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Threshold - March Of Progress CD (album) cover

MARCH OF PROGRESS

Threshold

 

Progressive Metal

3.98 | 398 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Gatot
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars I did not quite follow the progression of Threshold as the CD that I had was "Clone" was not that good for me as the composition was just sloppy and not quite memorable in terms of melody. As my metalhead friend told me this new album "March of Progress" was the band's answer after five years long break as the band's long time vocalist Andrew 'Mac' McDermott left in 2011 that certainly put a roadblock up for them. Prior to his passing he left the group due to health issues, Damian Wilson came back to help them continue on. This is his second stint with the band. Although Mac was such a strong presence fronting the band and probably their finest lead vocalist, Damian has grabbed the reins and unified the once fragmented band. In fact Damian's voice in this album sounds different with his other records. This one is great.

"Ashes" (6:51) opens the album wonderfully with a catchy music that suggests to the band that they should focus on songs like this one. I think anyone who loves rock music would love this opening track as the music blasts off beautifully with good introduction combine with raw guitar riffs and it has great chorus part that is very catchy. The tempo is quite fast. The second track "Return Of The Thought Police" (6:09) is slower in tempo but the melody is still maintained by the band being catchy and memorable. The style changes are also enjoyable especially as the vocal line is evolving. The song moves into faster temp right after the middle of the song followed with nice guitar solo. The third track "Staring At The Sun" (4:25)
starts nicely with guitar riffs followed with nice keyboard work at the back. Damian Wilson enters the music beautifully with his high register notes.

"Liberty Complacency Dependency" (7:48) starts off with guitar work combined with keyboards followed with Damian vocal line. This song has different style than the previous three tracks and make this one is very enjoyable track. "Colophon" (6:00) starts nicely with guitar work in slow tempo followed with powerful Damian vocal line. The music flows in upbeat tempo started with guitar solo right after vocal breaks. "The Hours (8:15) starts in an ambient style with slow tempo followed with heavy, raw and nice guitar riffs. The music flows nicely in relatively fast tempo with some segments demonstrating guitar solo. "That's Why We Came" (5:40) serves like a break as the intro part is quite slow in nature. Even though the overall style is still in slow mode but this track is enjoyable. 
"Don't Look Down" (8:12) brings the music into faster and rockin' style with great keyboard solo combined with good vocal and excellent guitar work. "Coda" (5:23) still maintains the music similar with other previous tracks.
"Rubicon" (10:24) starts nicely with keyboard as main instrument that brings all segments together to form excellent composition.

I think for the fans of Threshold, the absence of performance in the past five years 
is not that important anymore. It's worth waiting for the band for five years but they come uo with an excellent album. Highly recommended album. It's a 4 stars plus rating. Keep on proggin' ..!

Peace on earth and mercy mild - GW

Gatot | 4/5 |

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