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ANGRA

Progressive Metal • Brazil


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Angra picture
Angra biography
Formed in 1991 in São Paulo, Brazil - Hiatuses from 1999-2001 and 2007-2009 - Still active as of 2019

A Brazilian neo-classical progressive metal band with a very talented vocalist Andre MATOS and Kiko LOUREIRO's fantastic guitar playing. Making a remake of KATE BUSH's "WUTHERING HEIGHTS" on their first album. They are now playing a more straight forward heavy metal, having left their initial Brazilian and classical influences.

See also: SHAMAN

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ANGRA discography


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ANGRA top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.94 | 186 ratings
Angels Cry
1993
4.10 | 248 ratings
Holy Land
1996
3.72 | 142 ratings
Fireworks
1998
3.80 | 163 ratings
Rebirth
2001
4.17 | 284 ratings
Temple of Shadows
2004
3.60 | 107 ratings
Aurora Consurgens
2006
3.35 | 94 ratings
Aqua
2010
3.57 | 70 ratings
Secret Garden
2014
3.58 | 43 ratings
Ømni
2018
4.11 | 18 ratings
Cycles of Pain
2023

ANGRA Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.55 | 26 ratings
Holy Live
1997
3.72 | 30 ratings
Rebirth World Tour
2003
4.14 | 14 ratings
Angels Cry: 20th Anniversary Tour
2013

ANGRA Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.15 | 20 ratings
Rebirth World Tour
2003
4.40 | 10 ratings
Angels Cry: 20th Anniversary Tour
2013

ANGRA Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.33 | 14 ratings
Best Reached Horizons
2012
3.00 | 3 ratings
On the Backs of Angels
2018

ANGRA Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.74 | 14 ratings
Reaching Horizons (demo)
1992
2.59 | 13 ratings
Evil Warning
1994
3.00 | 4 ratings
Eyes of Christ (demo)
1994
1.60 | 6 ratings
Live Acoustic At Fnac
1995
3.32 | 31 ratings
Freedom Call
1996
4.00 | 4 ratings
Make believe
1996
4.00 | 4 ratings
Acoustic ... and More
1998
3.50 | 15 ratings
Lisbon
1998
2.07 | 9 ratings
Rainy Nights
1998
3.40 | 5 ratings
Acid Rain (demo single)
2001
3.26 | 38 ratings
Hunters and Prey
2002
2.55 | 10 ratings
The Course Of Nature
2006
3.81 | 12 ratings
Arising Thunder
2010
3.12 | 6 ratings
Lease Of Life
2010

ANGRA Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Holy Live by ANGRA album cover Live, 1997
3.55 | 26 ratings

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Holy Live
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by Lesanderd

4 stars It was recorded at the Aquaboulevard in Paris, France in 1996, during the Holy Land tour. It has 6 songs and 35 minutes of music from the greatest South American power prog metal band. Reports say that Angra played more than 10 songs that day, but due to bad recording, some songs were not used for this album. All the songs here are performed well live. Andre Matos was in top form during those days. The charismatic late singer had an awesome interaction with the excited audience, A very fine live EP. I recommend it to all fans of this great band from Brazil.
 Aurora Consurgens by ANGRA album cover Studio Album, 2006
3.60 | 107 ratings

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Aurora Consurgens
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by Idaho

4 stars A touch less progressive than their earlier albums, Aurora Consurgens is still a worthy addition to any progressive/power metal collection. Edu Falaschi continues to impress with his powerful vocals, and Kiko Loureiro and Rafael Bittencourt continue to impress with their guitars. Like other reviewers, I found "Ego Painted Grey" to be the highlight here. It's dynamic--starting softly and then becoming heavy--and it more resembles something from earlier Angra albums.

I bought the first four Angra albums about 20 years ago, and I've only returned to listen to some of their later albums recently. Their 2014 and 2018 albums were a bit disappointing, but I was pleasantly suprised by Aurora Consurgens. While not quite matching the brilliance of the early albums, it is a great listen and is fully deserving of 4 stars.

 Ømni by ANGRA album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.58 | 43 ratings

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Ømni
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by Idaho

3 stars Angra has gone through a lot of turnover throughout the years, with guitarist Rafael Bittencourt the only remaining original member. They continue to play a mix of power metal and prog metal, although unfortunately their sound has become less unique and more generic than their early albums.

