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PROTO-PROG

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Proto-Prog definition

The denomination Proto Prog comes from the combination of two words, Proto from the Greek The earliest,. and Prog which as we know is a short term for Progressive Rock, so as it's name clearly indicates, refers to the earliest form of Progressive Rock or Progressive Rock in embryonary state.

These bands normally were formed and released albums before Progressive Rock had completely developed (there are some rare Proto Prog bands from the early 70's, because the genre didn't expanded to all the Continents simultaneously

The common elements in all these bands is that they developed one or more elements of Prog, and even when not completely defined as part of the genre, they are without any doubt, an important stage in the evolution of Progressive Rock.

Generally, Proto Prog bands are the direct link between Psyche and Prog and for that reason the Psychedelic components are present in the vast majority of them, but being that Progressive Rock was born from the blending of different genres, we have broadened the definition to cover any band that combined some elements of Progressive Rock with other genres prior to 1970.

Some of these bands evolved and turned into 100% Prog, while others simply choose another path, but their importance and contribution in the formative period of Prog can't be denied, for that reason no Prog site can ignore them.

Iván Melgar - Morey

Proto-Prog Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Proto-Prog | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.48 | 896 ratings
ABBEY ROAD
Beatles, The
4.50 | 518 ratings
QUADROPHENIA
Who, The
4.39 | 818 ratings
REVOLVER
Beatles, The
4.33 | 1062 ratings
DEEP PURPLE IN ROCK
Deep Purple
4.34 | 925 ratings
SGT. PEPPER'S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND
Beatles, The
4.31 | 1071 ratings
MACHINE HEAD
Deep Purple
4.36 | 504 ratings
WHO'S NEXT
Who, The
4.31 | 587 ratings
THE DOORS
Doors, The
4.17 | 721 ratings
THE BEATLES [AKA: THE WHITE ALBUM]
Beatles, The
4.24 | 446 ratings
STRANGE DAYS
Doors, The
4.25 | 393 ratings
THE JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE: ARE YOU EXPERIENCED
Hendrix, Jimi
4.13 | 651 ratings
MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR
Beatles, The
4.02 | 418 ratings
L.A. WOMAN
Doors, The
3.92 | 633 ratings
RUBBER SOUL
Beatles, The
3.93 | 492 ratings
TOMMY
Who, The
3.96 | 347 ratings
THE JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE: ELECTRIC LADYLAND
Hendrix, Jimi
3.84 | 714 ratings
BURN
Deep Purple
3.99 | 267 ratings
THE JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE: AXIS - BOLD AS LOVE
Hendrix, Jimi
4.13 | 157 ratings
TWELVE DREAMS OF DR. SARDONICUS
Spirit
3.91 | 288 ratings
NOW WHAT?!
Deep Purple

Latest Proto-Prog Music Reviews


 Live At Leeds by WHO, THE album cover Live, 1970
4.01 | 131 ratings

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Live At Leeds
The Who Proto-Prog

Review by Guillermo
Prog Reviewer

3 stars This review is about the original LP release from 1970.

"The greatest live album of all time". Well. In my opinion, it isn't. I expected great things from this album after I read that it was considered by many people as a great live album. Maybe if I have listened to this album when I was a 13-15 year old teenager maybe I could consider this album as "the greatest live album of all time". But now...

Anyway, it is an energetic live album, with "raw" and spontaneus performances by a young band. But even with all these things being considered, I still think that there are better performances of some of these songs in other live albums. For example: the live version of "Young Man Blues" which was released in "The Kids Are Alright" soundtrack album in 1979 is better than the live version which was included in "Live at Leeds". The live version of "Summertime Blues" which was included in the "Woodstock" film is also better than the live version which was included in "Live at Leeds".

"My Generation" in "Live at Leeds" is a long version which also has a lot of improvisation from the band, also including some parts from other songs like "See Me, Feel Me" and "Sparks" from the "Tommy" Rock Opera. It is too long (15 minutes in duration) and it is not very interesting for me. The song "Magic Bus" has never been one of my favorite songs from the band, and this live version is not so good.

Anyway, "Live at Leeds" includes very energetic performances from the band, which are good but not better than other live recordings from the band, with Keith Moon's "hyperactive" drums playing, Pete Townshend's heavy guitar playing, John Entwistle's "thunderfingers" bass playing, and Roger Daltrey's very good lead vocals. But the original "Live at Leeds" album from 1970 also showed some mistakes in their playing and singing. Maybe due to this, it could be considered as an "honest" and "raw" live recording from this band, with the later expanded editions from this album being released with "corrections" done in the recording studio. So, the original LP release of "Live at Leeds" has it merits due to the more spontaneous playing and singing. Also, the cover design was a very good idea, with it being like a parody from a bootleg LP.

