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BILL BRUFORD

Jazz Rock/Fusion • United Kingdom


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Bill Bruford biography
William Scott Bruford - Born May 17, 1949 (Sevenoaks, Kent, UK)

Pick up just about any of the most successful albums from progressive rock's heyday, flip it over to the credits, and there's a good chance you'll see Bill BRUFORD listed as the drummer. Having played in perhaps more famous prog bands than any other artist, BRUFORD has, at one time or another, kept time for just about every major band in the genre, as well as maintaining a successful solo career.

Beginning his professional career while still in his teens, BRUFORD answered a drummer wanted ad in the Melody Maker and proceeded to join two young men in what he thought was to be 'a vocal group, in the style of The Fifth Dimension'. The two young men were named Chris SQUIRE & Jon ANDERSON, and together they formed the nucleus of what was to become one of the biggest progressive bands of all time, YES. After the worldwide success of their albums "Fragile" & "Close to the Edge", BRUFORD was eager to explore more fertile musical pastures. Leaving a band that was, at that point, poised on the verge of worldwide superstardom was seen by most as misguided at best, insane at worst. BRUFORD, however, felt he had learned all he could from YES, and was looking for a fresh musical environment in which to stretch his wings. He found just such an entity in KING CRIMSON.

After numerous personnel changes over the years, bandleader Robert FRIPP had decided to radically reform KING CRIMSON, and enlisted BRUFORD with the priceless quote "I think you're about ready now, Bill..." For the next two years, BRUFORD and CRIMSON produced some of the most innovative and influential music of the 1970s before FRIPP, in a prescient preemptive response to the growing grandiosity of the genre, once again disbanded the band in 1974. BRUFORD then shifted his time between a variety of projects. In 1977, he joined GENESIS as a touring drummer to allow recently promoted frontman Phil COLLINS to concentrate on vocal duties. The same year, he formed his own eponymous fusion band with Jeff Berlin, Alan HOLDSWORTH, and Dave Stewart. They released a series of fine albums which allowed BRUFORD ample room to explore his love of jazz.

After an aborted attempt at forming a supergroup featuring John WETTON & Rick WAKEMAN, BRUFORD & WETTON then joined forces with Eddie Jobson & Alan HOLDSWORTH to become U.K. The orig...
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Buy BILL BRUFORD Music


One Of A KindOne Of A Kind
Astralwerks 1991
$12.86
$9.85 (used)
Earthworks: Complete Deluxe BoxsetEarthworks: Complete Deluxe Boxset
Summerfold Uk 2019
$94.00
$93.44 (used)
If Summer Had Its GhostsIf Summer Had Its Ghosts
Discipline Us 1997
$11.94 (used)
Earthworks Live: Stamping GroundEarthworks Live: Stamping Ground
Venture / Caroline 1994
$34.99
$2.48 (used)
Feels Good to MeFeels Good to Me
E.G. Records 1990
$89.95
$11.94 (used)
Percussion Collective Featuring Bill BrufordPercussion Collective Featuring Bill Bruford
Cherry Red 2019
$16.79
$21.15 (used)

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BILL BRUFORD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

BILL BRUFORD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.95 | 212 ratings
Bruford: Feels Good To Me
1978
4.11 | 318 ratings
Bruford: One Of A Kind
1979
3.46 | 109 ratings
Bruford: Gradually Going Tornado
1980
3.48 | 40 ratings
Bill Bruford & Ralph Towner & Eddie Gomez: If Summer Had Its Ghosts
1997

BILL BRUFORD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.64 | 54 ratings
Bruford: The Bruford Tapes
1979
3.91 | 13 ratings
Bruford & Borstlap: Every Step A Dance, Every Word A Song
2004
3.30 | 23 ratings
Bruford: Rock Goes To College
2007
2.28 | 6 ratings
Bruford & Borstlap: In Two Minds
2007

BILL BRUFORD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.20 | 5 ratings
Bruford - Borstlap / In Concert In Holland
2005
4.28 | 16 ratings
BBC Rock Goes to College: Live 1979
2006