Despite that, Omni is still good. It's more cohesive and consistent than Secret Garden, and maybe just a touch better. Angra does play around just a little bit with different vocal styles--a little bit of growling, a small section with a guest vocalist.

The best track here is "The Bottom of My Soul," which has some of the intensity of old Angra. My version also includes a bonus track, a 2018 version of Z.I.T.O., originally from their Holy Land album. It's a testament to the quality of their current vocalist--but also a reminder that the quality of their music has fallen. Still, though, this is a solid album, and fans of both prog metal and power metal will find a lot to enjoy. 3.5 stars.

 Secret Garden by ANGRA album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.57 | 70 ratings

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Secret Garden
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by Idaho

3 stars Secret Garden is an interesting album for Angra. They've got a new singer--Fabio Lione, who's probably sung for more power/prog metal bands than anyone else. A cover of The Police classic Synchronicity II appears in the middle of the album. Epica's lead singer, Simone Simons, sings lead vocals on the title track, which is written by Maria Ilmoniemi, the wife of Angra's guitarist Kiko Loureiro. Germany metal singer Doro Pesch also appears.

Secret Garden is all over the place. It's at its best when it stays true to the traditional sound of Angra, like it does on the first four tracks. Despite the new vocalist, these first four would have been right at home on any of Angra's first five albums. Then the quality drops a bit, and most of the rest of the album isn't exactly filler, but it's a more generic prog/power sound that will likely disappoint most Angra fans. Synchronicity II is a fun cover of an amazing song, but it doesn't come close to matching the original and it should have been placed at the end of the album as a bonus track instead of as the fifth song. Secret Garden is okay, but I'm surprised they named the album after it. It doesn't sound at all like Angra. The album ends on a nice note, the soft and beautiful Silent Call.

Do I like this album? Absolutely. Is it as good as their first five? Half of it is pretty close. It really does sound like two different EPs squished together--classic Angra in the first, generic power/prog with some odd bits and pieces in the second. Those listening to Angra for the first time shouldn't start here, but Angra fans will still find a lot to like. 3.5 stars.

 Temple of Shadows by ANGRA album cover Studio Album, 2004
4.17 | 284 ratings

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Temple of Shadows
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars The awkward transition from the André Matos era is over; Brazil's power metal masters are trying on a new mantle--one that really fits them well: with their usual impressive display of compositional eclecticism and skill they have made a stab a the "prog theater" realm--an operatic concept album that explores multiple musical styles within a stage theater-like format all the while retaining their metal foundations--and it works! It's good! And this doesn't even give credit for the incredibly high level of musicianship exhibited by all of the band members!

1. "Deus Le Volt!" (0:52) nice cinematic intro to ?

2. "Spread Your Fire" (4:25) rapid fire metal with lead guitar shredding that makes way for gruff Survivor-like aggressive lead vocal with antiphonal choral background vocals. Interesting. Keyboard work makes it seem as if there is an orchestra involved as well. Operatic female vocal helping out in the third minute before Hammy-speed instrumental passage ensues. Great musicianship. While I appreciate the compositional skill and technical and support prowess necessary to pull this off, I'm not sure I like the music. (8.667/10)

3. "Angels And Demons" (4:11) take a simple Thin Lizzy song and speed up all instrumental tracks by five and you'll get a song like this. Eduardo Falaschi's voice is sounding a little old (or strained). Technically quite impressive. (8.667/10)

4. "Waiting Silence" (4:55) excellent 1980s heavy metal brought into the 21st Century. Again, Eduardo's voice is sounding like he's really pressing to get his tone and volume. Nice 1980s chords and melodies. Impressive solos. (8.75/10)

5. "Wishing Well" (4:00) acoustic guitars, synth and Tommy Shaw-like vocal give this opening a very STYX like feel. Even when it hits full stride it has a classic rock feel. (8.75/10)

6. "The Temple Of Hate" (5:13) back to the Thin Lizzy school of hyperdrive. Don't like the 1980s drum sound. How those musicians retain control and synchrony when spewing out notes that fast I'll never know. (8.75/10)

7. "The Shadow Hunter" (8:04) after a very impressive acoustic guitar intro this fully Latin song turns Probably the most impressive construct on the album for its dynamics and stylistic range. That pervasive Latin flare has a lot to do with its magic--that and the more humane drumming and percussion. There are even some Yes-like moments (the multi-voice fifth minute). Great sense of melody from the guitarist--even during his solos. My second favorite song on the album. (13.5/15)