Good but not- essential, at least for me.

 H.P. Lovecraft by H.P. LOVECRAFT album cover Studio Album, 1967
3.32 | 45 ratings

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H.P. Lovecraft
H.P. Lovecraft Proto-Prog

Review by Progfan97402

4 stars I've been aware of H.P. Lovecraft since 1995, ever since I bought a copy of the Goldmine Price Guide to Collectible Record Albums (1994 edition) (too bad the book fell apart since). Ironically I knew this group before I knew the horror author/poet the band took their name from. This book obviously focused on American pressings only, so don't expect to find entries for Museo Rosenbach or Il Balletto di Bronzo, for example (if you want to see such, check Hans Pokora's Record Collector Dreams series of books). Everything from well known acts like the Beatles, Stones, Dylan and Elvis, to hyper rare and expensive like the New Tweedy Brothers. Groups like the Ultimate Spinach and H.P. Lovecraft are included. They gave a list of two prices, what each title was worth, near mint, and in good condition, in 1994 (some have really shot through the roof since then, others have stayed much the same). It's only recent that I finally acquired the first two H.P. Lovecraft LPs. Never regretted my purchases, although I realize later versions of the band (as Lovecraft and Love Craft) with only drummer Michael Tegza in common, are apparently to be avoided. Without a doubt their second album, H.P. Lovecraft II is clearly the best album. On their debut it's obvious their origins as a folk rock group, as they take on "Motherless Child" (they also took on "High Flying Bird" on their second album that Judy Henske is most famous for). Think of the debut as a bit in the league of Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, more folk rock, less psych, although the psychedelic elements are still there, this album was released in the fall of 1967, after Sgt. Pepper. How many version of Dino Valienti's (Chet Powers) "Let's Get Together" exist? H.P. Lovecraft did a version. The Airplane did one on Takes Off, and most notably the Youngbloods, who had the biggest hit with their version of it. The Kingston Trio recorded the earliest version of it in 1964. "I've Been Wrong Before" shows a bit of a Byrds influence, while "That's the Bag I'm In" reeks "'60s groovy", right down to the dated lingo. I really get a kick off this song. Despite I was born in 1972, I never related to the Gen-X lingo, never mind the current Millenial, although I always refrained from using the word "groovy" for the reason of embarrassment. "The White Ship" seems to be most liked, there's a bolero beat, almost as if the band had "White Rabbit" in mind and tried a similar approach. I'll be up front, and I'm not alone on this: "Time Machine" was a mistake. What's up with all this ragtime and vaudeville? There's one short organ break that I really like because, but that's it. Luckily I really love the lounge jazz of "That's How Much I Love You, Baby". The last piece is them doing a Gregorian chant. To me, with the exception of "Time Machine", this is a very good album, but I always felt their next one is better, but you still want their debut because it's still worth getting.
 West Coast Seatle Boy - The Jimi Hendrix Anthology by HENDRIX, JIMI album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2010
4.57 | 5 ratings

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West Coast Seatle Boy - The Jimi Hendrix Anthology
Jimi Hendrix Proto-Prog

Review by AZF

5 stars This is the greatest box set ever associated with Jimi Hendrix.A DVD containing a Timeline (Expertly narrated by Bootstrap Collins) of Jimi's letters from the Army. All the way up to his plans before his death. News reports of this are also included. Full song clips of TV performances. The greatest DVD (It knocks the Joe Boyd film!) is also available separately, should you find the box set price too much at the moment.

4 discs, the first is an alternative R'n'B Also Fans Of The 1960's. As it charts Jimi's session and early bands. The second disc starts us off during the making of "Are You Experienced?", and goes up to "Electric Ladyland", complete with acoustic demo tracks. This is probably the disc I play the most. The third disc is post "Electric Ladyland" in the first half and post Noel Redding for the second half. Woodstock guitarist Larry Lee sings a self composed sing "Mastermind" which is one of my highlights of the box. The final disc is either my second most played, or joint first, but it starts with an incredible Band Of Gypsies live take of "Stone Free" that Jimi transforms into a New Year's Eve celebration. Disc four has some incredible studio material from the same Band Of Gypsies that were tragically broken up. The last half of the fourth disc has Jimi paired with Billy Cox from his last band and Mitch Mitchell. One of my other highlights of the box is the instrumental "All God's Children" and finally the box ends with "Suddenly November Morning". A haunting acoustic demo which begs the confirmation and release of a whole album of acoustic Hendrix!

