progressive metal band.

The second track has the voice is so versatile and incredible flexible from conveying angry and tender feelings. The keyboards and rhythm section remind me of Dream Theater. "New Year's Eve" has a killer riff with rhythm changes, while "Handful of nothing" is the closest to heavy metal that the band has written until that point. "Home" has 75% of the song quite many mellow passages to be balanced by speedy drumming during the guitar leads. Digital piano decorates the song towards the end. "Black Hills" has a fantastic instrumental 2 minute section with killer guitar and semi-oriental chords. "Inside Out" looks promising at first sight, however, brings a motive that could be heard in another song already and the last 4 minutes are composed of silence and some demo-sounding section. Recommended to all fans of the band, however the band hasn't bring much new with this effort.

 Entropia by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.11 | 557 ratings

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Entropia
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars While Pain of Salvation never were my top favourite band, I've always respected their creativity, originality and gift. The band showcases a range of influence is far away from a typical progressive metal band.

The sound is more contemporary taking a few nods from alternative metal, American nu-metal/rock scene, 80's (listen to the keyboards in "People passing by", funky grooves, and of course, a few prog-metal acts such as Dream Theater. In contrasts to many other progressive metal bands, focus is more on songwriting and arrangements rather than flamboyance.

There are quite contrasts in the music, numerous mellow moments but also very loud passages with screaming and double bass drum. Melody and unexpected moves are strong weapons of that band. "People passing by" is one of the most eclectic songs with so many different sections, really inventive. "Revival" is reminiscent of Dream Theater hooks. "Void of her" is a sublime guitar/organ piece that carries motives from longer epics. Melancholy is not a typical trait by this band but nevertheless, traces of it can be found in beautiful chorus in "Nightmist" and "Plains of dawn" that highlights band's soft moments and vocal harmonies.

One of the most original progressive metal debut albums of 90's.

 Entropia by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.11 | 557 ratings

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Entropia
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars The roots of PAIN OF SALVATION actually date back to 1984 when founder Daniel Gildenl÷w was only 11 years old and started his first band Reality when he met another future member guitarist Daniel Magdic who would play until after the debut album. In short, Reality won a Swedish talent contest with Gildenl÷w scoring the best vocalist award. In 1990 he met drummer Johan Langell and bassist Gustaf Hielm and the following year changed the band name Reality to the more familiar PAIN OF SALVATION which would find international success with its innovative string of progressive metal albums. The band spent many years practicing before Hielm left the band and was replaced by Daniel's brother Kristoffer Gildenl÷w. The fifth member Fredrik Hermansson came into the picture of hearing the band's demo "Hereafter" and scored the position as keyboardist. The band was perched to unleash its debut album ENTROPIA in 1997.

PAIN OF SALVATION hit the ground running with its debut that featured a fully developed concept about a family surviving and coping during a war. With emotional and heartfelt lyrics, the band made a name for itself not only for highly emotive storylines brought to life by the complex vocal harmonies reminiscent of The Beatles and Queen but made even more dramatic by lead singer Daniel Gildenl÷w's broad vocal range and sense of charisma. Added to that the music was on fire. Loosely based on the Dream Theater sound that emerged in the early 90s, PAIN OF SALVATION was a bit more diverse in its scope as it covered the spectrum of influences ranging from the pop rock of The Beatles, The Moody Blues and Lou Reed to jazz, classical, ethnic music, hip hop, soul and funk not to mention heavy metal from bands like Faith No More and other technically infused bands like Fates Warning and Queensryche.

Noted for the dramatic swings from calm to heavy passages and back all fortified with heavy syncopation and polyrhythms and unpredictable mood shifts between disparate genre styles, PAIN OF SALVATION quickly stood out from the pack and ENTROPIA, a name that is a fusion of the words "entropy" and "utopia," clearly displays the band's knack for creating a fully functional collage effect that displayed a completely unique style. This theatrical concept album is carved up into three chapters with each act offering a creative breath of fresh air in a genre that was quickly filling up with Dream Theater clones. With moments of straight on metal, others of technical jazz-fusion wizardry with warm and tender softer ballads reminiscent of modern progressive rock, ENTROPIA hits many notes with each track exuding a charm all its own with stellar instrumental interplay that offers an infinite supply of variations that find the instrumentation morphing into new creative displays of harmonic interplay.

