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DAAL

Eclectic Prog • Italy


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Daal biography
Formed in Bergamo, Italy, in 2008

DAAL is an Italian duet. It's a project by Davide GUIDONI and Alfio COSTA. They're both experienced musicians on Italian Prog rock scene - Guidoni is a drummer who had been working with Taproban, The Far Side, Gallant Farm, Nuova Era, Ozone Player and others. Costa (Tilion, Prowlers, Colossus project, Dark Session) plays keyboards - mostly vintage ones, as well as some softsynths.

It's not surprising their music is rich in lush textures, with emphasis on a multitude of layers; a heritage of Italian Progressive Rock movement is evident, as well as various other influences. A curiosity is their nod to a Swedish progressive rock scene.




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Decalogue Of DarknessDecalogue Of Darkness
Maracash 2018
$16.27
$22.94 (used)
Navels Falling Into A Living OrigamiNavels Falling Into A Living Origami
Maracash 2018
$15.17
$20.26 (used)
Dances Of The Drastic NavelsDances Of The Drastic Navels
Agla Records
$19.99
DodecahedronDodecahedron
Agla Records
$21.99
Destruktive Actions Affect LivingsDestruktive Actions Affect Livings
Agla Records
$19.99
ArchivesArchives
Maracash 2019
$34.99
$30.82 (used)
DisorganicorigamiDisorganicorigami
Mellow Records
$19.99

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DAAL discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

DAAL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.72 | 103 ratings
Disorganicorigami
2009
4.00 | 140 ratings
Destruktive Actions Affect Livings
2011
4.23 | 118 ratings
Echoes Of Falling Stars
2011
4.07 | 273 ratings
Dodecahedron
2012
4.01 | 214 ratings
Dances Of The Drastic Navels
2014
4.26 | 291 ratings
Decalogue Of Darkness
2018
3.90 | 155 ratings
Navels Falling Into A Living Origami
2018

DAAL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DAAL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

DAAL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.81 | 21 ratings
Destruktive Actions affect Livings limited edition boxset
2011
4.60 | 25 ratings
Dodecahedron (Limited Edition Boxset)
2012
4.06 | 5 ratings
Archives
2019

DAAL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.34 | 35 ratings
Echoes
2012
4.36 | 39 ratings
The Call of the Witches
2012
4.71 | 7 ratings
Decalogue of Darkness - Chapter I
2018

DAAL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Archives by DAAL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
4.06 | 5 ratings

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Archives
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Mariusprog

4 stars The last 12 months have been very prolific for the Daal. Exactly one year ago "Decalogue of Darkness" and "Navels falling into a living Origami" were published, and besides the drummer Davide Guidoni published his first solo album at the same time "Echoes from the undertow " (B-Rain the name of his project). In 2019 the Daal decide to reprint a collection, which includes their second album (now sold out)" Destruktive Actions Affect Livings (D.A.A.L.), and two other discs that came out in limited edition: "Echoes of the falling stars" and "The call of the Witches". "Archives" presents itself in a splendid double package, with many images and descriptions of the material, omitting the details of their second CD (D.A.A.L.) in which, moreover, one of their best compositions is found ("The Dance of the Drastic Navels Part II") I would dwell on the second CD which contains some songs I have never heard before. "The Call of Cthulhu" is an o very dark chapter of their discography...scratchy, hard, desperate, with a final worthy of horror films The Suite "The Fall of the House of Usher" in pure Gothic style, with even a part sung, a very rare thing for the group "Witches" which I believe is part of a tribute album produced by Musea, and finally "Echoes" by Pink Floyd, also present on a tribute album, with the singer of the Bacio della Medusa Simone Cecchini! A record not only for completists, but for anyone who wants to go deeper, the unfathomable secret world of this strange creature!!
 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.26 | 291 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Astrod

5 stars If dark, chilling instrumentals are your thing, check this out right away, because this album is genuinely horrifying (especially Chapters VI-X). I'd never consider this album for casual listening. The best way to listen to this album is at night, alone, in the dark.

I first checked out this album seven months ago after I read the glowing reviews. I was not initially impressed. It sounded interesting, especially the first track, but it did not hold my attention, and I rarely went back to it. When I did return to it, I would usually get bored after the second track and stop listening. I recently listened to it again, (probably my fourth time all the way through), and I have to admit, the album grew on me.

