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HAWKWIND

Psychedelic/Space Rock • United Kingdom


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Hawkwind biography
Formed in London, UK in 1969 - Still active as of 2018

Over their 30-odd year history, HAWKWIND were probably the most famous underground rock band in the world. The group was formed in the late '60s by guitarist/singer Dave BROCK, guitarist Mick SLATTERY and saxman/flautist/singer Nik TURNER. Dave BROCK was the leader of HAWKWIND and he was the captain, as it were. The band never would have made it for 30 years without Dave.

HAWKWIND's history has been marked by a series of confusing line-ups through 40 or so personnel changes. Their sound has continued to metamorphose and evolve: an almost jazz feel ("Hawkwind"), the "experimental" & acoustic sounds of early releases ("In Search of Space"), changing to the metal sound of their days (mid 70's), and a modern electronic feel on the latest ("Electric Teepee"). Yes, one can detect definite evolutions. With the primary use of the synthesizer, heavy and delay with the touch of techno, HAWKWIND practically created a genre of music that be called: psychedelic space-rock. Their creativity seems to be in the use of the synths to add to the intense moods of their songs. They were the master of the acid-space rock genre.

There are at least 100 total albums that are either compilations, EP's, bootlegs of live performances, etc. You can't go wrong with any of the 70's releases in my opinion.
"Doremi Fasol Latido" ('72) - A great album with a heavy metal space rock a-la lan Lemmy KILMISTER, who later founded MOTORHEAD.
"A Space Ritual" ('73) - The essential live album combining Space-rock music, and poetry. The GREATEST album in the world!
"Hall of the Mountain Grill" ('74) - A great album for FLOYD fans - very heavy, psychedelic music with lots of effects.
"Warrior at the Edge of Time" ('75) - In my opinion, THE classic album.
"Quark, Strangeness and Charm" ('77) - A return to a more traditional HAWKWIND sound.
"The Hawklords - 25 Years On" ('78)
"PXR 5" ('79) - This album really started the HAWKWIND tradition of semi-live, semi-studio albums.

Then you should consider the following efforts which I would recommend to the "Hawkfan":
"Levitation" ('80) - The last truly great HAWKWIND studio album.
"The Church of Hawkwind" ('82) - Really a Dave BROCK solo album. Very spacey and electronic.
"Chronicle of the Black...
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HAWKWIND discography


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HAWKWIND top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.37 | 280 ratings
Hawkwind
1970
3.63 | 373 ratings
X In Search Of Space
1971
3.75 | 337 ratings
Doremi Fasol Latido
1972
3.98 | 447 ratings
Hall Of The Mountain Grill
1974
4.09 | 655 ratings
Warrior On The Edge Of Time
1975
3.45 | 176 ratings
Astounding Sounds, Amazing Music
1976
3.68 | 223 ratings
Quark, Strangeness And Charm
1977
3.26 | 123 ratings
Hawklords: 25 Years On
1978
2.90 | 123 ratings
PXR 5
1979
3.98 | 250 ratings
Levitation
1980
3.18 | 97 ratings
Sonic Attack
1981
2.80 | 94 ratings
Church Of Hawkwind
1982
2.73 | 87 ratings
Choose Your Masques
1982
3.44 | 119 ratings
The Chronicle Of The Black Sword
1985
3.23 | 100 ratings
The Xenon Codex
1988
3.06 | 100 ratings
Space Bandits
1990
3.81 | 120 ratings
Electric Tepee
1992
2.86 | 80 ratings
It Is The Business Of The Future To Be Dangerous
1993
3.25 | 77 ratings
Alien 4
1995
3.27 | 59 ratings
Distant Horizons
1997
2.43 | 44 ratings
In Your Area
1998
2.89 | 44 ratings
Spacebrock
2000
2.61 | 75 ratings
Take Me To Your Leader
2005
3.21 | 38 ratings
Take Me To Your Future
2006
3.67 | 122 ratings
Blood Of The Earth
2010
3.59 | 93 ratings
Onward
2012
3.76 | 23 ratings
Hawkwind Light Orchestra: Stellar Variations
2012
3.44 | 43 ratings
The Machine Stops
2016
3.58 | 43 ratings
Into The Woods
2017
3.03 | 21 ratings
Road To Utopia
2018
2.83 | 14 ratings
All Aboard The Skylark
2019

HAWKWIND Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.20 | 285 ratings
Space Ritual
1973
3.83 | 68 ratings
Live Seventy Nine
1980
3.36 | 24 ratings
The Text of Festival - Hawkwind Live 1970-1972
1983
2.31 | 35 ratings
Zones
1983
3.33 | 31 ratings
This is Hawkwind - Do Not Panic
1984
1.89 | 31 ratings
Bring Me the Head of Yuri Gagarin
1985
1.74 | 14 ratings
Hawkwind Live '70/'73
1985
2.80 | 36 ratings
Space Ritual Vol. 2
1985
3.73 | 70 ratings
Live Chronicles
1986
3.75 | 60 ratings
Palace Springs
1991
3.20 | 29 ratings
BBC Radio 1 Live
1991
3.23 | 25 ratings
The Friday Rock Show Sessions Live at Reading '86
1992
3.30 | 29 ratings
California Brainstorm
1992
3.84 | 28 ratings
The Hawklords Live
1992
2.00 | 11 ratings
Live - ST.Albans U.K. Winter Tour 1979
1993
4.24 | 38 ratings
The Business Trip
1994
2.71 | 20 ratings
Undisclosed Files - Addendum
1995
4.32 | 46 ratings
Love in Space
1996
3.67 | 41 ratings
The 1999 Party
1997
2.16 | 17 ratings
Live & Rare: Onward Flies The Bird
1997
2.14 | 7 ratings
Welcome to The Future
1997
3.78 | 9 ratings
Hawkwind 1997
1997
1.65 | 15 ratings
Live at Glastonbury 90
1999
2.40 | 10 ratings
The Collectors Serise Vol. 2: Live 1982 (Choose Your Masques)
1999
2.00 | 5 ratings
Live - 1970-72
1999
2.45 | 11 ratings
Thrilling Hawkwind Adventures
2000
1.62 | 12 ratings
Live from The Darkside
2000
3.58 | 17 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 1 : Dave Brock, Sonic Assassins
2000
2.94 | 16 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 2 : Hawkwind Live / Hawklords Studio
2000
3.39 | 19 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 3 : Free Festivals
2000
2.78 | 18 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 4 : Live '78
2000
2.81 | 16 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 5 : Live '76 & '77
2000
2.69 | 13 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 6 : Live 1970-1973
2001
2.86 | 14 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 7 : Dave Brock, The Demos
2001
2.77 | 27 ratings
Atomhenge 76
2001
3.57 | 23 ratings
Yule Ritual
2001
3.58 | 15 ratings
Live 1990
2002
3.87 | 35 ratings
Canterbury Fayre 2001
2002
3.83 | 12 ratings
Live in Nottingham (2002)
2002
4.55 | 17 ratings
Spaced Out In London
2002
2.38 | 8 ratings
Cosmic Overdirve
2002
2.61 | 14 ratings
Live ī74 The Chicago Auditorium 21 March 1974
2006
3.50 | 23 ratings
Space Ritual (2CD+DVD)
2007
1.86 | 9 ratings
Winter Solstice 2005
2009
1.56 | 7 ratings
Minneapolis 1989
2009
1.27 | 9 ratings
Shot Down in the Night
2009
3.61 | 19 ratings
Leave No Star Unturned
2011
3.91 | 11 ratings
Space Ritual Live
2015
3.92 | 4 ratings
At The Roundhouse
2017

