Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY

Crossover Prog • Australia


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

United Progressive Fraternity picture
United Progressive Fraternity biography
Formally installed on 31 March 2014

After the Australian band UNITOPIA decided to call it a day after their fourth album "Covered Mirror Vol. 1", it was clear the world would never know what Vol. 2 would bring.

However, the idea behind the band was not lost, and singer Mark Trueack, Matt Williams, Dave Hopgood and Tim Irrgang teamed up with multi-instrumentalist Guy Manning (Manning, The Tangent, Po90) to continue under the name UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY.

In 2014, this resulted in the album "Falling in Love with the World", on which various guest musicians would also play a role - most notably Jon Anderson (Yes, in case you didn't know that) and Steve Hackett (Genesis).
With this album, the band stays on the same track as UNITOPIA where it comes to lyrical themes (the environment, the state of humanity), but musically takes a slightly heavier approach.

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY

Buy UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY Music


Planetary OverloadPlanetary Overload
Giant Electric Pea 2019
$11.78
$17.92 (used)
Fall in Love with the WorldFall in Love with the World
Inside Out Music 2014
$34.99
Right Now on Ebay (logo)

More places to buy UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY music online Buy UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY & Prog Rock Digital Music online:

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.87 | 82 ratings
Fall In Love With The World
2014
3.79 | 48 ratings
Planetary Overload, Part 1 - Loss
2019

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Planetary Overload, Part 1 - Loss by UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.79 | 48 ratings

BUY
Planetary Overload, Part 1 - Loss
United Progressive Fraternity Crossover Prog