BILL BRUFORD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.59 | 34 ratings
Master Strokes: 1978-1985
1986
4.12 | 6 ratings
The Winterfold Collection 1978 - 1986
2009
4.13 | 5 ratings
The Summerfold Collection 1987 - 2008
2009
4.00 | 3 ratings
Bruford: Seems Like A Lifetime Ago
2017

BILL BRUFORD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

BILL BRUFORD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Bruford: One Of A Kind by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Studio Album, 1979
4.11 | 318 ratings

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Bruford: One Of A Kind
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Is it possible for a "smooth jazz" song to feature near-Malmsteenian shredding? The Bruford group, with Allan Holdsworth on the six-string, aims to find out on "One of a Kind, part 1" from their second album, One of a Kind. Turns out it is possible, and they deploy some of that late-1970s/early-1980s smoothness not only on this song, but throughout the LP: wizardly guitar soloing over those standard-issue chord changes played on a synth. Nice enough, but we expect more from Bruford.

Luckily, they give us more. There are three Bruford classics here: "Hells Bells" and each of the two parts of "The Sahara of Snow." And there are two other strong offerings, "Fainting in Coils" and "5G," both of which showcase bassist Jeff Berlin. Much of the other half of One of a Kind is fusion-lite with occasional prog-rock forays.

Although Holdsworth's playing here is rightfully praised, ex-National Health keyboardist Dave Stewart is the keystone on most of the tracks, and at least for One of a Kind, the group could just as fairly be called Stewart.

On the whole, One of a Kind is a good album and a slight improvement over the group's debut, Feels Good to Me (1977). Most of the best songs on these two LPs are also on the 1979 live album The Bruford Tapes, which I'd ordinarily recommend as a starting point for this group. However, while the performances on The Bruford Tapes are great, the sound quality isn't, and at least one track is incomplete.

Meanwhile, the Bruford group's third and final studio album, the relatively rock-oriented Gradually Going Tornado, is their best, but fusion fans will likely find more to like on this album and on Feels Good to Me.

P.S.: One of a Kind is a must for Rototom fans. Having largely abandoned mallet percussion for this album, Bruford relies on a set of Rototoms to lend some tonality to his playing.

 Bruford: The Bruford Tapes by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Live, 1979
3.64 | 54 ratings

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Bruford: The Bruford Tapes
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This 47-minute live recording starts with an emcee's introduction: 'Alright. Live on WLIR-FM - - How 'bout it for a collection of great musicians, Polydor recording artists - - Bruford.' I point this out because he refers to a 'collection...of musicians' and to 'artists,' rather than to a group. So it goes, I guess, with jazz combos named after one of their number.

Synergy is defined as the result of pieces working together to form a system greater than those separate parts, and that's what's documented on The Bruford Tapes. Some of the improvised sections hint that this was recorded during two of the first shows of the tour - - their first with a new guitarist (John Clark) with big shoes to fill. But overall, the band is very tight throughout. As much as I have always admired both Bill Bruford (drums) and Jeff Berlin (bass), I'm most impressed with the work of keyboardist Dave 'not the guy from Eurythmics' Stewart, who moves among several instruments effortlessly.

The best performances here are the opener, 'Hell's Bells,' and the closing number, '5G,' the only track here that rivals its studio version. Too bad it... fades out?

Unfortunately, despite the excellent performances, The Bruford Tapes suffers from inferior sound. Of course these live recordings don't sound as good as the originals (which were recorded by professional engineers at Trident Studios in London). But audio quality of the CD (mine is the undated Editions E.G. release, not the newer Winterfold one) pales in comparison to other late- 1970s/early-1980s soundboard recordings.

But apparently, there weren't many professional recordings of concerts by this group. One is Rock Goes to College,recorded earlier in 1979 with Allan Holdsworth (guitar) and Annette Peacock (vocals), several months prior to the release of One of a Kind. The other I'm aware of is Live at the Venue, a 1980 gig on the Seems Like a Lifetime Ago box set. That concert was in support of Gradually Going Tornado, and featured several vocal songs sung by Berlin. So The Bruford Tapes is about all there is from the One of a Kind tour.

Overall, The Bruford Tapes is a very good album and a good example of the proverbial whole being worth more than its parts. Casual fans might be satisfied with Feels Good to Me and One of a Kind, but for Bruford fans (and many others, I'd guess), the paucity of available alternatives makes this a must-have.

