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HEAVY PROG

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Heavy Prog definition

Heavy Prog defines progressive rock music that draws as much influence from hard rock as it does from classic progressive rock. In simple terms, it is a marriage of the guitar-based heavy blues of the late 1960s and 1970s - artists such as Cream, Led Zeppelin, and Black Sabbath - and the progressive/symphonic movement represented by King Crimson, Yes and Genesis.

The electric guitar, amplified to produce distortion (or 'overdrive') is a crucial element, providing the 'heavy' tone required for this aggressive style, and later for the British and North American heavy metal of the late 1970s and 80s. The primary rock format of drums, bass and guitar with keys and/or vocals on top is represented strongly in heavy prog. The presence of the Hammond organ with its deep, intense rumble was also common among harder progressive groups such as ATOMIC ROOSTER. Although certain other acts, such as King Crimson and Jethro Tull, utilize a heavy guitar, bass and keyboard sound, the bulk of their work over the years puts them in a different category.

Bands that represent Heavy Prog would include RUSH, PORCUPINE TREE, THE MARS VOLTA, URIAH HEEP, TEMPEST, BLACK WIDOW, DR. Z,ATOMIC ROOSTER, WARHORSE, BIRTH CONTROL, TILES.

- written bt Atavachron (David)

Current Team as of 12/24/14

Louis (rdtprog)
Thanos (aapatsos)
Frank (infocat)

Heavy Prog Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Heavy Prog | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.39 | 2692 ratings
MOVING PICTURES
Rush
4.36 | 2284 ratings
HEMISPHERES
Rush
4.32 | 2113 ratings
A FAREWELL TO KINGS
Rush
4.29 | 1953 ratings
PERMANENT WAVES
Rush
4.26 | 2444 ratings
FEAR OF A BLANK PLANET
Porcupine Tree
4.24 | 2408 ratings
IN ABSENTIA
Porcupine Tree
4.19 | 1177 ratings
DE-LOUSED IN THE COMATORIUM
Mars Volta, The
4.17 | 1080 ratings
THE MOUNTAIN
Haken
4.18 | 749 ratings
SALISBURY
Uriah Heep
4.11 | 1995 ratings
2112
Rush
4.12 | 1022 ratings
VISIONS
Haken
4.10 | 1930 ratings
DEADWING
Porcupine Tree
4.14 | 628 ratings
UNTIL ALL THE GHOSTS ARE GONE
Anekdoten
4.12 | 660 ratings
LOOK AT YOURSELF
Uriah Heep
4.06 | 1274 ratings
THE SKY MOVES SIDEWAYS
Porcupine Tree
4.06 | 873 ratings
FRANCES THE MUTE
Mars Volta, The
4.06 | 1003 ratings
AQUARIUS
Haken
4.07 | 725 ratings
DEMONS AND WIZARDS
Uriah Heep
4.02 | 1440 ratings
LIGHTBULB SUN
Porcupine Tree
4.08 | 414 ratings
FROM WITHIN
Anekdoten

Heavy Prog overlooked and obscure gems albums new


Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Heavy Prog experts team

A COMPLEX NATURE
Yang
MMOIRES INCUBUSSIENNES
ExCubus
ONCE WE WERE BORN ...
Divine Baze Orchestra, The
ZUNDAPP
Zundapp

Latest Heavy Prog Music Reviews


 Tarquin's Seaweed Farm (K7) by PORCUPINE TREE album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1989
3.40 | 66 ratings

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Tarquin's Seaweed Farm (K7)
Porcupine Tree Heavy Prog

Review by TCat
Prog Reviewer

3 stars The story of Porcupine Tree's strange and unique first recording starts back a few years before the album was recorded. It all starts with Steven Wilson, of course, who, when he was 15 years old and the year was 1983. Wilson recorded some music along with Si Vockings on keyboard under the band name 'Altamont'. Alan Duffy, who ran Imaginary Records, sent Wilson some lyrics inspired by the love both of them had for Syd Barrett, and wondered if Wilson could provide the instrumental and music background for them. Wilson says that the music on Altamont's first album was really a compilation, two tracks from Duffy and two tracks that he (Wilson) recorded on his multi-tracking equipment in his own home along with Si. (Another album was released in 2002 that had more Altamont music on it that was originally improvised live onto cassette tape from 1983 ' 1985). Although there weren't too many copies made, there were a few tracks that actually got put onto sampler albums, and these tracks started the underground following that became Wilson's first fans.

There was also another band that Steven helped form along with 3 of his friends in school called 'Karma'. In October of 1983, this band released a demo tape called 'The Joke's on You' which features the original 15 minute version of 'Nine Cats' which became a popular Porcupine Tree song. It also contains the original version of 'Small Fish' another track that was used by Porcupine Tree. Another demo tape was made by this band in 1985 called 'The Last Man to Laugh'. The psychedelic music produced by Altamont and Karma was circulated in the London musical underground and these tapes were creating quite a name for Steven, so even that early, he was on his way.

Finally, in 1987, Wilson formed two projects. One of these is the well-known 'No-man' who he formed with Tim Bowness and Ben Coleman as an art-rock trio, who, in the early years, remixed many of their songs to make them usable in dance clubs. The 2nd project he formed was done as a joke, or fake band, known as Porcupine Tree. Steven and a friend of his created a fictional band made up of non-existent band members with ridiculous names and backstories. The band was supposed to be a fake, legendary seventies psychedelic band. To back up this story, Steven recorded music and compiled it onto a cassette known as 'Tarquin's Seaweed Farm' and a 2nd one known as 'The Nostalgia Factory'. Copies of these tapes were sent out to various people, including the magazine 'Freakbeat' which was run by an individual who was setting up a record company. A few tracks were used on some compilation tapes and that sparked even more interest in the London underground.

Steven continued to distribute these two tapes while the record company was being formed. He was eventually invited to be the first artist signed to one of the labels (Delerium) and they wanted to release the two Porcupine Tree cassettes on 2 different double albums. Wilson decided instead to compile what he felt were the best tracks and released what would become known as 'On the Sunday of Life'. That would become PT's first original album. The remainder of the material from these first two cassettes would eventually be released on the collection called 'Yellow Hedgerow Dreamscape'. Both of these albums would be remastered and a lot of the music from YHD would be re-recorded.

So, there you have a brief history of the beginnings of Porcupine Tree, who would become one of the most influential and important progressive rock bands to arrive in more recent years. This review is for the first demo tape called 'Tanquin's Seaweed Farm' also sub-titled 'Words from a Hessian Sack'. This was originally an 80 minute tape released with a booklet of fake information about the band. It was reissued by Delerium in 1991 with a limited run of 300 copies. All of the tracks were performed by Steven Wilson (so in actuality, it is a Wilson solo album). The tracks were also all written by Wilson except for 'Jupiter Island' which was cowritten by Alan Duffy, 'Clarinet Vignette' cowritten by Tim Matthews and 'The Cross' which was written by Prince.

Side A of the tape is supposedly all studio recordings while Side B is the live recordings. Side A consists of mostly psychedelic music inspired by those bands from the 70's. Many of the songs from side A are on 'On the Sunday of Life' (hereafter abbreviated as OtSoL) which can still be found quite easily. There are a few of the titles that are changed, but most of the music remains the same. Starting with 'Music for the Head (Here)' we get a psychedelic instrumental introduction to the album. It is minimalistic and it creates suspense for the following track. You get woodwind effects and sitar over sustained synth drones. This leads into 'Jupiter Island' which has a real 80's sound to it, upbeat with high speed vocals. It is said that Wilson didn't think his regular voice was good enough, so he had it sped up, and that is the case with most of his vocals on this album. The percussion is programmed, there are a lot of spacey effects and the vocals come in. There is a guitar solo on the instrumental break. The tune is pretty basic leaning towards space rock.

