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TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI

Jazz Rock/Fusion • Finland


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Tasavallan Presidentti picture
Tasavallan Presidentti biography
Founded in Helsinki, Finland in 1969 - Disbanded in 1974 - Between 1983-2007 regrouped briefly several times

This group is one of the earliest prog group from all of Scandinavia (their first album was recorded in 69 but the group has roots from 68) although they were hardly classic prog, playing a very wide spectrum of music from jazzy stuff to blues via folk and rock. All four albums are very constant in the crazy Finnish way of playing progressive music, but you will have a hard time to find their second album - the only one not to be released on Love Record under which recorded TABULA RASA and FINNFOREST as well as WIGWAM a band that could they (TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTITI) be compared to. Their last album was more similar to COLOSSEUM.

: : : Hugues Chantraine, BELGIUM : : :

Played as a back-up band on PEKKA STRENG's "Magneettimiehen Kuolema" album.

See also: HERE and HERE

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TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI discography


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TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.73 | 57 ratings
Tasavallan Presidentti
1969
3.84 | 58 ratings
Tasavallan Presidentti II
1971
4.25 | 99 ratings
Lambertland
1972
3.39 | 52 ratings
Milky Way Moses
1974
3.16 | 16 ratings
Six Complete
2006

TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.88 | 13 ratings
Still Struggling For Freedom
2001
3.86 | 5 ratings
Pop-Liisa 1
2016
3.00 | 1 ratings
Live in Lambertland
2019

TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.28 | 6 ratings
Six + Live!
2007

TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.18 | 3 ratings
Classics (Comp.)
1990

TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.00 | 2 ratings
Time Alone with You / Obsolete Machine
1969
4.82 | 3 ratings
Solitary / Deep Thinker
1970
3.92 | 5 ratings
Sisältäni Portin Löysin / Selvä Näkijä
1972
3.00 | 2 ratings
Six
2005

TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Lambertland by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.25 | 99 ratings

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Lambertland
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Tasavallan Presidentti from Finland impressed me with their charming prog-infused song-based bluesrock second record (1971). A year later the band would release 'Lambertland' with a different singer and quite frankly; a totally different type of band. This is pure eclectic prog. Take some early Zappa ('King Kong' was mentioned earlier), add some Soft Machine, Fairport Convention, some Jan Akkerman style guitar (of Focus) and most importantly some Sammy Davis Junior (yes that jazz singer who sang 'Mr. Bojangles'). The combination of folk & jazz-rock with the beautiful artwork and title 'Lamberland' creates a unique journey through the imagination. Light-hearted, charming and full of positive creative energy. The quirkiness of the melodies and the way the rhythms are gently pumping are quite unique. The band uses interesting harmonies and finds original folky melodies. Pekka Pöyry plays both saxes and flutes and is great in always finding a suitable place in the music. Jukka Tolonen, a guitarist of some fame in Finland, mostly excels at finding nice quirky jazz riffs. The vocals of Eero Raittinen have fueled some debate and on the opining song he does in fact sings way out of tune. Since I do like the tone of his voice and his different way of singing (more like vocal jazz) I can actually appreciate his performances quite a lot. The album has a few very strong moments and no weak spots and I really like the totality of it. The Svart label has released a stunning vinyl reprint. 'Lambertland' may have its shortcomings, but it does deliver that truly original one-of-a-kind early seventies progressive rock experience like all too few album do. It's the kind of album you'd like to see in the PA top 100.
 Tasavallan Presidentti II by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.84 | 58 ratings