It was late at night, and I couldn't sleep. I was sick of everything I had been listening to, and I wanted to listen to something creepy. So I decided to listen to this album again.

The first few seconds of Chapter I make it clear that this is bleak music. The whole track breathes doom and desolation, and I imagine figures in the dark. The drumming is intense, and the blaring mellotron is unsettling. Somewhere around the halfway mark is a break, where heavy, fatal piano keys begin. Eerie. The piano is used throughout this album very well.

Chapter II is the track that I enjoy the least. While it has an enticing start, I found the repetitive drumming and mellotrons that blare from the 4-11 minute marks to lose my interest. Honestly, the drumming is rather deranged. It's too "out there" for my taste. Thankfully the song get's real interesting around the 12-minute mark, but as a whole, this song is just too "demented" for me to really grasp and enjoy. Despite not really enjoying this song, I can definitely appreciate its artistic value. It almost seems like it is a genuinely "evil" song, (if that makes any sense). I could imagine music like this being played by demons in hell. Chapter II is the reason why I had such a hard time getting into this album, but I would not be surprised if I grow to love this song as much as the others.

Chapters III and IV have their moments, but in my opinion, they only serve to lead up to the truly heart wrenching, bleak, and chilling aspects of the album which begin on Chapter V. I have never heard instrumental music that was able to affect my emotions as strongly as tracks V-X.

Chapter V is an off-putting and demented song that is more than a little creepy. It ends with a bunch of explosions. Chapter VI is a tragic, tear-jerking song, which seems to embody depression itself, I'm guessing the war was lost. And just when you think it couldn't get any darker, Chapter VII begins, and it is exceptionally unsettling; it gives me the chills. Sound effects and eerie knocking sounds make it feel as if a hundred malicious creatures are trying to gain entry into my house.

Chapter VIII dials down a bit, (initially), but gets intense. The drumming and distorted guitar sounds are incredible. I get the impression that I am running through a dark forest, pursued by whatever those creatures were from Chapter VII. Chapter IX returns to the dismal, but incredibly beautiful depressed feeling presented in Chapter VI. The sound effects here are gripping, and the melody is chilling.

Chapter X begins a little lighter than the other tracks and features some excellent mellotron, guitar, bass, and drums interplay. Not only can these artists compose incredible melodies, but they can really play. The final two minutes are pure gold, a superb and fatal ending. Lots of goosebumps...

5 Stars, a masterpiece of prog. I have never heard instrumental music more disturbing, emotional, depressing, and tragic than this. I wonder what images the artists had in their heads when they wrote this.

 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.26 | 291 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Here's an album which, if nothing else, has an accurate title - - although Ten Instrumental Heavy-Symphonic Prog Songs would've been even more descriptive.

I really like the drumming here. Since drummer Davide Guidoni is half of Daal, it's not surprising that he's much more prominent in the mix than drummers usually are. On songs like "Chapter VIII" his kit is cranked up while the listener must strain to hear the guitar (played by a sideman) - - it seems a little odd for rock music. But Guidoni's position in the mix works here because he's not showy. On some Emerson, Lake and Palmer albums it seems obligatory that Carl Palmer have a showcase every so often, whether it's demanded by the material or not (OK, to be fair, the material is sometimes arranged so that a drum solo seems necessary). Guidoni seems content to play second fiddle, so to speak, to pianist/keyboardist Alfio Costa. Costa composed the entire album and even gets a track ("Chapter XI") to himself. Most likely Guidoni shares the drummer's trait of humility (he does get full responsibility for the art direction, though).

For his part, Costa dominates the proceedings but doesn't hog the limelight. Many instrumentalists have been much less central on projects billed as solo albums. But Costa is no Wakeman; Decalogue of Darkness isn't about him, it's about... well, actually, it's not entirely clear what this album is about. The song titles provide no obvious clues, nor does the title or the cover art. Of course, as the cliché goes, the songs should speak for themselves, and that's evidently what Costa and Guidoni intend.

Given that Decalogue of Darkness is entirely instrumental, and that each song seems to evoke a different mood, it could easily be a popularized film score. Adding to this sense is the use, especially earlier in the album, of classical motifs.

Overall, this is a good instrumental album, heavier on the atmosphere than the melody, which is why if I heard randomly-chosen 30-second passage from Decalogue of Darkness, I'm sure I couldn't tell you what song it was from. The exotic "Chapter VII" is probably the best track here, although the 16-minute "Chapter II" is nearly as good and perhaps more representative of the whole.