There is a slight difference in the naming of the tracks here between the original and OtSoL. On this album, the track is called 'Nun's Cleavage ' Left' while on OtSoL it is called 'Third Eye Surfer', but the music is the same. The track is another psychedelic instrumental with improvised percussion overlayered by synth improvisation and effects. The 2 tracks on the original are 'Clarinette Vignette' and 'Nun's Cleavage ' Right'. These two tracks were combined on OtSoL and renamed as 'On the Sunday of Life', but again, the music remains the same. The former track is more ambient with a lovely clarinet solo that eventually fades into more psychedelia of the latter track.

At this point, OtSoL places the title track from the 2nd album 'The Nostalia Factory' as the next track. After that, it returns to the same sequence as Tanquin's Seaweed Farm with the scary, yet funny satirical track 'Space Transmission'. This one has spoken word vocals that have been processed through synths and is a first person telling of a strange prisoner trapped by an even more evil entity. This should raise the short hairs on the back of your neck. After this, 'Message from a Self-Destructing Turnip' is a short and silly track.

At this point, both this album and OtSoL have the popular track 'Radioactive Toy', but the versions are quite different. 'Tanquin's Seaweed Farm' has the original version which is much shorter and missing the amazing guitar solo that is on OtSoL. So if you are looking specifically for that song, I would suggest getting OtSoL. If you are a collector interested in the original version, then you will want this album. The remaining tracks on Tarquin's Seaweed Farm are not on OtSoL, but most of them are on 'Yellow Hedgerow Dreamscape', but in slightly different versions. The remainder of the tracks on OtSoL are from 'The Nostalgia Factory'.

Most of the rest of the album is instrumental with a few sections with processed vocals. 'Towel' is the next track and it returns to instrumental psychedelia. This track is more guitar driven than previous instrumentals on this album. It is a bit more melodic with some wild percussion, at least up until the last 45 seconds when it gets quite haphazard sounding. 'Wastecoat' is more psychedelia with synthesized effects, warped and spacey sounds, very glitchy sounding. Finally, we come to a longer track at over 8 minutes, a mostly instrumental track called 'Mute'. Some very strange sounds start this off which sounds like it might have come off of The Residents 'Eskimo' album. Other than that, it has some ambient sounds with minimal drones and effects, some lovely synth improvisation and whatnot. It builds to a nice space rock style similar to the instrumentals on 'Up the Downstair' and 'The Sky Moves Sideways', so its very melodic and lovely, mostly produced by guitar. In the middle, the music fades needlessly into the background and the track gets ruined by some stupid spoken vocal effects. The music fades back in again later though. (The version of this track that appears on Yello Hedgerow Dreamscape is a different version than this one.) This side ends with another version of the beginning track this time called 'Music for the Head ' There' which is more psychedelia and ambience.

This is where Side B finally starts. There are only 3 tracks on this side, but they are all quite long. This is supposedly the Live part of the album, but I am pretty certain that the 'live' part is only pre-recorded crowd noises. This starts with the 11 minute track 'No Reason to Live, No Reason to Die'. This is pretty much an improvised instrumental music inspired by space rock and psychedelic bands with the guitar being the main instrument while everything else is support. The beat is moderately slow with synths playing sustained chords and notes. The keyboards help with improvisation later on and they alternate with the guitar for the lead instrument. As the track continues, the rhythm slowly picks up in tempo. Before you hit the 9 minute mark, the music becomes ambient and atmospheric for the remainder of the track. 'Daughters in Excess' is another psychedelic instrumental track lasting almost 7 minutes. It starts off minimal, but after a few minutes, it gets quite loud with screaming guitars and effects and wild percussion.

The final track is actually a combined track of 3 songs. 'The Cross' starts out the track which actually has vocals which were written by Prince (this is a cover). The 2nd part is called 'The Hole' and it is a short spoken word vocal that sounds like someone trying to get the crowd excited. This section is not available on any other compilation and is left off of Yellow Hedgerow Dreamscape, but you aren't really missing much as it is part of the original 'joke' of the fake band trying to get the crowd excited. The last section is called 'Yellow Hedgerow Dreamscape' and it makes up most of this 20 minute track. It is all instrumental and contains more space rock style music driven by the guitar. This finishes off the album.

This album will not appeal to a lot of people, unless they are already fans of Porcupine Tree. Remember, this is the band (or at least Steven Wilson) at the beginning of his career. It is not a recording you want to start out with if you are planning on exploring PT's discography. It is pretty much a document of where Steven's head was in the beginning and shows you where this amazing band started out. Nevertheless, for a young Steven Wilson, it is still somewhat astounding, especially considering that he taught himself how to play guitar and keyboards. If you are interested in this music, you would be better off searching for On the Sunday of Life and Yellow Hedgerow Dreamscape, as you will most likely not find this recording. If you must hear it, your best bet would be to try to find the recordings that are on You Tube, but be aware that those recordings are not always the originals.

Since I am a rabid Porcupine Tree fan, I find this recording to be very interesting and entertaining. It definitely is not my favorite by the band, not even close, but I enjoy it for the historical aspects and being able to hear Steven Wilson when he was starting out. I find a lot of gems on this recording, and, since I am kind of a purist when it comes to SW, I want to hear it in the order that it was originally intended, with the untouched recordings. So it is important to me. But, I got to keep this all subjective, so, the actual recording is obsolete as far as most of the public is concerned. But because SW is so talented, and there are a lot of treasures here, I have to at least give it 3 stars. But in reality, to me it means a lot more than it would to others. As far as the length of this review, I just had to get it out of my system and hopefully add some insight into the beginnings of this amazing artist, and maybe it will help others understand Porcupine Tree's early music and the growth of the band.

 A Leap Into The Dark by TIRITH, THE album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.05 | 2 ratings

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A Leap Into The Dark
The Tirith Heavy Prog

Review by TCat
Prog Reviewer

3 stars "The Tirith" is a heavy prog band from the UK founded by Tim Cox. The band's first album was released in 2015 and contains songs that were written by the band 40 years ago. In May of 2019, the band released their 2nd album called "A Leap Into the Dark" which consists of their more recent material written over the past few years. The line-up remains the same as the previous album, namely Tim Cox on guitars and keyboards; Dick Cory on vocals, bass, acoustic guitar and pedals; and Carl Nightingale on drums. The album has 10 tracks and a total duration of over 70 minutes.

The first track consists of two songs melded together. The title track "A Leap Into the Dark" is pared together with "The Autumn of Our Days" for a 10 minute track. The track starts off with a fast guitar riff which alternates with a moderate riff for a somewhat heavy sound with synths supporting it all. The vocals are okay, but nothing special with a nasal-ly feel. The guitar solo is excellent as the continued alternation of fast riffs and moderate riffs persist. The second half of the track is a bit more symphonic with added synth support and a new theme in the vocals that is a bit less intense. Another nice guitar solo also follows on the instrumental break.

"Kalaya" is another almost 10 minute track that begins with atmospheric synths and acoustic guitar. The lyrics are about a princess in the Himalayas. Just before the 3 minute mark, a guitar riff is introduced and the full band kicks in with a hard melodic riff that again alternates from heavy to soft. The music is pretty straightforward as far as rhythm and meter goes, but it does change in tone many times, never settling in one place to long instrumentally, but the vocal melody does follow a variation of traditional song patterns. "The Sphinx" starts with a long, flowing introduction which later turns to a more progressive sound and builds to a faster tempo with some regal sounding synths. The tempo continues in its quick tempo as the vocals join in with lyrics suggesting there is more to the Sphinx than what meets the eye. You can expect more excellent guitar work on this one too during the break.