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Tasavallan Presidentti II
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Tasavallan Presidentti from Finland recorded a progressive rock must-have called 'Lambertland' (with a slightly different line-up), but not before releasing this charmer of an album in 1971 (only in their neighboring country of Sweden) . The band sounds surprisingly English and lead-singer Frank Robson actually grew up in England and is therefor a native speaker. This is type of progressive rock that has a blues rock basis enhanced with prog, jazz- rock and folkrock. The sound of Tasavallan Presidentti could be compared to bands like Colosseum (use of saxophone), Patto (jazz-rock guitar by Tolonen), Spooky Tooth (songwriting), early Focus, Edgar Broughton Band (vocal expression) and Procol Harum (mainly the vocals). This is just one of those albums that hits the right vibe, full of enthusiasm and pleasant songy' rock melodies. The sound of the productions is quite good and my only complaint is that the vocals of Frank Robson - though often very charming and inciting - do have their false notes here and there. This is most problematic on the song 'I'm Going Home Again'. The guitars of Jukka Tolonen are among the best of early seventies rock. Still a very pleasant little album from the golden age of rock deserving a small four star rating. Currently available on vinyl on the Svart label.
 Live in Lambertland by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Live, 2019
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Live in Lambertland
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Mortte

— First review of this album —
3 stars Svart Records has really continued it's cultural work releasing this double live, because there are so little released live material from Pressas sixties/seventies times! I believe without Svart Records these live recordings would have stayed forgotten in the vaults. In last review I told YLE started live broadcastings from Liisankatu Studio. Luckily they broadcasted bands gigs also from other places like Esplanadinkappeli restaurant, Kulttuuritalo (the main concert place of Helsinki that time) and Natsa Club (one of the few clubs in Helsinki that time where popular musicians had gigs and jams that time). I think 1972 was the peak year of Tasavallan Presidentti in their career. They went then their first tour in the UK and also recorded and released their best album 'Lambertland'. This album documents really well, how they sounded live that year.

First album was recorded wholly from Esplanadikappeli. They start with medley from 'Celebration Of the Saved Nine' and 'The Bargain'. Both are played quite the same way as in studio album, but Aaltonen is playing much complex rhythm. I like more the straightforward playing of the studio version. Next comes version from 'Lounge' that is the only version in this album. It's also really same as the studio, but in the middle there is different slower part. That changes quite fascinating when P'yry starts to play organ and the whole band plays quiter. First version of 'Lambertland' is as great as the studioversion, only in the middle there is some different improvisation part and they play the end heavier than in studio version. 'Dance' has really fast tempo, also it sounds as they really get into playing mood in this last piece from this gig! It has quite long intro with Raittinen and P'yry making really pirimitive voices, also there are imrovisational pieces that are not in the studio version.

Second album starts with another longer version from 'the Bargain'. At first only Tolonen is playing guitar, then P'yry joins and soon after that the whole band. 'Ramblin' is a piece from Tolonen's first solo album. I can't compare those versions, because haven't heard the original, but anyway this piece is the least interesting to me. Good playing, but not enough substance. These two pieces are recorded from the Eastern Pop Concert, Kulttuuritalo. There were also playing Omega from Hungary and Blue Effect from Czechoslovakia. Last three tracks are recorded from Natsa. It's the latest performance and you can hear how their playing had become tighter.'Lambertland' is almost same kind of version as in first album. It's amazing, how Raittinen sings this as great as in studio (really would have wanted to hear this in their 50th celebration concert). 'Dance' is shorter and not have as long intro, but primitive vocals are there too. 'Celebration Of the Saved Nine' is longer and has quite interesting improvisational period in the end.

This album is culturally really important, but when reviewing it as an album, I think it is a bit too long. The versions of the same tracks haven't got enough variety to keep my interest it's over 90 lenght. I would have taken only 'Lounge' from the Esplanadinkappeli-concert and add it with the rest of material. But of course there would have been those, who had said 'Why there isn't the whole Kappeli-gig', so I think that's the reason Svart decided to put this all to same record. Anyway I would have given four starts to more compact version, now I will give only three.