HAWKWIND Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.92 | 8 ratings
Chaos
1996
3.00 | 6 ratings
Classic Rock Legends (DVD)
2001
3.39 | 17 ratings
Out Of The Shadows (DVD)
2004
3.05 | 12 ratings
Knights Of Space
2008
1.36 | 5 ratings
Winter Solstice - Live at the Astoria 2005
2009
1.21 | 6 ratings
USA Tour 1989-1990
2009
3.75 | 8 ratings
Live 1984 - 1995
2009
1.40 | 6 ratings
Treworgey 29th July 1989
2009

HAWKWIND Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.97 | 28 ratings
Roadhawks
1976
3.05 | 44 ratings
Masters of the Universe
1977
3.40 | 16 ratings
Friends and Relations
1982
3.14 | 14 ratings
Friends & Relations..... Twice Upon a Time
1983
2.20 | 5 ratings
Utopia 1984
1985
3.45 | 11 ratings
Friends & Relations Vol. 3
1985
2.06 | 11 ratings
In The Beginning...
1985
1.80 | 10 ratings
Ridicule
1985
3.51 | 9 ratings
Anthology Vol 1
1985
1.79 | 23 ratings
Out & Intake
1987
1.80 | 5 ratings
Early Daze [Best of...]
1987
3.31 | 13 ratings
Spirit of The Age
1988
3.64 | 13 ratings
Acid Daze The History of Hawkwind
1990
4.00 | 16 ratings
Stasis The U.A. Years 1971-1975
1990
3.00 | 8 ratings
The Best of & The Rest of Hawkwind
1990
3.94 | 7 ratings
Anthology
1991
3.89 | 7 ratings
Masters Of The Universe (1991/ Castle)
1991
3.89 | 10 ratings
Psychedelic Warlords
1992
3.00 | 6 ratings
Mighty Hawkwind Classics 1980-1985
1992
2.25 | 4 ratings
Lord of Light
1993
2.08 | 6 ratings
The Best of Hawkwind
1994
1.22 | 4 ratings
Silver Machine
1994
3.93 | 5 ratings
25 Years on 1970-1973
1994
3.93 | 5 ratings
25 Years on 1973-1977
1994
2.08 | 6 ratings
Independent Days Volume 1 & 2
1995
3.75 | 3 ratings
Silver Machine
1995
2.00 | 2 ratings
Space Is Deep
1995
3.48 | 13 ratings
The Ambient Anarchists
1997
3.77 | 13 ratings
Sonic Boom Killers Best of Singles A's and B's from 1970 to 1980
1998
2.69 | 7 ratings
Anthology 1967-1982
1998
2.09 | 4 ratings
The Master
1998
3.45 | 11 ratings
Golden Void 1969-1979
1999
3.50 | 4 ratings
Year 2000: Codename Hawkwind Volume One
1999
3.20 | 9 ratings
Complete '79 Collector Series Vol. 1
1999
2.86 | 18 ratings
Epocheclipse: The Ultimate Best Of
1999
4.17 | 29 ratings
Epoche-Eclipse / 30 Year Anthology
1999
3.33 | 3 ratings
Family Box 4CD SET Limited Edition Collector's Set
2000
3.67 | 3 ratings
The Stonehenge Collection (Zones / This is Hawkwind - Do Not Panic)
2000
2.25 | 4 ratings
The Hawkwind Collection - The Legends Collection
2001
2.67 | 6 ratings
Masters Of The Universe
2001
1.96 | 6 ratings
Family Tree
2001
3.91 | 4 ratings
Masters of Rock
2002
3.00 | 6 ratings
Welcome to The Future
2003
3.60 | 5 ratings
Oscillations
2003
4.15 | 11 ratings
The Dream Goes On - An Anthology 1985 - 1997
2008
4.14 | 12 ratings
Spirit Of The Age - An Anthology - 1976 - 1984
2008
4.75 | 4 ratings
Parallel Universe: A Liberty/U.A. Years Anthology 1970-1974
2011
4.39 | 5 ratings
5 Album Set
2013
3.35 | 21 ratings
Spacehawks
2013