ENTROPIA may be PAIN OF SALVATION's heaviest album at least consistently so although there is plenty of softer passages that allow lighter less bombastic movements to muster lush motifs. The opening "! (Forward)" displays a ferocious metal introduction with jagged riff driven rhythms, intricate melodic interplays and the operatic vocal style of Daniel G. The contrast between heavy metal and soft piano balladries is seamless as are the harsh vocal outbursts with the clean sung vocal harmonics that zigzag around seemingly random yet all ties together perfectly! The beauty of PAIN OF SALVATION in general is completely represented in full form on ENTROPIA. While tackling extreme progressive technicalities, the music never strays from the vital emotional connection that links the sounds to the dramatic storyline which narrates the conceptual story that is something right out of the neo-prog playbook from the likes of Arena, IQ and Pendragon.

All of the musicians on board are on fire. Daniel Gildenl÷w and Daniel Magdic's twin guitar attacks are highly symbiotic and the drums and keys exhibit advanced progginess as well. The flirtations with funk and trip hop at key moments offer unforeseen elements that pop up now and again and overall the album is chock full of a youthful energy that delivers the album with a fiery passion absent in so many bands who fail to ignite a level of excitement that PAIN OF SALVATION generates. While not as lauded as the band's following "The Perfect Element I" or "Remedy Lane," personally i find this debut to be one of the best progressive metal albums around and just as compelling as those two. A masterful debut that showed not only the top notch musicianship but a keen sense of songwriting skills that allowed a wealth of styles and sounds to come to life. Outstanding debut!

 Remedy Lane by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 2002
4.23 | 1167 ratings

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Remedy Lane
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by SoundsofSeasons
Prog Reviewer

5 stars If there is one album within progressive metal that truly moves me it is Remedy Lane, and if there is one band that is most genuine in their lyrical content and sound it is Pain Of Salvation. We find in this album complexity in structure, and skill in musicianship, that will made a seasoned musician blush. The lyrics may make you blush too if you play this in public to an average non-prog fan, without the right mood or context, so be aware of that too! haha. Remedy Lane tackles concepts such as the dangers and ecstasy of sexual exploration, in this case younger than the protagonist is ready for, depression in the face of true life struggles anyone can relate to, fear of becoming a parent and what that will require, the tragedy of life when it is stripped away from you, the grief that comes with the resentment of a lost unborn child, the rage and confusion that comes from the inability to place blame for such an event on anyone, the choice to point a finger to ones' self in hindsight for such an tragedy, loss of all will to live, trying to protect our loved ones from their own internal pain, and finding the will to move on from all of it.

Yeah, this isn't your average progressive metal album filled with songs of fairies, monsters, demons, and magic. This is much much scarier and much more substantial. These song talk of real life circumstances real people have dealt with, or may deal with at one time or another, or at least someone you may know or have seen walking along the street may have experienced in their life. This music is heartbreaking to say the least. Pain Of Salvation weaves these stories with incredibly high levels of musicianship coming from all band members (the drummer in particular is just one of the best to come from the progressive metal scene, period) and a vocalist that is the feature of the band for good reason. This guy Daniel Gildenl÷w has a voice that is almost inhuman in its' range and versatility. He's basically progressive metals equivalent of Freddie Mercury from Queen. He might even be better than Freddie Mercury in some ways. Yes, i mean it, and i realize that Freddie Mercury is known as one of the greatest voices to ever grace rock music as a whole.

If you enjoy progressive rock, or progressive metal at all, you must give this album a chance. This and 'Perfect Element Pt. 1' are pinnacles of the progressive metal genre, and of all of progressive music of any genre. I like this one a bit better, but to each their own, and both are landmarks of prog. This is a concept album without any of the pretentiousness, or over long drawn out jamming that so many concept albums fall prey to.

