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YES

Symphonic Prog • United Kingdom


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Yes biography
Active since 1968 with varying formations - Two major hiatus between 1981-1983 and 2004-2008

YES formed in London (UK) in 1968 with Jon ANDERSON (vocals), Chris SQUIRE (bass, vocals), Peter BANKS (guitar, vocals), Tony KAYE (keyboards), and Bill BRUFORD (drums). Well-known and influential mainstream progressive from the 1970's, and still around in some form ever since, they were highly influential in their heyday, especially notable for the really creative "Relayer", which included at the time Swiss keyboardist Patrick MORAZ who replaced Rick WAKEMAN

During the 1970s, YES pioneered the use of synthesizers and sound effects in modern music. Driven by Jon's artistic vision, they produced such timeless, symphonic-rock masterworks as "Roundabout," "Close To the Edge," and "Awaken". In the 1980s, YES pushed new digital sampling technologies to their limits, selling millions of records and influencing a generation of digital musicians with classics like "Owner Of A Lonely Heart" and "Rhythm Of Love". Moving through the 1990s and into the new millennium, the band keeps expanding its boundaries by using the latest hard-disk recording techniques and, most recently, working with a full orchestra to create their genre-defying music.

YES gained large popularity with their brand of mysticism and grand-scale compositions. "Fragile" and "Close to the Edge" are considered their best works as it's symphonic, complex, cerebral, spiritual and moving. These albums featured beautiful harmonies and strong, occasionally heavy playing. Also, "Fragile" contained the popular hit song "Roundabout". This was followed by the controversial "Tales from Topographic Oceans" LP, which was a double album consisting of only four 20-minute length suites centering on religious concepts. Also, "Relayer" was their most experimental, yet grandiose and symphonic. They broke up, until the new jewel "Going For The One" and its incredible "Awaken" was issued in 1977. In later years, YES would go through many transformations. There were other very good YES albums after "Going For The One" ("Drama", "Keys To Ascension" and surprisingly "The Ladder") but this is the last great album.

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Buy YES Music


FragileFragile
Mobile Fidelity 2020
$124.99
Fly From Here: Return TripFly From Here: Return Trip
Yes Music 2019
$13.75
$18.76 (used)
Yes Album, The (Expanded & Remastered)Yes Album, The (Expanded & Remastered)
Elektra Catalog Group 2003
$5.79
$7.90 (used)
Live At Glastonbury Festival 2003Live At Glastonbury Festival 2003
Store for Music 2019
$12.02
$14.22 (used)
DramaDrama
Extra tracks · Remastered
Rhino 2004
$4.28
$2.20 (used)
Close To The Edge (Expanded & Remastered)Close To The Edge (Expanded & Remastered)
Elektra Catalog Group 2003
$6.66
$3.07 (used)
Fragile (Expanded & Remastered)Fragile (Expanded & Remastered)
Elektra Catalog Group 2003
$8.03
$4.68 (used)
Ultimate Yes: 35th Anniversary Collection (3CD, Digi-Pak)Ultimate Yes: 35th Anniversary Collection (3CD, Digi-Pak)
Elektra Catalog Group 2004
$21.89
$12.57 (used)
90125 (Expanded & Remastered)90125 (Expanded & Remastered)
Elektra Catalog Group 2004
$5.77
$4.30 (used)

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YES discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

YES top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.25 | 1294 ratings
Yes
1969
3.30 | 1350 ratings
Time And A Word
1970
4.29 | 2821 ratings
The Yes Album
1971
4.45 | 3477 ratings
Fragile
1971
4.66 | 4395 ratings
Close To The Edge
1972
3.89 | 2354 ratings
Tales From Topographic Oceans
1973
4.37 | 3001 ratings
Relayer
1974
4.04 | 1963 ratings
Going For The One
1977
2.98 | 1482 ratings
Tormato
1978
3.78 | 1642 ratings
Drama
1980
2.99 | 1526 ratings
90125
1983
2.53 | 1113 ratings
Big Generator
1987
2.50 | 1028 ratings
Union
1991
3.05 | 936 ratings
Talk
1994
2.05 | 822 ratings
Open Your Eyes
1997
3.26 | 959 ratings
The Ladder
1999
3.73 | 1088 ratings
Magnification
2001
3.42 | 1078 ratings
Fly From Here
2011
2.34 | 601 ratings
Heaven & Earth
2014
3.09 | 95 ratings
Fly From Here - Return Trip
2018
3.22 | 13 ratings
From A Page
2019