HAWKWIND Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.83 | 9 ratings
Hurry on a Sundown
1970
4.61 | 19 ratings
Silver Machine
1972
2.90 | 12 ratings
Urban Guerrilla
1973
3.80 | 10 ratings
The Psychedelic Warlords (Disappear In Smoke)
1974
3.56 | 9 ratings
Kings Of Speed
1975
3.78 | 9 ratings
25 Years EP
1978
2.74 | 10 ratings
Who's Gonna Win The War?
1980
3.20 | 10 ratings
Shot Down In The Night (live)
1980
3.90 | 10 ratings
Sonic Assassins (ep)
1981
3.25 | 8 ratings
Angels Of Death
1981
2.59 | 8 ratings
Motorhead
1982
2.67 | 6 ratings
Motorway City
1983
3.43 | 7 ratings
Your Last Chance EP
1983
3.59 | 12 ratings
Night of the Hawks (ep)
1983
3.75 | 8 ratings
Independent Days EP
1984
3.88 | 7 ratings
Needle Gun
1985
4.00 | 2 ratings
Zarozinia
1986
3.29 | 7 ratings
Decide Your Future EP
1993
3.00 | 5 ratings
Area 54 EP
1995
3.25 | 4 ratings
Love In Space
1997
3.17 | 6 ratings
Spirit Of The Age
2005
3.00 | 3 ratings
Silver Machine
2007

HAWKWIND Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Doremi Fasol Latido by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.75 | 337 ratings

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Doremi Fasol Latido
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

5 stars It's 1972, and Hawkwind has only a mere 3 albums. I wonder if they knew how long their legacy would go on. Most of their albums charted in the UK, while only two did in the US. Their UK success is what kept them going, for better or worse. But, lets not get ahead of ourselves. The time we're interested in, in our fancy little aluminum foil space-time capsule is 1972, and the band at the time were mere fledglings, well, pretty much.

Their third album, "Doremi Fasol Latido" would basically be the one to really kick off their string of great albums. Even though their previous album saw them hit number 18 on the UK charts, this album would raise that number a few notches, and a lot of the reason for the increasing popularity was bringing in two new members of the band; Lemmy on bass (who of course would go on to become the lead singer for Motorhead), and Simon King on drums. Most people know that Lemmy's time with the band was short (only until 1975), but King would end up being a regular member for quite a while (until 1980), however, this line-up would be mostly responsible for the band's best albums. Another newbie to the band was Robert Calvert, who contributed with occasional vocals and such through the history of the band. He would not be on every album, but was sort of a guest star who would appear from time to time hereafter. Beyond this, we have as returning members, Dave Brock, the one main staple of the band through the years, on guitars and most lead vocals; Nik Turner (who stayed until 1984 with a temporary break between '76 and '82) on sax flute and vocals; Dik Mik (or Michael Davies who stayed until 1973) on synth and Del Dettmar (who left the band in 1974) on synth. The band was only in for 3 albums thus far, and already they were in a state of constant flux. But for the time being, they were relatively stable.

Lemmy thought he was to replace the previous 2nd guitarist Huw Lloyd-Langton when he came into the band, but Brock decided he would be the only guitarist, so Lenny took the bassist position when the old bass player failed to show up. Lemmy got thrown into the band hardly even knowing what a bass guitar was, and said he just treated it like a "deep guitar". King, on the other hand, had a different drumming style than the previous drummer, as King had a more rock style where Ollis, the previous drummer, was more of a jazz style.

The album was recorded in a barn and the band used mattresses on the walls to make it all more "studio-like". Tapes from long jam sessions were made and then were cut up and spliced together to make a track out of it while other overdubs were made to put it all together or joined together by synthesizer riffs. The original version of the album had 7 tracks, 3 on side one and 4 on side two. When the remastered CD came out, 4 bonus tracks were added to this.

The album starts out with the epic space rock classic "Brainstorm" written by Nik Turner. Nik was known as the member that provided the best jam tunes and sessions. The track was originally made for a live appearance on the Johnnie Walker show and has since been changed often for live shows and re-recorded in various forms, but has remained a staple for concerts at almost every show. Starting with the usual echoing vocals, this original studio version is a bit rough, but that is the sound that the band would become famous for, the long, one-chord space jams with a guitar riff supporting improvised guitar and synth riffs. The track ends up taking up more than half of the first side of the album. If you want to hear the beginnings of space rock from the band that made it popular, this is the track to hear. "Space is Deep" is written by Brock with lyrics based on a poem called "Black Corridor", which is written by the band's go-to author Michael Moorcock. For the vocal sections of the track, both Brock and Lemmy provide acoustic guitars and vocals while spacey effects swirl around. As the song goes into the long instrumental section, the entire band comes in for another electronic space jam. In the track, the electric guitars slowly take over the acoustics, and we enter into a two-chord rock-out psychedelic jam, this time much shorter than the previous track, and then the acoustics fade back in retaining some odd guitar effects before tying the track together. This side ends with a short instrumental keyboard track by Del Dettmar.

For the 2nd side of the album, the next 3 tracks are all written by Brock. It starts with the eerie sounds of the 7 minute "Lord of Light" which soon finds its footing with a heavy guitar and bass riff that eventually bring in the vocals, complete with the usual echo effects. This track would become a single which was released in Germany. In the single edit, the time is cut almost in half, retaining mostly the vocal sections, which were more radio friendly than the long jam which includes the heavy guitars and some nice flute riffage by Turner. As is the case with most of Hawkwind's tracks, none of the instruments stick out as the soloing instruments are usually mixed evenly with the background creating that space rock wall of sound. At the time, this style was rather unheard of in the US and went against everything that was popular there. Now, however, it is the style that the many space rock bands rely on.

"Down Through the Night" continues the previous track, but breaks down the sound wall a bit with another acoustic performance surrounded by spacey effects and flute swashes. Regular vocals with reversed vocal effects layered in come in later. Another space jam follows with the almost 9 minute "Time We Left This World Today". A heavy guitar riff is established and repeated while almost chanted vocals repeat over and over with a sort of call and answer between Brock and the band. This track pushes forward in a relentless heavy walking tempo, and various sax and flute sounds are thrown in. The whole thing comes together in a funky, guitar scratching miasma of sound that is more psychedelic and experimental while the vocalists continue to shout out indiscernible words. The shouts finally quit and the band continues with its jam. This is the heaviest track on the album and at times it becomes quite intense with the guitars and the bass fighting for top spot here. The last track on the original album is "The Watcher", the first track written by Lemmy for Hawkwind. This one is quite psychedelic sounding, though it is much quieter as it consists of Lemmy singing and playing acoustic. He would later re- record the track with Motorhead.