"No More" is a moderate tempo and has an accessible feel to it as it is less heavy, but the lyrics are more relevant even though it has a nostalgic feel to it and a very pleasant melody. The subject seems to be about the death of a friend. " . . . and the Wind Will Come" is the first of 3 tracks under 4 minutes. The lyrics are based on a poem written by Tim Cox set to music. Acoustic guitar introduce the track with the vocals, but soon gets more upbeat in a progressive way. Being based on a poem, the melody is more non-traditional and the tone of the song changes frequently. "Song of the Forgotten One" deals with alienation. It remains mellow and pensive throughout. "The Scare" is a tribute to Ray Bradbury and is based on the story "Something Wicked This Way Comes". It features a descending guitar hook on the verses and a nice guitar solo on the break, but the vocal melody is a bit too repetitive and uninteresting considering the excellent story it is all based on.

The longer tracks return with the 8 minute track "The Exile", again a song dealing with alienation. The song starts out with the same leveled out mood as the last few tracks. One thing that has become noticeable in the last few songs is a lack of emotion in the vocals and the music, plus the melodies are not quite as interesting as they were in the beginning half of the album. The guitar solos in the instrumental breaks are still quite good, but the pattern is getting a bit old now. "The Nostalgia Sequence" manages to make it up to just past the 10 minute mark. Breaking from the moderate tempo that has been the main feel of the past few tracks, this one starts off soft with a solo piano and a nice melody. Acoustic guitars and drums soon join, but things remain soft as the vocals come in. The subject is about how his town has changed since his childhood and nothing is the same. I was hoping this one would have a better melody to it, but again there is a basic lack of emotion in the vocals, and even though the song was led by piano, you get the same token guitar solo in the break. With the end of the lyrics coming at the 5 minute mark, one hopes for some nice development for the last half of the song. The piano intro theme returns, but doesn't change much from the beginning. Then, the track moves to a Pink Floyd style with sustained keyboard notes, the bass establishing a melody and then synths start to soar. This is a welcome change from the usual pattern of the songs, but it is quite apparent how the music is borrowing from a Pink Floyd style instrumental, even to the slow guitar passage that closes things off. It's good, but it's predictable. The album ends with a reprise of "The Autumn of Our Day", which is pretty much an alternative version of the track, with more acoustic guitar and a softer sound. There is a lovely acoustic solo at the end of it all.

This album started off strong, but becomes more predictable as it moves on. The tracks in the beginning seemed to show more emotion, but this wanes as the album continues on. The music gets predictable when it seems to follow a similar pattern that it locks into by the middle of the album. The vocalist is okay at first, but you wish he had more emotion. Some of the lyrics are quite meaningful, while other songs are a bit tacky, but this could have been avoided with more emotion and a more dynamic vocalist. The fact that his singing is quite nasally doesn't help either. The band is strong enough to do better than this with more variety and by adding more progressiveness to their music, which tends to lack in most of the album. Anyway, it ends up as having an overall average feel to it by the end, so it gets 3 stars.

 Still Looking For The Answers by 41POINT9 album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.05 | 2 ratings

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Still Looking For The Answers
41Point9 Heavy Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars This is the debut album of the American band that was recently added to the database, seemingly on the strength of the second, presumably more progressive album Mr. Astute Trousers (2018); I remember suggestions being made when the debut had come out, but the band was (strangely) rejected or ignored back then. I originally received this album to be reviewed in a Finnish prog magazine Colossus in 2012. I haven't much listened to it ever since, but the CD still happens to be in my collections, so why not review it here.

BTW, have a closer look at the cat on the cover: a buttered toast is tied on his back. This refers to two superstitious beliefs, a) cat always lands on his feet, b) toast always falls the buttered side down. The band invented a mock-scientific experiment, resulting as a cat floating in mid-air, according to the humorous liner notes. Ha ha. In 2015, British Neo Prog band Sanguine Hum released a concept album Now We Have Light, which incorporated the same mock-scientific idea in its adventurous and humorous sf plot. A mere coincidence or stealing of an idea? Anyway, this album is not conceptual, the cat experiment seems to appear only on the album covers. The lyrics here are something I'm not paying much attention to.

The band bio describes the music as a fusion of prog, metal and AOR. That description pretty much hits the nail. The core line-up is bassist Bob Madsen, vocalist Brian Cline (ex-ENCHANT) and guitarist-keyboardist Kenny Steel who joined a bit later. Without a permanent drummer they have recruited SPOCK'S BEARD men Nick D'Virgilio and Jimmy Keegan, among several other guest musicians and backing vocalists. Not being familiar with Enchant, the vocals strongly remind me of Neal Morse, another reason to have sonic connotations to Spock's Beard. 41POINT9 play energetic rock with the mentioned prog, AOR and metal elements, without being highly progressive on this album. I haven't listened to their second album.

The songs, when evaluated individually, are not bad at all. They will please you for sure if you fancy the style and the bands mentioned. There's the typically American feel, bold and catchy. The playing is good, that can't be denied. The problem, if there is one, is the the lack of originality, and the fact that with Spock's Beard and several other modern American prog bands you'll get rather similar music with a notably bigger variety in compositions, in a word, more progressive. 41POINT9 favours the AOR side instead of an eclectic prog approach such as the Gentle Giant influences you hear in Spock's Beard. There are some fine details, but they remain very small. Among nine tracks there's one instrumental, 'Surface Tension (A Drive Thru the City)', and one song which could be described as a ballad ('Promise the Moon'), but for the rest of material a tired feeling of sameyness sets in. A classic 3-star case: good but non-essential -- and so unoriginal.

 Mr. Astute Trousers by 41POINT9 album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.94 | 4 ratings

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Mr. Astute Trousers
41Point9 Heavy Prog

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars That's kinda heavy progressive music for sure. Though Bob Madsen and Brian Cline, the founder of 41POINT9, are claiming the mystery. 'We don't care about styles or subjects or how a song will be classified.' Well, always a matter of definition of course. If you will describe it as 'rather complex though very accessible rock music which will embed diverse music styles and sentiments' ... that might be a matter of agreement, or what? Anyway, when checking their background a bit, it necessarily strikes that both are known for collaborating with Ted Leonard's Enchant once. When it comes to the earlier days, the last century. And that must have been the starting point for their friendship and musical co-operation too. Meanwhile 'Mr. Astute Trousers' is their sophomore album, I haven't heard anything from the predecessor yet anyhow. Although both are building the core, at least Kenny Steel is aboard as another constant, can be seen as a steady band member therefore.

There are many aspects which makes this attractive. Above all, the compositions are masterful. Garnered with Madsen's vivid bass lines, and of course Cline's excellent singing voice, just trying to point out the most obvious. As for the global flow, over the course, gradually, the album is getting into more shallow waters, so to say. Hence, while taking care of my preference yet, this effort offers its real strength straight from the very start. Now let the guitars speak. Enchanting melodies with singalong character are offered, definitely entertaining. This is skillfully woven, including pop moments, folk and smooth jazz sentiment, samples, electronics, as well as courageous vocal and string arrangements. This album is a must have in each and every case. Especially if you're already keen on bands like Tiles, Spock's Beard, Nine Stones Close and similar.

