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PROGRESSIVE ELECTRONIC

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Progressive Electronic definition

Born in the late 60's after the expansion of avant-gardist, modern, post-modern and minimalist experimentation, the progressive electronic movement immediately guides us into a musical adventure around technologies and new possibilities for composition. As an author or a searcher, the musician often creates his own modules and electronic combinations, deciding his own artistic and musical action. The visionary works of Stockhausen, Subotnick, John Cage ("concrete" music, electro-acoustic experimentation), La Monte Young, Steve Reich, Terry Riley (minimal, micro-tonal music) express a vision of total reconstruction in the current musical world. Luminous works such as "A Rainbow in Curved Air" (1967) and "Silver Apples of the Moon" (1967) bring an inflexion on opened forms and new ways to explore the essence and the physical aspects of sounds (through time and space). "Static" textures, collages & long running sounds, the power of technology previously exposed in ambitious classical works will have a major impact in "popular" electronic music.

After the artisan & innovative uses of magnetic tapes, feedback, microphones, etc., the instrumental synthesis, the elaboration of global sound forms and the psycho-acoustic interactions will be sublimated thanks to the launch of the analog synth. A great improvement happened in 1964 with the appearance of the first modular synthesiser (Moog). This material (or "invention") brings the answer to the technological aspirations of many musicians, mainly after the release of the popular "Switched on Bach" (Walter Carlos) and Mother Mallard's portable masterpiece (pieces composed between 1970-73).

At the beginning of popular essays in electronica, the pioneering technologies (in term of recording and sound transmission) will not be abandoned. For instance, "Tone Float" (1969) by Organisation (pre-Kraftwerk), "Zwei Osterei" & "Klopzeichen" (1969-70) by Kluster and "Irrlicht" (1972) by Klaus Schulze will carry on the domestication of the electric energy and the use of refined harmoniums, organs and echo machines. During the 70's decade, European groups & musicians such as Eno, Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream will make their name in the music industry thanks to an abundant use of analog synthesisers and original electronic combinations. After weird, mysterious experimentation on conventional acoustic & electric instruments, Kraftwerk enjoyed huge success in popular music thanks to "mechanical electronic pop music". "Trans Europe Express" (1977) and "The Man Machine" (1978) figure as two commercial classics. The German spacey electronic scene launched by Tangerine Dream with their outstanding "Alpha Centauri" (1971) and Cluster "I" & "II" (1971-72) will have echoes everywhere, starting from the Berlin underground electronic scene (the Berlin School) with Klaus Schulze ("Timewind" 1974), Michael Hoenig ("Departure from the Northern Wasteland" 1978), Ashra ("New Age of Earth" 1976), Conrad Schnitzler's buzz-drones and repetitive electronics ("Zug", "Blau", Gold" 1972-74) . After several innovations always from Germany we notice the dark, doomy atmospheric manifests of Nekropolis (Peter Frohmader) in "Le culte des Goules" (1981), Asmus Tietchens in his colourful and engaged "Biotop" (1981) and the semi-ambient "Hermeneutic Music" (1988) by Lars Troschen (sound sculptor and synthesist).

In France, the "hypnotic" and "propulsive" electronic essays of Heldon ("Electronic Guerrilla" 1974) and Lard Free ("Spiral Malax"1977) introduce an inclination for industrial, urban and post-modern sound projections. The French "avant gardist" Philippe Besombes takes back the inspiration of " concrete music" (Pierre Henry.) and mixes it to a hybrid rocking universe (published in 1973, "Libra" figures as a true classic). Bernard Xolotl in "Prophecy" (1981), "Procession" / "Last Wave" (1983), Zanov (Green Ray, 1976) and Didier Bocquet (Voyage cerebral, 1978) will follow the musical path anticipated by Klaus Schulze in his kosmische electronic symphonies.

At the end of the 70's until the debut of the 80's Albums as "ambient 1: Music for Airports" (Brian Eno), "Cluster & Eno", "Deluxe" (Hans Joachim Roedelius side project called Harmonia) will announce the emergence of the famous ambient movement, musically characterised by gorgeous shimmering atmospheric textures.