 Pop-Liisa 1 by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Live, 2016
3.86 | 5 ratings

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Pop-Liisa 1
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Mortte

4 stars Although prog music had at least little popularity in Finland at the seventies, prog music or not even rock music wasn't commonly played in the Finnish radio. Also there really weren't many places where bands could play their music live. So when Finnish state radio channel YLE decided to start live music broadcasts from the Liisankatu Studio in Helsinki, it was a big step to Finnish prog music. Those broadcastings started in 1972 and lasted 1977. They were at first in tuesday's but changed to wednesday. Every other tuesday there were pop theme and every other jazz, although there were quite many same musicians in both themes and as we know, Finnish prog was highly influenced by jazz. These broadcasts were really live, so if guitar string broke and there were no second guitar, the host had to make some improvisation talking to avoid ankward silence in the program. Although these broadcasts were in the YLE, they could have remain into unknown history without Svart records. They went into YLE archives and decided to release some of those broadcastings. Unfortunately all the broadcasts hadn't survived, for example Haikara was too in the Liisankadun studio, but I quess there wasn't enough survived material to an album. There are two series in Svart Records: Pop Liisa & Jazz Liisa.

Tasavallan Presidentti was in the Pop Liisa at autumn 1973. M'ns Groundstroem was the latest change in a line-up, Heikki Virtanen took his place. TP had just returned from UK, where they played at the Reading Festival and Marquee Club. Also they have started to record 'Milky Way Moses' album.They played 56 minutes at the Liisankatu broadcastings, but sadly there were technical problems, so only two pieces are included in this release (really would have liked to hear their live version from 'Milky Way Moses'). First piece here is 'Lennosta Kii', which is origally composed by Eero Koivistoinen. TP made an studio version of this as 'Caught From the Air' to forthcoming album. Although this version is in Finnish, it has a lots in common to studio version. The main difference is, that in the middle there is the end part of 'How to start a day', that I have started recently love a lot as the whole B-side of 'Milky Way Moses'. The another piece 'Dance' has a lot more improvisational parts as the studio version, also it has even greater tempo. All the way both long pieces are really great, I believe in this recording moment TP was musically at it's best!

This record is from the time when TP was both musically and also with it's success going high! Sadly the members anyway didn't feel then their career going forward, also I think there had been personal problems already many years. So really great 'Milky Way Moses'-album became their last album in the seventies. I know there are fans of 1990/2000 Finnish prog outside Finland (for example bands Kingston Wall, Uzva, Hidria Spacefolk). I really hope they will check out this live album as also live albums from Wigwam, because my honest opion is those modern Finnish prog artists just haven't ever achieved the same magic as there is in these old live recordings. There were really reason, why Wigwam and TP were the cream of the Finnish prog in the seventies, although I of course really love Haikara, Kalevala, Nova & Nimbus too!

 Tasavallan Presidentti by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Studio Album, 1969
3.73 | 57 ratings

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Tasavallan Presidentti
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Soon after WIGWAM had released their debut single in the spring of 1969, the other Finnish prog giant TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI was founded -- by the young, highly gifted guitarist Jukka Tolonen together with his cousin and bandmate, drummer Vesa Aaltonen. Just like Wigwam, also TP was born from the ashes of the groundbreaking band Blues Section; it was most likely the former BS bassist Måns Groundstroem's idea to invite the British vocalist Frank Robson, who had replaced Jim Pembroke in the last stages of that band in 1968. Before Robson's return from England, Groundstroem suggested the addition of saxophonist-flautist Juhani Aaltonen. The foursome was't satisfied with the original band name Balloon, so they phoned a certain guy who was good at inventing names. The chap was reading a newspaper at the moment, and his first suggestion was Uutiset ja Sää (News and Weather), but "The President of the State" indeed sounds more serious. Urho Kekkonen himself gave his acceptance to the name. The group's first gig took place in the midsummer of '69, and the LP, produced by the Love Records leader Otto Donner, came out in December.

Despite some stylistic uncoherence, the album is a strong evidence of the band's excellent musical competence. As a brief intro there's an elegant flute melody backed by acoustic guitar, before the meaty jazz-rock starts. The second track 'Obsolete Machine' is my favourite of the album, with its fascinating rhythm pattern, Clapton-like electric guitar, fresh-sounding flute and the bluesy vocals of Robson, comparable to Gary Brooker and Steve Winwood. The blues oriented songs were mostly written by Robson and Groundstroem. The latter shows some will to experiment in his instrumental outburst 'Crazy Thing No. 1' and in the atonality of 'Ancient Mariner'. Groundsroem wrote also the beautiful rock ballad 'I Love You Teddy Bear' and the gorgeous final instrumental 'Wutu-Banale'.