YES Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.34 | 941 ratings
Yessongs
1973
3.64 | 485 ratings
Yesshows
1980
2.27 | 248 ratings
9012 Live: The Solos
1985
4.05 | 504 ratings
Keys to Ascension
1996
3.95 | 476 ratings
Keys to Ascension 2
1997
2.62 | 145 ratings
BBC Sessions 1969-1970 Something's Coming (2 Cds)
1997
3.59 | 211 ratings
House of Yes: Live From the House of Blues
2000
2.66 | 39 ratings
Extended Versions
2002
2.89 | 37 ratings
Roundabout: The Best Of Yes- Live
2003
3.86 | 182 ratings
Live at Montreux 2003
2007
4.22 | 293 ratings
Symphonic Live
2009
4.47 | 172 ratings
Keys To Ascension (Full)
2010
3.32 | 38 ratings
Astral Traveller (The BBC Sessions)
2011
3.51 | 140 ratings
In The Present - Live From Lyon
2011
3.52 | 68 ratings
Union Live
2011
2.78 | 64 ratings
Like It Is: Yes at the Bristol Hippodrome
2014
4.51 | 91 ratings
Progeny - Seven Shows from Seventy-Two
2015
3.34 | 70 ratings
Like It Is - Yes at the Mesa Arts Centre
2015
3.48 | 61 ratings
Topographic Drama: Live Across America
2017
3.95 | 49 ratings
Yes ft. ARW: Live At The Apollo
2018
2.92 | 26 ratings
Yes 50 Live
2019

YES Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.68 | 176 ratings
Yessongs (DVD)
1973
3.20 | 105 ratings
9012 LIVE (DVD)
1985
4.13 | 93 ratings
Yesyears (DVD)
1991
3.70 | 47 ratings
The Union Tour Live
1991
2.95 | 57 ratings
Greatest Video Hits
1991
4.33 | 9 ratings
The Best Of MusikLaden Live
1999
3.62 | 125 ratings
House Of Yes: Live From The House Of Blues (DVD)
2000
3.70 | 131 ratings
Keys to Ascension (DVD)
2000
4.59 | 325 ratings
Symphonic Live (DVD)
2002
3.08 | 75 ratings
Yesspeak
2003
2.40 | 85 ratings
Live in Philadelphia 1979
2003
3.11 | 36 ratings
Inside Yes 1968-1973
2003
3.60 | 96 ratings
Yes Acoustic: Guaranteed No Hiss
2004
4.30 | 175 ratings
Songs From Tsongas: 35th Anniversary Concert (DVD)
2005
3.42 | 71 ratings
Live 1975 At Q.P.R. Vol. 1
2005
3.33 | 65 ratings
Live 1975 At Q.P.R. Vol. 2
2005
3.63 | 57 ratings
Yes (Classic Artists)
2006
3.96 | 139 ratings
Montreux 2003 (DVD)
2007
3.83 | 47 ratings
Yes - The New Director's Cut
2008
3.83 | 45 ratings
The Lost Broadcasts
2009
3.21 | 33 ratings
Rock Of The 70's
2009
3.91 | 67 ratings
Union - Live
2010
3.04 | 6 ratings
Live Hemel Hempstead Pavillion October 3rd 1971
2013
3.57 | 30 ratings
Yes ft. ARW: Live At The Apollo
2018

YES Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.62 | 15 ratings
2 Originals Of Yes
1973
3.11 | 220 ratings
Yesterdays
1975
3.77 | 187 ratings
Classic Yes
1981
3.28 | 116 ratings
Yesyears
1991
3.46 | 77 ratings
Yesstory
1992
2.87 | 81 ratings
Highlights: The Very Best of Yes
1993
2.58 | 33 ratings
The Best of Yes
2000
3.55 | 472 ratings
Keystudio
2001
2.71 | 22 ratings
Yes-today
2002
4.27 | 125 ratings
In A Word
2002
3.16 | 100 ratings
Ultimate Yes: 35th Anniversary Collection
2003
2.14 | 67 ratings
Remixes
2003
2.52 | 26 ratings
Topography: The Yes Anthology
2004
3.25 | 145 ratings
The Word Is Live
2005
3.80 | 25 ratings
Essentially Yes
2006
3.52 | 18 ratings
Collection 2CD: Yes
2008
5.00 | 2 ratings
Wonderous Stories: The Best of Yes
2011
4.09 | 47 ratings
Progeny: Highlights From Seventy-Two
2015
4.69 | 29 ratings
The Steven Wilson Remixes
2018