 The Day Is Done by KARMAMOI album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.95 | 15 ratings

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The Day Is Done
Karmamoi Heavy Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars "Interesting new Italian prog".

When Karmamoi was working on its new album The Day Is Gone the band witnessed the horror of the Grenfell Tower on television (June 14th, 2017), this had a huge impact on them. After reading the heartbreaking story about the Syrian brothers Mohammed and Omar (they fled from Syria, had a safe home in London but Mohammed died in the Grenfell Tower disaster) the band decided to pay tribute with a concept album, featuring guest musicians singer Sara Rinaldi, Colin Edwin on bass (Porcupine Tree) and Geoff Leigh on flute (Steven Wilson).

Many tracks on this album alternate between atmospheric, dreamy and slow rhythms, coloured by the voice of Sara Rinaldi. I consider this mellow and dark music (reminding me of early Roger Waters solo) as a musical translation of the feelings of emptiness, sorrow, depression and grief after the Grenfell Tower disaster, for the brothers it was from one hell to another! The bombastic outbursts with moving guitar work sound like desperate cries, this adds a more dynamic dimension to the music. The first song (the titletrack) is a good example. It starts dreamy featuring twanging guitar, melancholical female vocals and piano, halfway a bit wailing flute. In the final part a powerful guitar solo with howling runs, in a bombastic outburst, very compelling, expressing the huge fear and despair in the inferno. And also in the instrumental track Getaway. First an intro with dreamy piano and atmospheric sounds, then a slow rhythm and gradually a more bombastic climate with moving, powerful electric guitar. Next the music returns to atmospheric but gradually culminates in a sumptuous outburst delivering a powerful electric guitar solo with again howling runs, this is topped with a subtle choir sound (I asked the band about this: it is a blend of Sara her voice and ethnic vox samples).

Some songs feature more dynamics and more tension, like in the alternating Portrait Of A Man with wonderful work on guitar (strong echoes from David Gilmour) and keyboards. And in Your Name. First a tight and catchy beat with powerful vocals and fiery electric guitar, gradually turning into more bombastic with lush keyboards. Halfway dreamy and atmospheric with fragile piano runs, soft bass and sensitive electric guitar and emotional female vocals. And finally another wonderful, often howling guitar solo , what a compelling music (Pink Floyd but also Camel come to my mind). In the track Take Me Home Geoff Leigh (Steven Wilson) shines with a swirling flute solo.

My highlight is Mother's Dirge, a long and captivating composition, close to 11 minutes. First a catchy beat, a raw guitar solo, then dreamy with twanging guitar and melancholical vocals. The music turns into a slow rhythm and more bombastic, with a sensitive electric guitar solo and a wonderful choir sound. Next dreamy with piano and vocals, suddenly a bombastic eruption with an ominous atmosphere and impressive words: '80 eyes have seen their end, that cruel damned night the fire swelled, 80 mouths have cried unheard, that cruel damned night the fire swelled, 80 hands have raised uncatched, that cruel damned night the fire swelled, 80 feets have run to death, that cruel damned night the fire swelled'. To me it evokes a tension and excitement that reminds me of The Wall by Pink Floyd. This part is followed by a slow rhythm and propulsive guitar riffs, embellished with a flashy synthesizer solo. Then melancholical vocals, and in the end a sensitive electric guitar solo, accompanied by a dynamic rhythm-section. This epic track is Karmakoi in its full splendor!

The final composition is the short and instrumental Lost Voices, very atmospheric (including ambulances sirens), close to ambient electronic, strongly contrasting with the dynamic previous composition. To me it sounds like a requiem, as a tribute to the victims.

Tasteful and elaborate compositions, a captivating balance between skills and emotions, this is an album to discover!

This review was recently published in a slightly different version on the Dutch progrock website Background Magazine.

 Caress Of Steel by RUSH album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.52 | 1206 ratings

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Caress Of Steel
Rush Heavy Prog

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

1 stars Despite being one to praise bands for being ambitious and trying something out, even if it doesn't quite work out, I still feel like there's a limit to how much credit I can give. To make things clearer, let's just say that I completely understand how this album was a flop both critically and commercially. After the slight leaning on prog found on certain songs in Fly By Night, Rush clearly thought that they could go so much further, creating an album in which 2 of the songs are 10 minutes or over, one of them almost 20. The issue with this is that the band seemed to be lacking ideas in the music department, with songs that while capturing more of the sound that Rush was to have, didn't change the fact that the songs sounded very uninspired all thoughout, the biggest offenders being the two epics, which both lack cohesion and sounded heavily padded.

The best song on the album is also the opening song, Bastille Day, and even it doesn't really match up to previous albums in terms of quality. It's a short, energetic song embracing a more metal tinged sound, but I personally find the riffs to be lackluster and everything to just sound kinda flat. The melody for the chorus is quite nice, and the solo is alright, but nothing here stands out to me, it's just an average song. I Think I'm Going Bald somehow manages to miss the one thing that has made Rush consistently great, even during weaker releases, incredible instrumentation, with the majority of the song sounding extremely bland, with awful lyrics and easily one of the most poorly executed solos that Alex Lifeson has performed within Rush's career, with nothing seeming to come together quite right at all, the mixing especially being off, with the guitar coming through really scratchily in places, further diminishing the enjoyment to be found here. Lakeside Park is also nothing particularly bad, although once again, I do find it to be quite unimpressive, defiitely being one of the weaker mid paced tracks Rush has put out, feeling very by the numbers in essentially every way, although Neil Peart does add some nice flair to aspects of the song. The worst part of the album is undoubtedly the final 2 songs however, and I'll talk about both of them interchangeably, as they both feel very similar to me, and both have the exact same problems. These songs both have some aspects os them which are great, such as the slow, atmospheric section of The Necromancer or the insane drum solo in Fountain Of Lamneth, but these are quickly replaced with either generic, or straight up bad sections that display next to nothing of any merit. This is especially present in the Fountain, as the back half of it is mostly comprised of slow passages that lack any sort of decent melody or beauty, being boring to a painful extent, especially when factoring just how long the song is. There's also the issue where even riffs that by all means should sound really great to me, just don't, the placement in the songs and the common lack of cohesion is what I say is to blame, with each song feeling like a variety of concepts and riffs loosely strung together, giving no moment any particular impact at all, no matter how good it could otherwise be. I just cannot enjoy anything to do with these in the slightest, and considering how much of the album they take up, it reflects the album extremely poorly.

While some people enjoy this album, and I cannot fault them for that, I personally find this album to be an absolute black hole of entertainment, and never has 44 minutes felt so long to me than when trying to actively listen to this album. The shorter songs lack the punch that their others tend to, and their more progressive compositions fall flat on their faces, easily being some of the most boring prog music I've heard. I'm very glad that Rush managed to bring out so many excellent albums past this point, but this album is one that I don't really plan on ever returning to.

Best tracks: Bastille Day

Weakest tracks: I think I'm Going Bald, The Necromancer, Fountain of Lamneth

Verdict: I genuinely cannot think of a single person that I would recommend this album to in good spirit, I find the best track on here to still be somewhat dull, and for almost the entire rest of it to be stuff that I honestly never want to hear again. To me, this is boring to a painful extent.