It was 2010 when I first got this box. I still listen to it constantly until forcing myself to change the discs. I feel it is a full five star effort. It is significant Experience Hendrix hasn't made another box. This would take some beating in both presentation (Book with rare photos sandwiched between the two discs on either bookend. DVD in envelope page at the end of the text), content and overall musicianship in the "West Coast Seattle Boy- The Jimi Hendrix Experience" box set.

 Come hell or high water by DEEP PURPLE album cover DVD/Video, 2001
4.01 | 44 ratings

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Come hell or high water
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by tvtennis

5 stars From time to time I have gone back to revisit this performance by MK II. On both; CD as well as the DVD releases. I've owned them since their release, but due to the emphasis being predominantly on Blackmore throwing water on the cameramen, I have missed the high level of the performance the band puts on. It is true by the bands' own admission that they had to work "extra hard". Perhaps that is the reason why this performance is somewhat different from the handful of others out there. All of the members have picked up their level a little extra. As far as Richie goes, he is being himself. His standards, as we all know, are quite high, so it does not hurt the show. It might even add to it a little. Having seen most of these songs performed n'teen times in the past over the years, from numerous live performances official and not. It is rather interesting to experience how an experienced band of guys can make it happen, and hardly miss a beat, giving the audience their value. Note: the DVD has a few more tracks on it than the CD release. The set list is impressive, "Anyone's Daughter" is a special treat from Fireball, and the sound quality is outstanding. Yes, Blackmore is in some what of a foul mood at the start, but having said that, it effects ONLY the first few minutes of Highway Star. If anything, it is exciting to see the slightly different (organ heavy) version of this track. Now I wish the CD reflected the rest of the tracks found on the DVD, I actually miss them.
 Come Hell Or High Water by DEEP PURPLE album cover Live, 1994
3.36 | 71 ratings

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Come Hell Or High Water
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by tvtennis

5 stars From time to time I have gone back to revisit this performance by MK II. On both; CD as well as the DVD releases. I've owned them since their release, but due to the emphasis being predominantly on Blackmore throwing water on the cameramen, I have missed the high level of the performance the band puts on. It is true by the bands' own admission that they had to work "extra hard". Perhaps that is the reason why this performance is somewhat different from the handful of others out there. All of the members have picked up their level a little extra. As far as Richie goes, he is being himself. His standards, as we all know, are quite high, so it does not hurt the show. It might even add to it a little. Having seen most of these songs performed n'teen times in the past over the years, from numerous live performances official and not. It is rather interesting to experience how an experienced band of guys can make it happen, and hardly miss a beat, giving the audience their value. Note: the DVD has a few more tracks on it than the CD release. The set list is impressive, "Anyone's Daughter" is a special treat from Fireball, and the sound quality is outstanding. Yes, Blackmore is in some what of a foul mood at the start, but having said that, it effects ONLY the first few minutes of Highway Star. If anything, it is exciting to see the slightly different (organ heavy) version of this track. Now I wish the CD reflected the rest of the tracks found on the DVD, I actually miss them.
 Scorching Beauty by IRON BUTTERFLY album cover Studio Album, 1975
2.35 | 30 ratings

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Scorching Beauty
Iron Butterfly Proto-Prog

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Four years after their first break up, Iron Butterfly comes back in January 1975 with Scorching Beauty. The album had a stunning cover art and photography, but it was a big, big disappointment. Although they still had half of the classic line up (guitarist Erik Brann and original drummer Ron Bushy) on board, the music had almost nothing reminding of their former self: without Doug Yule´s distinctive vocals and organ it just does not sound like Iron Butterfly at all. Worse: the new compositions were also very different and closer to the early 70´s hard rock cliches.

That would not be a big problem if they only were a little more inspired and convincing. Ok, the tracks are not all bad. The opener 1975 overture and Hard Miseree are quite pleasant and have their merits. However, they are easily counterbalanced by the mediocrity of the remaining cuts (Am I Down and People of The World are especially hard to listen to). Erik Brann proves himself a decent singer and his guitar skills are obvious, and the band is very tight, but the weak compositions really blew the whole experience. So much so that even the good production and nice performances could not save the project.

From now on Iron Butterfly was a completely band altogether. And they would only prove themselves worth with their next release Sun and Steel. This one is only for collectors and completionists.

 Burn by DEEP PURPLE album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.84 | 714 ratings

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Burn
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by Progfan97402

4 stars Although I have always enjoyed Deep Purple, I hadn't bothered buying much of their albums but sporadically, probably due to a lot of my years spent on buying more obscure stuff, but since a lot of the obscure stuff is just costing too much (the Italian prog, for example), I had to concentrate on lesser obscure stuff, like the Doors or Deep Purple for some catch up work. Burn brought in an then-unknown David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes from Trapeze, and for many, it's an improvement over Who Do We Think We Are (although I thought that one was underrated and I enjoyed that one too). It's been said the Coverdale and Hughes had brought in soul and funk influences in the band, but that's pretty much toned down on Burn, but brought much more in the front on their next one, Stormbringer. I remembered as a kid hearing the title track on the radio, it doesn't get the recognition of "Smoke on the Water", but still full of great guitar playing from Ritchie Blackmore, and Jon Lord does some extended organ, and even synth solos here. "Might Just Take Your Life" really features a nice organ riff from Lord, but for the most part, a bit on the bluesy side (Deep Purple only proves how much early heavy metal was rooted in the blues). "Lay Day, Stay Down" shows a bit of that boogie influence, but at least Blackmore made sure it still stayed in the hard rock/early metal vein. "Sail Away" is a bit on the funky side that I really like. The vocals sound deeper, so it's probably not Coverdale singing this one, but Hughes. Check out that big fat Moog solo Lord gives, it's brief, but you could imagine that coming out of a modular Moog, although it was a MiniMoog (except for ELP, and some electronic artists like Tangerine Dream, the modular Moog was pretty much passe in the prog rock world by 1974). "Mistreated" is another one of those bluesy numbers, while "A" 200", clearly John Lord's is much more in the prog vein, and is the one song that progheads are most likely to enjoy. But then Deep Purple did help to pioneer metal, but they frequently had prog tendencies from time to time. This particular song even had a little bit of Mellotron (Mellotron also appeared on Stormbringer, as well as The Book of Taleisyn on "Anthem"). While it's clear Burn isn't as great as the best Mark II lineup albums, it certainly is still very much well worth having, and still sounds like a Deep Purple album.
 Something Else From The Move by MOVE, THE album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1968
3.00 | 4 ratings

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Something Else From The Move
The Move Proto-Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE Team

3 stars THE MOVE had unexpected success with their debut eponymous album and although their fortune was limited to their native UK, the band had stacked up four top 10 hits and were eager to keep the fire burning. And that's exactly what they did by releasing this quick follow up in the form of a live EP titled SOMETHING ELSE FROM THE MOVE just a few months later. This was the perfect type of material to fill the slot between albums and showcased THE MOVE's energetic and electrifying live sets. The album was recorded live on February 27, 1968 at the famous London Marquee Club. The original release consisted of only five tracks and were mixed exclusively in mono however many more tracks were recorded and subsequently released as bonus tracks on future extended releases as well as being released in stereo. They are all also available as bonus tracks on the 1998 remastered reissue of the "Shazam" album.

While one would expect the performances to be material from the band's debut release, it actually contains nothing but covers of some of the band's favorite tracks beginning with The Byrd's "So You Want To Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star." Immediately one is struck by how much more raw and rocking this is compared to the carefully crafted and perfectly polished psychedelic pop of the debut release. The beauty of these live performances is it shows THE MOVE in full on stage regalia delivering a rock 'n' roll energy level that isn't always present on the studio albums. The selection of tracks is quite pleasant as they all seem to morph perfectly into one another despite being mined from quite a diverse catalogue of artists. The folk rock intro suddenly leaps into the psychedelic garage rock Love song "Stephanie Knows Who" and then off to the world of rockabilly with Eddie Cochran's "Somethin' Else." Also on board is the Jerry Lee Lewis track "It'll Be Me" and even an excellent cover of Spooky Tooth's "Sunshine Help Me" complete with groovy blues guitar riffs and solos matching the splendor of the original.

The album was released in 1999 on CD and from then on includes the Erma Franklin / Janis Joplin classic "Piece Of My Heart" and three other tracks by Denny Lane, Jackie Wilson and an additional unedited version of "Sunshine Help Me." This EP while not exactly essential is quite a pleasant listening experience as it fully conveys what THE MOVE was all about in a live setting and how well they could adapt their own particular style of playing around a varying set list of songs. The album has been remastered and reissued in its own right with varying amounts of bonus tracks tacked onto the end. It is really a treat to hear the band in their early days before the more progressive elements were added on "Shazam" and how well they could master the vast array of influences on board. While not quite reaching the heights of essential releases, it is nonetheless a very enjoyable little tidbit that fills the cracks of the time between the first two albums.

3.5 rounded down

 Metamorphosis by IRON BUTTERFLY album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.39 | 68 ratings

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Metamorphosis
Iron Butterfly Proto-Prog

Review by aglasshouse

4 stars Every time I've seen Iron Butterfly's history, their profile has a whole, and the music they've created, I've always thought of them as steadfast. In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, for all intents and purposes, should not have been as successful as it was. An 18-minute long acid trip jam? Many others at the time tried to achieve the same thing and failed, but these Californians somehow managed to turn such a product of the times into a product that stands the test of time (and made a boat-load at that). Something as miraculous as this is hard for anyone to followup, let alone a half-stoned [&*!#] rock band like Iron Butterfly was. They managed it though, the following album Ball (1969) charting even higher than it's predecessor in the U.S.

Iron Butterfly managed to make magic happen twice. I guess the obvious question that should and was asked was: "can they do it again?" Yes and no.

There's a difference this time around. Metamorphosis, released the following year after Ball, charted at 16 in the U.S. Now, in any other circumstance this would be laudable, because obviously it's not easy to whip up a record that charts in the first place. But for Iron Butterfly, this was practically dismal. Granted, 'Easy Rider' did chart 66 on Billboard, being I.B.'s biggest hit since 'In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida', although I personally owe this more to the success of the latter and name recognition as opposed to song quality (who knows, the 70's were easily pleased). So, financially-wise, Iron Butterfly were sort of able to hit the gold once more. However, musically-wise, Metamorphosis is different from all of it's predecessors, even including Heavy. A sense of fragility (that granted plagued many bands during transitional periods) comes into play here, because the band slowly started going downhill after their monster-hit, and Metamorphosis was the last album regarded at least decently by critics. On this particular album, the original line- up is broken, with guitarist Erik Brann parting ways due to band conflicts. Replacing him, flatteringly enough, was four different session guitarists. Mike Pinera of Blues Image and Alice Cooper (as well as Ramadam, a supergroup formed with Mitch Mitchell of Jimi Hendrix Experience), Larry Reinhardt (future Captain Beyond along with Dorman), Bill Cooper, and even producer Richard Podolor on the twelve-string.

Metamorphosis is really the culmination of Iron Butterfly's slowly building up musical consistency since In-A-Gadda- Da-Vida. This applies for musicianship (because honestly they weren't the greatest players), production, and songwriting. The production is much higher, and allows for a more dynamic sound in both the experimental and traditional departments. Speaking of experimental, critics tend to refer to Iron Butterfly post-Vida as being more and more musically adventurous, and I would tend to agree. Metamorphosis puts a much greater emphasis on the progressive/space rock side of the band, something I've always found remarkably endearing when it comes to them in particular. Mostly this is on the smash epic 'Butterfly Bleu', a masterpiece of proto-metal and prog music that rivals even I-A-G-D-V (except is much more structured and, dare I say, intelligent?). Still retaining a spaced-out, pseudo complex attitude, 'Butterfly Bleu' manages to be heavy, emotional, and eclectic all in on package. It also funnily enough features one of the earliest uses of a talk-box (yeah, that thing Bon Jovi used on 'Livin' On a Prayer' to make his guitar go "rwoworwowrwow") during a gritty section on the latter half of the epic. Of the traditional we have 'New Day', a Steppenwolf-esque song headed off by a disarmingly good catchy riff. 'Shady Lady' is, at times, your standard brand of funky blues-rock, but it delves into extremely dark tonal shifts at certain areas. The rest of the album is rather expected of Iron Butterfly, being basically cheesy rock n' roll tunes molded by quasi-hippie zeitgeist ('Soldier In Our Town'), but I suppose the big single 'Easy Rider' has it's moments as well.

The band itself does very well for itself on this particular album. As aforementioned, four different multi-talented guitarist make themselves well-known on Metamorphosis. Mike Pinera's (presumably) part on 'Butterfly Bleu' with the talk-box always makes me smile ever time I hear it. It really makes the song have a bigger personality (of course his vocals on the rest of the song is good as well, putting on a zealous, emotional performance). The Iron Butterfly themselves are nothing to scoff about of course, But it's clear that the talents of Ingle, Dorman, and Bushy are not without merit. The band's made their abilities clear ever since 'Vida' in '68, and here they meld almost perfectly with their session musicians.

Some may get turned off by Iron Butterfly's material, but for me Metamorphosis is nothing short of a wonderful surprise. People wanted the Butterfly, and they got the Butterfly.

 Made In Japan by DEEP PURPLE album cover Live, 1972
4.50 | 625 ratings

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Made In Japan
Deep Purple Proto-Prog

Review by LadyScarlet

5 stars This is without doubt the best live album made by anyone, and the most worn out LP of mine. Made in Japan shows Deep Purple at their peak, and the album contains many interesting parts. The album starts with the perfect show-opener "Highway Star". It contains of simple and effective riffs, mixed with virtuostic solos, beautiful arpeggios and Ian´s screaming vocals. The Made in Japan version of this song is also a perfect example of how tight Deep Purple was back then. "Child in Time" is the next song, and it is also one of my Purple favourites. On this version, you hear epic dynamics, unmatched singing from Gillan, a great organ solo by Jon Lord, extended and rapid guitar improvisation by Blackmore etc. As a whole, incredible song and performance! "Smoke on the water" isn´t the most known riff in the world for nothing. Killer riff, and great energy througout the song. As usual, unique and great solos by both Blackmore and Lord, and also the lyrics tells us a funny story. "The Mule", with its snakecharming theme, is the showcase for the amazing drummer Ian Paice. With that said, I tend to be inpatient with drum solos, so this is not my favourite track on the album. But I really like the way the band starts playing those rapid, unison licks after a long drum solo, and Paice just keeps going, drumming like a maniac! "Strange kind of Woman" is another favourite of the album. Very simple, swinging rock song, and then the guitar solos come! this song may contain the best guitar improvisation ever recorded with the two extended solos by Blackmore. The solos contains technique, melody, feeling, creativity and energy, just about everything you could wish! Strange kind of Woman also includes the interesting vocal/guitar battle between Gillan and Blackmore, which shows off Gillans incredible vocal range, and how good the two of them worked together musically. "Lazy" is in a way very basic, and in a way not basic at all. It starts off with a crazy organ intro, where Lord show us every possible way of playing a hammond. The song is simply a 12-bar, but heavily modified with Purple charachteristics. Fantastic soloing, great energy and pace, a break were Blackmore is quoting a swedish tune called "Midsommarvaka" and then the band get together again and finish the song in a classy way. Stunning performance! "Space Truckin" is the last song of the album, and covers a whole side on the LP. It´s a classic Purple song, and in this version it includes endless improvisations by the band, primarly by Lord. Not my favourite, but still a cool way to end an album. Five stars on this one without doubt, it belongs in everyones record collection!
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Proto-Prog bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
ANDROMEDA United Kingdom
APPALOOSA United States
BAKERLOO United Kingdom
THE BEATLES United Kingdom
BRAINBOX Netherlands
THE ARTHUR BROWN BAND United Kingdom
THE COLLECTORS Canada
COVEN United States
THE CROME SYRCUS United States
DEEP PURPLE United Kingdom
THE DOORS United States
EARTH OPERA United States
FLAMING YOUTH United Kingdom
GATTCH Slovakia
GILES GILES & FRIPP United Kingdom
THE GODS United Kingdom
H.P. LOVECRAFT United States
HANSSON & KARLSSON Sweden
HAPSHASH AND THE COLOURED COAT United Kingdom
JIMI HENDRIX United States
IRON BUTTERFLY United States
IT'S A BEAUTIFUL DAY United States
JEFFERSON AIRPLANE United States
KALEIDOSCOPE / FAIRFIELD PARLOUR United Kingdom
MÁQUINA! Spain
THE MASTERS APPRENTICES Australia
THE MOVE United Kingdom
NIRVANA United Kingdom
PAN & REGALIZ Spain
PÄRSON SOUND Sweden
THE PRETTY THINGS United Kingdom
QUIET WORLD United Kingdom
SALAMANDER United Kingdom
THE SHIVER Switzerland
SILVER APPLES United States
SPIRIT United States
SPOOKY TOOTH United Kingdom
SWEETWATER United States
TOMORROW United Kingdom
TOUCH United States
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA United States
VANILLA FUDGE United States
THE WHO United Kingdom

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