The CD reissue then adds 4 bonus tracks to the album starting with the UK single "Urban Guerrilla", which was written and sung by Calvert. Since the lyrics at the time were quite controversial, the single was pulled after 3 weeks. The song ended up creating an urban legend that Nik Turner's flat was raided searching for bombs, but the raid ended up having to do with some motorcycle club members wanted for murder. The song is a great rocker and definitely add to the album. So does the B-side to this non-album single, "Brainbox Pollution" and both of these tracks fit on the album nicely. This B-side has a longer instrumental section and features layers of sax along with the guitars. The "Lord of Light" single mix is next and this version trims off about half of the original version. Last, but not least is a previously unreleased version of "Ejection".

This is one case when the added tracks on the reissue makes a great Hawkwind album even better, where the added material is all as good or better than the material on the original album. Overall, however, this is Hawkwind at its best as the band works together and will continue to do so for several years after. This album marks the beginning of their best output, the years when they were at their best and when their music would have the most influence. This is a definite must have for space rock lovers and for Hawkwind lovers, plus it is a valuable album as far as being an influential record even today.

 Distant Horizons by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1997
3.27 | 59 ratings

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Distant Horizons
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars The year is 1997 and Hawkwind is still releasing albums. Two years after their last studio album 'Alien 4', the band, now reduced to a quartet, put out their 21st album 'Distant Horizons'. Of course, Dave Brock is there on electric guitar, keyboards and vocals. Jerry Richards started touring with the band in 1996 and became a core member and furnishes some of his own electric guitar on the album. He would remain a regular member until 2002. Ron Tree also joined the band in 1996 and makes his album debut providing vocals and also bass, taking the place of Alan Davey, who was the bands bassist since 1985 and who left the band because he didn't like the direction the band was heading at the time. Davey would come back in 2002 and would reciprocate by replace Ron Tree. Last of all, Richard Chadwick would be there on drums. Chadwick has been with the band consistently since 1988 and still is still a current member.

So, in summary, we have two long-time members and two fairly new members in the band for this album. During the touring for this album, two more members would join the band that are not present on 'Distant Horizons': Rastafarian Captain Rizz and keyboardist Julian 'Crum' Crimmins. (It would be this 6 person line-up that would participate in the studio/live album 'In Your Area' that would be released a year later.) So the big question for this album is, how would the band fare without Davey and with two fairly new members contributing?

Brock would write and sing most of the tracks on the album, but there would also be contributions with Chadwick, though his writing credits are always shared; 2 with Brock and 2 with Richards, and with 2 tracks credited solely to Tree. The album starts off with the title track and it reflects the trance-like sound that the band was chasing at the time. This sound was the main reason why Davey decided to leave the band. However, Hawkwind even during this stage of their career, still hung onto the overall space rock sound they pioneered, and Brock and Richards still make sure there are plenty of spacey guitar solos that join in to the trance beat that play underneath everything. The sound of vocal recordings are all there too, giving the long- time fans the sound they were familiar with.

'Phetamine Street' follows with a more organic sound, and it is surprisingly one of the Tree-penned tracks. The guitar hook combined with the catchy drum and percussion effects turn this into a very intriguing and infectious sound. It is almost as if Brock's 'Waimea Canyon Drive' can't hold any steam or really much interest as it moves back to a trance style, and just sort of meanders about aimlessly. This is even made more evident as the powerful guitars of 'Alchemy', credited to Richards and Chadwick, come blaring out of your speakers with a rousing guitar solo. However, Brock's 'Clouded Vision' sounds much better and has more focus, even though it is a more pensive track. The vocals are also more up front which also helps. Tree then follows up with his answer to the previous track with a powerful and lively 'Reptoid Vision' that has a much darker and heavier sense to it. It is also one of the longer tracks on the album and it goes into a great exploratorial and progressive instrumental break that brings back memories of the older Hawkwind. Really, the only weak track on this first half of the album is 'Waimea''. The rest of the album to this point is really turning out to be one of the bands best efforts in quite a while.

There are a few more longer tracks that follow now, and they are really the strength of this album. 'Population Overload', credited to Brock and Chadwick, is a decent track, but seems to be a bit direction-less. A lot of the time is spent in a more ambient, meandering style even though the rhythm is fairly constant. 'Wheels' is credited to Richards and Chadwick, and the differences are almost obvious as, strangely enough, the tracks that are more Hawkwind-like are the ones that are not credited to Brock. This one has a more driving, space rock style to it and some great guitar licks later on. The last two tracks are both credited to Brock. 'Kauai / Taxi for Max' is a nice, atmospheric synth piece in the beginning that later turns into a sound collage of effects. 'Love in Space' finishes things off with a soft keyboard heavy track that goes down rather smoothly, but doesn't necessarily give you the punch you might want to end an album off with.

This album is one of the band's better efforts during this long spell of mediocre attempts. There is a lot of different styles and textures here that actually sounds like a decent attempt to make the band relevant again, even though the weakest tracks on the albums are Brock's. It sounds like there could have been some hope for the band with this line up. Unfortunately, the follow up album 'In Your Area' wouldn't give the level of satisfaction that this album would, and after that, Brock released an album (Spacebrock) under the Hawkwind name that many end up considering a Brock solo album more than a Hawkwind album. This would be the beginning of a long dry spell, and we wouldn't hear from the band again until 2005 with the awful comeback album 'Take Me to Your Leader'.

 All Aboard The Skylark by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 2019
2.83 | 14 ratings

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All Aboard The Skylark
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Mortte

2 stars Hawkwind has been with us 50 years! To celebrate this, they released two new albums, this new studio album and "Acoustic Daze", that has acoustic versions from their old songs. I think itīs a pity the very organic sounding direction of "Into the Woods" didnīt continue in this new album. Instead the album is mostly that modern spacey sounding production that has been in Hawkwind albums from the mid eighties. All the musicians have been in the earlier Hawkwind albums, the newest member is saxplayer Michal Sosna, who has earlier been only "At the Roundhouse"-album.