YES Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.29 | 24 ratings
Something's Coming
1969
3.53 | 17 ratings
Looking Around
1969
2.85 | 29 ratings
Sweetness / Something's Coming
1969
3.33 | 20 ratings
Sweet Dreams
1970
3.42 | 38 ratings
Time and a Word
1970
3.44 | 47 ratings
Your Move
1971
3.22 | 18 ratings
Roundabout
1972
4.58 | 19 ratings
And You And I (Part 1 & 2)
1972
2.91 | 51 ratings
America
1972
4.71 | 21 ratings
And You And I
1974
3.25 | 17 ratings
Soon
1976
3.25 | 40 ratings
Soon - Sound Chaser - Roundabout
1976
2.47 | 17 ratings
Yes Solos
1976
3.65 | 40 ratings
Wonderous Stories 12''
1977
4.04 | 39 ratings
Going For The One 12''
1977
4.09 | 11 ratings
Turn Of The Century
1977
2.75 | 53 ratings
Don't Kill The Whale
1978
3.01 | 38 ratings
Into The Lens
1980
4.24 | 44 ratings
Roundabout
1981
2.37 | 43 ratings
Owner of a Lonely Heart (promo single)
1983
2.20 | 49 ratings
Owner Of A Lonely Heart
1983
2.69 | 37 ratings
Leave It
1984
2.87 | 23 ratings
Twelve Inches on Tape
1984
2.85 | 34 ratings
It Can Happen
1984
2.50 | 11 ratings
Rhythm Of Love
1987
2.72 | 31 ratings
Love Will Find A Way
1987
2.23 | 40 ratings
Rhythm Of Love (2)
1987
3.33 | 20 ratings
Saving My Heart
1991
2.60 | 41 ratings
Owner Of A Lonely Heart
1991
2.57 | 11 ratings
Lift Me Up
1991
2.54 | 23 ratings
Make It Easy
1991
2.60 | 11 ratings
Yesyears - Sampler
1991
2.59 | 26 ratings
The Calling
1994
3.00 | 4 ratings
Lightning Strikes (She Ay ... Do Wa Bap)
1999
2.83 | 71 ratings
YesSymphonic
2001
2.23 | 7 ratings
Selections From The Word Is Live
2005
3.05 | 65 ratings
We Can Fly
2011

YES Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 From A Page by YES album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.22 | 13 ratings

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From A Page
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by Soul2Create

3 stars With From a Page we finally get the opportunity of hearing what could have made Fly From Here a great album and not a mediocre one (IMHO, of course). In this review I will focus on the four 'new' tracks composed back in 2011:

To the moment (8.5/10). One of the best songs Yes has composed in the past 25 years. Really. Flows perfectly and ends with a gorgeous keyboard solo by O. Wakeman.

From a page (7/10) - gentle song that develops slowly, driven by the piano of O. Wakeman. At the middle Steve Howe joins in with a wonderful acoustic and electric guitar solo. The song is good, nothing amazing but better than anything showed on Heaven and Earth.

From the turn of a card (5/10) - Benoit David sings along with the piano of Wakeman. The weakest song here.

The gift of love (6/10). A mini-epic than shows what that line-up could do. Unfortunately, the overall sound and tempo reminds more of H&E than FFH, nice and mellow without being challenging. That said, Howe's contributions are amazing.

Overall, I'm glad with this release, it holds one great song, one good, a curiosity and a weak one. Recommended for all Yes fans.