 Pentadelia by ALBATROS album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.46 | 28 ratings

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Pentadelia
Albatros Heavy Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars "Overlooked new Spanish prog"

I discovered this Spanish five-piece formation on The Spanish Progressive Rock Page (I wrote a few years for this website that looks dead and burried since 2016) ) in the New Releases section, like I did with other promising new Spanish bands Zaguan, Neverness, Bijou and the excellent Senogul. I was very curious to Albatros their sound when I read about their psychedelic oriented blend of several styles, from Rock Andalus to prog metal. Well, during my first listening session I got impressed from the very first moment. Although I trace elements from early Led Zeppelin, Seventies Hawkwind, Pink Floyd (Pompeii-era) and Eighties Rush, I notice that Albatros (the name points at five guys who wants to make psychedelic inspired music) has developped an own musical identity: their trademarks are great dynamics and building up compelling or hypnotizing atmospheres, topped with surprising musical ideas, an adventurous rhythm- section, powerful guitarwork and inventive keyboard play. The album contains 8 songs, I am delighted about 6 tracks because these showcase Albatros their exciting eclectic musical approach.

The instrumental 48: It starts with the sound of the sea and birds, blended with powerful saxophone work and then climates that shift from propulsive with prog metal guitar/drums to a slow rhythm with sensitive electric guitar/mellow organ and a dreamy atmosphere with twanging guitar and soaring keyboards. This culminates into a very compelling psychedelic mood featuring great interplay, fiery guitar and hypnotizing synthesizers.

Supernova: A strong and catchy beat in a hypnotizing climate (evoking early Hawkwind) with wah-wah guitar and lots of dynamics, the second part is mellow with Floydian guitar and warm Spanish vocals, ending in a lush finale delivering a sensitive electric guitar solo and a fluent rhythm-section.

Santuario: First a mellow climate with twanging acoustic guitar, then an accellaration featuring fluent drums, inspired Spanish vocals and tasteful interplay between guitar and keyboards.

The instrumental Ensor: Tasteful and varied with sensational interplay between a bombastic choir-Mellotron-like sound and wah-wah drenched guitar with obvious psychedelic undertones.

Waiting For A Sign: First wailing distorted vocals and bluesy Fender Rhodes piano, then more and more dynamic with a slow but exciting psychedelic inspired synthesizer solo, very compelling music.

And finally the instrumental Mehari: Dynamic and varied with excellent work on guitar and keyboards, the climate sounds like Heavy Psychedelic Prog.

The other two songs also deliver good and captivating moments but Hombre Menguante suffers from mediocre English vocals and the final track Las Tripas de Goliat sounds a bit too fragmentic to me (too many ideas in one song in my opinion) and I am not pleased with the theatrical way of singing.

Nonetheless, I still consider Albatros its debut album as a very promising effort: cascades of interesting musical ideas, it generates a lot of excitement and the band succeeds to keep an own face in a fascinating way. Unfortunately no more albums after its second Ursus from 2011 and Mundo Bosque from 2014.

 Night Shadow by DANIEL ELISEEV PROJECT (D.E.P.) album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.96 | 14 ratings

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Night Shadow
Daniel Eliseev Project (D.E.P.) Heavy Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

4 stars "Good new from Bulgaria, very good news!"

Guitar player, arranger and composer Daniel grew up at a time when Bulgaria was part of the so-called communist Eastern Bloc, in these difficult times rock music was like a semi-legal way of expressing yourself and standing out of the communist system. When Daniel was 10 years old he listened to The Beatles, his mother loved to play their music, and he started to be interested in music. When he was 13 a friend gave him an acoustic guitar for one night, he was enchanted and arranged on the first three strings of the guitar a popular melody of a movie, then his musical adventure started. Classic progressive rock played a huge role in his development as a musician, especially the albums Going For The One by Yes and Three Friends by Gentle Giant. He also got inspiration from Genesis, The Mahavishnu Orchestra, King Crimson, The Beatles, Van Der Graaf Generator, Kansas, UK, Rush, Allan Holdsworth, Steve Hackett and Anthony Phillips. And more modern favourite bands are Echolyn, The Flower Kings, Enchant, Porcupine Tree, Steven Wilson, Cairo, Tears For Fears, Frost, Spock's Beard and Magellan. Bulgaria is a country where progressive rock is not very popular. FSB is one of the most successful Bulgarian bands but 'it's not easy to be a non-commercial musician, you are like a lone wolf' Daniel says. Progrock concerts are rare but there is much more attention for world-known bands like Dream Theater, Riverside, Steven Wilson and Steve Hackett. In 1995 Daniel started his professional carreer with the band Avalon and their eponymous debut album, followed by playing with the bands Travelhouse, Arx, Insight, Led Zeppelin Tribute Bulgaria, Prog-Rock Tribute Bulgaria, Sekta, Modus, Surbahar, TubeFx and Samodelia. Since 2013 he focused on one side writing and producing his own author's music, and on other side in developing his own private music school Infinity. In 2018 he released his first solo album under the name Daniel Eliseev Project (D.E.P.) entitled Night Shadow. In the autumn the first single will appear, and in the first half of the year 2020 the second album of Daniel Eliseev Project (D.E.P.) can be expected. Meanwhile, in parallel with the second D.E.P. album, he is also working on an entirely instrumental album, which will appear in 2020.

1. Alter Ego (5:27) : The album kicks off with powerful and dynamic Heavy Prog (Rush inspired) featuring Yes-like vocal harmonies, a captivating contrast with the exciting heavy guitar riffs and blistering guitar solo, topped with subtle Supertramp- like electric piano runs. An impressive start!

2. Night Shadow (7:06) : This track is more song-oriented with a blend of electric ' and acoustic guitar, and a strong vocal performance by Konstantin Djambazov. It sounds very melodic and harmonic, like Eighties Yes. Halfway a break with spectacular keyboard runs and heavy guitar riffs, then a tight mid-tempo with exciting heavy guitar solo, I enjoy the huge tension between the mellow and heavy parts. The bombastic final part delivers thunderous drums.

3. Pandora And Epimetheus (7:12) : First a mellow intro with soft fretless bass runs by Venci Pavlov, and subtle work on guitar and keyboards. Now the climate turns first into bombastic with powerful guitar, lush Hammond rhythm, and then into catchy beat with male and female vocal duet. The second part is Heavy Prog Extravaganza with lots of strong musical ideas: from a break with acoustic guitar runs, Mellotron violins, Hammond and a vocal duet to flashy synthesizer runs and a fiery guitar solo. The interplay between the musicians is awesome and I am blown away by the bombastic atmosphere featuring heavy riffs, lush Hammond and powerful guitar, top notch Heavy Prog!

4. Awakening (2:18) : After lots of Heavy Prog this composition is dreamy with warm classical guitar and nature sounds, then wonderful violin and a viola da gamba (rooted in Italy), simply beautiful.

5. Broken Consciousness (5:09) : The first part contains twanging acoustic guitar, a mellow mid-temp with pleasant vocals, song-oriented, embellished with viola da gamba and acoustic guitar. Halfway the mood shifts to an accellaration with sensational soli on guitar and keyboards, fuelled by excellent rhythm-section, wow!

6. Hidden Voices (3:50) : This one is a tribute to the distinctive Gentle Giant vocal harmonies, with tasteful synthesizer layers. Then an accellaration with spectacular synthesizer sounds and vocal harmonies, the music sounds very dynamic and powerful, with hints from Rush.

7. A Song For You (3:01) : This mellow piece is a personal song, dedicated to Daniel his mother, she died too early, the fairy tale-like atmosphere evokes an imaginery world, with voices of children, and celestial female vocals by Anelia Toteva. Daniel puts his emotion into the music with outstanding twanging acoustic guitar, and a few words, very moving.