Tolonen was to become a notable composer a bit later; here he offers a romantic, birdsong-flavoured 'Thinking Back' in which he plays his first-learned instrument, piano. The album's reception was warm and it received favourable reviews abroad too. Personally, I like it more than their second eponymous album, but I prefer the third, more complex prog album Lambertland with the new vocalist Eero Raittinen. Blues elements don't generally interest me very much, but this innovative album has more than that. An important early classic in Finnish rock music.

 Milky Way Moses by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.39 | 52 ratings

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Milky Way Moses
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars In 1973 hardly anyone would guess that TP would be history within one year (for two decades). The previous year saw the departure of the original bassist Måns Groundstroem and the arrival of Heikki Virtanen, who happened to be Jukka Tolonen's cousin. The band continued as an internationally respected live act. The fourth album was recorded in London, August-September 1973, and produced by the established Peter Eden. This time the lyrics came from the pen of Jim Pembroke (WIGWAM), and the reeds player Pekka Pöyry - a notable figure in the Finnish jazz scene - stepped more into the light as a composer alongside Jukka Tolonen.

The 8-minute title track is instrumentally oriented, typical slice of TP's jazz-rock, more ballsy than focused or melodic. It seems Eero Raittinen as a vocalist is not at his best on this album. 'Caught in the Air' originates from EERO KOIVISTOINEN's groundbreaking avant/proto-prog album Valtakunta (1968), in which the fancy lyrics of the poet Jarkko Laine were sung by Eero Raittinen. The track is stretched up to 11:37 with wandering instrumental sections; I'd say there's not enough proggy innovations to justify the length of this version that clearly loses to the fantastic, psychedelically coloured original.

'Jelly' is an instrumental group effort, not much more than a jam. Pöyry's two compositions are placed in the end. 'How to Start a Day' is quite interesting especially for the paranoid vocals that approach whispering and muttering. But again, 13:47 is way too long for the thin musical contents. The most economic song 'Piece of Mind' is rather calm; nice, but unspectacular. The album came out in April 1974 when the spark had begun to die out. Tasavallan Presidentti collapsed after the summer's tours, and JUKKA TOLONEN continued his solo career with excellent Fusion albums.

 Lambertland by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.25 | 99 ratings

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Lambertland
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI's third album was recorded in April-May 1972. Each album saw one member being replaced; first the original saxophonist-flautist Juhani Aaltonen gave way to Pekka Pöyry, and this time the vocalist changed from British Frank Robson to Eero Raittinen, an established singer in the 60's/70's pop culture. The band's fame rose rapidly both in Finland and in England, where they toured twice. Lambertland is almost entirely composed by the guitar master Jukka Tolonen, lyrics are written by Mats Huldén (the original WIGWAM bassist). Gone is the patchwork-like nature of the previous albums, now the album is completely coherent - supposedly also conceptual, though I can't quite figure out the story - and shows the group stronger than ever with a unique personality.

The fast-tempo opener 'Lounge' is a heady cocktail of riffy and bluesy rock, improvisational jazz virtuosity, prog complexity and tight funk. Pöyry's alto sax is all over the place. For me, and many, the album's shiny highlight is the title track that starts slowly in a mystic, nocturnal way. Raittinen's powerful vocals sound truly fantastic on those looooong notes. The delicate instrumental moment that builds up from solitary hi-hat and soft guitar chords into more intense jazz-rock is amazing too. The track changes seamlessly into Pekka Pöyry's instrumental composition 'Celebration of the Saved Nine'.