During the 80's, Maurizio Bianchi will be in search of the absolute industrial "post-nuclear" sound tapestry. His visionary musical experience is based on cyclical loops, abrasive concrete noises and vertiginous piano dreamscapes. ("Symphony for a Genocide" 1981 and recently the mesmerising "A.M.B Iehn Tale" 2005). Before M.B and the industrial-bruitist wave, the 70's Italian specialists of electronic experiments had been (among others) Francesco Cabiati (Mirage, 1979), Francesco Bucherri (Journey, 1979), and Francesco Messina for representative, lyrical and spacey orchestrations and also Futuro Antica (D'ai primitivi all'elettronica, 1980) or Telaio Magnetico (Live' 75) for tripped out minimalism.

In the early 1980s and after following the kosmische path of classic Klaus Schulze, The Bay Area / Los Angeles school of electronic created the so called "alchemical" / "Sacred" space music. The music offers a dynamic combination between ancient-traditional music of the West and synthesised sonic soundscapes. The most representative artists of this movement are Michael Stream (Lyra Sound Constellation, 1983) Robert Rich (Numena, 1987) and Steve Roach (Dreamtime Return, 1988).

In the early 80s Ian Boddy (Spirits, 1984 / Phoenix, 1986) and Mark Shreeve (Assassin, 1983 / Legion, 1984) unique spacedout synthesised sagas represented the british answer to the challenging Berlin kosmische school. Their music embodies timbral drone sequences, systematic arpeggiations and synth-pop textures.

Young contemporary bands and artists in electronic experimentation took their inspiration from the 70's "kosmische" analog synth psychedelica of Klaus Schulze, Conrad Schnitzler, Tangerine Dream, etc. In the spaced out synthesisers spectrum, modern Japanese artists as Yamazaki Maso (noisy avant garde experimentor who contributes to the Kawabata's projects named Andromelos, Christina 23 onna and Father Moo & the Black sheeps) or Takushi Yamazaki (Space Machine) are key figures. The minimal, moody / lysergic epic soundscapes of Omit (Clinton Williams), Cloudland Canyon, Astral social club or Zombi also contribute to the renewal of the "cosmic" synth genre. Many modern electronic artists have taken an original musical direction, surfing on post-krautrock ambient waves (Aethenor), on spherical "abstract" ambient minimalism (Pete Namlook, Biosphere, Robert Henke) or on trancey, (post) industrial drone hypnosis (Alio Die / Amon / Nimh for the italian side and Andrew Chalk with his respective projects Mirror, Monos and Ora).

To sum up things, the progressive electronic subgenre is dedicated to intricate, moving, cerebral, intrusive electronic experiences that get involved in "kosmische", dark ambient, (post) industrial, droning, surreal or impressionist soundscapes territories.

Philippe BLACHE


The responsibility for the psych/space, indo/raga, krautrock and prog electronic subgenres is taken by the PSIKE team,
currently consisting of
- Sheavy
- Meltdowner
- siLLy puPPy
- Rivertree


Progressive Electronic Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Progressive Electronic | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.24 | 754 ratings
RUBYCON
Tangerine Dream
4.24 | 223 ratings
MIRAGE
Schulze, Klaus
4.58 | 23 ratings
CATCH WAVE
Kosugi, Takehisa
4.18 | 215 ratings
TIMEWIND
Schulze, Klaus
4.14 | 648 ratings
PHAEDRA
Tangerine Dream
4.40 | 34 ratings
GREEN RAY
Zanov
4.55 | 21 ratings
IN COURSE OF TIME
Zanov
4.18 | 115 ratings
EPSILON IN MALAYSIAN PALE
Froese, Edgar
4.10 | 200 ratings
X
Schulze, Klaus
4.28 | 32 ratings
AN ELECTRIC STORM
White Noise
4.19 | 42 ratings
INTEGRATI... DISINTEGRATI
Leprino, Franco
4.02 | 153 ratings
NEW AGE OF EARTH
Ashra
4.22 | 31 ratings
LUCIFER RISING
Beausoleil, Bobby
3.99 | 382 ratings
FORCE MAJEURE
Tangerine Dream
4.02 | 143 ratings
AMBIENT 4 : ON LAND
Eno, Brian
3.97 | 263 ratings
ANOTHER GREEN WORLD
Eno, Brian
4.13 | 37 ratings
EARTHEN
Alpha Wave Movement
3.94 | 310 ratings
THE MAN-MACHINE (DIE MENSCH-MASCHINE)
Kraftwerk
3.93 | 449 ratings
STRATOSFEAR
Tangerine Dream
3.98 | 94 ratings
BODY LOVE: ORIGINAL FILMMUSIK
Schulze, Klaus