8. The Journey Along (9:58) : This epic final composition begins with spacey synthesizer and sensitive electric guitar. The lots of shifting moods, between mellow and bombastic, the one moment acoustic guitar (twanging and flageolets), the other moment heavy guitar work (from propulsive riffs to biting runs) or sensational synthesizer flights, and a powerful Hammond solo, I love that distinctive sound! In the final part the music alternates between dreamy with a ticking clock sound and exciting heavy guitar (again Rush comes to my mind), topped with strong vocal harmonies. Finally subtle guitar work with the volume pedal and strumming acoustic guitar, slowly fading away, what an awesome and elaborate composition!

I am impressed by Daniel his first solo project, he delivers a very dynamic album with lots of exciting work on guitar and keyboards, strong vocals and inventive and varied musical ideas. He is surrounded by outstanding musicians. Highly recommended, especially for the Heavy Prog fans

 Zea Mice by MOTHER TURTLE album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.94 | 104 ratings

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Zea Mice
Mother Turtle Heavy Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N 255

Mother Turtle is a Greek progressive rock band that started as a jam studio band who take their cues from nearly all aspects of progressive rock, a synergy of many ingredients tossed, fried, and served in sizzler style to make this a very tasty prog band. Mother Turtle was formed in Thessaloniki in 2011 and previously was known as Hogweed. The band members cite as their inspirations Frank Zappa, Rush, Camel, Genesis, Marillion, and many other prog rock legends.

Mother Turtle is perhaps the most mischievous and known progressive rock band from Greece nowadays. Surely it's one of the most representatives of the term 'progressive', without the strain it has been through for at least 20 years, and not just within borders, is global. If there is an element independent of the exact musical content I'm looking for in a prog band, that's the unpredictability. Mother Turtle have this element as a key part of their temperament and that was shown both on their self-titled debut studio album in 2013 and on their second one 'II' in 2016. Even within each album the different elements are many and even the basic direction isn't the same on the tracks. Their third studio album 'Zea Mice' released in 2018 solemnly confirms the above it the most challenging listening experience offered us so far.

So, 'Zea Mice' is the third studio album of Mother Turtle and was released in 2018. The core of Kostas Konstantinidis, George Theodoropoulos and George Baltas have been writing music together since the band's self- titled debut, adding George Filopelou, Alexander Kiourntziadis and Babis Prodromidis for their sophomore release 'II'. All of them have stayed on for this third foray into the realm of the progressive rock music. So, the line up on the album is Kostas Konstantinidis (lead and backing vocals, guitars, MiDi, ukulele and composer), Giorgos Theodoropoulos (keyboards and programming), Babis Prodomidis (saxophone), Alex Kiourntziadis (violin), George Filopelou (bass) and Giorgos Mpalats (drums). 'Zea Mice' also features some guest musicians, Elpida Papakosma (vocals), Aristotelis Mavropoulos (reader) and Apostolis Georgiadis (percussion).

For an unsigned act in just their seventh year, Mother Turtle has presented some remarkably mature and fascinating writing to the world. Their independent work is polished and consistently gains reputation in the realm of progressive rock music. In their new work, Mother Turtle decided to silence vocally and concentrates almost only on music. From the earliest hearings, one could say that the band parodies an entire musical genre. Still, things in 'Zea Mice' are absolutely serious, really. But, perhaps the most interesting here is that 'Zea Mice' is an instrumental album, which is a departure from the band's first two previous albums, both of which featured regular vocal work. While several pieces on this release do feature recitations and meandering vocalizations, the vast majority of the album is an extended instrumental journey through funk, jazz, electronic, and ambient music. 'Zea Mice' proves that Mother Turtle can and will employ a varied approach to composing in a musical niche where it seams the sky is truly the only limit to them.

'Zea Mice' is comprised of three movements, simply entitled Parts I, II and III, each one is a multi-track ordeal. Being an instrumental album with ambiguous track titles and only a handful of spoken portions, all in Greek, by which to navigate, the album's artwork and language conjure thematic images of refuse, abandonment, and survival. Musically speaking, there are sections that trend toward jazz-fusion, others that are dirty hard rock, and others still that touch on the territory of avant-garde music. The composition of Mother Turtle remains the same and unaltered compared to the previous 'II'. The jamming spirit that seemed to adopt on their previous work, not only continues but it's also a vehicle to explore new prog paths that we have not been used to. One would say how the neo-prog and symphonic style of their self-titled debut has almost disappeared, while the jazz rock and Canterbury elements of 'II' have been thrilled by psych prog touches that bring to my mind the best moments of Ozric Tentacles and Porcupine Tree period of the 90's.

Conclusion: Mother Turtle impressed me once again and I would say that I'm very impressed with the way the band evolves. 'Zea Mice' is a difficult but a brilliant album of Mother Turtle where is difficult to point an indisputably lonely progressive style. One has to invest some time and effort to get to the bottom of this band and album that, besides a broad range of musical approaches, also offers an infinite number of instruments and moods. This isn't easy stuff, indeed. Personally, I think it really says something about the band's compositional abilities when they can write an instrumental album with unique tracks that don't simply bleed into one unidentifiable whole. In reality 'Zea Mice' is an ingenious combination of styles and flavours of rock, jazz, primal prog, contemporary prog, larded with folk, metal, oriental, classical and endless other influences. Prog rock must be revolutionary, and under this light, Mother Turtle is the undisputed marketers of this particular artistic insurrection. So, 'Zea Mice' is a strong and great album to listen to.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Demons And Wizards by URIAH HEEP album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.07 | 725 ratings

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Demons And Wizards
Uriah Heep Heavy Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars By 1972 the rock music universe began to settle into distinct marketing packages as the free for all 60s experimentation that trickled into the early 70s began to dissipate. Bands that mixed various styles of music were suddenly finding it more prudent to settle on one side of the fence or the other. While some progressively infused heavy rock bands jumped the fence to pure prog (T2, Atomic Rooster, High Tide), many of those bands ceased to exist after an album or two as the prog universe became more sophisticated however as that scenario unfolded the world of hard rock was becoming more popular and as a result more financially viable. While URIAH HEEP straddled both worlds equally on its 1971 bouts with excellence on the albums 'Salisbury' and 'Look At Yourself,' it wasn't hard to see which way the wind was blowing with bands like Black Sabbath, Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin tearing up the charts and laughing all the way to the bank.

And so it was decided that URIAH HEEP would follow their initial inclinations as demonstrated on their debut album ''Very 'Eavy ' Very 'Umble' that they would hone their musical constructs into the world of hard rock and as the band became more confident of their abilities the band finally found the success that eluded them during the experimental phase with their breakthrough album DEMONS AND WIZARDS in 1972. The band joined the ranks of many of the fringe prog related bands of the era that implemented a more direct heavy rock approach but augmented with a few proggy features which usually included an epic track that delved into greater complexities without what many deemed overweening prog excesses. So in the year 1972 when rock could exist as the bubblegum glam rock of Sweet, T. Rex or Roxy Music, or the over-zealous art rock of prog's bigwigs such as Yes, Jethro Tull, Gentle Giant and Genesis,

URIAH HEEP found the perfect middle ground and in the process found their greatest success as well as their only American top 40 single in the form of the 60s garage band meets heavy psyche single 'Easy Livin.' The album eschewed the excesses of the past and crafted nice neatly packaged smaller chunks of melodic hard rock mixed with softer acoustic guitar and shifted the emphasis off of Ken Hensley's virtuosic organ driven antics to the vocal prowess of lead singer David Byron. His vocal style was exactly what the doctor ordered for not only breaking the band into the mainstream but also as a major inspiration for the heavy metal bands of the late 70s and 80s. DEMONS AND WIZARDS found a new bassist in the New Zealand born Gary Thain who had played with the Keef Hartley Band after the departure of Paul Newton who seems to have dropped out of the music industry. Additionally Lee Kerslake replaced drummer Iain Clark. Ironically despite finding more in common with Blue Oyster Cult or the less progressive Mark II lineup of Deep Purple, DEMONS AND WIZARDS displayed the fantasy artwork of Roger Dean on the album cover, who had made his name more synonymous with the prog world with bands like Yes and despite the connotations of a fantasy album by the album cover art, the tracks were really just a collection of feel good songs that had nothing in common with each other. Concentrated and to the point, DEMONS AND WIZARDS cast the perfect hard rock spell that mesmerized the public's appetite for short no nonsense hard rockers and as the track 'Easy Livin' hit #39 on the Billboard charts and the album became one of the year's best sellers and has sold well over six million copies ever since as well as hitting #23 on Billboard's album charts.