8. "No Pain For The Dead" (5:05) more awesome acoustic guitar--this time doubled up with two instruments. Eduardo tries a very gentle, stage-like ballad vocal approach until the heavy metal chords and walls of sound enter and push him into his usual gristful-belting manner. Once the music settles down, it returns to a very Broadway/theatric style--and so does Eduardo's voice style. Great cello and masterful synth strings passage preps us for the entrance of the gorgeous voice of Sabine Edelsbacher in a performance that yet again affirms the band's Broadway/theatric approach. Another top three song for me. (9/10)

9. "Winds Of Destination" (6:56) cello introduces the pace and galloping theme that follows. Impressive Metallica-like jaunt precedes and supports guest Hansi Kürsch and Eduardo's vocal duet. In the second minute, after the first verse, the music devolves into a piano-based classical section. Again, the theatricity of the live stage comes to mind here. Nice vocal here. At 3:48 we shift again onto the autostrada--this one not quite as wild and unbound as previous songs, more like a healthy drive in your convertable sports car through the Italian countryside. After some more impressive guitar shredding the music shifts into a higher gear at 5:58 in order to build toward a finish of choral vocal crescendo. (13.25/15)

10. "Sprouts Of Time" (5:09) weird, out of place song, that seems to, once again, seem to come from some kind of theatrical production--you know: how a character in the play steps to the side to sing a solo aside while the band's music takes on a whole different style not heard anywhere else in the play. It's a great song even if it does sound and feel as if we're getting to the end--or at least the dénouement of one of the characters or themes in the plot. (9/10)

11. "Morning Star" (7:39) yet another style explore! This is truly impressive! The band seem capable--even masterful--at taking on any and all musical styles. This one is a more pedestrian, laid back style --a musical style that I really like--at least that is until 2:28 when the metal power chords join in--once again transforming Eduardo into a metal singer, not just a professional stage theater performer. Nice interlude in the fourth minute to remind us of the song's pedestrian roots, but then we are transported again into a Thin Lizzy world of dizzying metal skill and instrumental prowess. Again, I am so impressed with the attention to melody within the composition and performance of these parts. If every part of every metal song could sound like this I'd be a fan. The awesome key change at 6:20 is marred a bit by Eduardo's thinning voice in those high notes. My favorite long song on the album. (14/15)

12. "Late Redemption" (4:55) gorgeous classical guitar with "strings" and the voice of Brazilian music legend Milton Nascimento leading the ghost-like background voices and first chorus. Edu's vocal performance exudes his respect for both this style of music as well as his singing cohort. Interesting rhythm percussion at the end of the second minute before the song breaks out into a heavy theme for a different chorus. From here out it's metal music at its most orchestral. Excellent! What an ingenious song construct! Mega kudos to the band for its conception and execution! My favorite piece of prog theater on the album. (10/10)

13. "Gate XIII" (5:04) an orchestral piece that sounds like an overture to a quest-themed musical or even an opera. Quite lovely. My guess is that composer and arranger Rafael Bittencourt has classical theatre dreams or leanings. (10/10)

Total Time: 66:28

Very impressive speed and technical skills on display throughout this album--even in Eduardo's "old" sounding theatric voice. But this is not always the type of music that my spirit desires. I do, however, love the concept of religious doubt and answer seeking explored in the story--especially in that it is set in the early Inquisition era.

A-/five stars; a minor masterpiece of theatric symphonic metal; a well-produced album of impressive musicianship. This is probably a masterpiece in the world of metal worship. It is also exactly the kind of album I would put forward as an example to all aspiring progressive rock musicians for what is possible: an example of the heights of planning, composition, arrangement, execution, and production that music is capable of--and not just prog metal or metal but all progressive rock music. Truly a wonderful body of songs.

 Hunters and Prey by ANGRA album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2002
3.26 | 38 ratings

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Hunters and Prey
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by CygnusX72

3 stars After the rather excellent Rebirth album, Angra released this mixture of new tracks, acoustic takes on two Rebirth tracks, and rather unnecessarily a cover of Genesis' Mama. Hardly essential listening, though it would be a shame to miss "Eyes of Christ", plus the title track "Hunters & Prey" along with its Portuguese language version. I'm not a great fan of acoustic retakes, nor cover versions, so half this album is superfluous. But worth tracking down if you are particularly taken by Angra.