The album starter "Flesh Fondue" is quite typical Hawkwind album starter with itīs "Leviation"-tempo. In the end there are some space effects and next "Nets of Space" is instrumental continuation of it. "Last Man On Earth" is the best song of the album and differs a lot from the other material. Itīs much more acoustic and have clear sounds and great melodies, also I really like Magnus Martins vocals in it. The rest of the album is quite much that modern spacey sounding where the album started. "We Are Not Dead...Only Sleeping" is slow ok piece. The title piece is quite mediocre instrumental. In "65 Million Years Ago" goes a little better direction, when the song changes more powerful in the middle of it. "In the Beginning" is spacey synth instrumental. "The Road To..." is again quite mediocre instrumental, reminds me backmusic of some game. The ending "the Fantasy of Faldum" is another highlight of this album, again sung by Martin. It starts and ends acoustic, but has an electric middle part.

To me it seems the real reason of releasing this album has been their celebration year. They have now released one album in a year from the 2016, I hope they now go back to their earlier release pace, because they seem not have great ideas to fill the whole album when releasing album a year. One reason for my disappointment to this album can be the reason that some old stars have made really good albums this year (for example Jukka Gustavson, P J Harvey, Pere Ubu, Meat Puppets, Royal Trux, Springsteen). On the other hand this hasnīt been a good year to old prog artists (except Jukka), so I little bit wonder what the future of prog will be? Anyway I think there is still hope Hawkwind will make great albums, those two different pieces in this new album give me hope they will go next more into that direction. I can give this only two stars, because I think this album is only for the fans.

 Warrior On The Edge Of Time by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.09 | 655 ratings

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Warrior On The Edge Of Time
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Warrior on the Edge of Time sounds like a lost early-1970s Moody Blues album performed by Pink Floyd with vocals by an especially manic Peter Hammill. It's got a lot of what you'd expect from a Moodies LP: rock songs interspersed with a few poems and an acoustic-guitar-and-Mellotron piece, some echo-chamber vocal harmonies, and mystical subject matter. The hi-hat is even forward in the mix, just like on a Moody Blues LP. But in practice, Warrior on the Edge of Time sure doesn't sound like it's being performed by Justin Hayward and company. To begin with, it lacks the restraint of the Moody Blues, whose use of sound effects and synthesizers would have been much subtler, and whose vocals would have been much more sober. And as psychedelic as the Moodies could be, Warrior on the Edge of Time is way trippier - - even Floydian. While only the two-part opener "Assault and Battery" / "The Golden Void" actually sounds like Pink Floyd, most of the album seems to be in the spirit of Piper- era Floyd.

My first - - and until now, only - - experience with Hawkwind was The Best of Friends an Relations, a 1994 compilation CD not listed on Prog Archives. I figured that if this was not only the best of Hawkwind, but of their friends and relations too, I'd spend my time listening to some other band. Not long after I started visiting progarchives.com, I saw that Warrior on the Edge of Time was one of the top "Psychedelic / Space Rock" LPs (#3 among non-Floyd albums). And then it turned out that Steven Wilson liked it enough to do a remix - - and I do value his opinion. So when I had some spare credit I downloaded the Wilson mix of the album, which also includes the non-LP b-side "Motorhead."

Hawkwind still isn't my proverbial cup of tea, but Warrior on the Edge of Time is better than I would have guessed. The soundscape is more varied and songs are more engaging than were those on The Best of Friends an Relations. Plus there's the fact that this is an intact album, the songs of which hang together pretty well.

Nonetheless, Warrior on the Edge of Time is a little too flaky for me, a little too sophomoric - - but not in the sense of sophomoric humor: I'm talking about the earnestness with which the group approaches the knights-and-wizards themes, both lyrically and sonically. If you're into fantasy themes, I'd check out Camel's Mirage or King Crimson's In the Court of the Crimson King (neither of which are entirely fantasy-based) or maybe Jon Anderson's Olias of Sunhillow or Bo Hansson's (instrumental) Music Inspired by Lord of the Rings. On the other hand, if space rock's your thing, I'm sure you're already well acquainted with Warrior on the Edge of Time.

 Live 1990 by HAWKWIND album cover Live, 2002
3.58 | 15 ratings

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Live 1990
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Solid Voiceprint release of two Hawkwind gigs from the Bridgette Wishart era - the same that brought us such delights as Palace Springs, California Brainstorm, and Space Bandits. You get two live sets here - Karnac Intro to Images comprises a set from the Winter 1990 tour, and has somewhat better sound quality, whilst the remainder of CD 2 from Lives of Great Men onwards is the same January 1990 set from Nottingham which has been put out as a single CD release. Both concerts, whilst not essential, are pretty good if you enjoy this era of the band - jump on it if you thought that Palace Springs or Space Bandits were your jam.
 Doremi Fasol Latido by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.75 | 337 ratings

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Doremi Fasol Latido
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars As one of the very first space rock bands to emerge in the late 60s, HAWKWIND had been experiencing a slow but steady rise in popularity with the band's 1971's "In Search of Space" hitting #18 on the UK album charts and introducing the galactic cosmic rocker's sound to an ever expanding audience but the band founded by guitarist / vocalist Dave Brock didn't really find its true happy space until the exit of the rhythm section duality of bassist Dave Anderson and drummer Terry Ollis who were replaced by future Motorhead madman Ian Kilmister aka Lemmy and percussionist Simon King formerly of Opal Butterfly. While Lemmy believed he was signing on as the new guitarist, he learned at the last minute that it was the role of bassist that was open and like a pro he learned how to play bass on the fly but without giving up any of his guitar god bravado.

DOREMI FASOL LATIDO, a cute little title derived from the musical scale song displayed the strongest era of HAWKWIND's 70s run with a noticeably heavier sound than the previous albums no doubt due to Lemmy's ferocious string attack as well as King's rock sensibilities. The album focuses more on heavy chugging riffs leaving Del Dittmer's whirling sputtering synthesizer tricks to take a back seat but they are hardly relegated to second tier status and instead create the needed contrast to expand HAWKWIND's sound into an even larger inter-dimensional grasp taking them one notch closer to true lords of the space rock throne. While the entire band complained that the production was crap since it was recorded in a barn, the truth is that the less than perfect final product adds a distinct charm that allows the treble parts to soar high and the bass chugs to ferociously mimic the guitar parts that Lemmy erroneously assumed he would be handling. The remastered versions have performed miracles.