 Relayer by YES album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.37 | 3001 ratings

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Relayer
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by chiang

5 stars "Relayer" (a world taken from "Tales From Topographic Oceans") is great!!! I bought it on 1974 and I still enjoy listening to it. I was at college at those days and feel the line that begins with "Fragile", goes through "CttE" and "TFTO" and gets to "Relayer" marks the best time for "YES music. OK, White is not Brufford and Moraz is not Wakeman, but it still sounds great. Return to "Close to the Edge" format was a very good idea. I absolutely love epics (real ones) and here I can get large doces of those. IMO "Gates of Delirium" is a masterpiece. Love the music, love the sound and love the mood changes, sometimes violent (war) and sometimes sweet (peace). "Sound Chaser" is heavy and wild, Jon anderson can't sing wildly, but it doesn't matter, the hole makes a great opus. "To Be Over" as been one of my all time favourites, if I close my eyes, I really feel "sailing down the calming streams" and get a free trip to relax. Every part of every piece is so well written and delivered that I simply feel this is my favourite 1974 album (even prior to KC's "Red").
 Going For The One by YES album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.04 | 1963 ratings

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Going For The One
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by progman02

5 stars I like to think of this beautiful record as a celebration of a coming- of-age era for Yes. It marks the return of Rick Wakeman. I acknowledge the complex musicianship found on 1974's Relayer with Patrick Moraz! The jazz fusion influence was just great! Whether it saw confused fans or not, I don't know, but it is a very experimental and well thought out record. I also praise the band for taking a year off in 1976 for each member to release a solo album. Taking that time off is integral in making sure that everyone has their space and can come back to the band refreshed, which I attribute to the success and feeling of rebirth for Yes on Going for the One. Each track on this album has a feeling of youthfulness and eagerness in everyone's playing.

Regarding the songs, the title track is a great moment for Steve Howe as he plays the slide guitar for the duration of the whole song. The musical and lyrical structure are more concise and straightforward, but that does not take away from the way the song flows. "Turn of the Century" is a great acoustic piece. It sounds like there is a reverb effect on the instruments, which compliments the gentle nature of the song. I admire the fact that Alan White received a writing credit on this track. His tuned percussion playing is subtle compared to his usual style of playing but it works well in the context of the song. There is a great blend and combination between guitar and keyboards in this song. "Parallels" once again showcases Wakeman's trademark prowess for keyborading on the church organ. It's a masterpiece if you ask me. "Wondrous Stories" is such a lush and soothing single. I respect that Yes decided to release it as a single. And then of course, the epic track "Awaken." The whole band basks in its richness as the song moves through its twists and turns and parts.

Even though Going for the One marked a return to a more commercial sounding record, it still earns its spot in my mind as a Yes masterpiece. The same goes for the album cover. Hipgnosis designed that cover and, although it doesn't have the trademark fantastical Roger Dean artwork, it works nevertheless.

Overall, this is an album that deserves to be recognized as a celebration of Yes. Well done!

 The Yes Album by YES album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.29 | 2821 ratings

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The Yes Album
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by jamesbaldwin
Prog Reviewer

3 stars And Howe came! Finally Yes became a prog-rock band.

1. Yours Is No Disgrace (9:36) Almost ten minutes for this rock ballad, which is characterized by a high-pitched sound due to Anderson's singing and the newcomer's guitar, Steve Howe. It is the contradiction of Yes: wanting to be rock, and therefore warm, rhythmic, passionate, and at the same time have a crystalline sound, which insists on the high notes of Howe's guitar, and on the singing of Anderson who, with his register, more contralto than tenor, and its hieratic intonation, he gives a celestial, cold atmosphere to the whole. The song is appreciated, as heard today, it seems quite naive, if not childish. Yes succeed as few to combine prog with pop, they could be considered the Beatles of prog. Rated 7.5 / 8.

2. Clap (Live) (3:07) * Howe's guitar is the protagonist of this live, virtuosic, acrobatic, cheerful, I would say pop-folk solo, extremely easy to listen to. Rated 7.5 / 8.

3. Starship Trooper: Life Seeker / Disillusion / Wurm (9:23) Second song of similar duration to the first, but more direct, without the instrumental frills of the first. Then Howe's classical guitar intervenes, Anderson follows it and then comes a very repetitive piece played on a Howe riff that soon becomes monotonous. The song gets jammed, the other players try to accumulate sound to make a progression, but it's too forced. Even the second long piece of the album is good but does not take off. Rated 7.5 / 8.