Progressive Electronic overlooked and obscure gems albums new


Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Progressive Electronic experts team

SYNTHETIK 1
seesselberg
WUNDERBAR
Riechmann, Wolfgang
D'AI PRIMITIVI ALL'ELETTRONICA
Futuro Antico
SYNTHESIST
Grosskopf, Harald

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Latest Progressive Electronic Music Reviews


 Mare Vaporum by OÖPHOI album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Mare Vaporum
Oöphoi Progressive Electronic

Review by admireArt
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
3 stars Gianluigi Gasparetti, (26 March 1958 - 12 April 2013) known by the pseudonym Oophoi, had a keen and natural way to create and thread highly attractive melody lines, whose abundance and consistency could be the envy of 1000s of Rock/Prog acts , who have disguised this limitation with fireworks and stage lights or "provocative", (yet, more than once meaningless) , concepts.

"Mare Vaporum", remastered, reshaped, refinished and released in 2010, closes, a then ongoing, trilogy which started in 2001, and is no exception to what was before mentioned about his natural genius , which by the way, poses a true challenge when rating, which means that with this kind of music composition level, he surely outsmarts any , usually overrated yearly, "this current year's PA 5 STARS Phenomenon", which eventually just get lost in the crowd the following year and so on.

So in able to debug this tree, I will cast the "magic" words- Ambient and Deep Atmospheric Electronic Music......, that should do the trick!

Anyway, the wisest and more deserving way to rate Oophoi is to do it in his self created and unique fields, his own progressive/drone/electronic works, which , subtly and silently, turn out to be quiet a full load of works. (PA's Oophoi archive, still awaits for collaborators to chip in!)

Therefore in comparison to his own works 3.5 PA stars, in a general (and uneven) race, 4 PA stars, but as told I am going to stick to rating him against himself, he deserves it!

***3.5 PA stars.

 Tangram by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Studio Album, 1980
3.90 | 245 ratings

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Tangram
Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Tangerine Dream's sound underwent a long transition in the second half of the 1970s, with various changes to the sound and different avenues explored, but in retrospect (once you set aside dead-ends like the interesting but flawed experiment Cyclone) the general direction seems to have been an evolution from their classic mid-1970s progressive electronic style as captured on Phaedra and Rubycon to a more accessible approach that would become the foundation of much of their 1980s soundtrack work.

Though this approach would gain wide exposure when applied to the soundtrack of Thief, it is on Tangram that its first pure expression is found, the new lineup of Franke, Froese, and Schmoelling gelling almost immediately to present a peaceful, meditative long-form piece with melodic almost-cyberpunk elements, offering a purist electronic sound which casts away some of the more rock-oriented accretions that Tangerine Dream had added and finds them adapting to new technologies as perfectly as they had the synthesisers of the 1970s.

 Ballet Statique by SCHNITZLER, CONRAD album cover Studio Album, 1978
4.06 | 24 ratings

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Ballet Statique
Conrad Schnitzler Progressive Electronic

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Conrad Schnitzler had already established a decent electronic krautrock pedigree prior to this, due to his involvement in the early careers of Kluster/Cluster and Tangerine Dream, but this solo album - its title varying between "Con" and "Ballet Statique" depending on which issue you are looking at - is a striking effort in its own right, offering a progressive electronic soundscape highly reminiscent of a middle ground between the sort of direction his former bandmates in Tangerine Dream had taken in mid-1970s albums like Rubicon and would soon take in their late- 1970s/early 1980s work like Thief or Tangram.

This sort of cyberpunk electronic mood music is not for everyone, but for those who like this sort of thing, this is the sort of thing they will like very much indeed, and somehow manages both to provide a precedent for much of the work in this vein that would emerge in the 1980s and seems less dated than many of its imitators.

 Four Decades Special Concert by JOBSON, EDDIE album cover Live, 2016
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Four Decades Special Concert
Eddie Jobson Progressive Electronic

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
3 stars Ignore the pallid three-star rating for a moment, and consider instead the unfulfilled potential in the career of Eddie Jobson. In a better organized universe his reputation would stand tall beside Keith Emerson, Rick Wakeman, and any other keyboard god in the Prog Rock pantheon...none of whom, by the way, could boast an equivalent dexterity on a second instrument, in this case the electric violin.

