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QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA

Rock Progressivo Italiano • Italy


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Quella Vecchia Locanda biography
Founded in Rome, Italy in 1970 - Disbanded in 1974

QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA is a great Italian prog band of the historic scene, formed in Rome in the early seventies. QVL plays a complex music with a lot of instrumental combinations, beautiful melodies and a very high sophistication. Close to KING CRIMSON.

QVL released two albums which are both considered essential releases from that particular scene. The first album is still regarded as a classic in its field, with an original fusion of classical influences and the use of flute and electric violin in evidence. QVL was fairly typical of the style, especially on their second album, "Il Tempo Della Goia", which ranks as one of the finest examples of classical, pastoral Italian symphonic along the lines of PFM, CELESTE, ALUSA FALLAX or LOCANDA DELLE FATE. The group sadly disbanded soon after the second album, leaving us with two more italian progressive gems, both with beautiful covers. Two of the most looked records of Italy!!!

See also: WiKi

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Il Tempo Della GioiaIl Tempo Della Gioia
Sony/Bmg Italy 2010
$6.76
$4.32 (used)
Quella Vecchia LocandaQuella Vecchia Locanda
Btf 2008
$21.22
$12.48 (used)

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QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA discography


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QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.14 | 333 ratings
Quella Vecchia Locanda
1972
4.12 | 321 ratings
Il Tempo Della Gioia
1974

QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.33 | 8 ratings
Live
1993

QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Il Tempo Della Gioia by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.12 | 321 ratings

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Il Tempo Della Gioia
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars The second of two creative and sophisticated albums by this band from Rome, its reception was mixed as many did not like the lineup changes (especially the departure/absence of dynamic violin phenom, Donald Lax) but others saw the compositional growth and loved the less crazed, more melodic accessibility of this album over the self-titled debut.

1. "Villa Doria Pamphili" (5:27) beautiful, symphonic, even cinematic music that begins being piano-based and dominated but then turns symphonic with strings. At 1:45 electric bass enters to accompany acoustic guitar for a lone male singer to enter and sing over. At 2:40, with the end of the singer's first verse comes a bombastic RENAISSANCE/Russian-like symphonic bridge and then return to simple acoustic foundation for the second verse. The bombastic Russian section repeats and is prolonged before decaying into a gorgeous solo piano piece for the final 45 seconds. (9.5/10)

2. "A Forma Di" (4:07) opens with quiet, pulsing strings with gentle, almost distant flutes, winds, upper octave piano, and harpsicord "dancing" around. Only very slowly does the background move forward and into full presence and full volume. Definitely conjures up a musical "view" of a religious ceremonial march of rural folk--like a processional of Russian peasant souls from Gogol's Dead Souls. (9.25/10)

3. "Il Tempo Della Gioia" (6:15) interesting music and song structure are betrayed by overall poor sound reproduction as well as flawed vocal and electric guitar performances and choices. (7.5/10)

4. "Un Giorno, un Amico" (9:39) wonderful acoustic intro of piano and violin. The breakout of full-band even goes well (again, the sound and stylings of the English band RENAISSANCE come strongly to mind), as the folk melodies and sounds are well-maintained. Over the course of the first half of the song, the music develops no further than a cabaret-like gypsy folk dance despite some find performances from the violin and piano, but then things shift under the leadership of clarinet. Everything slows down a notch and becomes more jazz lounge-y. Again, it is the emotional sense of melody expressed by the violinist that keeps me engaged--and deeply so. At the seven minute mark vocals join the fray for the first time, followed by an electric guitar solo--both of which fail to impress. Poor, flangy drum sound, too. (17/20)

5. "╚ Accaduto una Notte" (8:16) opens with choral voices singing wordlessly (like the opening and ending sections of PFM's "L'isola de niente") which also fade away leaving a very gentle, spacious pastoral section not unlike some sections of CELESTE's Principe di un giorno or even MAXOPHONE--both of which won't come out for over a year). Musically, this is the most mature, interesting, and fully developed piece on the album. Still poor production of voice and electric instruments, but musically very perfect--brilliantly conceived. This is a piece I'd LOVE to hear re- recorded or performed live. (19/20)

The musical constructs, compositional arrangements, and instrumental performances of this album are incredible-- delicious. Where it falls short is in sound production and vocal performances. When the sounds are acoustic, the engineering team seems to do well; it's with the renderings of the electrical instruments that the music production falls short. Still, I am one of the faction who like this album better than the more bluesy, frenzied debut.

4.5 stars; a near-masterpiece of progressive rock music and a wonderful listening experience for the more acoustic, symphonic approaches to rock music.

 Il Tempo Della Gioia by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.12 | 321 ratings

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Il Tempo Della Gioia
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Menswear
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Afternoon Delight!