 Bruford: One Of A Kind by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Studio Album, 1979
4.11 | 318 ratings

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Bruford: One Of A Kind
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars One of the best Bruford solo outputs, if not the best one, together with "Feels good to me". "One of a kind" proves Bruford's capabilities not only as a drummer but also a band member and composer. Surrounded by strong music characters of Jeff Berlin, Dave Stewart and Allan Holdsworth, this is a team effort that contains more warmth than a usual fusion record. "Hells Bells" is one of the catchiest tracks on the record, driven by a typical Bruford sound and rhythmic pattern. The mini-suite "One of a kind" retains a typical fusion feeling with Holdsworth's guitar, Stewart's synths and an improvisational feeling. It is a brilliant composition where all players stretch out and deliver challenging material for a feast. My favourite part are the final fast-paced 40 seconds which sound like graduation. "Travels with myself and someone else" remind me of National Health. After several less melodic tracks, we have a clear melody in "Fainting in Coils" with excellent keyboard synths. "Five G" is a showcase for the bass player and drummer led by furious face and coloured by gentle synths. Holdsworth kicks in with his ingenious guitar soloing. The final mini-suite comprises 2 parts and feels like unstructured part followed by a more symphonic and modern second part. A highly recommended fusion album with jazz and contemporary influences.

 Bruford: Gradually Going Tornado by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Studio Album, 1980
3.46 | 109 ratings

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Bruford: Gradually Going Tornado
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Word on the street is that compared to the other two studio albums by this group, Bill Bruford's drumming is uncharacteristicly straightforward. It's also been said that Jeff Berlin's singing is pedestrian. I can confirm that both of these are true, and that as a result, Gradually Going Tornado is quite different from Feels Good to Me and One of a Kind. Combine all of this with the loss of guitar virtuoso Allan Holdsworth, and it's probably a surprise that this album is the best of the three produced by this group.

I think the key to the success of Gradually Going Tornado are the ensemble arrangements, led by Dave Stewart's often eccentric keyboard parts and Jeff Berlin's manic basslines. As others have pointed out, Bruford's drumming is closer to traditional rock than to the inventive, oddly-accented playing he delivered on Fragile or Earthworks. The result, while still arguably classifiable as 'Jazz-rock/Fusion,' is less improvisational, and maybe more symphonic, than the group's other two studio efforts. Somehow, the generally unremarkable vocals don't detract from the proceedings, as they might have on a jazzier album. (Since I mention the other instrumentalists here, I'll add that Holdsworth's replacement on guitar, John Clark, is quite up to the task.)

The highlights are the vocal tracks 'Age of Information,' 'Plans for J.D,' and 'Gothic 17,' and Berlin's instrumental 'Joe Frazier.'

 Bruford: One Of A Kind by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Studio Album, 1979
4.11 | 318 ratings

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Bruford: One Of A Kind
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nš 230

Bill Bruford is one of the most famous and recognized drummers of the world and he was one of the founder members of Yes, a member of King Crimson and a founder member of U.K. Beyond that, he participated in several musical projects and performed live with Genesis, he returned to King Crimson and Yes, performed with his ex- colleagues of Yes, Jon Anderson, Rick Wakeman, Steve Howe and Patrick Moraz, and also with the American band Pavlov's Dog. These are only some of his most important musical contributions to our loved universe of the progressive rock music.

So, Bruford was, undoubtedly, one of the founders of the progressive rock music and he bought new ideas to it, with rock, jazz and orchestral techniques. According to Digital Dream Door, Bruford is the seventh greatest rock drummer of all time. Bruford is also considered as one of the most influential drummers ever existed and his technique and influence are considered at the same level such as Neil Pearl of Rush, John Bonham of Led Zeppelin, Keith Moon of The Who, Carl Palmer of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Ian Paice of Deep Purple, or in our days, Mike Portnoy of Dream Theater.

'One Of A Kind' is the second solo studio album of Bill Bruford and was released in 1979. This album was released one year later, after Bill Bruford having participated in the release of U.K., the eponymous debut studio album of U.K., the super-group he helped to form with three other great progressive rock musicians, the guitarist Allan Holdsworth, the keyboardist and violinist Eddie Jobson and the bassist and vocalist John Wetton.