Jobson was a prodigy who tasted success at an absurdly young age, joining Curved Air while still a teenager, and co-founding UK before his 23rd birthday. But despite his extraordinary talents and striking visual cachet (remember the transparent violin?) he never quite blossomed into a genuine celebrity, in part because his best years were spent supporting other bands with more assertive figureheads: Bryan Ferry, Frank Zappa, Ian Anderson et al (UK might have been his ticket to fame, if the group hadn't arrived so late or imploded so fast).

What was left? A solo career that never gained any traction, followed by the dead-end paycheck of TV and film scores, and sporadic live appearances leading toward this belated return to the limelight in Japan, on November 9, 2013. It was billed as a Special Concert, and in retrospect was exactly that: a forty-year career retrospective gathering 27 songs, presented here on two lavishly annotated compact discs (the deluxe package adds a concert Blu-Ray disc, plus a book and t-shirt).

All the music was carefully chosen and played in chronological order, with Disc One devoted to Jobson's primetime '70s collaborations, from Curved Air through Roxy Music and Zappa to UK. The second disc concentrates on later material, less familiar to casual fans but more thrilling in context, and brought to vivid life by a very tight backing band. Further endorsement, and the icing on an already appetizing cake, was provided by guest appearances from Sonja Kristina and John Wetton, both in fine voice after four decades.

The concept, arrangements, set-list, and performances all add up to a coulda-shoulda-woulda-been, once-in-a-blue-moon classic. But the recording itself is terrible, rendering a five-star event with frustrating two-star fidelity (at least on CD; maybe the video disc is an improvement). Have you ever heard music while swimming underwater? That's more or less the effect here: a flat mix, curiously muffled and totally lacking any concert dynamics...it's almost as if some of the microphones went dead on stage without anyone noticing.

For lack of a better scapegoat, let's blame the constraints of a tight budget from a strictly provincial label (Ward Records), which likewise didn't have the resources to market the results outside Japan (I was astonished to discover the CD at my local library in backwoods western New York). With an uncompromised production this would have been an essential experience: a thrilling late-career victory lap by an unsung superstar who never received the acclaim he deserved.

 Live by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Live, 1980
3.12 | 33 ratings

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Live
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by Modrigue
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Schulze's first live and last analog album

Finally, after eight years of career, here is Klaus Schulze's long awaited live album! Difficultly understandable when you know the German pioneer was already very prolific. Like other electronic artists of the 70's such as his fellow countrymen TANGERINE DREAM, his concerts were often composed of improvised and previously unreleased material. Nowadays, some of these performances can be found as bonus tracks on the Revisited Records Editions or in the "La Vie Electronique" boxsets.

Nonetheless, this live compilation, just titled "...Live...", is a double album compiling more than two hours of sequenced music within four gigs extracts, from 1979 and 1976. All tracks have a typical 'schulzian' duration, i.e. 20 to 30 minutes, except "Sense" which lasts... 51 minutes! The last piece also contains a little surprise... Musically speaking, the style is quite similar to Klaus's melodic and retro-futuristic works during the late 70's, such as "Moondawn" and the two "Body Love". Nonetheless, there is slight difference this time, as the compositions sounds more modern, more sci-fi, maybe due to the usage of rhythm boxes.

I personally consider Disc 1 more interesting than Disc 2. "Bellistique" was recorded in Paris, November 13th 1979. Although the shortest track of this compilation, this is my favorite. An hyper pulsating sequence for an over-trippy music. I cannot think of another piece from Schulze sounding this fast and furious at the time, it simply foreshadows the trance genre of the 90's! Mindblowing! A bit repetitive, however dark and thrilling... Chaotic and atmospheric, the ending is quite frightening. Recorded in Berlin, October 5th 1976, "Sense" is the only track not from 1979. This 51 minutes long mastodon is the central point of the album and features Harald Grosskopf at percussions. After an ambient hazy introduction, a short evanescent mesmerizing loop disappears into smoke to unveil the main theme that will nearly last until the end, with nice spacey variations. A sensation of misty magic reigns over this tune. The mysterious vaporous sequence comes back for the final section. For sure, "Sense" could certainly have been shortened to 30 minutes, but this piece still remains overall quite good. 4 stars.