Well, it's for any moment of the day really, but the sunny afternoon of Della Gioia is irresistible. Bright colors, mildly windy and your loved one by yourself on a soft blanket, this album evokes pleasant, relaxing times...at times! It's time for joy, as the title says so the fun is there mixed with more tranquil moments. But they blend it effortlessly! How!?

Less rock and roll on the menu (less Tull and vocals mainly) but super well written classical bits are plenty. Majestic, inspired, grandiose...call it whattya want, it's virtuosity with a nice chianti and some fava beans.

Orchestral but groovy, well sung but baroque at times, you cannot go wrong. A solid chunk of spaghetti rock.

 Il Tempo Della Gioia by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.12 | 321 ratings

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Il Tempo Della Gioia
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA (That Old Inn in English) emerged at the height of the Italian prog boom in the early 70s, released only two gems of the genre and then sadly disbanded but in their brief yet productive career they released not only their stunning masterpiece of a self-titled debut but a second classic in the form of IL TEMPO DELLA GIOIA (The Age Of Joy). In the two years since the debut there had been a significant lineup change that steered the band's sound in a new direction. Violinist Donald Lax was replaced by Claudio Filice and bassist Massimo Giorgi (from the band Il Ritratto di Dorian Gray) took over for Romualdo Coletta. The debut album gained the band a prominent role in the Italian prog scene and in the two year gap they caught the attention of RCA records which meant a stealthier production job for their sophomore release.

One of the most startling differences between QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA's debut and IL TEMPO DELLA GIOIA is the absence of the madman violinist Donald Lax who was one of the key components of the debut. In his stead, the more relaxed Claudio Filice is quite subdued and the band follows suit making album number two a much mellower romp through the prog universe with longer tracks that develop into intricate parts but eschew the frenetic youthful energy that permeated the eponymous debut. Another distinct feature of IL TEMPO is that is includes the guest sax player Rodolfo Bianchi who adds some rather jazzy touches strewn about although never taking center stage. There are also some beautiful choral moments.

At its core QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA's general musical approach centers around complex classically driven piano and keyboard parts that break into heavy rock enthusiasm less often than album #1. As mentioned Claudio Filice doesn't compete in the sheer madman approach of Lax and even on tracks like "Un Giorno, Un Amico" where he lets loose, he still sounds quite inhibited which ultimately affected the entire band's performance. While this may sound like a bad thing, it's a testament to how the members of the band were a cohesive unit and worked together within the confines of every member making IL TEMPO DELLA GIOIA, which makes it a true GIOA (Joy) to listen to. Each of the five compositions has a distinct identity and offers each musical instrument to have a day in the sunlight.

While initially i was disappointed by the approach of QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA's mellow second album since it clearly makes less of an impact, there is no doubt that this is the same band with the same compositional approach of beautifully designed symphonic Italian prog of the era. While the sheer intensity of the debut has been dampened, the focus has shifted to more melodic driven symphonic touches and instrumental interchange. Once again the members play tightly constructed pieces that flow together perfectly. This album is almost exclusively instrumental with only occasional dynamic vocals from founding member Giorgio Giorgi whose vocal prowess matches any of the operatic greats of the day. Despite playing second best to their debut, IL TEMPO DELLA GIOIA is still an excellent slice of early 70s Italian prog not to be missed.

 Il Tempo Della Gioia by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.12 | 321 ratings

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Il Tempo Della Gioia
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by nikitasv777

5 stars Quella Vecchia Locanda have proved themselves expert musicians. ''Il Tempo della Gioia'' one of the all-time great Italian prog albums with classical influences. Second album by QVL, genuinely unique and beautiful. This is very melodious music with use of flute, piccolo, guitar, keyboards and violin, and with clarinet and sax. Music varies from the simple to the grandiose. Tunes with unexpected tempo changes, with breathtaking collection of violin solos. This is beautiful and subtle music. Amazing sound! Once the album finishes, a sensation of 'want more'. ''Il Tempo della Gioia'' - an excellent example of the Italian scene. I have absolutely no hesitation in giving this album 5 stars.
 Quella Vecchia Locanda by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.14 | 333 ratings

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Quella Vecchia Locanda
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by nikitasv777

5 stars Quella Vecchia Locanda were formed around 1970 as a quintet. QVL only released two albums in their short career. Album 1972 year regarded as a classic in its field, with an original fusion of classical influences and the use of flute, piano, organ, spinet and violin in evidence. It all blends so fantasticaly wel with guitars, bass and drums. The album is about a deformed boy shunned by the community because of his diversity. At 34 minutes the album is short but perfectly formed and still sounds very good. Album is a classic and I unreservedly recommend it to you. I cannot give this album anything other than 5 stars.
 Quella Vecchia Locanda by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.14 | 333 ratings