As a pointer, Angra are Brazilian prog metal, with elements of speed/thrash metal (though not too much as I dislike those genres), with some nice Latin American textures thrown into their sound. Excellent guitar work abounds, and for me vocalist Edu Falaschi was an upgrade on predecessor Andre Matos' rather nasal vocals. Holy Land is well regarded by prog fans (with Matos) but my recommendation would be to start with Rebirth, or Temple of Shadows.

 Rebirth by ANGRA album cover Studio Album, 2001
3.80 | 163 ratings

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Rebirth
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by lukretio

3 stars Rebirth: it would have been hard to find a more fitting title for Angra's fourth full-length album, the first after the band split in two and was left for dead at the time by many specialized magazines. Singer Andre Matos and the entire rhythm section comprised of Luís Mariutti and Ricardo Confessori departed to form Shaman, leaving guitarists Kiko Loureiro and Rafael Bittencourt to pick up the pieces. The duo recruited Felipe Andreoli (bass), Aquiles Priester (drums) and Edu Falaschi (vocals) to try and keep the Angra ship alive. But the album does not feel like a rebirth just in terms of its revolutionized line-up. It is also a musical rebirth, after a record, Fireworks, that was probably too ambitious for its own good and ultimately felt a bit like a mixed bag.

Rebirth does not waste any time to let the listener know that things have changed. In this sense, opener (after the obligatory orchestral intro) "Nova Era" is a strong statement of intents. The Brazilian folk experimentations of the past line-up are considerably toned down (though they still surface on a couple of songs) in favour of a more direct and fast-tempo speed/power metal approach that immediately showcases the talents of the new line-up, particularly of drummer Aquiles Priester and singer Edu Falaschi. Although Falaschi does not have the unique charm of Matos' voice, his range is impressive and his crystalline delivery shows that Angra have found an excellent substitute for their iconic former singer. Elsewhere the album moves in more progressive territories, with songs ("Millennium Sun", "Unholy Wars", "Running Alone") built around complex structures, tempo changes, extended instrumental passages, and great orchestral arrangements, courtesy of Günter Werno from German prog metallers Vanden Plas.

These tracks are what elevates Rebirth above the standard power metal sound that one can find aplenty on albums released in the late 1990s / early 2000s. At the same time, the music is more streamlined, direct and powerful than what typically characterizes a prog metal release. In this way, Rebirth walks the fine line between the two worlds, pleasing fans of standard European (and especially Italian) power metal as well as those of more progressively-inclined bands like Queensrÿche and Dream Theatre.

In large part, Rebirth is a success story as the tunes are pleasant, accessible and at the same time sufficiently varied and multifaceted to keep things interesting. But, as a prog metal aficionado, I cannot help but miss the drive to experiment and push things forward and in unexpected directions that had characterized the earlier work of the band. It is particularly songs like "Acid Rain", "Heroes of Sand" and "Judgment Day" that haven't aged very well: lacking a strong melodic presence and deprived of interesting forward-thinking moments, these tracks fall a bit flat and bog down an album that remains nevertheless better than average.

[Also posted on metalmusicarchives.com and metal-archives.com]

 Holy Live by ANGRA album cover Live, 1997
3.55 | 26 ratings

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Holy Live
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by OLD PROG

3 stars Angra's first live album is a good live album. They made it too early, however. They could only use songs from "Holy Land" and "Angel's Cry". So the inventors of Progressive Prog Metal can't be convincing. It all seems calculated to make everything look perfect. Despite this, "Holy Live" is an honest, unpretentious EP, though, if not to please the fans. But it sounds cold. For the rest, the production is excellent and it is really a pleasure to listen to these excellent musicians. In the end what remains after listening is just that and I can't really enjoy this "Holy Live".
 Holy Land by ANGRA album cover Studio Album, 1996
4.10 | 248 ratings

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Holy Land
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars By no means harsh or abrasive "metal," this music is more in the "heavy" department like SYLVAN, led by the very talented vocal/keyboard artist, André Matos--though I am equally reminded of a heavier, more sophisticated version of Peter Nicholls-led IQ as well.