End of side A

4. I've Seen All Good People: Your Move / All Good People (6:47) Finally comes a song where Anderson, so far in the shade, becomes the protagonist. It is a very catchy folk-rock, worthy of the Beatles. Tony Kaye simulates the flutes, and we are close to a pastoral atmosphere that will then lead to And You And I. Around three and a half minutes the song suddenly becomes a rock almost boogie that continues the same until the end. Minor piece. Rated 7,5.

5. A Venture (3:13) Piece of song based on Kaye's piano and Squire's bass, another very rhythmic but not very inventive boogie. The quality of the album has dropped. Rated 6.5 / 7.

6. Perpetual Change (8:50). The final song is clearly the best on the album. Anderson's voice is finally in line with the ascending atmosphere of the song, and here Yes anticipate that masterpiece that will be Heart of the Sunrise. The song is more adult than the others, more serious. Continuing, a rather specious instrumental digression arrives, but then finally Anderson's voice returns, and the final upbeat. Rated 8+.

This is a naive album, with catchy prog-pop-folk music, easy to listen, light, friendly. There are no high peaks, and there is only one masterpiece, Perpetual Change.

Rating: 7,5. Three Stars.

 It Can Happen by YES album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1984
2.85 | 34 ratings

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It Can Happen
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars This ATCO single - - catalog number 99745 in the US, B9745 in the UK - - was released in June 1984 as the follow-up to the minor hit "Leave It." It peaked at #51 in the US and #92 in the UK. Like "Leave It," "It Can Happen" is written in the unmistakable style of Yes bassist Chris Squire, although in both cases he had plenty of songwriting help. Much has been made of the differences between the canonical version of the song, sung by Jon Anderson, and the "Cinema" version, first released on Yesyears in 1991, on which Squire is the lead vocalist. I'll limit my comments to mentioning my opinion that, corny as it sounds, they're both pretty good.

"It Can Happen (edit)"

The a-side of the single is an edit of the 90125 album track, which opens with a sitar played by Dipak (Deepak) Khazanchi. Like all but one 90125 song, "It Can Happen" was produced by former Yes vocalist Trevor Horn, and here he works his magic, bringing Yes into the modern sound of the 1980s without leaving any fingerprints. As far as I know, the single was created with just one edit, which removes the seventy-one seconds beginning at 3:12 on the album version. The splice is a no-brainer from a compositional standpoint - - plus, there was already an edit at 3:12 - - but it's done flawlessly.

This version was out of print until the 3-CD The Ultimate Yes: the 35th Anniversary Collection was released in 2003. As of late 2019, the edited version is still available for individual download on Amazon, iTunes, and presumably other platforms.

"It Can Happen (live version)"

I used to believe that this live version of "It Can Happen" had to be the same recording used on the 9012Live videocassette, released the following year. It's true that the video version is half a minute longer, but I just assumed that the single version was an edit. After all, I had it on good account that this b-side was recorded at the Edmonton during the second North American leg of Yes's 1984 tour, which is also the provenance of 9012Live. But then I actually heard the b-side. It's not the same. After wondering about the discrepancy for years, I finally discovered that there were two Edmonton shows and that the video is from the Friday concert. The b-side is probably from Saturday.

What makes the 9012Live recording of "It Can Happen" special is Anderson's improvised vocals during the breakdown section (beginning about 5:40) which precedes the outro. After Anderson repeats "you can mend the wires / you can feed the soul apart," he ad libs: "you can touch your heart, touch your soul, touch your life, 'cause deep down inside, deep down, you've got the power." Trevor Rabin then begins singing his "na-na-na" part from the fade of the studio version, and Anderson just keeps on going: "deep inside you have the power / feelin' lost - - feelin' lost and a-lonely / reach out, reach out" - - here Rabin hits the high note of his vocal line - - "reach out, 'cause you've got the power!" Those last five syllables introduce a fantastic new melody to the song, and he repeats it twice as Rabin and Squire chant the chorus: "it can happen to you, it can happen to me..." To me it's the highlight of the 67-minute 9012Live video.

But unfortunately that isn't the version on the b-side of this single. Here, during the breakdown, Anderson ad-libs similarly, but doesn't find the aforementioned melody. I wonder why they chose this recording for this single. Maybe the decision had something to do with licensing connected to the 9012Live concert film (which wouldn't be released for another sixteen months)? Or maybe it was "just a b-side;" the flip-side choice could've been a last-minute decision. Another interesting note: the b-side labels of both the UK and US releases indicate that this rendition was "produced by Eddie Offord and Yes;" Offord was not, as far as I know, involved with 9012Live.