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Quella Vecchia Locanda
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA has so much more of a beautiful ring to the ears than the rather plain sounding English translation 'This Old Inn' which found this band from Rome carrying on the Italian progressive rock tradition of taking on a cutesy band name in the same style as Premiata Forneria Marconi (Award-winning Marconi Bakery) and Banco del Mutuo Soccorso (Bank of Mutual Relief). This quintet formed in 1970 and enjoyed a rather vigorous live setting that helped them become one of the more remembered Italian prog rock bands of the heyday in the early 70s. Their eponymously titled debut emerged in 1972 after a rather pop-oriented beginning which while almost completely faded into history left traces only lingering about on a various artists compilation titled 'Progressive Voyage' (The track is titled 'Io ti amo' or in English 'I love you.' While they would hone their prog rock chops in no time and be ready for the big time, there's no doubt that the pop aspects of this band carried over to their proggier side and allowed them to dish out some of the more melodic flow of compositions in the Italian prog rock scene.

QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA only released two albums in their short career with this one being released on the Help label and then finally getting picked up by RCA for their second album 'Il Tempo Della Gioia.' While they only released two albums, both are quite distinct in their style despite both firmly placed in the category of classically infused rock with folk and jazzy touches. This debut album lacks the production prowess of the second album but for my ears is the more interesting album of the two as it unleashes a powerful youthful exuberance and enthusiasm that 'Il Tempo Della Gioia' lacks as they began to slip into a comfort zone but a very beautiful one i must add. The band's main leaders were lead singer and flautist Giorgio Giorgi, guitarist and clarinetist Raimondo Maria Cocco, keyboardist Massimo Roselli and percussionist Patrick Traina who all played together in the earlier pop rock phases of the band but for their more adventurous prog years added Donald Lax to dazzle with his violin skills that added a unique gypsy swing and Paganini element to the band's overall sound that set them apart from many of the purely symphonic rock contemporaries of the day.

'Prologo' bursts onto the scene with a scorching duo between the violin and piano with the guitar bursting in and finally the drums and as the intro cedes into the more symphonic leaning rock segments, the instruments all go crazy on each other. Lax plays both acoustic and electric violins and sometimes delivers frenetic assaults reminiscent of the Mahavishnu Orchestra and at times reminding of the folkier side of the prog rock scene from such bands like Comus or Spirogyra. While not unique to QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA, the band mastered the dynamics shifting of soft sensual classical piano oriented pastoral segments with the heavy guitar laden rock sections that allowed Roselli to unleash his best Keith Emerson inspired keyboard wizardry. Certain tracks like 'Un Villaggio,Un'illsione' display Lax's playing around with Bach, Brahms, Corelli and other classical masters and weave them into a more Paganini performance that would be reworked into the rock fusion compositions that start out with classical intros and slowly morph into the heavier guitar, bass and drum action accompanied by the passionate vocal style of Giorgi who had the perfect vocal style for this type of music magic.

It may only last slightly over 34 minutes in duration but the debut album by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA is one of the best offerings the early RPI scene had to offer. These eight tracks are chock full of passionately strewn classically infused rock sophistication very much at a level of the other greats of PFM, Banco, Il Balleto di Bronzo, Le Orme and the rest. The music is as perfectly constructed as the stunningly beautiful album cover and covers so many grounds in such a small amount of time that i can easily put this one on rotation and listen to it repeatedly without getting bored for one second. This band mastered the melodies, the Tull inspired folk feel, the ELP keyboard prowess, the medieval chamber aspects, the freak gypsy folk and the symphonic heavy rock. Chock full of brilliant dynamic shifts and progressive time signature workouts without sacrificing some of the most intricately designed melodic developments, QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA is one of the Italian greats of the era. For my money this debut release is one of the absolute best examples of this era of Italian progressive rock that rightfully deserves all the high praise and positive criticism that it has received ever since.

 Quella Vecchia Locanda by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.14 | 333 ratings

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Quella Vecchia Locanda
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars This is a nice blues rock album with a lot of input from classically trained musicians and composers. The presence of flutes, violins, and clarinet make it a little more interesting. The drums and bass play make it sound rather dated.