While there is no doubt that the progressive rock tendencies on the previous albums took URIAH HEEP to a whole new level and that this demoted hard rock style does seem a little lackluster in comparison, DEMONS AND WIZARDS nonetheless emerged as a brilliant slice of early 70s hard rock that still managed to throw in a few proggy touches such as the organ sequences on 'Circle of Hands' or the pseudo-prog combo pack of the final two tracks 'Paradise' and 'The Spell' that appear as a single track on some CD editions. While straight forward hard rock rules the roost on this one, this closing duality found an atmospheric acoustic guitar progression that sounded more like Pink Floyd than Deep Purple but found resolution as things morphed into a honky tonk blue rock based upbeat sequence.

Personally i would've preferred that URIAH HEEP had stuck to their heavy prog compositions that they crafted in 1971 as i find them much more interesting than the rather watered down albums that follow but i have to admit that DEMONS AND WIZARDS stands out as the best of the hard rock years that continued throughout the 70s into the modern era. The album not only displayed a band that crafted some of the tightest tracks of their career but also showcases how their melodic hooks are utterly irresistible excellent guitar performances made all the better by David Byron's phenomenal vocals. This was the first step into a highly successful stream of albums that stacked up in the 70s and although the band's popularity started to diminish in the 80s the band has remained a popular arena rock act with some of the classic tracks on DEMONS AND WIZARD remaining steadfast crowd pleasers. A step down in the world of prog complexities but the first step in a highly lucrative career. Can't say i blame them for their decision.