Summary

"It Can Happen" is a nice art-rock number whose studio and live versions should be in the collections of any serious Yes fan. But in my estimation, the a-side of this single isn't essential, since the mix seems to be identical to the album version - - it's just a shortened version. And the b-side isn't as good a performance as the one on 9012Live. So I'd only recommend this release to serious Yes collectors.

 In The Present - Live From Lyon by YES album cover Live, 2011
3.51 | 140 ratings

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In The Present - Live From Lyon
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

3 stars The first time Yes plays a song at its original tempo on In the Present - - Live from Lyon is nearly an hour into the show. Apparently this CD is the entire concert, perhaps with most of the banter removed, and it's easy to picture them taking their time getting up to speed. The opener "Siberian Khatru" is a bit slow - - though we've certainly heard it slower - - and a bit sterile compared to the version on Yessongs, for example. Two songs later is a disappointing "Tempus Fugit:" it's slow and sloppy, especially the keyboards, and frankly not like Yes. I got to see this tour about a year before this show, and I felt like new keyboardist Oliver Wakeman was still getting used to the material - -but it was just his fifth show with Yes. But the show on In the Present - - Live from Lyon was, but by my count, his seventy-ninth. Kudos to the group for not going back and fixing every error; I feel like this is an accurate transcription of the show. This even goes for the vocals. Even though Chris Squire's are obviously auto-tuned, this was done live.

Anyway, "Tempus Fugit" is followed by the already plodding "Onward," which is done beautifully, but the tempo reduction is almost putting me to sleep! Things pick up noticeably with the fifth number, "Astral Traveller," which was the highlight of the concert I saw. Here it's a bit slow, but it sounds great, including the organ parts. Interestingly, Squire is the only one on this recording who'd appeared on the original forty years earlier. Drummer Alan White does a nice job moving between Bill Bruford's original parts and his own stright-ahead playing - - and manages to squeeze in a precisely two-minute drum solo.

Finally we get to the the seventh song, "And You And I." The third movement, "The Preacher The Teacher," at 6:49 into the track, is played at the canonical speed! After a couple of obligatory solo acoustic numbers from guitarist Steve Howe, things stay on track with the first and only Rabin-era track, "Owner of a Lonely Heart," to which Howe contributes a very nice guitar solo. The next string of songs, "South Side of the Sky" → "Machine Messiah" → "Heart of the Sunrise," is the strongest on the album, despite the fact that the tempos flag a bit on the first two pieces. The concert closes predictably with nice renditions of "Roundabout" (at a good tempo) and "Starship Trooper" (a bit slow).

Of the fifteen tracks (including the Howe solo "Second Initial," included on some versions), only two - - "South Side of the Sky" and "Machine Messiah" - - are among the best live versions of their respective compositions, so it's tough to call this album essential, even to many Yes fans. But In the Present - - Live from Lyon is unique among official Yes releases as the only live album to feature Oliver Wakeman or vocalist Benoît David.

And David is completely fantastic throughout the concert. As has been said many times, he can hit every note as well as longtime lead singer Jon Anderson, and his voice is ideally suited for singing Trevor Horn's lead vocals on "Machine Messiah" and "Tempus Fugit." I'll also echo a common complaint about In the Present - - Live from Lyon: it's too bad that the official recording from this tour doesn't include "Aliens (Are Only Us from the Future)," which Squire sang at many of the shows earlier in the tour. Although Squire eventually recorded a studio version of the song with Steve Hackett, it was never released by Yes, live or otherwise.

In all, In the Present - - Live from Lyon is pretty good, especially compared to their other post-Anderson live albums.

 Union Live by YES album cover Live, 2011
3.52 | 68 ratings

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Union Live
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

3 stars In some ways, Yes' 1991 tour represented the zenith of corporate rock. Advertised as 'Yesshows '91: Around the World in 80 Dates,' it brought together the eight(!) best-known members of the group for a two-and-a-half-hour show, well over half of which featured the whole octet. The backstory is that there had been two rival Yes groups since 1989, and by late 1990 it was looking like neither was going if to be commercially viable on its own. So they sued each other, but that didn't help, so they merged into a single group, released a mediocre album with songs by the separate groups, and went on tour.