1. "Prologo" (5:01) plays like a prog epic with its many, many small themes, sections, twists and turns, classical and rock. Fine musicianship and vocals, but just a little too busy and nonsensical to me. (9/10)

2. "Un villagio, un'illusione" (3:53) after the radical twisting and turning of the opening song, the fairly straightforward and steady arrangement of this one is a bit of a surprise. (7.5/10)

3. "RealtÓ" (4:14) has very delicate, nylon-string guitar opening with matching vocal, before a heavier LED ZEPPELIN- like blues rock chord progression takes us into a chorus. Repeat one more time and then the song shifts into a still gentle, almost folk-classical instrumental section. Return to A-B format for the final minute or so. Beautiful song. (9.5/10)

4. "Immagini sfuocate" (2:57) opens with demonic sounding organ play, moving into a sustained crescendo within which flutes, electric bass, violin, and guitar add their spice. When we finally come out of the worm hole, we find ourselves in classic blues rock in the vein of SPIRIT or RARE EARTH. (8.5/10)

5. "Il cieco" (4:12) opens with a dated rock sound feel but then moves into a softer, flute-dominated section in the second minute. Piano and percussion bring us out into a kind of JETHRO TULL "Locomotive Breath" sound and style. The final 30 seconds are spent in more plaintive classical mode. (8/10)

6. "Dialogo" (3:43) another classically-infused blues rock tune that breaks for an interesting final minute of vocal 'dialogue'. (8.5/10)

7. "Sogno, risveglia e" (5:16) Easily the best song on the album, for its classical themes at the beginning--played on piano and strings--which then set up the entire beautiful song. Solo violin and flute take over the largo melody play in the third minute before the violin tracks fire it up a bit. At 3:30 vocalist sings over his piano, alternating with strings' input. The song returns to the gorgeous spacious piano theme for the final 45 seconds. (9.5/10)

An album that does a fairly competent job of melding classical music instruments and compositional styles and themes with rock instruments and formats. It would have been better if the rock compositionship was a little beyond fairly simple, straightforward blues rock formats.

A near-masterpiece of classically-infused blues ("progressive") rock.

 Il Tempo Della Gioia by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.12 | 321 ratings

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Il Tempo Della Gioia
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Magnum Vaeltaja
Special Collaborator Eclectic Prog Team

4 stars This second album by Quella Vecchia Locanda takes a drastically different path from the first but the journey is still satisfying.

With just about all of the hard blues rock elements of their first album removed in favour of subdued classical textures, the tone of this album is very different from the first. It still works excellently, however, and how this album could be best described is "refined". The production is improved, the moods are more delicate. Oddly enough, the structure of the album is generally looser and more free-flowing since it isn't bound to a concept like "Quella Vecchia Locanda" was. It's for that reason that I give this album one star lower of a rating. While it's an excellent album, "Il Tempo Della Gioia" doesn't take the listener on as much of a journey in its short 35 minute span as its predecessor.

Still a great addition to any RPI collection, though. 4 stars.

 Quella Vecchia Locanda by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.14 | 333 ratings

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Quella Vecchia Locanda
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by Magnum Vaeltaja
Special Collaborator Eclectic Prog Team

5 stars A true gem of not only the Italian scene, but prog as a whole. Quella Vecchia Locanda's debut self-titled album is a real treat, playing out like a storybook, painting vivid musical pictures as it takes its listener on a spell-binding journey.

Many people have noted stylistic similarities between the band and Genesis or Jethro Tull. While these comparisons are valid, they're a little bit contrived. Sure, there are lyrical, pastoral moods, charismatic vocals, classical interplay and heavy blues rocking throughout the album but those are just characteristic of the Italian sound. No cloning to be heard here.

So what makes "That Old Inn" stand out so much in the vast RPI scene? It really all comes down to composition. This is one of the most wonderfully, thoughtfully, intelligently composed albums that I've heard. The amount of energy that the album conveys is incredible, and it's evident from the opening bars of "Prologo", yet it's not a hack-and-slash headbanging album at all. There's such a great diversity of mood in this album, from soft, nocturnal pastoral sections to spirited classical melodies to hard rock riffing. And what makes it so powerful is that it's all delivered so succinctly. "Quella Vecchia Locanda" offers build-ups, climaxes, lyrical storytelling, breathing room, all in the short span of under 35 minutes! Though it's a shorter album, the length makes it easily digestible and always leaves me in awe, wondering how a band can take me on such a great journey in such a short time frame.

An absolute must-have for anyone looking for a quality album that's short and sweet. 5 well-deserved stars for an underrated classic.

 Quella Vecchia Locanda by QUELLA VECCHIA LOCANDA album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.14 | 333 ratings

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Quella Vecchia Locanda
Quella Vecchia Locanda Rock Progressivo Italiano

Review by purplesnake

5 stars What can I say, this album is beautiful. It's a must have. The melodies are so beautiful, the flute and violin work is exceptional, its full of energy...as a composer myself this is an album I can really appreciate. I think the last piece on here is especially gorgeous. And the whole album feels like such a beautiful story...I'm not the kind of person who can explain music with words too well, since I see music as its own language, its own world, and within that world this album tells quite a tale. But really, just stop reading this review and listen to the album if you haven't already.
Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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