Decalogue of Darkness is also accessible, à la Trans-Siberian Orchestra, though it's less overtly commercial and has much less guitar. Put another way, those who like their symphonic prog with a bit of metal will enjoy this album, as will prog-rock fans in general. (For what it's worth, Prog Archives users rank Decalogue of Darkness among the best albums of 2018.)

 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.26 | 291 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars More spoopy prog with a significant influence from mid-1970s King Crimson from the dynamic duo of Daal? Sure, why not? This is pretty much "Dodecahedron II: Polyhedral Boogaloo", with the album split into 10 chapters (hence the title!). Take Dodecahedron, immerse it in purest Mellotron for a while, and cut into 10 slices instead of 12, and you more or less arrive at this.

Lucky for Daal, Dodecahedron was a pretty good album, with the result that this one is as well. Perhaps a more retro- prog styled approach this time, in keeping with the historical style of the cover illustration, but otherwise we're looking at business as usual for Daal.

 Archives by DAAL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
4.06 | 5 ratings

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Archives
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars

DAAL has been busy in the last year. Not only has this duo released two stellar new classics in the form of 'Navels Falling Into A Living Origami' and 'Decalogue of Darkness' towards the end of 2018 but now in 2019 this electric space rock act that supplies beautiful doses of avant-prog and progressive electronic into their cauldron of sonic delight releases a new compilation accurately titled ARCHIVES.

ARCHIVES is just what it sounds like. No, it is not a greatest hits of sort but rather a compilation that consists of the 2011 album 'Destructive Actions Affect Livings' along with the other 2011 release 'Echoes of Falling Stars' and if that wasn't enough it also includes my favorite DAAL release of all: the outstandingly beautiful and haunting 2012 EP 'The Call of the Witches.'

Unfortunately there are no bonus tracks to be had and no bells and whistles. In fact this compilation had to cut off the Pain of Salvation cover of 'Undertow' from 'Echoes of Falling Stars' for the sake of fitting all of this onto 2 CDs. This is not really one for the true fans who already find of these albums in their collection already but rather for those who missed out on DAAL's magical music mojo the first time around and take it from a true fan here, you need to check this stuff out.

Needless to say, this is more of a release for those who wish to obtain a physical release of this material since the original albums are all available as digital downloads on the DAAL Bandcamp site. The albums have been out of print and this is a way to make them available again in a more compact form. This is a must for fans of eclectic progressive space rock and these early recordings are some of my absolute favorites but then again DAAL can do no wrong in my book. It just puzzles me as to why they remain so underground after so much good music released. I guess they are ahead of their time and need several years to float by before they become more widely known. Start now! You won't regret it ;)

 Navels Falling Into A Living Origami by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.90 | 155 ratings

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Navels Falling Into A Living Origami
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by admireArt
Prog Reviewer

3 stars So the album really begins around minute six after a kind of boring and overly sweet experimental pastorale like introduction. The blues like electric guitar embarks on a trippy and enticing prog/rock ride with some added electronic noises to build what could be track 3 on an uncut one track conceptual release by DAAL in 2018 and named Navels Falling into a Living Origami.

As far as minute 12 it´s easy to sense a less experimental songwriting, unlike "old school" DAAL, in favor of more friendly melodic lines and I suppose it worked out fine considering the appeal this album had in its days here in PA.

Around minute 21 there is a 4 minute intersection which clearly displays the "old school" I was talking about. Minute 24 marks the next "track" of this release with a piano/electric guitar based composition which take turns and build a somewhat King Crimsony mood although its finale runs a bit too long.

Minute 30- A two minute(+-) arpeggiated , dramatic piano counterpoint introduces the next section which could easily be described as Symphonic Prog with a blues oriented electric guitar which also serves as mid section before a symphonic exercise which actually ends up sounding less interesting without the guitar.

Minute 37. For those who like Progressive Electronic this 6 minute section will turn out quiet appealing.

After a bit of silence the last section appears. A kind of Italian version of one of this duo´s heartfelt influences, Pink Floyd, in between the Barrett & Waters era.

Now the crappy part of reviewing... rating !!

Would have loved to love it after all those favorable ratings and my early DAAL days enthusiasm but it actually stays short of 4 & 5.