So, the line up of the album is Bill Bruford (drums and percussion), Allan Holdsworth (electric guitar), Dave Stewart (keyboards and synthesizers) and Jeff Berlin (bass).

Some of the material recorded on this album, despite never was been released on any studio album of U.K., was originally performed live in the 1978 live tour of U.K. It happens with the track 'Forever Until Sunday', which features an unaccredited Jobson work on violin, and with the ninth and tenth tracks 'The Sahara Of The Snow, Pt 1 and 2'. By the other hand, the track 'Hell's Bells' used a fragment of a song original composed by the former and original colleague of Stewart, Alan Gowen, when both were members of the Canterbury scene band, founded in 1975, National Health.

By the time when 'One Of A Kind' was recorded, two years later, the core group from 'Feels Good To Me' has became even more focused. Bruford restricted himself to the drum kit, likely in an effort to create a recording that could be more easily reproduced when performed live. Gone too, were the vocals and added trumpet, further indications that Bruford was looking at the group as a viable touring entity. Since Stewart has gone from National Health and Holdsworth was back from the time spent in the U.S.A. with Tony Williams, it seemed as though that everything was lining up.

The same characteristics founded on his debut studio album 'Feels Good To Me' are evident on 'One Of A Kind', with everyone demonstrating palpable growth. Holdsworth's style, as distinctive as it is, would ultimately evolve into something more abstract that would, in some ways, alienate some of his core audience. But at this point he is still eminently approachable, equally capable of relaxed and flowing lines as he is able of rapid-fire exchanges. Jeff Berlin finds the comfortable middle-ground, with a formidable technique that never seems on display for the sake of it. Stewart continues to avoid the trappings of his contemporaries like Keith Emerson and Rick Wakeman, with a conception that is clearly broader than both and an interest in the ensemble that demonstrates a kind of a refreshing lack of his ego.

The compositions on 'One Of A Kind' are even more episodic than those on 'Feels Good To Me', and in many ways, more challenging. And yet, despite a landscape of constantly shifting meters and tempi, the magic of 'One Of A Kind' is that it remains a compelling and an accessible work, despite its complexity. The irregular meters are so comfortably executed and in-the-pocket that unless one is paying attention, nobody doesn't really notice all that all. The solos flow organically throughout the long form compositions, integrated in ways that makes them feel a part of the larger whole even though, in performance, it would become clear just of how of much freedom was being afforded to all.

Conclusion: 'One Of A Kind' is a collection of progressive rock songs with a jazz exploration, which latter would be defined as jazz/rock fusion. This is an excellent album with twists and turns around its music, punctuated by Bruford's steadying and slightly subversive rhythms, Holdsworth's flashes of fire, Berlin's insistent line bass and Stewart's remarkably colourful keyboard work. 'One Of A Kind' is an album I bought some years ago and I always considered it an excellent album. It's commonly accepted that it's his best solo work and that it's also one of the best albums of the jazz/rock fusion. This is an album with the same quality of the best albums of Mahavishnu Orchestra, Herbie Hancock, Brand X, Jean-Luc Ponty, Santana, Billy Cobham, Al Di Meola, Miles Davies, Return To Forever and Weather Report.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Bruford: Feels Good To Me by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 212 ratings

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Bruford: Feels Good To Me
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by macpurity

5 stars This recording was released 40 years ago! It will soon have a new remastered release later this year as a 6CD, 2DVD box set. So, it seems only fitting that another review be added to honor this rather phenomenal piece of jazz-rock art. If anything, to alert other Bruford fans that new mixes and remasters are on the way. The boxed set will feature this recording, One Of A Kind, The Bruford Tapes and Gradually Going Tornado, along with some other select special additions. It cna be found through a web search and/or a visit to a web site having to do with a scorched outbuilding.

Previous reviews truly hit all the marks, even the not so glowing ones. I can relate to some of the misgivings, but as a whole, the compositions are about as complex as permitted in music theory textbooks. Bruford and company push the envelope in terms of rhythms and compositions.