The change of characters was a great move as DOREMI FASOL LATIDO hits all the right notes in perfect proportions. While the opening "Brainstorm" displays a new harder rocking version of the space rock launched like a missile with the self-titled debut album, it immediately casts a hypnotic spell with Lemmy's bombastic bass groove augmented by Brock's sizzling guitar antics. After establishing firm control the track sputters off into true space rock turf. This was saxist / flautist Nik Turner's first stab at songwriting and cranks out an excellent space rock groove that allows his breath blowing skills to display mind-blowing freakery during the track's major freakout toward the middle. The following track allows a time-out from the frenetic pace set by the opener. "Space Is Deep" which mined lyrics from Michael Moorcok's poem "Black Corrider" finds a dual acoustic guitar performance by Brock and Lemmy with extensive layers of electronic wizardry and introduces the hard song / soft song pattern of the album's forty minute run.

After the tiny piano intro of "One Change," the "Lord of Light" breaks into a sputtering mess of sounds which chaotically coalesce until one of the most melodic and energetic tracks burst into heavy metal mode with some of Lemmy's most badass bass playing along with Brock's power chords bantering with the usual space swirls of electronic whizzing around like solar storms colliding with planetary magnetic shields. "Down Through The Night" provides another softer respite from the orotundity but doesn't simply copy and past "Space Is Deep" but rather creates a frenetic angular mix of an acoustic guitar strumathon with space whispering flute sounds echoing from the heaven's above. The heavily fortified electronic winds emulate a hurricane with some of the most echoey vocals on the entire album. Once again these tracks find the perfect way to cede into a new reality without losing the overall mood setting of what preceded.

"Time We Left This World Today" is yet another completely different methodology with heavy bluesy guitar riffs and call and response vocals from the various members. While the electronic sound effects are present they are subdued in the backdrop. The guitars sound slightly out of tune adding a touch of avant-garde dissonance which allows the track to develop into more bizarre progressive movements that despite a steady power stomp through the track finds the instrumental interplay becoming more experimental and free form. The syncopated beats and the vocals fall into a psychedelic haze of a repetitive groove with subtle changes that evolve into new variations. The final track "The Watcher" has been called the very first Motorhead song and was Lemmy's first contribution as songwriter to the HAWKWIND project. Despite performed only on an acoustic guitar with a fuzzed out bass, this psychedelic track that narrates the destruction of the Earth from human greed from the vantage point of space, has Lemmy's style stamped all over it and would actually reappear on the first Motorhead album many years later.

HAWKWIND were on the top of their game after DOREMI FASOL LATIDO hit the scene. With the non-album single "Silver Machine" hitting the top 40 and the tour proving successful, the popularity of the material on this album would be the main musical ingredients for the band's lauded 1973 live album "Space Ritual" which featured every track from DOREMI with the sole exception of the Lemmy penned closer "The Watcher." It's hard to say which album i prefer from HAWKWIND's earliest gems but this one has long been a top contender with its stellar songwriting that took on the task of melding hard rock with psychedelia along with soft acoustic guitar driven anthems that made Bowie's "Space Oddity" sound like Simon & Garfunkel in comparison. Lemmy's bombastic rock energy was exactly what HAWKWIND was missing in their earliest years and would drive them through the best period of their career until a restless Lemmy found that the heavier metal music was his true calling.

4.5 rounded down

 Take Me To Your Leader by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 2005
2.61 | 75 ratings

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Take Me To Your Leader
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

1 stars After a five year lapse in releasing studio albums, the hope was that Hawkwind would come back to the studio with better songs and a better album. After all, the core group at this time consisted of Dave Brock who was with the band from the beginning, Alan Davey who had worked on and off with the band for several years now, and Richard Chadwick who had been with the band since 1988. Things were in Hawkwind's favor, but the last two decades saw them releasing average material and swinging away from their space rock sound that made them legends. "Take Me to Your Leader' had a lot of fans hoping for a real comeback. Unfortunately, the time was still not right.

The album starts out with a re-make of "Spirit of the Age", originally co-written by Dave Brock and Robert Calvert who passed away in 1988. This new recording features vocals by journalist Matthew Wright. The track is great, of course, with its broiling guitar and spacey effects, but not enough has changed in it to merit a re-make, other than a slightly cleaner sound. I suppose it was quite an attraction to Hawkwind fans however, to get them curious about the new album. The next two tracks are written by Alan Davey. "Out Here We Are" fades in from the previous track and goes right to a mid-tempo, synth-washed track that sounds too safe and mellow, almost like one of the more commercial Moody Blues songs from their own later commercial music. There is some sax thrown in, but it sounds completely out of place here. It was put there to give this boring instrumental some life, but it doesn't. In fact, it sounds a bit like new age drivel, you almost expect to see Yanni step out of the spaceship. "Greenback Massacre" tries to factor in some stoner rock sounds and the vocals are gruff, almost sounding like Lemmy who left the band and formed "Motorhead" long ago, but it only comes off as weak, like they are trying to mimic their own sound.

"To Love a Machine" is written by Brock, but that doesn't mean it is any better. In fact, it is also surprisingly weak even if it does venture towards the space rock sound again, it is just poorly executed and rough sounding. The programmed percussion doesn't help either. The track keeps building and then losing its momentum each time it softens, trading space rock power for acoustic softness in an alternating pattern. Then there is this long section that is supposed to sound jazzy underneath crowd noises. The title track "Take Me to Your Leader" is credited to all three core band members. It is mostly instrumental with some spoken word. It is mostly just automatic music, a heartless track with no direction past the first minute or so.