3 PA stars.

 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.26 | 291 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Sinedie

5 stars What drives a musical group to change the skin so often, even publishing 2 CDs at the same time, one the exact opposite of the other? Want to surprise? A strong sense of experimental research? Two souls within the same project? I believe that "Decalogue of Darkness" and "Navels Falling into a Living Origami" (as usual cryptic titles for their records) are all this, but the demonstration that in 2018 we can still again compose excellent music both experimental, both "traditional". To say the true "Decalogue of Darkness" reminds us closely of their previous work ("Dodecahedron") but I feel I can say that the Decalogue is far more inspired, more exciting, perhaps thanks to the mellotron, perhaps the absolutely dramatic and dreamy mood of the entire album. Accompanied by evocative videos (I suggest you visit their youtube page!) The various chapters that make up the work (no title ... only numbers of the various chapters ... as in Dodecahedron!) Are the result of stylistic cohesion, that only the great groups can have. "Chapter I, II, III, IV, VI, X" are the best of the italic matrix instrumental has given birth in the last few years, inevitably recalling the great of the past (I hear the echo of "Darwin", "Ys", "Zarathustra" throughout the album ...) "Navels Falling into a living Origami" is even a single 50-minute suite without subdivisions, a long and slow flow of landscapes, sometimes progressive, often experimental at the edge of dissonance, at the borders of new age and intimate jazz, with an approach to sound that is clearly reminiscent of Floyd post-Barrett and pre-darkside. In the end of this Maelmstrom something happens that is rare in the music of Daal... A part sung! Guglielmo Mariotti (former companion of Guidoni in Taproban) paints a ballad with a macabre text accompanied only by acoustic guitars, how to seal the end of this authentic journey into the unconscious in an almost pastoral way. Decalogue of Darkness ***** Navels Falling into a Living Origami ****
 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.26 | 291 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by LakeGlade12

2 stars 1.5 Stars, An endless fog of mellotron

While it is frowned on to pass judgement on a album after a single listen, when an album is either amazing or awful it does not require too many repeated plays, and unfortunately Decalogue Of Darkness falls into the latter. DAAL have been one of those highly rated bands that I often saw mentioned but never got around to checking out. Given the hype around this album in particular I knew I eventually needed to give them a fair listen.

I can get where the high ratings are coming from, as it fits directly into the mellotron-heavy, vintage Prog that has been very successful for bands such as Wobbler and the All Traps On Earth. However, what this instrumental album severely lacks that the others possess is variety, not just within tracks but between them as well. I can understand why each song has almost the same title as there is so little to distinguish each one from another!

The entire album is mostly mid-tempo, dark but nothing sinister and is driven primarily by the mellotron and piano. There are some more intense secions but nothing I have not heard before. I am struggling to find anything that is really original on this album, it often sounds like the soundtrack to Epitaph on King Crimson's 1969 debut, with a lot of recycled themes that have been done better from many other bands. The only slight exception was Chapter VII which had a pleasant space-rock middle part and was the only highlight and song I can remember from the entire 70 minute album.

There is little else that can be said about the album really, other than it is well produced, makes for decent background music and worth getting if you like your tracks submerged in mellotron. As the album is 100 % Prog I will give it a 2 star rating for this site, but that is the highest rating I can give for this overhyped album. If you want a mellotron-heavy, mostly instrumental masterpiece then I would strongly recommend the recently released A Drop Of Light from All Traps On Earth, which totally outclasses this album. The main reason being is that they have clear changes in composition structure to maintain your attention, and that they go well beyond the vintage-prog sound by adding Magma influences and Avant-Prog unpredictability into their sound. Decalogue of Darkness is very one-note in comparison and to be honest is one of the most boring Prog albums I have ever heard. I was fed up after only 10 minutes of listening, and had to push myself to get through it all.