 Road Salt Two by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.51 | 402 ratings

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Road Salt Two
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N║ 271

In 1984, Daniel Gildenlow with only eleven years old founded a band named Reality in Eskilstuna, Sweden. One of the early members of the group was Daniel Magdic, who would remain with the band until after the release of their debut studio album. In 1987, Reality participated in the Swedish Annual Musical Contest, Rock-SM, and they were the youngest competitors ever to enter the competition. Daniel Gildenlow won the category of "Best Vocalist". In 1990, drummer Johan Langell and bassist Gustaf Hielm joined the band. Daniel Gildenlow renamed the band to Pain Of Salvation in 1991. The name Pain Of Salvation was devised by Daniel Gildenlow, who interpreted the name has having the meaning of balance. During the next three years, the band competed in contests and competitions while earning recognition in the process. In 1994, Kristoffer Gildenlow, Daniel's younger brother, replaced Hielm on bass. With this ine up, Gildenlow brothers, Magdic and Langell entered in a local studio and recorded the "Hereafter" demo, which the band actively shopped record labels. Fredrik Hermansson learned of the band through the "Hereafter" demo and successfully auditioned to become the band's keyboardist. So, it was with this line up the band released in 1997 their debut studio album "Entropia". Their second studio album "One Hour By The Concrete Lake" was recorded in 1999 with a slightly different line up. Magdic was replaced by Johan Hallgren, who had previously played with Daniel Gildenlow in a band called Crypt Of Kerberos. With this same line up they recorded three new studio albums "The Perfect Element Part 1" in 2001, "Remedy Lane" in 2002 and "Be" in 2004. In 2007 they recorded their sixth studio album "Scarsick" without the presence of Kristoffer Gildenlow. He left the band due to his relocation to Holland. In 2010 and 2011 they recorded two more studio albums "Road Salt One" and "Road Salt Two". On these albums occurs a new change in the line up of them. Langell due to family commitments was replaced by the French drummer LÚo Margarit.

So, "Road Salt Two" which is the eighth studio album of Pain Of Salvation was released in 2011, one year after their previous studio album "Road Salt One". It follows the same musical patterns on that album. Like "Road Salt One", this is another conceptual album as happened with all previous Pain Of Salvation's studio albums. However and as happened with "Road Salt One" too, the album was no more song oriented and is streamlined in its production values.

You might say that if you've heard "Road Salt One" before, you may already know all you need to know about "Road Salt Two". After all, the title "Road Salt Two" kind of gives it away that it's a linked album that we have on our hands. You might say that, which isn't completely wrong, but that it's not enough. Why? Because that it would be unjust regardless of whether you like the first part or don't. It's not to imply this album is all that different, or that it will blow your mind. No, but it's a fine piece of music, with nuances to be discovered on repeated listens. Besides, if "Road Salt" is an own musical project, you must check both parts to have the complete picture. So, having listened to the album for the first time I wasn't all that impressed because it seemed to me a bit of the same. However, it turned out to be a false sign. "Road Salt Two" seems to be quite a bit more refined than its predecessor. I don't know whether it's because it's a second venture in the bluesy territories or because the band seems to understand more where they are heading with this. Or because things have simply started falling into place better. And those details can make a subtil difference.

"Road Salt Two" has twelve or fourteen tracks, depending on if you have the standard edition or the limited edition dig pack, which is my version. The concept, the music and the lyrics were made by Daniel Gildenlow, as is usual in the band. As I wrote before, "Road Salt One" and "Road Salt Two" are the first two albums from the band to feature LÚo Margarit on drums. So, the line up on the album is Daniel Gildenlow (lead vocals and backing vocals, electric, acoustic and fretless guitars and bass guitars), Johan Hallgren (backing vocals and electric guitars), Fredrik Hermansson (electric and acoustic pianos, organs, mellotron and keyboards) and LÚo Margarit (backing vocals and drums).

Conclusion: When I reviewed "Road Salt One" I wrote that it represents the first part of the concept. So, "Road Salt Two" represents its second part. Even that "Road Salt Two" be essentially a repetition of the overall concept, it still manages to be a bit different. Its darker feel gives it a noticeable different tone. It also seems to be a more cohesive and consistent work than its predecessor. Despite the first part may be the stronger release, I probably recommend this second part. However, I still think that "Road Salt One" and "Road Salt Two" must be heard as a single album. When you play both albums together that is when you really understand the total musical power of these two excellent albums and what they are all about. Their achievement in create an interesting piece, more than impresses. I still think these two albums should have been released as a double album. However, Daniel Gildenlow knows why he didn't that.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Road Salt One by PAIN OF SALVATION album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.32 | 487 ratings

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Road Salt One
Pain Of Salvation Progressive Metal

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N║ 270

As many of we know, Pain Of Salvation is a Swedish progressive rock metal band led by Daniel Gildenlow who is the band's main songwriter, lyricist, guitarist and vocalist. Pain Of Salvation's sound is characterised by a riff oriented guitar work, a broad vocal range, oscillations between calm and heavy musical passages, syncopation with a great variety of rhythms and polyrhythms with the simultaneous use of two or more conflicting rhythms. Thus far, every studio albums released by the band has been conceptual albums. The concepts of their albums tends to addresses contemporary issues, such as sexuality, war, the environment, the humanity, the philosophy concept of existence and the nature of the concept of the existence of God. So, as we can see, Pain Of Salvation is a very special band, really.