"Digital Nation" is credited to Chadwick. It starts accapella with minimal spacey effects, then a percussive pattern kicks in with some guitar, synth and flute that joins in later, but they just seem to float off in their own directions. It's quite lifeless even when the sax comes in later. Arthur Brown worked with Hawkwind quite extensively during this time period and wrote the next track called "Sunray". Simon House, who also worked with the band previously, lends his needed help with keyboards and violin while Brown provides the vocals, and it actually sounds a bit more interesting and believable. You can almost hear echoes of the band's glory days in there, and a bit of a Bowie sound, especially with the guitars and Brown's flamboyant singing. The album could have used more tracks like this.

"Sighs" is a short track written by both Brock and Davey. It's a bit more experimental, but really too short to go anywhere. "Angela Android" comes next, co-written by Brock and Chadwick and some vocals provided by new wave singer Lene Lovich and her high pitched singing and annoying partly spoken vocals. Lene actually toured with Hawkwind for a few years. The style is in the vein of rock and roll with space rock leanings, but it just doesn't have enough life in it to make you want to shake & shimmy or even stumble & trip. Corniness incarnate. The last track is "A Letter to Robert" co written by Brock and Chadwick again, but this time joined one more time by Arthur Brown. Simon House is also there again, so maybe this will be a better track like "Sunray" was. It's not. Brown is reading a letter he wrote to Robert Calvert with spacey synth effects going on around his reading. I suppose it is supposed to be there for nostalgic purposes or something, but it really doesn't do anything for me.

There was a bonus DVD that came with the first 2000 copies of the album sold which has interviews from the three core members, a promo video of "Spirit of the Age" and a live performance in 2004 of the same song, a live version of "Silver Machine" done at the Ruisrock Festival in Finland in 2004 and apparently includes Lemmy in the performance, and also a live 1992 performance of "The Right to Decide" and a 2004 performance of "Psychedelic Warriors". I haven't seen the DVD so I don't know what it's like, but I doubt it changes this lackluster album much.

So, unfortunately, the long waiting period between studio albums didn't improve the quality of this album, and only lengthened the time span of the sub-par albums released in the '90s and 2000s. This is a period of Hawkwind material that is best to be avoided and I'm happy to give you the low down on these weaker albums so you can see if you want to waste your time with them or not. Only hard core completionists should look for this album. That's all.

 Church Of Hawkwind by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1982
2.80 | 94 ratings

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Church Of Hawkwind
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

2 stars 'Church of Hawkwind' was the 12th studio album released by Hawkwind. Being released in 1982, it was influenced by the sounds of the time and was centered around being a bit more experimental and more electronic. In actuality, the original intent was that the band name was to be 'Church of Hawkwind' because of the differing sound on the album, and also because it was more of a Dave Brock centered album, and could almost be considered a solo album. Most of Hawkwind's other albums featured contributions from all of the band, but this time, Brock was the main songwritier. Everyone of the tracks are attributed, or co-attributed to Brock.

There are 3 different versions of the album. The original was divided into two sides, with the 1st side being called 'Space' and the 2nd side called 'Fate'. There were 12 tracks total on the album. In 1994, Greffin released the CD reissue which contained 15 tracks. The first 6 tracks followed the same order, but then some bonus tracks were added in disrupting the flow of the album, especially since the bonus tracks were not similar to the others. All of the tracks were taken out of sequence with bonus tracks popping up between original tracks. In 2010, Atomhenge released a new CD with the 12 original tracks restored to their proper sequence and then 6 more bonus tracks added to the end.

'Angel Voices' acts as a short introduction to the album and features processed vocal effects with low spoken vocals and fast spoken vocals in a call and answer style with spacey sounds building to the next track 'Nuclear Drive'. The full band fades in playing a fast paced space rock style track. The guitars are pretty much taking a back seat to the new wave sounding synths. Otherwise, the same basic Hawkwind formula is there, but in a more condensed, shorter form, and it ends just as things get interesting. 'Star Cannibal' is the longest track on here at just over 5 minutes. The synth is noticeably more prominent here, and the vocals are in a spoken and rhythmic style. The whole thing comes off sounding cheap and outdated, and they even sounded like that back when this was released. The layers of synths bury everything that should have made this track interesting. The band was definitely out of their element here. Things to get intense at the end, but it fades out just as it seems to be ready for it's payoff.

'The Phenomenon of Luminosity' returns to the short tracks which take up the rest of the original album. This track is a series of spacey effects with a sample of John Glenn transmitting from the Friendship Seven spacecraft. Electronic effects and synths play loops and sound effects. 'Fall of Earth City' has more annoying, spoken vocals and electronic and guitar loops. There is some guitar improvisation mixed low underneath the vocals and synths. 'The Church' ends the less than mediocre first half with another short track with more boring synth loops and stuff.

Another short track starts up the second part of the alum with 'Joker at the Gate'. More synths bore into your soul, but at least this time there is some semblance of a melody. Echoing vocals sound out but don't add anything. 'Some People Never Die' was attributed to Brock, but in reality it takes a lot of material from another band called On the Seventh Day'. Even the field recordings from Robert F. Kennedy's and Lee Harvey Oswald's shootings were in the original recording and are retained on this track. All this track consists of are these copied field recordings and drone-like synthesizers. Alternate versions of this same track are on Brock's solo album also. 'Light Specific Data' has a looped riff from the guitar and more synth layers. Not much happens here except for some free flowing improvisation and repetitive loops.

'Experiment with Destiny' is only an alternate version of a previously released track with a different title, 'Virgin of the World' from the album 'Sonic Attack'. It's a more atmospheric track that breaks away from the rhythm loops for a short while. 'The Last Messiah' is yet again another short track of electronic loops and textures. 'Looking in the Future' end the original album at least with a longer 4 minute track, but by this time most listeners have probably given up on this album. The copying of the new wave style continues here, so nothing is really gained from this track either.

This is one of Hawkwind's most embarrassing albums, but unfortunately they got caught up in trying to make their sound relevant for the time. This would go on for the most part, for the next few albums. After that, the band would have a hard time returning to the sound of their glory days in the 70s. But at least they would keep trying.