1. "Crossing" (1:55) a church-like choral piece (plus songbird) (5/5)

2. "Nothing To Say" (6:20) pre-djenty guitars & bass with steady drums and then layers of synth support before lead guitar and fancy synth-strings bridge to singing section. (8.75/10)

3. "Silence and Distance" (5:34) starts out as a slow ballad--until 1:30 when the hard rocking' kicks in--with "horn" synth embellishments. (This keyboard artist, André Matos, is very talented!) Nice twin guitars represent during instrumental section. Solid song! (9.25/10)

4. "Carolina IV" (10:33) If IQ's Peter Nicholls' band were a little more heavy and dynamic, this is what you might get. (19/20)

5. "Holy Land" (6:26) shaker percussion give way to piano and "flute" keys for André to sing over. This definitely has a Middle Eastern flavor to it--though one delivered in a kind of Broadway/stage style. Reminds of RUSH--though a very keyboard-centric song. (8.5/10)

6. "The Shaman" (5:23) very interesting chord play from the piano while the rest of the band establishes the song's intro. It all funnels into a forward-moving 1980s heavy metal song with many layers of instrumental passages in the weave and within the multi-voice vocal weave. Great percussion section while Arabic(?) voice speaks. Then it peels wheels kicking into fifth gear for the final section. The vocal part is actually the weakest part of this. A very interesting song, musically, but not as interesting melody-wise. (9/10)

7. "Make Believe" (5:51) another snare and piano intro soon joined by acoustic guitar and organ before bass and voice enter. André really has a wonderful theater-like voice (I like his slowed down vocals much better than his metal voice--though he does come through with the high-range belting of the final third of the song. There's quite a little MARCO GLÜHMANN there.) This excellent song could've come straight off of Posthumous Silence! (9.5/10)

8. "Z.I.T.O (6:09) Liszt-like keys over metal bass and guitars while André sings with a Geddy Lee/Peter Nicholls-like passion. Finally, some more great twin-shredding-guitar interplay! (9/10)

9. "Deep Blue (5:47) opens with gentle church organ playing slowly--as if processionally. André enters with an equally pious voice. Organ leaves, piano and strings take over accompanying André before the song shifts into full metal jacket at 1:30. In the slow down parts I'm reminded of Supertramp's Roger Hodgson on "Fool's Overture." And then, surprise! There's a return to liturgical sounds with organ, piano and lone tenor singing in Latin. Punctuated by horns and organ and female background choir, this is just exceptional music! (And exceptional theater!) Awesome! But we're not done yet! It's only 3:50! Hearing some words in the lyrics like "pray" makes me think that this might be a very personal, very spiritual song from André--despite the Brian May-like guitar solo. (9.5/10)

10. "Lullaby For Lucifer (2:43) back to the seashore with seagulls and waves over which Spanish guitar picks a gentle accompaniment for another very emotional André vocal. The only flaw is in the quality of the engineering of the vocal track. (4.75/5)

Total Time: 54:41

I don't get it: Are these guys Brazilian, British, or Israeli? If you like your prog metal theatric, sophisticated, and keyboard-driven, then these guys might be your cup of tea. I was hoping/expecting to hear more fire from the two guitarists. Oh, well.

A-/five stars; a minor masterpiece of theatric heavy (somewhat metal) prog and one of the more sophisticated and "deep" prog metal albums I've ever heard. Bueno!

 Angels Cry by ANGRA album cover Studio Album, 1993
3.94 | 186 ratings

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Angels Cry
Angra Progressive Metal

Review by Menswear
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Just another wannabe band?

No.

Angra deserves much more praise than they have; in North America anyways. The fact that they are frequently absent of your fa favorite list is perhaps due to the saturated market of metallic music. The early 2000's have been a prolific time for our he headbanging friends, with the wave of Nightwishesque bands including Evanescence and such. Eyeliner, black dyed hair, go goatees, spiked wrist bands bands were legions and kinda bored us in the end. Where to look for protein in a sea of sugar?

Angra does not fall into that category. With Matos, Loureiro, Bittencourt and later, our beloved suprahuman Aquiles Priester, Angra is not a temporary band with not much to say. While some bands are quickly out of ideas, Angra keep delivering quality products after 20 years of loyal service. They are obviously hyper qualified musicians (those solos) and Matos is capable of vocals beyond I ever heard. Not even Geoff Tate or Geddy Lee gets that high. To cover Kate Bush is something, but to cover it decently is is worthy of your attention.

I admit that I'm a sucker for the art cover (very 90's) and the fact that they rock not only power metal, but also neo-classical and Brazilian influences. You have to admit that sort of approach is in short supply in the over-abudant world of metal.

An impressive debut with adrenaline, orchestration and enough originality to part from the herd. They were first before many more popular bands, so dibs on Angra!

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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