"Road Salt One", which is the seventh studio album of Pain Of Salvation and that was released in 2010, follow the same musical patterns. However, while this is one more conceptual album, as happened with all Pain Of Salvation's albums, till now, the album is no more a song oriented album with its streamlined in its production values, but a bit different.

Daniel Gildenlow has described the album, in interviews, as sounding more "jam oriented" with tracks that sounds like more they have been recorded live in a rehearsal room. He indicated that the intent of the album was to go back to letting the song be the focal point by having the album feature just us touching our hearts. He also described the concept of "Road Salt One" having been made about many parallel stories and that it also can be compared to the movie "Magnolia". "Magnolia" is an American film drama, written, produced and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, in 1999. The movie is a mosaic of interrelated characters in search of happiness, forgiveness and the meaning of life.

"Road Salt One" is a rather curious album. I sincerely confess that I'd never heard a progressive metal band attempt to fuse the blues into their sound. This is maybe because blues aren simply not progressive enough, or to put it in other way, they aren't complex enough to be part of this genre of progressive rock music. Granting that anything was bound to surpass the band's previous musical adventures into the progressive metal sub-genre, you still couldn't fault them for actually stretching out beyond their established sound. At least, I think it was the intention of Pain Of Salvation.

However, this album shows a heavy influence from not just the blues but also from other similar genres like roots rock, gospel and choir music. Still, anyone who actually detracts Pain Of Salvation to be a pure metal progressive band, should remember they never really were totally evocative of the progressive metal, anyway. Even during the band's heyday, which probably ended with "Remedy Lane", the band showed they were much more than a simple progressive metal band. We mustn't forget that Daniel always sustained that Pain Of Salvation was a very different band. So, this is definitely a Pain Of Salvation's album. But, it's nowhere as harsh as "Scarsick". Quite the opposite, it's mellow. "Scarsick" took me a while to get used to. But in a way, it's also the weak spot of this album. You might just skim over it and leave it at that. At times it sounds as the slow and dark parts of "Be". But you must admit, it isn't a bad thing, really.

"Road Salt One" has twelve or thirteen tracks if we have the standard edition or the limited digipack edition, which is my version. The concept of the music and lyrics were made by Daniel Gildenlow. This is the first album from the band to feature the French LÚo Margarit on drums. He substituted Johan Langell, the former drummer of the group. He left the band after the end of the live tour of "Scarsick" due to family commitments. So, the line up on the album is Daniel Gildenlow (lead vocals and backing vocals, electric, acoustic and fretless guitars, bass guitar, organs, piano, mandolin, lute, balalaika, keyboards and drums), Johan Hallgren (backing vocals and electric guitars), Fredrik Hermansson (electric and acoustic pianos, organs, mellotron and keyboards) and LÚo Margarit (backing vocals and drums).

Conclusion: If you expected this album in the same vein of the "Linoleum" EP, you were right. If you expected this album in the same vein of "Scarsick", you were wrong. There's no doubt that Pain Of Salvation continues to follow their own path and continues to surprise us. With the "Road Salt" musical project they continued to prove, without no doubt, that they're a very different and special band. "Road Salt One" represents the first part of this conceptual project. It's an album with some great songs and the others are all good too. With this album we go on a trip all the way back to the 70's rock. When I heard the sound of Iron Butterfly, Jimmy Hendrix, Blue Oyster Cult and specially Led Zeppelin, I can see depth in music expressed with surprisingly simple retro lyrics. However, "Road Salt One" is far more diverse than that. "Road Salt One" is, in reality, an album more diverse than it seems. There's certainly a grower on the album. The more you heard it, the more you like it. As I wrote before, when I reviewed "Scarsick", the same happened with it. Personally, I prefer side B to Side A, which I think be more cohesive. My favourite songs are "Sisters", "Linoleum" and "Innocence". Despite I consider "Road Salt One" the weakest of all their albums it remains to me a good album too.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

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