'The Bargain' has a very reserved basic rhythm on top of which the semi-shamanistic, Jim Morrison reminding vocals and the light jazz doodling of the group make me think of THE DOORS of the 70's, songs such as 'L. A. Woman' and 'Riders on the Storm'. 'Dance', the other instrumental, is fine due to the flute and the occasional Medieval influences, though it has a bit too much of self-indulgent jazz- rock boasting by Tolonen. 'Last Quarters' features a charming bass line, a lot of flute, and some JETHRO TULL-ish nuances. Yeah, a nice track, even if I at first thought it to be directionless.

Without a doubt Lambertland is among the biggest prog classics of Finland, but it's not a 5-star masterpiece to me.

 Milky Way Moses by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.39 | 52 ratings

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Milky Way Moses
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Ever ponder on some mysterious album that somehow, for no apparent reason, becomes a mythical icon and you don't even know why? That is how I feel by Tasavallan Presidentti's Milky Way Moses, an LP I bought back in 1974 or so, initially enamored by the lovely cover art of bright green and sharp yellow trees and finally enthralled by the cool jazzy prog within the grooves. I finally nailed a CD copy and was immediately plunged into a drenching pool of self-inflicted nostalgia that has me beaming. This album remains my favorite Finish prog recording (though the recent Moonwagon albums come awfully close). Jukka Tolonen needs no introduction, a legendary guitarist closely associated in my mind with vintage Jan Akkerman, where robust jazzy chords and slick leads conspire to woo the casual listener and convert them permanently. Together with bassist Heikki Virtanen, sax/flute master Pekka Pöyry and drum king Vesa Aaltonen, Tolonen provides a shimmering glide for singer Eero Raittinen to show off his vocal skills. A nice mix of short and long tracks makes for a delightful menu.

There is little pussyfooting here as title track takes off from the get-go, a flick of the wrist envelops the axe strings with confident technique allied with intense feeling and you just know this will be fun. Breezy, airy jazz- rock, a cool urban vibe where blaring saxophones, tingling piano and that dogged riff keep it all hanging tight. Eero vocalizes nicely in a semi-trembling yelp that is actually quite striking. The stage is set for some soloing, well anchored by the rhythm tandem. Jukka then takes the spotlight and delivers a wah-wah duet with Pekka's squeaky sax, a true masterpiece moment where both maul each other with clever mini blasts, a delirious little musical game. Another vocal refrain which veers into a heavier raging funk and the deed is done. Excellent!

The stunning 11 minute+ epic "Caught from the Air" is another highlight moment, a thrilling musical escapade that swerves in a myriad of directions. Feline guitar and fluttering piano combine to create a jazz tornado that ultimately permits Pekka to go bananas on his sax, in a very overt Didier Malherbe style. Midway through, the groove goes from very relaxed, almost like instrumental Stealy Dan, to more hysterical, notes blasted at a furious pace and decidedly jazz where screeching organ, pounding piano, irate sax and mad guitar rule the waves. The vocals return to that familiar exuberance and the whole just glides along with zest to an effortless finale.

On "Jelly", Virtanen and Aaltonen propel the jiggly jello-jazz with syncopated mayhem, a delightful turbo- powered lightning bolt that knows no respite just finality. Disjointed yet controlled, the manic 3 minute + piece shows off the talents of all involved. The Focus parallel is evident in both the guitar and the turbulent drumming.

A true 70s vibe appears on "Confusing the Issue" which incorporates some odd stylistics, a Planet Gong cabaret meets Frank Zappa feel, with Eero doing odd things with his voice ("Cucumber Stew"?), not unlike the zealous Canterbury lads. Tolonen rips off an acid-drenched solo, making anyone within earshot to giggle nervously.

The longest sucker is the nearly 14 minute "How to Start a Day", a weird introduction that has some Gong meets the Legendary Pink Dots facets, which then prompts bassist Virtanen to shovel along a clearly defined but relentless groove, flute spiraling above the fray. The subsequent massive jam explosion just creams the jeans! Tight and sublimely crazy! Eero even dares to pull off a cheeky Jim Morrison imitation that will make anyone smile. Hilarious! Fill in that damn sax blare and people will glare. Tubular bells arrive just in time to save the gong, literally!