Having been at two of the concerts (4/18 and 7/18), I can say the show was phenomenal. The April show, which was 'in the round' at the Hartford Civic Center, was the best Yes show I've seen. Lead singer Jon Anderson sounded great, and of the instrumentalists, I remember guitarist Trevor Rabin, keyboardist Rick Wakeman, and drummers Bill Bruford and Alan White standing out.

Union Live can't recapture the event for me, but it's pretty good nonetheless. The downsides? First, harmonized vocals are a trademark of the Yes sound, but too often, bassist Chris Squire's backing vocals are weak, providing insufficient support to Anderson, especially later in the show. Second, the mixing over-separates the instruments, reducing the 'live' feel. On 'Roundabout,' for example, the bass guitar nearly disappears in places. I originally assumed that Union Live was mixed from scratch for the CD release, but now I wonder whether it could've been a live soundboard mix with the audience added (injudiciously, in my opinion) after the fact. My final complaint is, I believe, the most substantial: the exclusion of a number of songs from the set, despite the availability of around 45 unused minutes between the two CDs. By my count, here's is what's missing: two Union songs ('Lift Me Up' and 'Shock to the System'), 'And You And I,' 'Changes,' the drum duet, and Tony Kaye's solo spot. I'd hold my tongue if just 'Lift Me Up' and 'Shock to the System' had been included. To begin with, live audio versions of these two songs aren't available legitimately - - plus, both were done very well in concert, especially 'Shock to the System,' which sounded better than the album version.

The upsides include the interesting twists added to the songs, especially by Rabin and Anderson. My favorite is the keyboard solo appended by Wakeman onto 'Owner of a Lonely Heart.' It's a part originally written by Rabin (as evinced on the demo of the song on Rabin's 90124), but Wakeman makes it his own. Most of the performances are very good, although the band must've been exhausted - - Union Live was recorded on August 8, 1991, the eighty-first and final concert of the 1991 tour, which had begun four months earlier. (They played a final five-date Japanese leg in February and March, 1992).

Union Live is no Yessongs, but it's as good as the average Yes live album. And at least until another recording from this tour is released, Union Live is an important part of Yes's discography.

 From A Page by YES album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.22 | 13 ratings

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From A Page
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars There's good news about From a Page, the Yes product released in late 2019: it's way better than the group's last studio album, Heaven and Earth, from 2014. Way better. But there's also bad news: the four From a Page songs (totaling about 26 minutes) were recorded in 2010, several years before the eight songs comprising the 52-minute Heaven and Earth. So the quality trend doesn't bode well for future releases from Yes, whose membership is very different from the 2010 line-up.

A bit more on that: From a Page was sung by lead vocalist Benoît David, and three of the four tracks were written by keyboardist Oliver Wakeman, who also produced the album. The fourth track is credited to the whole band: Wakeman, David, bassist Chris Squire, drummer Alan White, and guitarist Steve Howe. Wakeman was dismissed in 2011 and David in 2010, and Squire died in 2015. So as part of the Yes catalog, these songs are anomalous, especially insofar as they were released out of chronological order.

Some fans have complained that the impetus for the release was profit. I can certainly see this viewpoint; I paid US$29.10 (£22.60) for a three-CD set,* which is as of this writing the only way to procure a digital copy of the four songs. Another view is that this is an Oliver Wakeman solo EP (or maybe a Wakeman/David release) whose steep price is justified by rebranding it as 'Yes.' The impetus for releasing it in 2019 might then be a lull in new Yes product (exacerbated, ironically, by this release, insofar as these four tunes can't be used on a new album) and concern that competing product might be forthcoming from the rouge offshoot 'Yes featuring Anderson, Rabin, and Wakeman.' Indeed, if Squire's Fish Out of Water or Rick Wakeman's** Six Wives of Henry VIII are correctly considered solo albums with substantial help from the rest of Yes, From a Page is probably a solo (or duo) recording as well. However, it probably couldn't be marketed for $29.