Review by guspanet

4 stars UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY - PLANETARY OVERLOAD Part 1: LOSS and ROMANTECHS: REIMAGINE (2019) By Gustavo Panetta Giant Electric Pea Ltd. It could reflect, deepen, think, draw conclusions, establish comparisons, generate debates, etc. ......... .or, simply, to say what we feel when we listen to this great work of UPF. I''m going to choose the 2nd. option, with some brushstrokes of the 1st. This second work in study of UPF, with the leadership of Mark "Truey" Trueack, and the immense contribution of Steve Unruh as a musician and producer, delights us with 2 CDs; being the first, described as Planetary Overload, Part 1: Loss; and the second: Romantechs: Reimagine. The first cut "Loss (Anthem)" is a piece by way of introduction, highlighting the intervention of flute, violin and sax, with the vocal part closely related to the style of Jon Anderson - who participated in the previous album -. The lyrics have an optimistic profile, emphasizing that "the loss will bring all of us together and will make us closer than before". Continues with "What Happens Now" with a beginning of flute chords as Ian Anderson, in the hands of the virtuoso Steve Unruh, continuing with saxophone, alternating with violin and flute, and a rhythm to awaken the lethargy of human beings responsible for the change of the future of our planet with a text that says: "Do not let the planet die". The third song "Cruel Times" (Cruel Times), is one of the best achievements of this work, with a calm beginning of guitar and a very direct message: "these are cruel times, nothing can make it false, there is a lot that we can do, we are the only ones that can do it well. Do not surrender to the fight. " After 3:40 it transforms into a cascade of sounds of the most varied, with jazz structures in piano, under the present, then synthesizer, violin with reminiscences of Kansas, being present wakemanianos chords and excellent vocal arrangements very Yes. Then follows: "What Are We Doing Ourselves", a brief topic that asks us a simple question: What are we doing for ourselves, for our world? All with a background of kalimba, tabla and similar gospel voices. The 5th theme: "Stop Time", is one of my favorites, with a very powerful force and a gigantic and even aggressive lyrics, with great sound display, enjoying the participation in keyboards of Nick Magnus (Steve Hackett), Colin Edwin on bass ( ex - Porcupine Tree) and Hasse Froberg (Flower Kings) in voice. At 3''30 he turns to a melody with Crimson''s touches of the 90''s, rising on the sound scale and with a very concrete description of the toxic tide and always the other shore, with the call to alert to what we do us to stop this destruction. We reached the 6th. cut, "One More", featuring guitar, violin and a very deep and sensitive melody, with a letter with an open ending: "Take a look, do not hide behind a wall; the signs are overwhelming and they blind us completely. " Continuing with the theme 7: "Mercenaries", the same begins with dissonant and distorted vibrations, with a dark voice that speaks of: "questions by the answers that you would not want to know and pass the threshold without return". Then it bursts into a loud and shocking melody that then dissipates, with good interventions of violin and guitar with wah-wah, that go marking an acceleration in a frenetic rhythm of great percussion and then returns to the chorus that talks about: "we can do it Well, we specialize in silent disappearances; at the end of the night we buried everything annoying ", referring to the great powers insensitive to the conceptual theme of this work. It ends abruptly with a great riff of Matt Williams. "What If", track 8, turns out to be a beautiful ballad with acoustic guitar, accompaniment of winds, and with questions such as: "What if the sun will refuse to shine and the sky will turn gray forever; the ocean will dry and the birds will stop singing? ". We continue with "Forgive Me My Son", another of my favorites, which starts with the voice of Truey mentioning the title, an explosion and shrapnel sounds. It turns out to be of great depth, stark and concise in its lyrics, with a violin that is expressed with laments and with the intervention of zitar, oud and other stringed instruments of Indian or Arab origin, which repeat chords as marking times; Reflections on the foolishness of war and at the same time speaks of a flag, a dream, a goal, an opportunity to make free hearts ... ambiguities of our times. We continue with "Dying To Be Reborn", theme 10, being a brilliant piece by Steve Unruh, with a very suggestive title: Die to be reborn. An acoustic guitar strum gives the beginning and end of the song, with an excellent score by George Perdikis and Nick Magnus on keyboards. The next-to-last cut, called "Seeds For Life," begins with a narrative by Dr. Gary Fowler and soundscapes background. We stand in front of the most ambitious and most extensive piece (19:33), with the intervention of a large number of musicians, notably Steve Hackett, Nick Magnus and the Fraternity Symphony Orchestra. At 2:21 there are xylophone sounds, drums, percussion and violin. Then the rhythm accelerates and at 6:15 the guitar intervenes with a sharp and intense plucking. At 7:20 Hackett appears with his classical guitar and some beautiful pieces of Spanish piece, adding the flute and an orchestral background. At 9:00, Truey''s voice intervenes, very similar to Gabriel''s timbre and Marek Arnold''s sax solo followed by high- flying synths. At 11:26 there is a very harmonious melody with piano, which is continued until 12:36 with the guitar intervention with a solid and marked plucking, repeating the same riff. At 13:47 the piano with chords is presented as remembering Emerson in Trilogy. At 14:40 begins a very sweet, optimistic melody, which repeats the same verse with chorus accompanying: "seeds for life, more precious than gold, seeds for the future." In the final part of this emblematic theme, the rhythm increases with distorted violin chords accompanied by the orchestra that goes in-crescendo and then loses in sound intensity, ending with Hackett at the last minute, giving the song a golden touch . The last cut of this great work "Loss To Lost" has an introduction in piano, flute and zitar. Then a steady rhythm is maintained, with choir participation and a hopeful message: "No more fighting, no more friction between us, it''s time to change our way of thinking ... with everything we know we could feed this world .. Let''s do it now !!! " The 2nd CD: Romantechs: Reimagine, which consists of 9 tracks, turns out to be a collection of re-worked versions, on the one hand, by themes by Mark Trueack and Sean Timms (ex Unitopia) (tracks 1 and 9); and on the other side of this work (tracks 2-8). These versions are quieter, with many sound effects or landscapes ordered by the work of Christophe Lebled on keyboards, with the strings of Steve Unruh, the great voice of Truey and some prestigious guests. As a corollary of this Romantechs, I prefer Mark''s words, referring to this work as if Vangelis had participated with his expert hand. I leave a special paragraph for everything that refers to the art of cover and booklet by Ed Unitsky, being the images and composition of photos of a great artistic level, taking the theme of this project to an exquisite interpretation and unique symbolisms.
 Planetary Overload, Part 1 - Loss by UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.79 | 48 ratings

BUY
Planetary Overload, Part 1 - Loss
United Progressive Fraternity Crossover Prog