 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.26 | 291 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by minus

5 stars Decalogue of Darkness is a new Daal album released in 2018, simultaneously with "Navels Falling into a Living Origami". Stylistically Decalogue of Darkness is a return to the atmosphere of "Dodecahedron", considered by many the best work of Alfio Costa (Mellotron, piano, noises, samplers) and Davide Guidoni (drums, acoustic percussions, noises, samplers), here still in the company by Ettore Salati (guitars) and Bobo Aiolfi (bass). Decalogue of Darkness is divided into ten chapters which investigate the darkest corners of the Daal sound universe, a concept album whose underlying theme is the sonic atmosphere, sometimes darker and more decadent, others more romantic and delicate, with a level of very high compositions that makes this work the most mature and complete of the group. The Decalogue opens with "Chapter I" that envelops the listener with atmospheres full of pathos and mystery. Mellotron and keyboards weave a seductive sound plot, but at the same time anxious and horrifying, made even more dramatic by the menacing piano chords, Salati's guitar and Aiolfi's bass give rise to an obsessive circular flow with incisive and magnetic passages: even the video of this first chapter traces the cultural obscurantism of the "dark ages", staging a parallel between medieval and contemporary society, with inquisitorial processes, osculum, diabolical orgy, blasphemous rites, human sacrifices and macabre dances. "Chapter II" is a suite of sixteen minutes musically divided into two different parts: The first is almost a chamber piece: which takes shape between sinister noises and distressing sounds: a dark celebration that leaves moments of great emotional tension. The second fraction it is a rhythmic jazz rock explosion in which all the musicians manage to carve out an important space, the pace dictated by Guidoni is imposing and decisive, the sound architectures of Costa are based on an eclectic prog, which amalgamates obsessive "Goblinian" passages. "Chapter III" is the most dreamy episode of the album, a short but poignant instrumental, that with tumultuous symphonic cues alternates delicate melodic brackets. The significant work of Mellotron brings out the most twilight, melancholic component of the Daal sound that, accomplices the violent rhythmic accelerations and guitar bumps, moves towards purely Nordic atmospheres (Anekdoten, 'nglag'rd...) "Chapter V" is a terrifying ballad that excites and scares in equal measure. The ancient acoustic sounds that enhance the song show the spiky gothic features of "Suspiria", while the dark electric textures venture into the dark territories beaten by Devil Doll in "Dies Irae" . To tone down the tone is "Chapter VI", with majestic symphonic openings and liquid solutions that let appreciate the great work of Costa and Salati, respectively on the piano and the guitar, and the rhythmic solidity of the couple Aiolfi / Guidoni. The disturbing "Chapter VII" is articulated around an obsessive and hypnotic circular motion, that makes so much "vintage italian progressive horror music". The blows of punches at the door underline unusual rhythmical lines that emphasize the cinematic nature of the piece. "Chapter VIII" falls back into the murky Daal sound nightmare. Pain and anguish are dripping from every single note with such power as to annihilate the listener, and suck him into a tormented vortex, pitch black and scary as the worst of all possible hells. A creepy sound experience! "Chapter IX" deals with darkness with elegant romanticism. The poignant melodies of the piano play the sound verses that lead to the grandiose epilogue of Decalogue of Darkness. "Chapter X" is the final Magnus Opus, with more than ten minutes of progressive seasoned by breakaways and breaks. Repeated arpeggios, melancholic agreements, solemn openings and sudden rhythmic turns determine the worthy conclusion of a work of undeniable imaginative power.
 Decalogue Of Darkness by DAAL album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.26 | 291 ratings

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Decalogue Of Darkness
Daal Eclectic Prog

Review by Aenima-x

5 stars Decalogue of Darkness is one of those records that surely attract people in the world of progressive music. A few years ago I had heard "Dodecahedron" and I loved it, but this is definitely higher !!! Decalogue of darkness includes the best symphonic prog in dark colors of recent times. It is powerful, melancholic, poetic, a pained songwriting, which brings the mind back to the best Italian prog of '70s like Bronze Ballet, Goblin, Banco, the great tradition of Italian prog relives here! "Chapter I" is a magnificent blend of heavy and light, deep melodic mellotrons. The melody has a dramatic pace. "Chapter II" is the suite of the album, and incredibly not at the end of the album! a long articulated piece, which constantly grows up to the final explosion. Epic! "Chapter III" is my favorite, the demonstration of how to write a perfect piece in 4 minutes, without resorting to unnecessary frills. "Chapter IV" is the most "Crimsonian" Daal have produced until today. Mellotron, Frippertronics and a nervous drums seal another jewel. "Chapter X" is my other favorite song, the magnus opus which worthily concludes this record. Alfio Costa, Davide Guidoni, Ettore Salati and Bobo Aiolfi are a perfect combo, with perfect interplay, the result of their alchemy is rainbow of dynamics, which covers the entire sound spectrum, reiterating the extreme eclecticism of the group! In conclusion, an excellent record recommended for those who love good music!
Thanks to clarke2001 for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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