Bruford's percussion is (ahem) flawless, The late Allan Holdsworth's guitar work is still fun to listen to, including those on-purpose notes that almost sound like errors. No such thing in Allan's delivery. The bass of Jeff Berlin is tight, on the money, and possesses phrasing that rank among the best bassists. Absolutely love Dave Stewart's keyboards and synth sounds. He's a master; as can also be appreciated in his work with Barbara Gaskin. Annette Peacock's vocals do take some adapting to, but once you gain familiarity with the music, you appreciate her style, range and presence. Then throw in Kenny Wheeler's flugelhorn for good measure and some smoothness (especially on Seems Like A Lifetime Ago Part I). With co-production by Robin Lumley, it is a conglomeration of shear mastery.

I bought this one, the first time, brand new, without any in-store listening, in 1977 on vinyl. On forst listen, it knocked my socks off. I played that album a lot through the years and nearly wore it out. Thankfully, I re-purchased it on CD 13 years later, in 1990, and once again enjoyed clear digital sound. This coming October (2017), I look forward to becoming re-familiar with this recording (and others in the box-set), some in the delights of 5.1 DTS surround. So glad that Bill Bruford encouraged a 2017 re-engineering of some representative jazz rock from forty years ago. Seems Like a Lifetime Ago! Indeed!

 The Winterfold Collection 1978 - 1986 by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2009
4.12 | 6 ratings

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The Winterfold Collection 1978 - 1986
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars This single CD compilation is the companion to the Summerfold collection. While that concentrates on 1987 ? 2008 and 12 releases, this is 1978 ? 1986 from six albums. With musicians such as Allan Holdsworth, Jeff Berlin and Patrick Moraz on board there is no surprise that here is music of the highest order. Although not fully jazz, there are still huge elements of that within the progressive style that is on display. What impresses me so much about this album is that Bill doesn't feel the need to be at the front over-riding the rest of the guys. This feels very much a band as opposed to a drummer with some hired guns to provide the melody. The impression is that improvisation was taking place in the studio, with musicians all on the same wavelength and it is certainly no surprise that from this he moved more and more into a 'pure' jazz style.

Of the two sets this is probably the one that will be most accessible to those who may not normally listen to jazz, but in reality they are both essential listening and a great guide to the music of someone who to many will always be associated with prog giants such as King Crimson or Yes. The booklet is well written, extremely informative with plenty of photos.

 The Summerfold Collection 1987 - 2008 by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2009
4.13 | 5 ratings

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The Summerfold Collection 1987 - 2008
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars This double CD brings together music from 12 albums released on the label between 1987 and 2008, 22 songs in all. Those looking for progressive rock workouts should turn their attention to the companion Winterfold release as what we have here is jazz in its' truest and many forms. While there have been important jazz drummers since the scene started to be made available in a recorded format, Gene Krupa being of course the most notable, there is no doubt that in recent times Bill has made a claim to being the most important player in the scene. This is not only due to his playing and songwriting, or his ability to bring together great musicians, but also due to the history he brings with him. Many people have been turned onto jazz who originally were fans of his from his progressive rock days, and have followed him on the journey and stayed the course.

Prior to this collection I had heard little of the output from this label, but the collection has been put together with care, showing the many sides of Bruford and his take on the genre. There are big band arrangements through to more simpler bands set ups, although still providing the complexity and spontaneity that this music needs. The booklet is extremely informative and in many ways this is the perfect introduction to the jazz side of Bruford and certainly has led me to want to find out more.

 Bruford: One Of A Kind by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Studio Album, 1979
4.11 | 318 ratings

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Bruford: One Of A Kind
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Guillermo
Prog Reviewer

4 stars After trying for several years to find his "best musical identity" in his musical career after the split of KING CRIMSON in late 1974, BILL BRUFORD, by the late seventies at last found it (in my opinion), leading his BRUFORD band to record this all instrumental (without vocals) very good Jazz-Rock / Fusion album in 1979. In fact, it was his second "solo" album, with "Feels Good to Me" (which was recorded in 1977 but was released in January 1978) being his first real solo album. But, with the "One of a Kind" album being really an album recorded under the BRUFORD band's name, with more songwriting collaborations from Dave Stewart, Jeff Berlin and Allan Holdsworth, all of which also contributed to the "Feels Good to Me", album but with that album really being released under BILL BRUFORD's name than as an album recorded as a band.