Review by Jeff_the_GlassCaster

4 stars United Progressive Fraternity (UPF) ' Planetary Overload ' Part 1 ' Loss

It has taken me several listens to write this review. Reason? Mostly because the issues addressed on this album are very close to my heart and I wanted to keep that from clouding my opinion. Also, because unlike beer or wine, music must be luxuriated over thru some time to be truly appreciated. That said ' I LOVE this album and can hardly wait for Part Two. For those of you who are familiar with my reviews of music, craft beer and food you know that when I mention my darling wife (The Lovely Miss B) in these reviews it is a rarity. She only gives her opinion when she is really moved. She loved most of this and liked the rest. This is not a band, rather a project conceived by Mark 'Truey' Trueack telling the story of our environmental crisis. He partners with Steve Unruh and a host of wonderful musicians to form this version of the UPF The opening sequence ' 'Dawning on Us' pulls you in with the haunting sounds and guest voice cameo's speaking of the state of Mother Earth and drags us the rest of the way with Jon Davison's (Yes) voice moving gracefully into Steve Unruh's flute'. At this point you are committed. Perhaps one of the things I love most about this album is that the lyric continually reminds us that there IS hope. When Truey and company move into the ballad 'Cruel Times' the lyric that stood out instantly for me was 'there is hope in everything we do, let's stand together in the face of gloom'. The backing harmonies from Lisa Wetton and Hasse Froberg along with Steve's violin makes for a dreamy song which transitions into an orchestration that could only move into ---- 'What Are We Doing to Ourselves' ' short, Caribbean and honest'' Intense and dramatic, 'Stop Time' is a pivotal point in this piece. I found it moving and the steppingstone for what was to come'. 'One More' ' this is the point of no withdrawal in this artistic work ' you are now hooked. Truey's vocal and Steve's violin and guitar give a gentle power to the lyric. Listen and you will understand. It only gets deeper from here. Now we come to 'Mercenaries' ' an appropriately heavy song at this point in the piece. This moves into >>>> 'What If ' >> 'Forgive Me, My Son' ' No matter what your social or political belief, if this does not touch your heart'.. well, I just don't know. The lyric is almost too simple'.. until you hear the young Brodie Byrne ask 'Father, what are we doing to ourselves?' You are now so far deep down the rabbit hole that is Planetary Overload that you just melt back into your chair. I promised myself that I would not break down this review song by song, but it just seemed to deserve this kind of attention. For me, the next song, 'Dying to be Reborn' is a weak spot on the album. I anticipated ' I'm not sure what ' this was not it. Not that I dislike it, this is a good song, just that it seems to not quite fit. Now we get to the ambitious 'Seeds for Life'. I fell in love with this symphonic epic the moment I first heard it. At first, I thought that my own current journey (small scale market farming) was heavily influencing my love of this song. After at least a dozen listens I know that has little to do with how much I enjoy this aural extravaganza. 'Seeds for Life' has the largest cast of the Fraternity in it and it shows. Progressive music in its truest sense. From start to finish this opus flows and moves the audience. It also shows off the virtuosity of the musicians and the musical composition accentuates the importance of the lyric. The song ends with a beautiful classically inspired Steve Hackett guitar solo that (sonically) could have ended the album, Except''. 'Loss to Lost' seems like the better way to end the album. It builds to give hope for tomorrow and a call to action ' 'Let's turn it all around. Let's find a solution. We can find hope. Hope is what we need.' This also sets us up for the much-desired volume 2. All that in one disc'.. but wait, there's more! The bonus disc is in no means an afterthought. The Romantechs: Reimagine are Christophe Lebled, Mark Trueack and Steve Unruh (along with several UPF players) doing alternative versions of UPF and Unitopia songs. A great bonus. In general, I found this album a wonderful listen. While the lyric could have been stronger at times, I understand the need to NOT chase people away from such heavy and important subject matter. The lyrics are clear and easy to understand. The music is moving. I anxiously await Part Two. Oh, let's not forget the wonderful artwork by Ed Unitsky as well - adding such a wonderful visual component is a wonderful finishing touch.

 Fall In Love With The World by UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.87 | 82 ratings

BUY
Fall In Love With The World
United Progressive Fraternity Crossover Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars UPF stands for United Progressive Fraternity, and originally came about after the demise of Australian band Unitopia. Mark Trueack (vocals), Matt Williams (guitar, bass, vocals), Dave Hopgood (drums, vocals) and Tim Irrgang (percussion) then joined forces with Guy Manning (Manning, The Tangent etc.), who brought in Marek Arnold (Toxic Smile, Flaming Row, SSTTGG etc.) and with bassist Daniel Mash the line-up was complete. There as then the short matter of bringing in ten guest musicians, including such unknowns as Jon Anderson and Steve Hackett?