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Heavy Prog bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
2112 Argentina
41POINT9 United States
4X United Kingdom
99 NAMES OF GOD United States
ABASH Italy
ABIGAIL'S GHOST United States
ADVENT HORIZON United States
AFTER THE FALL United States
AICAN Russia
ALBATROS Spain
ALDENFIELD United States
ALGABAS Russia
ALGARAVIA Brazil
ALIZARIN United States
ALTERED STATE United States
ALTHEA Italy
AMALGAM EFFECT United States
AMUSIA Canada
ANABASI ROAD Italy
THE ANABASIS United States
ANDROMEDA Germany
ANEKDOTEN Sweden
ANKH Poland
ANOMUS Finland
ANTI-DEPRESSIVE DELIVERY Norway
ANXTRON Brazil
APOLLO Finland
ARABS IN ASPIC Norway
ARAXES Switzerland
ARC United Kingdom
ARCANE Australia
ARCANE ATLAS United States
THE ARISTOCRATS Multi-National
ARMAGEDDON United Kingdom
ARTYFICTION Poland
ASTEROID Sweden
ATLANTIDE Italy
ATLAS CUBE Germany
ATLAS VOLT Sweden
ATOMIC ROOSTER United Kingdom
ATRIS United States
AUSTRALIS Chile
AUTOMATIC FINE TUNING United Kingdom
BABE RUTH United Kingdom
BADGER United Kingdom
BAKER GURVITZ ARMY United Kingdom
BAKERY Australia
BALISET United States
BALLOON Netherlands
BARAKA Japan
DAVID BARRET TRIO Canada
BASS INVADERS United States
BATTLE CIRCUS New Zealand
ERIC BAULE Spain
BBI France
BI KYO RAN Japan
BIBLE BLACK Japan
A BIG GOODBYE United States
BIGELF United States
BIRTH CONTROL Germany
THE BITTERS United States
BL LOTUS Sweden
BLACK BONZO Sweden
BLACK MARKET SEROTONIN United Kingdom
BLACK WIDOW United Kingdom
BLOOD CEREMONY Canada
BODKIN United Kingdom
BOLT United States
BOOK OF HOURS Sweden
BREAKING ORBIT Australia
THE BROWN Japan
BULL ANGUS United States
BURNING SAVIOURS Sweden
CACTUS PEYOTES Brazil
CAMAFEO Argentina
CAPHARNAUM Canada
CAPTAIN BEYOND United States
CAPTAIN KICKARSE AND THE AWESOMES Australia
CAPTAIN OF THE SWEDISH TEAM Canada
CARDEILHAC Switzerland
CARGO Netherlands
CARGO CULT REVIVAL United States
CARPADIUM United States
CARPE NOTA United States
CASUAL SILENCE Netherlands
CELELALTE CUVINTE Romania
CELESTIAL OEUVRE United States
CHAIN United States
CHOLO VISCERAL Peru
CHRONOBUNNY Norway
STEVE CICHON United States
CLEAR BLUE SKY United Kingdom
CLEVIS United States
CLIMAX Bolivia
COBWEB STRANGE United States
COLLAPSE France
COLT Poland
CONTRA United States
CONTRARIAN United States
COSMIC NOMADS Australia
A COSMIC TRAIL Germany
TYLER COTNER United States
COUNTRY LANE Switzerland
CRACK THE SKY United States
CRYPTIC VISION United States
CRYSTAL BREED Germany
MICKEY CURTIS AND SAMURAI Japan
THE CYBERIAM United States
CYNICISM MANAGEMENT Slovenia
CYTRUS Poland
D'ACCORD Norway
DAH Yugoslavia
DNAE Argentina
DANIEL ELISEEV PROJECT (D.E.P.) Bulgaria
DAREDIABLO United States
DARK United Kingdom
DEAD END SPACE United States
DEAFENING OPERA Germany
THE DEATH COBRA Australia
DEEEXPUS United Kingdom
DEFORMICA Argentina
DJ-VU Norway
DELLA TERRA (AEGIS INTEGER) United States
DELTA RED Mexico
DELVOID Norway
DEMIANS France
DEVIL DOLL Multi-National
DIALETO Brazil
DIAPASYN United States
DIFICIL EQUILIBRIO Spain
DILEMMA Netherlands
DILLINGER Canada
THE DIVINE BAZE ORCHESTRA Sweden
DIVINE IN SIGHT United States
EL DOOM & THE BORN ELECTRIC Norway
DR. Z United Kingdom
DRAGON Belgium
DRUGI NAčIN Yugoslavia
DUST SCULPTURES United States
EARTH ELECTRIC Portugal
EARTH FLIGHT Germany
EASTER ISLAND United States
EAT GHOSTS / MINERVA Germany
EIGHTH WHALE United States
ELDER United States
ELF PROJECT United States
ELIAS HULK United Kingdom
ELONKORJUU Finland
ENCHANT United States
ENFANT Bolivia
ENMARTE Argentina
ENORMITY United States
EPHRAT Israel
EPITAPH Mexico
EPIZOOTIC Sweden
ESCHERBACH United States
ESTIGMA Chile
ETT ROP P HJLP Sweden
EVERON Germany
EVERY OTHER FATE United States
EXCUBUS Canada
EXPLORERS CLUB United States
EXSIMIO Chile
FACING NEW YORK United States
THE FALL OF TROY United States
FANTASMAGORIA Japan
THE FAR SIDE Italy
FIELDS United Kingdom
FITNES Serbia
FIVE OF THE EYES United States
FLOTANTE Chile
FORGOTTEN SUNS Portugal
A FORMAL HORSE United Kingdom
FRAME Germany
FREEDOM'S CHILDREN South Africa
FRIJID PINK United States
FUMIGUN Chile
FUNGUS Italy
FUSION ORCHESTRA United Kingdom
FUSION ORCHESTRA 2 United Kingdom
FUTURE WAS PERFECT Bulgaria
FUZZY DUCK United Kingdom
GTE Norway
GATE 6 Netherlands
GENEROUS MEN Sweden
GHOST IN MIRRORS United Kingdom
GHOST MEDICINE United States
GHOST TOAST Hungary
GLARESHIFT Italy
GLASSWORK Spain
GNOMONAUT United States
MOOSEHEART GODBLESS THEE United States
GODZILLA IN THE KITCHEN Germany
GOMORRHA Germany
GOODTHUNDER United States
GOSIA United Kingdom
GRAN TORINO Italy
GRAVY TRAIN United Kingdom
THE GREAT LABYRINTH PROJECT United States
GREYHAVEN United States
H.A.A.S. Colombia
HACKBERRY Netherlands
HADES Norway
HAIL THE SUN United States
HAKEN United Kingdom
HALLELUJAH United Kingdom
HAYSTACKS BALBOA United States
HAZE Germany
HEADSPACE United Kingdom
HEIR TO MADNESS United States
HERO Italy
HEROINE United States
HIGH TIDE United Kingdom
HILLWARD Canada
EL HOMBRE ASTRAL Spain
HST Norway
HUMAN LIFE INDEX United States
HUMUS FUGA Guatemala
I AM THREE PEOPLE Finland
I BOW CANDLES Multi-National
IDEE CONFUSE Italy
IMAGERY Brazil
IMAGIN'ARIA Italy
IMPULSO DE LOS SONIDOS INCONSCIENTES Argentina
IN OCEANS United Kingdom
IN THE PRESENCE OF WOLVES United States
INDIAN SUMMER United Kingdom
INDISCIPLINE Canada
INFRONT Russia
INTROVISIN Costa Rica
L' IRA DEL BACCANO Italy
IRISH COFFEE Belgium
IZ United States
JACK YELLO Germany
JACKAL Canada
JANE Germany
JARDIN DE PIEDRA Peru
JENGHIZ KHAN Belgium
JIMMY CHAMBERLIN COMPLEX United States
JOHN PAUL JONES United Kingdom
JONESY United Kingdom
JUGLANS REGIA Italy
JUNIPHER GREENE Norway
JUNK FARM Germany
KALEIDOREAL Sweden
KARMAMOI Italy
KARNIVOOL Australia
KES Turkey
KETTLESPIDER Australia
KIN PING MEH Germany
KINDLER United States
THE KINDRED Canada
KINGFISHER SKY Netherlands
KOPECKY United States
KOURTYL France
LAGITAGIDA Japan
LANDBERK Sweden
LANDSCAPE Netherlands
LAST LAUGH Sweden
LAUNDRY United States
LUCAS LEE United States
LEECH Estonia
LEGEND United States
LEST France
LEVIN MINNEMANN RUDESS United States
LIQUID SCARLET Sweden
LIQUID WOLF Finland
LONE STAR United Kingdom
A LONELY CROWD Australia
LORD ONLY United States
LOST APPARITIONS United States
LOST NATION United States
LOVE FAGERSTEDT Sweden
LUCIFER'S FRIEND Germany
LUGNORO Sweden
MAD ARTWORK Sweden
MADRIGAL Germany
MAGELLAN United States
MAGNA VICE Finland
MALOMBRA Italy
THE MARS VOLTA United States
FELIX MARTIN United States
MASTER EXPERIENCE Italy
MAXWELL'S DEMON United States
MAY BLITZ United Kingdom
MEDEA Netherlands
MELODRAMUS United States
THE MERCURY TREE United States
METANOMIA Argentina
MICAH United States
MIGHTY ZAZUUM Croatia
MILESTONE Russia
MOCAH Argentina
MDULO 1000 Brazil
HEDVIG MOLLESTAD TRIO Norway
MONTRESOR Australia
MONUMENT / ZIOR United Kingdom
MORTE MACABRE Sweden
MOTHER TURTLE Greece
MOTHERJANE India
MUMPBEAK United Kingdom
MURPHY BLEND Germany
NAIKAKU Japan
NAKED France
THE NATIONAL ORCHESTRA OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GOATS Italy
NEBULOSA Sweden
NECROMANDUS United Kingdom
NEM-Q Netherlands
NEPOčIN Yugoslavia
NEVRLLJF Sweden
NEW SUN United States
NIGHT SUN Germany
NIGHTRIDER France
NIMB Mexico
NINGEN-ISU Japan
NO BRAIN CELL Greece
NO LIFE ORCHESTRA Norway
NO MORE PAIN United States
NOMADIC HORIZON United States
NON NEWTONIAN MAN Italy
NORTHWIND United States
NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED United States
NOUGHT United Kingdom
OCEAN France
OCEANA COMPANY Netherlands
ODD PALACE Denmark
ODIN United Kingdom
OF THE I Switzerland
OKO Yugoslavia
OKTOPUS United Kingdom
OLLOCS United States
ONSGEN ENSEMBLE Finland
OPRAM France
OPUS 3 Chile
OPUSCULUS Canada
ORATRISM France
ORIGENS Brazil
ORION DUST France
ORPHAN BLOOM United States
ORPHEO Netherlands
ORPHEUS NINE United States
OSADA VIDA Poland
OVRFWRD United States
P.A.W.N. Germany
PENDULUM Indonesia
PERMIAN INCIDENT Norway
PERSEPHONE'S DREAM United States
PESKY GEE United Kingdom
PHANTOM'S OPERA United States
PHI Austria
PHOENIX DOWN United States
PINKROOM Poland
PINN DROPP Poland
PINNACLE United States
PIRATE Australia
PLAYGROUNDED Greece
PLESIOSAURIO Argentina
POINTS NORTH United States
POLICROMIA Argentina
POP MASINA Yugoslavia
PORCUPINE TREE United Kingdom
PORT MAHADIA United States
PORTMAN Croatia
POSEIDOTICA Argentina
PREHISTORIC ANIMALS Sweden
PRO MUSICA Romania
PROGRESIV TM Romania
PSIGLO Uruguay
PSYCHOCEAN Italy
EL PUENTE DE ALVARADO Mexico
PUGH'S PLACE Netherlands
PULP CULTURE United States
PULSONICA Argentina
QUATERMASS United Kingdom
RAG I RYGGEN Sweden
RAINER TANKRED PAPPON Brazil
RAM United States
REACHING REVERY United States
RED STAR REVOLT United States
RENAISSANCE OF FOOLS Sweden
ALBERTO RIGONI Italy
ROLE OF THE OBSERVER United States
ROOM United Kingdom
ROSALIA Japan
JASON RUBENSTEIN United States
RUPHUS Norway
RUSH Canada
S&L Italy
S.O.T.E. (SONGS OF THE EXILE) Netherlands
SAELIG OYA France
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SARTORIUS Mexico
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SECTION 3B Multi-National
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WHERE ARE YOU LIAM? Russia
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MICHAEL ZUCKER United States
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