"Piece of Mind" is led again by that thrilling bass in that classic Howlett/Rowe style, a loopy construction that keeps the imagery flowing. Short sweet and effective.

Like I stated earlier, not the best jazz-rock album, nor is it Tasavallan Presidentti's best but there is something about the pervasive comfort of nostalgia that needs not to be explained and just is. Yes, it sounds dated and perhaps not very relevant but I like it. Always have and forever will. Sax is everything!

4 Starlit prophets

 Time Alone with You / Obsolete Machine  by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1969
2.00 | 2 ratings

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Time Alone with You / Obsolete Machine
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

2 stars This Finnish prog pioneer released their aponymous debut album in 1969. It's a strong but slightly uneven mix of ballsy jazz-rock, jazz, blues, psychedelia and also some art music influences, featuring top musicians like the guitarist Jukka Tolonen and sax/flute player Juhani Aaltonen. The vocals are by British- born Frank Robson, who has a thick, bluesy voice, a bit reminding of Procol Harum's Gary Brooker (and Traffic's Steve Winwood, though not as much as Wigwam's Jukka Gustavson did).

So, into this unrated, coverless single. The A-side 'Time Alone With You' doesn't much interest me. It's written by Robson and his vocals sort of push into the centre more than would be needed. The much repeated "naa naa naa naa naa naa" could have been replaced by some instrument. The song is quite fast and straightforward blues-rock.

'Obsolete Machine' was taken from the album, and for me it's among its highlights. It is rooted in blues- rock too, but it has so much more to offer. Aaltonen's flute is fantastic and can be heard almost through the whole track. The rhythm pattern is very nice and lively (I can't say what it is, I have no such musical knowledge). Vesa Aaltonen does excellent work on drums. This song, credited to the whole band, has a perfect balance between sung parts and instrumental sections. It goes forward very determinantly and yet it has a fascinating, psychedelic atmosphere to it. If that was a non-album track I might give one star more, but in my opinion this single is not very notable. 'Time Alone With You' is included as a bonus on the debut album's CD edition.

 Tasavallan Presidentti II by TASAVALLAN PRESIDENTTI album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.84 | 58 ratings

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Tasavallan Presidentti II
Tasavallan Presidentti Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Sean Trane
Special Collaborator Prog Folk

3 stars The rather rare second album of TP, the one that never got released in their homeland, but in the neighbouring Sweden, and only very recently received a legit (I think) reissue on Walhalla Records. Recorded in the summer of 70, TP2 is a mix of tracks from their debut album (the embarrassing Teddy Bear and Once Again) and tracks that are proper to this album, but already very reminiscent of the upcoming Lambertland. TP was by then in a transitory state with first singer Robson still in the fold, but not for much longer, but windman Poyry has already replaced Aaltonen.

While the album still features some of the embarrassing moments of their debut album (the afore-mentioned tracks) including the Beatles/Traffic semi-lift-off Weather Brightly. The album suffers from a very average quality (not to say amateurish) production, Tolonen's guitar is in full flight, as can be heard in Introduction, Thinker, Freedom or Tease Me. But you can see that the group still hadn't fully matured by then, as evidenced in the slightly Indian-inspired (tabla- like drumming, and sitar-like guitar strumming) 7-mins track of Sinking. The album's highlights are the near-excellent opening rapid-fire instrumental Introduction, the pleasant flute-drenched Deep Thinker, the slow Struggling For Freedom and the closing choppy descending Tell Me More, all hinting at the upcoming Lambertland album.

The Walhalla CD reissue comes with the full Lambertland album as a bonus, but doesn't feature the splendid artwork, so you're left with a rather average brown and white double picture artwork, with just enough space for the other album's track list. Sooooo, since this second album is rather over-rated, your interest in having this unofficial 2on1 is of rather limited interest. I'd rather advise you to search for the proper Lambertland release, which is easily their best album, and IMHO the only thing you really need from them, unless you'd want to make a CD-r compilation of their other three albums.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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