Enough backstory. As Wakeman discusses in the helpful liner notes, From a Page was assembled from session takes using Pro Tools - - although its cut-and-paste nature would be evident anyway; the first hint is the pitch-shifting of David's vocals. But this isn't really a detriment to my ears; I'm very impressed with Wakeman's ability to put together a plausible 26-minute EP out of what must have been potshards. The exception seems to be 'To the Moment,' the first song, which might have been relatively intact. 'To the Moment' is also the outlier in terms of quality. It's a far cry from the band's best work, but it's the only solid track among the four. In retrospect, perhaps it should've been a 2010 non-album single.***

The remaining From a Page songs have a half-baked feel. I suspect that the group writing credit on 'Gift of Love' was a business formality (or necessity). Take that away, and not only does this EP not seem to be a Yes album, it appears to be a handful of Wakeman demos waiting to be fleshed out by the rest of the band. Nonetheless, they're promising demos, which is, I'm sad to report, more than I can say about Heaven and Earth.

I'd only recommend From a Page to serious Yes fans and/or collectors. Someday 'To the Moment' will probably be available as a digital download, and well-adjusted Yes fans might want to download that. ====

*This set also includes the previously released 2-CD Live from Lyon, which I'd already paid for. A single vinyl disc, including just the new songs (plus a 'Single Mix' of 'To the Moment') can be had for the same price.

**Father of Oliver.

***I know, I know: (a) Yes has never done such things, and (b) a 2010 non-album single by a rock dinosaur without an upcoming album would've made no commercial sense.

 From A Page by YES album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.22 | 13 ratings

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From A Page
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by Gus82

5 stars From a Page is an unexpected gift from Oliver Wakeman who decided after the death of Chris Squire to re-work on some lost recordings from the 2008-2010 Yes period. These four tracks shows what Fly from Here could have included if Oliver Wakeman had not been replaced by Geoff Downes to recreate the Drama formation. I will not says these tracks would have increase the quality of Fly From Here as I already consider Fly From Here as one of the best Yes album ever, no less. But it would not have decreased it either.

To The Moment is the hit single. Let's say, in other times, with another band, on another planet, it could have been a hit. Nice song with great vocals from Benoit David and really good instrumental section. Wakeman's keyboard shines all over the song.

Words On A Page is a delicate piece with great vocals and harmonies and an instrumental section in the middle starting with Wakeman's beautiful piano and followed by a perfect slide guitar section from Steve Howe. If you think Sad Night At The Airfield is a great track, this one should also do the trick. Probably the best track of this mini album.

From The Turn Of A Card is probably the least Yes style of the lot. It is a new version of a track initially recorded by Oliver Wakeman, Benoit David and Gordon Giltrap in 2013. Wakeman took the vocal part and re-recorded a softer piano-only arrangement. This is a great track nevertheless and it is very interesting to hear Benoit David's "real" voice (a lower pitch), once he had not to mime Jon Anderson anymore.

Finally, The Gift of Love is a combination of two different compositions. One from Oliver Wakeman and the other from Chris Squire which will resurface later in a very different version as The Game on the beloved Heaven & Earth album. Very interesting to see how you can create such different songs and atmosphere with the same basis.

In the end, the only default of this mini album is its length: only 26 minutes long. Wakeman states that they were also working on Into the Storm, The Man You Always Wanted Me To Be and Don't Take No For An Answer during these sessions. It would have been interesting to see Wakeman's versions of these tracks (specially Into The Storm that he co-wrote) and it would have give us a full album, the third version of Fly From Here that we could have called "Fly from Here - Final Boarding Call For Passengers.

 Fragile by YES album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.45 | 3477 ratings

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Fragile
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by Zoltanxvamos

5 stars Well... Wakeman, Bruford, Anderson, Howe and Squire managed to make the best Yes record ever. I hate to say it but I prefer this album over Close to The Edge, this album has a brilliant structure, phenomenal songwriting, technically fantastic instrumentation and so on. Everything in this album fits together so well, the album cover is in my top 5 favourite and so forth. I cannot express how much I love this album. Everyone chooses Close to The Edge over this one and for good reason, it is the one album that people consider to be the prog album. This is in my top 10 favourite albums, I feel like this album will grow on me more and more as I get older. As much as I would love to go on about how much I think this album is in the top 10 best prog albums of all time, I find that this is a bit more self-explanatory. I really really do love Yes, but this album is just... it does it for me.
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