The use of Marek's saxophone is probably more prevalent on this than on his other releases, and the album certainly benefits from it. Musically this is crossover prog, with some interesting percussive and world influences, and in many ways it is quite different to what else is out there, although at the same time it contains some passages that are quite simplistic yet always melodic. I don't know how much impact Guy and Marek had on the writing of the music, but it is clear that they had a large amount to do with the arrangements. I haven't previously come across Unitopia, but I am certainly intrigued to hear what the band used to sound like, as this is an incredibly immediate and accessible album, and it is just a shame that it has taken me four years to come across it. The use of Jon Anderson on fourth track "The Water" on backing vocals is quite interesting, as before looking up the details I hadn't been aware who had been involved but he stands out a great deal, and puts a stamp of approval on proceedings. Hopefully his appearance will attract fans of his to try this out, as that song itself is yet another great melodic AOR progressive rock number which makes me smile each time I play it. Overall, fun and commercial with small world influences here which make a big difference when they appear. Ecological, and great fun to boot!

 Fall In Love With The World by UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.87 | 82 ratings

BUY
Fall In Love With The World
United Progressive Fraternity Crossover Prog

Review by b_olariu
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Australian prog band Unitopia decided to call it a day in 2014 after 4 albums and more then 10 years career, but the head behind this band Mark Trueack together with his mates Matt Williams, Dave Hopgood and Tim Irrgang decided to team up with well known musician Guy Manning and going under the name of United Progressive Fraternity. Also there are some top notch invited guests here like Jon Anderson, Steve Unruh , Steve Hackett and few more who done a great job. Well, as I expected the sound UPF offers is not far from Unitopia atmosphere, but in places is little less intresting and with less progressive aproach. I definetly call this first baby named Fall in love with the world issued in 2014 progressive rock, but the progressive elements are few to my ears, the only great tune from the album is the longest one Travelling man (The story of ESHU), clocking around 22 min with exemplary musicianship and ideas, there are some great instrumental sections, keyboards, guitars are brilliant and the vocal passages aswell. Unfortunatly the rest are only ok, nothing special about it. and I prefer Unitopia much more, an album like The Garden Marck Trueack will never be part of, definatly the best album from his career untill now. All in all decent release, nothing groundbreaking here only good and nothing more. The art work made by famous Ed Unitsky is asyou might imagine colorful, intresting and very well made. 3 stars for this debut.

 Fall In Love With The World by UNITED PROGRESSIVE FRATERNITY album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.87 | 82 ratings

BUY
Fall In Love With The World
United Progressive Fraternity Crossover Prog

Review by Angelo
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

4 stars One of the albums I ran into through the great community around House of Prog is Fall In Love With the World, by United Progressive Fraternity (UPF).

A line up consisting of former members of Unitopia and The Tangent, give this band has a solid musical base, and it shows on this album. An album that carries a message that was also brought forward by Unitopia earlier - we should take better care of our planet. A broad subject that affects us all and is high the agenda of UPF. This shows in the lyrics, all centered around this theme, each track in its own way.

Opening track is the film music like We only get one world. The album contains a lot of heavy progressive rock, driven by guitars and keyboards. Still, the band has left a lot of room for quieter parts and other instruments as well.

Best proof of this, because it fills about 25% of the album by itself, is the 22 minute epic in 7 movements, Travelling Man (The story of Eshu). This track contains well executed saxophone and (sax-)flute solo's, but also driving guitars and wailing keyboards. To me, the best part of this track, and maybe even the album is the combination of the 3rd and 4th movement here. The former contains an almost marching beat, on top of which the vocals, keyboards and guitar interleave with each other like on early 70s Genesis tracks. It transfers almost seamlessly into the second, which moves from a heavy guitar driven part into a middle eastern feel and then suddenly introduces a violin that shows how well violins and guitars can rock together.

The Water is also an 'ear-catcher', that contains backing vocals and vocal effects recorded by Jon Anderson - making UPF singer and producer Mark Trueack a very happy man, according to the liner notes. The driving beat of this track makes it really work. The acoustic guitar based alternative mix that is included as a bonus is also not bad, but lacks a bit of that drive.

In Choices, Don't look back - turn left and Religion of war, the band manages to mix slightly pop rock choruses with just the musical complexity to make rock into progressive rock. The interplay between the instruments, including that aforementioned saxophone makes this into modern symphonic rock, with a catchy edge.

Surprisingly, the least appealing track to me on this album is the title track, Falling in love with the world. The track is based around an acoustic guitar, with other instruments playing around it in the same way as on the rest of the album. However, the track lacks a bit of power, not in the least due to the very low tempo of the vocals. Not a bad track, but nowhere near for example Travelling man.

Overall, I am pleasantly happy with this album, and the way it UPF combines old school symphonic rock with modern sounds and instrumentation. Some tracks, like Don't look back and Religion of war and certainly The Water are actually good material for getting the band air play on rock radio stations around the world and the internet.

More than worth buying for sure!

Thanks to angelo for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives