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PROGRESSIVE ELECTRONIC

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Progressive Electronic definition

Born in the late 60's after the expansion of avant-gardist, modern, post-modern and minimalist experimentation, the progressive electronic movement immediately guides us into a musical adventure around technologies and new possibilities for composition. As an author or a searcher, the musician often creates his own modules and electronic combinations, deciding his own artistic and musical action. The visionary works of Stockhausen, Subotnick, John Cage ("concrete" music, electro-acoustic experimentation), La Monte Young, Steve Reich, Terry Riley (minimal, micro-tonal music) express a vision of total reconstruction in the current musical world. Luminous works such as "A Rainbow in Curved Air" (1967) and "Silver Apples of the Moon" (1967) bring an inflexion on opened forms and new ways to explore the essence and the physical aspects of sounds (through time and space). "Static" textures, collages & long running sounds, the power of technology previously exposed in ambitious classical works will have a major impact in "popular" electronic music.

After the artisan & innovative uses of magnetic tapes, feedback, microphones, etc., the instrumental synthesis, the elaboration of global sound forms and the psycho-acoustic interactions will be sublimated thanks to the launch of the analog synth. A great improvement happened in 1964 with the appearance of the first modular synthesiser (Moog). This material (or "invention") brings the answer to the technological aspirations of many musicians, mainly after the release of the popular "Switched on Bach" (Walter Carlos) and Mother Mallard's portable masterpiece (pieces composed between 1970-73).

At the beginning of popular essays in electronica, the pioneering technologies (in term of recording and sound transmission) will not be abandoned. For instance, "Tone Float" (1969) by Organisation (pre-Kraftwerk), "Zwei Osterei" & "Klopzeichen" (1969-70) by Kluster and "Irrlicht" (1972) by Klaus Schulze will carry on the domestication of the electric energy and the use of refined harmoniums, organs and echo machines. During the 70's decade, European groups & musicians such as Eno, Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream will make their name in the music industry thanks to an abundant use of analog synthesisers and original electronic combinations. After weird, mysterious experimentation on conventional acoustic & electric instruments, Kraftwerk enjoyed huge success in popular music thanks to "mechanical electronic pop music". "Trans Europe Express" (1977) and "The Man Machine" (1978) figure as two commercial classics. The German spacey electronic scene launched by Tangerine Dream with their outstanding "Alpha Centauri" (1971) and Cluster "I" & "II" (1971-72) will have echoes everywhere, starting from the Berlin underground electronic scene (the Berlin School) with Klaus Schulze ("Timewind" 1974), Michael Hoenig ("Departure from the Northern Wasteland" 1978), Ashra ("New Age of Earth" 1976), Conrad Schnitzler's buzz-drones and repetitive electronics ("Zug", "Blau", Gold" 1972-74) . After several innovations always from Germany we notice the dark, doomy atmospheric manifests of Nekropolis (Peter Frohmader) in "Le culte des Goules" (1981), Asmus Tietchens in his colourful and engaged "Biotop" (1981) and the semi-ambient "Hermeneutic Music" (1988) by Lars Troschen (sound sculptor and synthesist).

In France, the "hypnotic" and "propulsive" electronic essays of Heldon ("Electronic Guerrilla" 1974) and Lard Free ("Spiral Malax"1977) introduce an inclination for industrial, urban and post-modern sound projections. The French "avant gardist" Philippe Besombes takes back the inspiration of " concrete music" (Pierre Henry.) and mixes it to a hybrid rocking universe (published in 1973, "Libra" figures as a true classic). Bernard Xolotl in "Prophecy" (1981), "Procession" / "Last Wave" (1983), Zanov (Green Ray, 1976) and Didier Bocquet (Voyage cerebral, 1978) will follow the musical path anticipated by Klaus Schulze in his kosmische electronic symphonies.

At the end of the 70's until the debut of the 80's Albums as "ambient 1: Music for Airports" (Brian Eno), "Cluster & Eno", "Deluxe" (Hans Joachim Roedelius side project called Harmonia) will announce the emergence of the famous ambient movement, musically characterised by gorgeous shimmering atmospheric textures.

During the 80's, Maurizio Bianchi will be in search of the absolute industrial "post-nuclear" sound tapestry. His visionary musical experience is based on cyclical loops, abrasive concrete noises and vertiginous piano dreamscapes. ("Symphony for a Genocide" 1981 and recently the mesmerising "A.M.B Iehn Tale" 2005). Before M.B and the industrial-bruitist wave, the 70's Italian specialists of electronic experiments had been (among others) Francesco Cabiati (Mirage, 1979), Francesco Bucherri (Journey, 1979), and Francesco Messina for representative, lyrical and spacey orchestrations and also Futuro Antica (D'ai primitivi all'elettronica, 1980) or Telaio Magnetico (Live' 75) for tripped out minimalism.

In the early 1980s and after following the kosmische path of classic Klaus Schulze, The Bay Area / Los Angeles school of electronic created the so called "alchemical" / "Sacred" space music. The music offers a dynamic combination between ancient-traditional music of the West and synthesised sonic soundscapes. The most representative artists of this movement are Michael Stream (Lyra Sound Constellation, 1983) Robert Rich (Numena, 1987) and Steve Roach (Dreamtime Return, 1988).

In the early 80s Ian Boddy (Spirits, 1984 / Phoenix, 1986) and Mark Shreeve (Assassin, 1983 / Legion, 1984) unique spacedout synthesised sagas represented the british answer to the challenging Berlin kosmische school. Their music embodies timbral drone sequences, systematic arpeggiations and synth-pop textures.

Young contemporary bands and artists in electronic experimentation took their inspiration from the 70's "kosmische" analog synth psychedelica of Klaus Schulze, Conrad Schnitzler, Tangerine Dream, etc. In the spaced out synthesisers spectrum, modern Japanese artists as Yamazaki Maso (noisy avant garde experimentor who contributes to the Kawabata's projects named Andromelos, Christina 23 onna and Father Moo & the Black sheeps) or Takushi Yamazaki (Space Machine) are key figures. The minimal, moody / lysergic epic soundscapes of Omit (Clinton Williams), Cloudland Canyon, Astral social club or Zombi also contribute to the renewal of the "cosmic" synth genre. Many modern electronic artists have taken an original musical direction, surfing on post-krautrock ambient waves (Aethenor), on spherical "abstract" ambient minimalism (Pete Namlook, Biosphere, Robert Henke) or on trancey, (post) industrial drone hypnosis (Alio Die / Amon / Nimh for the italian side and Andrew Chalk with his respective projects Mirror, Monos and Ora).

To sum up things, the progressive electronic subgenre is dedicated to intricate, moving, cerebral, intrusive electronic experiences that get involved in "kosmische", dark ambient, (post) industrial, droning, surreal or impressionist soundscapes territories.

Philippe BLACHE


The responsibility for the psych/space, indo/raga, krautrock and prog electronic subgenres is taken by the PSIKE team,
currently consisting of

- Meltdowner
- siLLy puPPy
- Rivertree
- Tapfret
- HarryAngel746

Progressive Electronic Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Progressive Electronic | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.27 | 331 ratings
MIRAGE
Schulze, Klaus
4.24 | 970 ratings
RUBYCON
Tangerine Dream
4.22 | 308 ratings
TIMEWIND
Schulze, Klaus
4.17 | 831 ratings
PHAEDRA
Tangerine Dream
4.56 | 19 ratings
DECONSECRATED AND PURE
Alio Die
4.30 | 43 ratings
IN COURSE OF TIME
Zanov
4.42 | 24 ratings
ARCHITEXTURE OF SILENCE
Alpha Wave Movement
4.12 | 157 ratings
EPSILON IN MALAYSIAN PALE
Froese, Edgar
4.35 | 27 ratings
LONG LOST RELATIVES
Syrinx
4.62 | 14 ratings
HONEYSUCKLE
Alio Die
4.17 | 59 ratings
INTEGRATI... DISINTEGRATI
Leprino, Franco
4.06 | 256 ratings
X
Schulze, Klaus
4.89 | 9 ratings
BARDO
Oöphoi
4.21 | 40 ratings
CATCH WAVE
Kosugi, Takehisa
4.22 | 35 ratings
TUSSILAGO FANFARA
Anna Sjalv Tredje
4.16 | 46 ratings
ALIO DIE & LORENZO MONTANA: HOLOGRAPHIC CODEX
Alio Die
4.16 | 44 ratings
20 JAZZ FUNK GREATS
Throbbing Gristle
4.02 | 202 ratings
NEW AGE OF EARTH
Ashra
4.00 | 494 ratings
FORCE MAJEURE
Tangerine Dream
4.42 | 17 ratings
TRANCE SPIRITS
Roach, Steve

Progressive Electronic overlooked and obscure gems albums new


Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Progressive Electronic experts team

DEN GÅTFULLA MÄNNISKAN
Malmberg, Eric
WUNDERBAR
Riechmann, Wolfgang
TIME REPLICATED
Bownik, Adam Certamen
SYNTHESIST
Grosskopf, Harald

Latest Progressive Electronic Music Reviews


 Rubycon by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.24 | 970 ratings

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Rubycon
Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

Review by prog_traveller!!

5 stars Tangerine Dream are the greatest representatives of kosmische musik, that extraordinary electronic "new wave" that exploded in Germany at the dawn of the seventies. A scene composed of real musicians, often with a classical background, who managed to give a new meaning to the use of keyboards and synthesizers in the field of music, moving the center of gravity of psychedelic rock from the center of the mind to the periphery of the universe. In 1975 Rubycon was released, an album that attenuated the melodramatic tension of the previous works to converge towards increasingly quiet and clear atmospheres. Considered the pinnacle of "figurativism" by Tangerine Dream, gold record also in Australia, it is a work that relies largely on the soft wailing of keyboards, on the crescendo of sequencers, on a jagged galaxy of timbres.

However, the symphonic and almost "baroque" component of the Tangerine Dream suites remains alive. An essay is the initial "Rubycon Part 1", which takes shape slowly, from an icy and rarefied entrance, up to the progressive opening towards more "airy" and warm sounds, with the modular rhythms of sequencers supported by short melodic phrases, drawn by the mellotron, by the strings and by the organ and by the synthetic choirs. It opens the curtain of the chilling and monodic sounds of moog and some hissing notes of mellotron. A daydream. Imagine nature and its landscapes, noises, sounds, water, birds. See the sky, see the stars, see the galaxies, see the cosmos. It is a relaxing and suggestive melody; of the imposing echoes of voices from the unconscious that expand and leave room for a sound from the abyss, from the depths of the earth. Utopia steps aside and leaves room for elaborate techno. You feel closed in an endless tunnel. The pace becomes more and more disturbing and faster, it becomes obsessive but fate makes it dissolve and sucks it away. It is the tangerine dream.

The second side ("Rubycon Part 2") continues on these soft tones, up to the fading of the final sound, in which only parute and remote melodies remain lost in the boundless spaces. It opens with the whistling of the wind. A nightmare. Imagine a house on top of a hill, open windows, blowing wind, fluttering curtains, someone screaming. Extra-sensory sounds are heard under the keyboards. Strange psychedelic hisses and hisses. The polyphony of Chris Franke's keyboards, who in "Rubycon" does a sublime job to say the least, conclude this human contact with the cosmos.

However, it is important to emphasize that we are not talking about a simple tape recording of songs: in this record the German trio has created something that goes beyond the normal idea of music we are used to. The value of this work is to be found precisely in the philosophical-artistic concept that led to the recording of this album and even more to what influenced posterity. Many giants of electronic music, and not only, have fished with both hands from these records that have paved the way for a totally new genre. In summary we can say that we are facing one of the most important records in the history of music, a milestone that marks the birth of a new world. Going beyond the historical side, we are talking about a record that knows how to penetrate our rational perceptions and that, if listened to with the right mood, gives immense emotions.

 Live at Reims Cathedral 1974 by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Live, 2020
4.00 | 3 ratings

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Live at Reims Cathedral 1974
Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

Review by Artik

4 stars I'm reviewing the Live at Reims Cathedral 1974 RSD vinyl edition. What we have here? The answer is: two lps, four sides and two tracks filled with excellent material with occasional flaws in quality of the recordings. The music comes from the times when every Tangerine Dream concert was improvised, so there is almost nothing familliar to the studio albums here. It was performed after Phaedra and before Rubycon and fits exactly there music-wise. The band started to use sequencers for the pulsating rhythms they would be famous for in then near future but we still have tones of floating soundscapes used to build their early trademark kosmische sound. A must for Berlin School enthusiasts and excellent addition to any prog collection so easily 4 stars in general.
 The Electric Lucifer  by HAACK, BRUCE album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.97 | 13 ratings

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The Electric Lucifer
Bruce Haack Progressive Electronic

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars Considered one of the most innovative early electronic music pioneers, BRUCE HAACK was born far north in Alberta's Rocky Mountains and nurtured his imaginative interpretations pretty much alone however he regularly participated in Native American powwows where peyote dreams and spiritual free floating surely allowed HAACK to access inner worlds once unnavigable. HAACK spent much of the 1960s creating children's music when he released a series of album's with Miss Nelson but even at those early stages, HAACK was busy turning everyday objects into early electronic instruments and when the moog finally hit the market he wasted no time in fueling his passion with the new sounds.

As the 60s ceded into the 1970s, HAACK put his kiddie music on hold so he could join the burgeoning pack of experimental music that was gripping the world and the first result of this creative splurge was the 1970 release THE ELECTRIC LUCIFER which found HAACK leaving the safe cuddly world of his childhood and plunging right into the existential quandaries of good and evil, heaven and hell and all the dichotomies that result from that dualistic nature. Considered one of those creative underground outsider psycho releases, THE ELECTRIC LUCIFER perhaps has a reputation more sinister than its actual presentation but for someone who appeared regularly on Mr Rogers' Neighborhood, this must've been quite the shock for those accustomed to his more squeaky clean persona.

While highly innovative in the world of electronica due to HAACK's insatiable appetite for self-creating various instruments as well as using everyday objects for sound enhancements, THE ELECTRIC LUCIFER was in reality a pop record musically speaking with ridiculously catchy melodies and instant ear worms that captured the zeitgeist of the psychedelic pop 60s. What makes this album really ahead of its time was the fact that HAACK offered a plethora of sound effects that would become extremely influential for some of the electronic music that emerged decades later. I'm talking about those IDM musical acts like Boards of Canada, Shpongle, Auterche and the gazillion electronic subgenre that have evolved around oscillating electronic riffs and manipulated sound effects. Add to that HAACK pioneered one of the first homemade vocoders which at the time was revolutionary.

It's very true that THE ELECTRIC LUCIFER sounds very dated as it points to that brief moment in time where nascent electronic freedom married the pot filled hippie dreams right before the nihilism and discontent with the world took over the idealism. Lyrically this album was basically a narration of the battle of good and evil and the turning points of the human race deciding which direction the species was collectively heading. Musically this album was something like part Doors, part Walter Carlos' unique moog flavors of the Switched on Bach series and part British pop like The Pretty Things but teased out with strange arrangements and vocal samplers. The mixing job is quite impressive as it sounds like a lot of cutting and editing of the tape was going on at the time. The vocals are all over the place on this one as well.

It's no surprise that this album was virtually ignored at the time since HAACK was hardly a household name like The Beatles and whose audience was basically the wee little tots of the day so this would hardly appeal to his then audience nor his head scratching parents had they happen to buy this thinking it was comparable to his earlier works. Nevertheless the quirkiness and imaginative efforts had not gone unnoticed and THE ELECTRIC LUCIFER has built a dedicated underground cult following which has at least partially redeemed its artistic merit. I can totally understand why many will be split over this album since it is probably way too out there for the casual pop music fans of the day and vice versa too poppy for those seeking the most far removed soundscapes that artists like AMM and The Sperm were releasing. This is more comparable to albums like Aphrodite's Child's "666" or The Beatle's most out there moments. All in all on a personal note, i really like this one since it falls perfectly in that middle ground zone between mainstream and beyond bizarre experimental.

 Stratosfear by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.99 | 575 ratings

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Stratosfear
Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nº 438

Formed in 1967 by Edgar Froese, Tangerine Dream is considered the greatest link between the prog rock music and the electronic music in the last century. Tangerine Dream had a history marked by several different phases. The first phase, between 1969 and 1973, reflects a strong influence of early Pink Floyd's psychedelic work. It comprises the first four studio albums of the band, "Electronic Meditation" from 1970, "Alpha Centauri" from 1971, "Zeit" from 1972 and "Atem" from 1973. These were the years that became known as "The Pink Years". The second phase of the band, between 1974 and 1983, is remembered by fans as the main sound transition period for the project, with keyboards, synthesizers and sequencers being used in their own way. This phase comprises their next eleven studio albums, "Phaedra" from 1974, "Rubycon" from 1975, "Stratosfear" from 1976, "Sorcerer (OST)" from 1977, "Cyclone" from 1978, "Force Majeure" from 1979, "Tangram" from 1980, "Exit" and "Thief (OST)" both works from 1981, "White Eagle" from 1982 and "Hyperborea" from 1983. This phase also includes their first three live albums, "Ricochet" from 1975, "Encore" from 1977 and "Logos... Live At The Dominion ? London" from 1983. This was the phase that became known as "The Virgin Years".

The futuristic sound of Tangerine Dream has influenced several generations and is still remembered today for the absolute singularity that it carried in its productions. This is even more evident when we are talking about the 70's, especially about of their albums that belong to "The Virgin Years". That was also their golden era that is also the phase with their best line up, which comprises Edgar Froese, Christopher Franke and Peter Baumann. This is particularly evident with their albums "Phaedra", "Rubycon" and "Ricochet" which are considered the three main masterpieces of Tangerine Dream. Even in that period they released "Cyclone" that is the only album of their discography with vocals.

So, now let's talk about "Stratosfear", which is the subject of this review. "Stratosfear", the last Tangerine Dream's album by the great trio Baumann, Franke and Froese, shows the group's desire to advance past their stellar recent material and stake out a new musical direction. "Stratosfear" took the style that had been developed on the three previous albums into slicker, more melodic and slightly less abstract territory. It was the first album since their debut to not feature a side-long track. However, "Stratosfear" still is an album consisting of only four songs, where two of them were over ten minutes, cannot be accused of being a commercial sell-out, not even by 70's standards. The organic instruments take more of a textural role, embellishing the effects instead of working their own melodic conventions. "Stratosfear" is also the beginning of a more evocative approach for Tangerine Dream. "Stratosfear" marked the beginning of the band's evolution from their early 70's synthesizer experiments towards a more recognizable and melodic sound. It contains even a stronger blend of Tangerine Dream's acoustic and electronic influences than before.

The title track opens with some relaxed and pleasant chords on guitar, which creates an atmosphere that fits the track very well. The electronic rhythms then start, introducing one of the best and most recognizable melodies that Tangerine Dream ever wrote. "Big Sleep In Search Of Hades" starts with harpsichord laying the foundation for a little melody played on Mellotron-flute that quickly gets stopped by a sinister synth-theme followed by some dark Mellotron strings. The mid-part sounds Eastern influenced. "3 AM At The Border Of The Marsh From Okefenokee" introduced something as unlikely as harmonica to the sound. But, it was used entirely just as an atmospheric effect on the beginning and end of the track. Most of the composition is made up of a pleasant electronic rhythm that slowly moves forward and evolves while Mellotron-flute and atmospheric synths are gracefully on top of it. "Invisible Limits" is the lengthiest track on the album. The funky guitar style on the slowly building opening adds some 70's influences. The opening climaxes in a very loud burst of Mellotron before slowing down to a melodic and laidback guitar theme leads into far faster and more energetic electronic rhythms. The finale sounds quite emotional with its melodic grand piano and longing synth lines.

Conclusion: "Stratosfear" represented the natural and necessary evolvement from the previous albums and that at a time when Tangerine Dream still could change within their signature sound. By treating the sequencers as a third instrument rather than an electronic foundation, "Stratosfear" builds on the softer moments creating a surprisingly warm immediate album. The cyclical nature of the arrangements gives the impression of individual songs rather than a single, epic tone poem. The brisk pacing and accessible melodies would continue to play a prominent role in their subsequent work, especially on "Force Majeure" and "Tangram". As I mentioned before, "Stratosfear" would be the last studio album from the trio Baumann, Franke and Froese and many rank it as one of the best from this fruitful period. And if you like of "Stratosfear", you definitely also should listen to Baumann's first solo studio album "Romance 76".

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Under a Spell by BARBIERI, RICHARD album cover Studio Album, 2021
4.00 | 3 ratings

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Under a Spell
Richard Barbieri Progressive Electronic

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars Predominantly known from his contributions to Japan and their follow-up Rain Tree Crow, as well as the many-sided rock band Porcupine Tree, RICHARD BARBIERI indeed is a big player in prog terms. From time to time you will also detect him playing keyboards and/or synthesizer on albums produced by related bands respectively musicians. Released on the acclaimed Kscope label 'Under A Spell' is his latest solo effort. According to the musical vita so far you certainly can await a diversified evocative blend of impressions, including hints of Jazz, Ethno/World, Avantgarde, Ambient, Kosmische Musik, and more. Guests are always welcome, where Gothenburg based Lisen Rylander-Löve has deep impact due to her ethereal voice appearance.

Well worth a listen, a fairly good album, consistently great material according to the compositional aspect, and the realization in the same way. Some songs are really spectacular in fact. Brilliant atmosphere, equipped with Luca Calabrese's nice trumpet input the melancholic dreamy Flare 2 is provided close to a Rain Tree Crow mood. Later though the track is entering the uptempo stage, while showcasing drummer Kjell Severinsson and Axel Crone (bass) serving some real groove. Of course this is focussed on the synthesizer and piano stuff, guitars are totally rare here. Two tracks offer some acoustic feeling at least. Impressing overall, just give this a try on the label's bandcamp page.

 Symphony - Live in Istanbul by KITARO album cover Live, 2014
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Symphony - Live in Istanbul
Kitaro Progressive Electronic

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
3 stars "In 1980, I began composing and producing music about the passageway and excursions of the Silk Road. This past spring, I embraced upon my first Symphonic Tour that reached Russia, Eastern and Central Europe and had the distinct pleasure of performing in Istanbul; a place where from ancient times to modern times, has flourished as an important hub of the Silk Road where Europe and Asia meet."

Symphony - Live in Istanbul was recorded over two nights in March of 2014 at the Halic Congress Center, and true to the title it features a symphony orchestra. Bassist and drummer are also present although they're not heard all the time. On keyboards there are two other men besides Kitaro himself, and on an important solistic role is the violin played by Jessica Hindin. The 66-minute concert is a dynamic selection of Kitaro's work covering many decades. Sometimes the mood is very romantic emphasizing the artist's New Age tendencies, but there's also a lot of symphonic and cinematic grandiosity. The audience gives applauses in between the pieces and otherwise stays completely silent, like in the classical music concerts.

The set begins with epic 'Heaven & Earth' (13:52), a title piece -- or is it a suite? -- from the soundtrack for the Oliver Stone film (1993) set in Vietnam. The Oriental details are beautifully woven into the passionate and dramatic music. 'Thinking of You' is the peaceful title track of the 1999 album. If you remember the Norwegian SECRET GARDEN, the unordinary Eurovision Song Contest winner from the mid-90's, you get the idea of the soothing and romantic melodicism starring synths and violin. 'Orochi' is a sharply powerful piece in which the drummer and the brass section are central. The main theme of 'Silk Road' is one the best known Kitaro tunes ever, and its performance here is gorgeous.

'Kokoro (Part II)' is another SECRET GARDEN reminding soft piece starring violin. 'Mercury' is a dreamy and moody slow piece featuring flute as a solo instrument. 'Reimei' and 'Matsuri' originate from Kojiki (1990). After the final applause comes a minute or two of minimalistic ambience featuring sounds of bells, which feels a bit strange. Overall the set is well designed. Had it been longer, some additional discographic highlights would have been very welcome. I would have enjoyed hearing something from e.g. The Light of the Spirit, 1987, and a track or two featuring vocals, with or without words, would have further increased the musical diversity and the emotional impact. I'll go with "good, but non-essential" three stars, but a fan might want to add the fourth star.

 Lily on the Beach by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Studio Album, 1989
2.95 | 80 ratings

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Lily on the Beach
Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

Review by bpeterson

5 stars I am not able to relate to the naysayers of this album. I feel they are sadly missing out on one of the most beautiful and thought transcending albums created by Tangerine Dream. I am not a consumer from a professional artist/musician standpoint, but rather from a human emotive standpoint. Maybe this is the disconnect. For me, Lily on the Beach is a put your headphones on, close your eyes, turn up the volume experience. The sounds, the guitar, the keyboard/piano, the drums, the woodwind (Long Island Summer), I am absorbed by them, moved to a place beyond thought. Really, as far as progressive electronic rock, this album is a stunner. I could listen to Lily on the Beach endlessly, every single track is luminous, energized.
 Brian & Roger Eno: Mixing Colours by ENO, BRIAN album cover Studio Album, 2020
4.38 | 7 ratings

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Brian & Roger Eno: Mixing Colours
Brian Eno Progressive Electronic

Review by rik wilson

5 stars Wow, Eno brothers music that takes you on a measured trip of space and nuance;music for the soul.Roger Eno's piano work is classical and loose enough to be avant jazz .It reminds me of Pierre de Bethmann's repetitive piano with a certain degree of sustain and echo. He also creates space in his playing by leaving silence as emphasis and punctuation; which allows his brother to do his thing as sound "colorist" and tonal mix master. The overall field of this music is all encompassing and very relaxing. Putting on this type of music helps one mentally by providing avenues of adventure and escape. "MIXING COLORS " is a delight that ranks among the better "space" releases that are currently out. Kick back and let it soak in.
 Dropsonde by BIOSPHERE album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.68 | 12 ratings

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Dropsonde
Biosphere Progressive Electronic

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars A richly varied and diverse collection of modern computer-realized ambient ideas from Norwegian Geir Jenssen.

Tracks on 2006 CD: 1**. "Dissolving Clouds" (4:28) computer sound slow ambient not unlike Brian Eno's Music for Airports or a combination of that album and 1982's On Land. (8/10)

2. "Birds Fly By Flapping Their Wings" (6:35) opens slowly but then treated drums and bass enter giving it an acid jazz kind of feel. Why this isn't acid jazz is due to the very little going on over the rhythm tracks. (8/10)

3**. "Warmed By The Drift" (6:50) with breathy horn play, this sounds like something from Mark Isham's Never Cry Wolf soundtrack. Enter bass and strumming guitar in the second half and we get a little change. (13/15)

4**. "In Triple Time" (5:50) what spills over from the previous song turns quickly into a kind of trip hoppy, acid jazz, KOOP-like danceable "ambient" music--with a little flute! Me likes! (10/10)

5**. "From A Solid To A Liquid" (5:19) like a contemplative duet on a church organ and electric piano. Haunting yet soothing. Very pretty. (9/10)

6**. "Arafura" (5:10) like the start of a KOOP song, only they got stuck, looped, while a piano is trying to sneak in but keeps getting clipped & splinched. The cool stuff you can do with computer editing! (8.75/10)

7. "Fall In, Fall Out" (7:10) pop-jazz snare drumming with clicks and pops until bass starts to sneak in and then two looped harp-like arpeggi. Harold Budd-like treated piano hit at 1:37 notes the entrance of another, new element. Perhaps a little too long. (13/15)

8. "Daphnis 26" (6:45) same insistent pace as the previous song but employing a whole different set of "instrument" sounds to achieve it. Sounds like a measure of a 1970s TANGERINE DREAM song trapped in a perpetual time loop. Heavier, almost"Tusk"-like marching band-like drums join in during the middle. Okay. (12/15)

9. "Altostratus" (5:11) an étude that simply goes nowhere interesting (to me). (6/10)

10. "Sherbrooke" (5:55) another "frozen in time" loop capturing one second of an acoustic rock band's song intro (think BONDAGE FRUIT's "Storm Bird, Storm Dreamer"). Interesting idea; wish it went somewhere. (7/10)

11**. "People Are Friends" (10:39) back to the Eno-esque soundscapes, using modern computer editing techniques to make it interesting. Ryuichi Sakamoto would love this! I wonder what the whispered and clipped voice samples are saying. (17.5/20)

Total time 69:52

12*. "In the Shape of a Flute" (6:17) opens like ripples in a pond after a rock has been dropped into it but then, about 50 seconds in, those snare-and-cymbal heavy Acid Jazz drums enter with their entourage of flutes. Again, I can't help but think of the KOOP albums from near this same period. The drums disappear for a spell in the fourth minute--letting the flutes have all the glory, but then return with a different arrangement for 100 of the final 130 seconds. Excellent! (9/10) * - missing on 2006 CD release ** - missing on 2005 LP release

C/3.5 stars; a very interesting album that the typical prog lover will probably enjoy quite a bit. For me it is a bit hit or miss--definitely filled with ingenious ideas and great sound, I think some songs could have been more fully developed. I definitely feel far more drawn to the Acid Jazz infused content.

 Aura Seminalis by ALIO DIE album cover Studio Album, 2008
4.00 | 7 ratings

BUY
Aura Seminalis
Alio Die Progressive Electronic

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars One of Stefano Musso's many solo works from the 2000s (there were eight that we know of), the end of the decade finds the maestro experimenting with Gregorian chant-like voices as well as his usual heavily-treated zithers and synthesizers to create his Indian-like drone sounds. The music contained here sounds like mediæval calls to prayer in empty cathedrals or abandoned mosques. 1. "Sine Tempore Part I" (16:47) heavily treated, muted male chant voices are swirling around in slow arpeggi before sustained strings sounds join in. In the fifth minute, higher pitched "angel whisps" join in. Everything quiets down a bit in the seventh minute as lower pitched notes slowly swirl around each other from the voice, violin, and "horn"- synth departments. In the eleventh minute, multi-sex choir dominates--especially in the upper "female" registers. Cool construction and execution. Blade Runner-like horn synth joins in for the final couple of minutes. Very engaging and hypnotic. (31/35)

2. "Sine Tempore Part II (8:47) male chant voices projected into the higher registers with a high degree of echo and response--from cello-like sub-layers of instruments--swirling and circling, rising and falling, droning and echoing for the first three minutes before changing the soundscape to one of more sparsely populated, "violin"-led spaciousness. Voices return to the fore in the sixth and seventh minutes--though more garbled and warbled--until slow decay and diminishment over the final minute or so. (17.25/20)

3. "Sine Tempore Part III" (7:10) a slow moving rondo of arpeggi from a male Gregorian chant-like voice and slowed and reversed and accelerated and reversed sustained zither and violin notes and chords. (13.25/15)

4. "Aura Seminalis Part I" (5:43) Mellotron?! with heavily-treated reverberating zither notes and chords and zither incidentals mixed in for good measure. (8.25/10)

5. "Aura Seminalis Part II (23:03) Soaring "string-horn" notes and drone sounds swirl and rise like a church organ from a long-forgotten land and time. The melody line is constant and repeated for the first three minutes before receding over the distant horizon to be replaced by the slow parade of a Silk Road caravan now carrying a similar but different tune and sound--one that is growing closer, moving toward us, celebrating with their nasally reed instruments--until passing by, receding into the behind us while other swirling organs and horns take their turns in the parade, passing us from right to left, one (group) after the other. The processional is very visual, and very cool! In the thirteenth minute, the passed caravan is now a mirage--sounds floating high above us in a way that loses pitch certainty and seems to warble and wobble in a kind of celestial echo. But then, in the sixteenth minute a more modern, fuller, industrial barrage comes our way. A new procession? A different culture? Nasally reed instruments crossing in the opposite direction at the same time would seem to indicate that two different cultures are crossing paths (apparently, peacefully; perhaps even oblivious to one another). Cool experience! (39.5/45)

Overall a very peaceful, relaxing listening experience--one that could provide for quite a nice REM sleep.

B/four stars; an excellent addition to any prog lover's music collection--especially if you love meditative electronica.

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Progressive Electronic bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
12 FOLLOWERS United States
6LA8 Pakistan
ACI Germany
AEON France
AETHENOR Multi-National
AFTERLIFE United States
ILDEFONSO AGUILAR Spain
PEKKA AIRAKSINEN Finland
AIRSCULPTURE United Kingdom
ALBERGO INTERGALATTICO SPAZIALE Italy
ALIO DIE Italy
ALLEGORY CHAPEL LTD United States
DAEVID ALLEN & MICROCOSMIC United Kingdom
ALLUSTE Italy
ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT United States
ALTO STRATUS United Kingdom
AMBER ROUTE United States
AMON Italy
PETER ANDERSSON Sweden
ANDROMELOS Japan
ANNA SJALV TREDJE Sweden
ARC United Kingdom
ARPANET United States
EDWARD ARTEMIEV Russia
ARZATHON Sweden
ASCOIL SUN Finland
ASHRA Germany
ASTRAL TV Denmark
THE ASTROBOY Portugal
ATOMINE ELEKTRINE Sweden
AUBE Japan
AUTOMAT Italy
AWENSON France
MARVIN AYRES United Kingdom
HARVEY BAINBRIDGE United Kingdom
AIDAN BAKER Canada
SIMON BALESTRAZZI Italy
BAFFO BANFI Italy
RICHARD BARBIERI United Kingdom
BASS COMMUNION United Kingdom
JOHN BATTEMA United States
BAUMANN / KOEK Germany
PETER BAUMANN Germany
BEAR BONES LAY LOW Venezuela
BOBBY BEAUSOLEIL United States
CARLOS BELTRÁN Mexico
LÁSZLÓ BENKÖ Hungary
PHILIPPE BESOMBES France
BETWEEN INTERVAL Sweden
MAURIZIO BIANCHI Italy
BIG ROBOT Norway
BIOSPHERE Norway
BITCHIN BAJAS United States
BIZARE KO.KO.KO. Austria
BLACK UNICORN United States
TIM BLAKE France
BLUE MOTION Switzerland
BLUE SAUSAGE INFANT United States
WOLFGANG BOCK Germany
DIDIER BOCQUET France
IAN BODDY United Kingdom
GASTON BORREANI Italy
ADAM CERTAMEN BOWNIK Poland
BOYS OF SUMMER Ireland
BREIDABLIK Norway
OLIVIER BRIAND France
MICHAEL BRÜCKNER Germany
FRANCESCO BUCCHERI Italy
HAROLD BUDD United States
MICHAEL BUNDT Germany
FRANCESCO CABIATI Italy
ROBERTO CACCIAPAGLIA Italy
SAMUEL CADIMA Portugal
CALDERA United States
TOM CAMERON United States
DALLAS CAMPBELL United States
JAVI CANOVAS Spain
CELLULOID United States
CELLUTRON & THE INVISIBLE United States
ANDREW CHALK United Kingdom
JOHN CHRISTIAN United Kingdom
CHRISTINE 23 ONNA Japan
CHURCH OF HED United States
THE CIRCULAR RUINS United Kingdom
MICK CLARKE United Kingdom
CLOUDLAND BALLROOM Ireland
CLOUDLAND CANYON United States
COIL United Kingdom
COMA VIRUS Germany
PASCAL COMELADE France
COMPUTERCHEMIST United Kingdom
CON HERTZ Germany
CONTRASTATE United Kingdom
COSMIC DEBRIS United States
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CRAWL UNIT United States
CREMATOR United Kingdom
CROP CIRCLES France
CROWS LABYRINTH Netherlands
CULTURAL NOISE Austria
FRANCESCO CURRÀ Italy
CYBOTRON Australia
DEAD VOICES ON AIR United Kingdom
DEATHCOUNT IN SILICONE VALLEY United Kingdom
JEAN-MICHEL DESBOUIS France
DEUTSCHE WERTARBEIT Germany
NICOLAS DICK France
DIN A TESTBILD Germany
DIONNE - BRÉGENT Canada
SERGEI DJOKANOV Bulgaria
DR. PHILTER BANX Canada
DR. SPACE'S ALIEN PLANET TRIP Denmark
HEINRICH DRESSEL Italy
DROKK United Kingdom
DSR LINES Belgium
WOLFGANG DÜREN Germany
DYNAMO SNACKBAR United Kingdom
E-MUSIKGRUPPE LUX OHR Finland
EARTHSTAR Multi-National
EDEN France
ELEKTRIKTUS Italy
ELICOIDE Italy
EMERALDS United States
J.D EMMANUEL United States
ENDOPLASMIC FLOW Multi-National
BRIAN ENO United Kingdom
ENVENOMIST United States
EXPO 70 United States
F.G EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY Switzerland
FRANCO FALSINI Italy
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FATHER MOO & THE BLACK SHEEP Japan
FFWD United Kingdom
FHIEVEL Italy
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GRAHAM GETTY United Kingdom
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INVOLVED United States
IVERSEN Norway
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MEERKAT Italy
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MOTHER MALLARD'S PORTABLE MASTERPIECE CO. United States
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THE ALMAN MULO BAND United Kingdom
JONAS MUNK Denmark
MUSHY Italy
IAN NAGOSKI United States
PETE NAMLOOK Germany
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NAZI UFO COMMANDER Italy
NEMESIS Finland
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NODE United Kingdom
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OSE France
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PEAK Australia
PETER M. Italy
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POLE France
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PULSE EMITTER United States
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RADIATION Russia
RADIO MASSACRE INTERNATIONAL United Kingdom
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RAISON D'ETRE Sweden
RAPOON United Kingdom
REALTIME Germany
TOM RECCHION United States
REDSHIFT United Kingdom
JONAS REINHARDT United States
ALEJANDRO VILLALÓN RENAUD Mexico
ROBERT RICH United States
CHRISTIAN RICHET France
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STEVE ROACH United States
HANS-JOACHIM ROEDELIUS Germany
HENRI ROGER France
ROGUE ELEMENT United Kingdom
ROGUE SPORE Ireland
THOMAS RONKIN United States
SAB Japan
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SANKT OTTEN Germany
SATAN ALFA BEEL ATEM Japan
SAYER United States
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CONRAD SCHNITZLER Germany
EBERHARD SCHOENER Germany
ROBERT SCHROEDER Germany
KLAUS SCHULZE Germany
SEESSELBERG Germany
SEQUENTIA LEGENDA France
SERGE RAMSES France
MARK SHEEKY United Kingdom
SHOGUN KUNITOKI Finland
MARK SHREEVE United Kingdom
FREDERICH SHULLER Romania
SIJ Ukraine
SIL MUIR Italy
THE SILVERMAN United Kingdom
SINIAALTO Finland
SINOIA CAVES Canada
JAKOB SKØTT Denmark
SKYRAMPS United States
SLOWS United Kingdom
SOFTWARE Germany
SONISK BLODBAD Multi-National
SOUNDS OF NEW SOMA Germany
SPACE ALLIANCE Italy
SPACE ART France
SPACE MACHINE Japan
SPACE SWEEPER United States
SPACECRAFT France
SPERM Finland
STARDRIVE United States
MICHAEL STEARNS United States
STELLARDRONE Lithuania
SUBINTERIOR Italy
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SYRINX Canada
JUTA TAKAHASHI Japan
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TANGRAM Hungary
TELAIO MAGNETICO Italy
DR. FIORELLA TERENZI Italy
TETRA Canada
THE SILVER SURFER Spain
THOUGHT GUILD United States
THREE SUNS Austria
THROBBING GRISTLE United Kingdom
ASMUS TIETCHENS Germany
TIPU SABZAWAAR Multi-National
TOMUTONTTU Finland
TÖNEN United States
TONTO'S EXPANDING HEAD BAND United Kingdom
TORTURE GNOSIS Multi-National
TOTAL STATION Russia
TRANCE United States
TRANQUILLITY Germany
TRANSPARENT ILLUSION United Kingdom
ROLF TROSTEL Germany
UDDER MILK DECAY United Kingdom
MATTEO UGGERI Italy
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VAKO Spain
VANDERSON Poland
JOEL VANDROOGENBROECK Switzerland
PATRICK VIAN France
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VIETGROVE United Kingdom
VLUBÄ Argentina
VOICE OF EYE United States
VOLT United Kingdom
ADELBERT VON DEYEN Germany
VON HAULSHOVEN Netherlands
ADRIAN WAGNER United Kingdom
RICHARD WAHNFRIED Germany
IGOR WAKHÉVITCH France
WAVEMAKER United Kingdom
WAVESTAR United Kingdom
PHILLIP WERREN Canada
WHITE NOISE United Kingdom
KEITH FULLERTON WHITMAN United States
PATRICK WIKLACZ France
TERJE WINTHER Norway
WINTHERSTORMER Norway
WO0 Serbia
BERNHARD WÖSTHEINRICH Germany
RENÉ VAN DER WOUDEN Netherlands
X-TG United Kingdom
XIU Italy
BERNARD XOLOTL France
YELLOW MAGIC ORCHESTRA Japan
YEN POX United States
YETI RAIN United States
YOU Germany
ZA SIÓDMA GÓRA Poland
ZADRI & MO France
EDWARD M. ZAJDA United States
ZALYS France
ZANOV France
ZED France
ZOLTAN United Kingdom
ZOMBI United States
ZORCH United Kingdom
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ZYGOAT United States
ZYTOSPACE Spain

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