Why I said before that BILL BRUFORD found his "real musical identity" with this album (and also with "Feels Good To Me")? He said in interviews that while he previously played with a lot of Prog Rock bands, he really was a Jazz drummer playing Rock music. This somewhat "strange mixture" of musical styles for him as a drummer really worked very well while he worked with these bands, with him contributing very good drums playing with very good technique. But for the "Feels Good to Me" and "One of a Kind" albums, he really was composing, playing and recording very good Jazz-Rock / Fusion music by the late seventies. It really was a long "journey" for him to really play the kind of music that he most liked, I think, since he started to be a professional musician in 1968.

While he was playing with the band "U.K. " (with Holdsworth, Eddie Jobson and John Wetton) , he played two of his songs on tour with that band, both of which he later recorded with the BRUFORD band for the "One of a Kind" album: "Forever Until Sunday" and "The Sahara of Snow (Parts 1 and 2)". He said in one interview that Jobson and Wetton didn't want to record those songs for the then planned second "U.K". album with Bruford and Holdsworth (which in the end was titled "Danger Money" and was recorded with Terry Bozzio replacing Bruford but without Holdsworth being replaced). Some live recordings of their 1978 tour show the band playing both songs, and those recordings show the conflicts that the band had, with Holdsworth and Bruford wanting to play Jazz Rock / Fusion music, while Jobson and Wetton wanted to play Prog Rock music (and in the case of Wetton, also Pop Rock music). So, both Bruford and Holdsworht left "U.K." (or were "fired", as Bruford said) in late 1978 to form the BRUFORD band. Anyway, for the recording of "Forever Until Sunday which was included in the "One of a Kind" album, Bruford invited Jobson (then uncredited in the record sleeve to avoid "confusion", as Jobson said in one interview) to play the violin part. But Jobson also was credited as songwriter with Bruford in the part 2 of "Sahara of Snow", but Jobson didn't appear playing in that song. Anyway, "Forever Until Sunday" and "The Sahara of Snow" were recorded for this album with almost the same arrangements that "U.K." played in their 1978 tour.

This "One of a Kind" album, in my opinion, has some more complicated music than the "Feels Good to Me"album, showing that BILL BRUFORD really improved as a composer since then ("with a litle help from his friends" in some songs). But BILL BRUFORD was the main composer and leader in this band. But he let his friends record some of their songs: "Hell's Bells" is a song composed by Stewart (with Alan Gowen); "The Abingdom Chasp" was composed by Holdsworth alone. Some of the other songs have songwriting contributions from the other members of the band: "One of a Kind Part 2" was composed by Bruford with Stewart; "Five G" was composed by Bruford with Berlin and Stewart. But the rest of the songs were composed by Bill Bruford alone.

This album has a very good recording and mixing, with all the members of the band playing very well. Jeff Berlin really shines as bass player in this album.

This is a very good Jazz-Rock / Fusion album. Maybe it sounds "very late seventies" in musical style, but it is very good anyway.

 Bruford: Rock Goes To College by BRUFORD, BILL album cover Live, 2007
3.30 | 23 ratings

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Bruford: Rock Goes To College
Bill Bruford Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

2 stars Back to the begining again

While the Bruford Tapes was released straight after it was recorded in 1979, the present live recording sat in the archives for many years before being released on CD (and apparently there is also a DVD version available, but I haven't seen it). This show was recorded earlier than the Bruford Tapes and features the original Bruford line-up including Allan Holdsworth on guitars and Annette Peacock on vocals. Some of the songs like Sample And Hold, Beelzebub, The Sahara Of Snow (both parts), and 5G are on both live albums, but others such as the two vocal pieces Back To The Begining and Adios A La Pasada - both originally on Feels Good To Me - are only here.

The sound quality of this recording is not perfect and I think it is best seen as of mainly historical interest. If you own the two studio albums One Of A Kind and Feels Good To Me as well as the live Bruford Tapes, I don't think you need this one as well unless you are a fan and collector of all things Bruford.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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