 The Chronicle Of The Black Sword by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1985
3.44 | 119 ratings

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The Chronicle Of The Black Sword
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars After some sub-par albums that pretty much missed the space rock bar that Hawkwind had set in the 70's, the band returned with their 14th album "The Chronicle of the Black Sword". Returning to the Michael Moorcock themed concept, the band decided to center the album around his fictional sci-fi characters, this time telling the story (musically) about Elrich. This time, Dave Brock, Huw Lloyd Langton and Harvey Bainbridge (joined 1977), who had been in the band on the previous album "Choose Your Masques" would be joined by newcomers Alan Davey on bass and Danny Thompson, Jr. on drums. Thompson would only remain with the band until 1988.

"Song of the Swords" starts off with a lively number that echoes the sound of the Hawkwind of the 70s, which was totally missing from the last few albums. A track by Brock, this one brings back in a more solid guitar sound and shows the promise of a better album than the last few. The track is too short, however, and ends just as you think it is going to go into a jam section. "Shade Gate" is written by Bainbridge and is an instrumental with electronics, synths and effects with a guitar fading in to the synth layers later on and then a sudden abrupt ending. The last of the 3 main members, Langton, wrote the next track "The Sea King". This has a nice mix of spacey effects and a guitar riff that gives it the appealing space rock sound, but again, this is too short. Bainbridge and Davey co-wrote "The Pulsing Cavern" which is a nice, atmospheric instrumental with the bass having a more central part while effects and keys swirl around and percussive pulsing sound. "Elric the Enchanter" is again written by Davey. It begins with a hard, steady beat and vocals. The band kicks in soon after for a heavier sound than what you usually expect from Hawkwind. As the track continues, you finally get the jam that you have been craving for as the track goes into the middle section and actually changes tempo and meter part way through. So far, this album is much better than the last few which were more keyboard centered and new wave sounding. This time things are more guitar centered.

The 2nd side starts with "Needle Gun" by Brock. With this track, the sound moves to a hard rock style and further from the trademark space rock sound. It's an okay track, but more standard sounding with silly lyrics. "Zarozinia" is also written by Brock (co-written by Kris Tait). This is a more ambient sounding track with synth layers and vocals only. It has a surprisingly lovely melody with no percussion. This would have been a stellar track with more development. "The Demise" is a short intermediary track co-written by Bainbridge and Brock which utilizes spoken words and spooky sounds. "Sleep of a Thousand Tears" is the only track on the album written by Michael Moorcock, the author of the sci-fi series the album is based on. Moorcock has collaborated with Hawkwind many times in the past and returns for this album. Brock also shares writing credit here. The sound continues with the heavier sound of the album, but thankfully keeps the space rock vibe even with the heavier riffs and pounding bass. The band once again allows time for a guitar centered jam. "Chaos Army" is another short track of sound effects. The last track is the longest at just over 6 minutes, called "Horn of Destiny" written by Brock. More guitar riffs and an up tempo, steady beat promised another heavy space rock track. Surprisingly dynamic (for Hawkwind), this track has some great percussive effects and generates a lot of expectation and drama.

This album is definitely an improvement over the direction the band had been going in for the past few albums. It is true that the music is more dynamic and heavier than normal, and that the vocals are more up front than previously, but that works to the albums benefit. The authentic and trademark space rock sound had returned. The biggest problem that still remained was that the songs were still shorter than in the previous decade and some tracks were just too short and things could seem choppy, especially on the first side of the album. However, the band really seemed to gel much better than they had for a while, much to the pleasant surprise of the fans. The question everyone asked back then however, was would it continue? Unfortunately, things were inconsistent with albums, some better than others throughout the rest of the band's career. But, for now, the band they loved was back.

 Choose Your Masques by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1982
2.73 | 87 ratings

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Choose Your Masques
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

2 stars Hawkwind's 13th studio album "Choose Your Masques" was released in 1982, and unfortunately saw the use of drum loops and drum machines growing, which was not the direction that drummer Martin Griffen wanted to go in. Griffen was reduced to a non-live drummer and his participation in this album was only some half hearted attempts to make the drums electronic, which is the direction that Dave Brock wanted to go in at the time. Griffen stayed on for the tour to support the album, but left the band afterwards.

Immediately in the first track "Choose Your Masks", we can hear the difference that is made with the increased used of drum loops. The track seems like it should be a great space rock sound that Hawkwind was famous for, but instead we get a flat sounding and almost lifeless track, with the electronic drums sound off-beat, the timing isn't quite as crisp as it should be, and the space effects are overused and sounding quite tiresome. This first track slides right into "Dream Worker" which is a psychedelic and somewhat experimental track with some spoken vocals from Ian Holm taken from a BBC serial broadcast of Lord of the Rings. It's okay, but almost seems like filler. Following this is "Arrival in Utopia" which is a bit better, but still lacks that dynamic that gets lost in the electronic sound. "Utopia" follows, and is just a throw away track that repeats itself ad nauseum.

The 2nd half of the album starts with "Silver Machine" which continues with the forced and washed out feel of the album, again you get the annoying drum machine and space effects galore. The instrumental break would have been promising, but it ends up coming off canned. "Void City" sounds like someone playing one of those Wurlitzer organs with automatic rhythm, again with an over-abundance of space effects and a boring synth melody that is hard to pick out amongst the hazy feeling. Later, robotic vocals come in sounding like a bad impression of Devo. "Solitary Mind Games" is a nice track, but again it loses its dynamic in the automatic percussion which is poorly done. "Fahrenheit 451" is probably the strongest track on the album, but even then, it sounds like a foray into the new wave movement that was going on at the time. Fortunately, they at least managed to sneak in a decent guitar solo. "The Scan" is a short electronic track. "Waiting for Tomorrow" ends with a heavier sound with a great hook, and strong vocals, but it's too short and doesn't develop into a space jam like you would like it to.

This is mostly a flat sounding album by Hawkwind that feels like it was done in a hurry. The songs seem to be thrown together quickly and the members of the band are just going through the motions. This is easily one of the albums that should be missed, or at least left for the fans that have to have all of the albums. Whatever you do, don't start with this one, as it is mostly embarrassing.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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