Disc 2 is unfortunately less inspired. Recorded in Paris, November 13th 1979, "Heart" opens in a calm but spooky atmosphere. It then turns more rhythmic and futuristic, with strange sound effects and synthesizers sounding even Middle-Eastern-ish at times. The second half sees the pace speeding up at the second half as well as pretty cool passages. Schulze plays his keyboard soli like a guitar hero here! An uneven composition, which contains very pleasant moments though. "Dymagic" was recorded in Amsterdam, October 27th 1979, and features Arthur Brown at vocals. The German musician already collaborated with the him on "Shadows of Ignorance", for his album "Dune", released the same year. Quite unique in its own way, this minimalistic track resembles nothing Klaus did before, or even after. It mainly consists in the same electronic loop supporting Arthur Brown's mad vocals. Half-narrated, half-narrated, the English singer enters a shamanic transe and seems to be fully possessed by some unknown demon. All this give the impression of a crossing between an obscure incantation with a mechanical ritual. Except the final section, relaxing and spacey, there are not many changes, even if the rhythm increases in the last third. Easily one of Schulze's weirdest pieces, some will immediately fall in love with its special craziness and esoteric ambiance, while others will just skip this nonsense. 2 stars.

In conclusion, although unequal, "...Live..." remains an interesting yet heterogeneous live compilation. One interesting thing about it is that each listener may have a different appreciation of each part. For me, the interest goes decrescendo: the tracks are respectively great, good, uneven and... bizarre. I would have liked to have the 1977 Köln WDR concert extract "For Barry Graves" featured here, instead of "Dymagic" for example. Another point worth mentioning is that there are not many contemplative soundscapes in this double album, however these 1979 compositions are much more lively than "Dune".

"...Live..." was for a long time the only testimony of Klaus' seventies performances and still remains one of his best live releases. Every fan of the late 70's retro-futuristic side of Schulze should give it a listen to make his own opinion.

After this one, the German keyboard wizard will turn digital, and this will be another story...

 Musik Von by HARMONIA album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.00 | 60 ratings

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Musik Von
Harmonia Progressive Electronic

Review by DamoXt7942
Forum & Site Admin Group RIO/Avant/Zeuhl & Neo Teams

4 stars Repetitive hallucinogenic electronic organization in the similar vein of a Krautrock giant NEU!. HARMONIA's debut sound article "Musik Von Harmonia" is surprisingly flooded with not only inorganic but also heartwarming synthesizer-based electricadelic convolution. Their eccentric activity might intentionally regulate the inner mind of the audience I guess. In the very beginning of this album "Watussi" the electrogemic phenomenon can be launched over and over based upon sharp-edged beep / noise-oriented sound convulsion. Inorganic Dadaism sounds just like a cleanser bottle upon the sleeve.

Another masterpiece in this debut shot "Sehr Kosmisch", the longest track, would sound the most atmospheric, ambient, and simultaneously warmhearted I imagine. Could this gentle ambience with quiet and deep heartbeats be called as "fruits of the earth"? As if we were embryos in the womb, we are absorbed safe and sound, contrary to the previous one. And likewise, "Ahoi!" has splendid ethnic flavour along with loose electronika, that should be recommended for people hoping to have a dreamy trip, whether in a real life or in a dream.

A mass of variations are developed in a short track, and each track has kaleidoscopic theatrical scenes or characteristics ("Veterano" full of bombastic fragility psychedelia or "Hausmusik" dim brilliance under warping tempo produced with electronic organ sounds and percussion is one of my loves). Although a song sounds simple and monotonous, it has various directions for shooting multiple essence via synthesizers. Entirely the soundscape is filled with closed feeling and hard, itchy sound bullets but actually so frank and intelligible for the audience to fall into this creation. Their inorganic manner cannot simply be inorganic but pretty innovative.

 X by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 1978
4.10 | 200 ratings

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X
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by Modrigue
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Schulze has 'classical' ambitions

Named after its chronological release order, "X" was certainly the most ambitious electronic record of its time. This massive double album (originally 2x60 minutes, 2x80 minutes for the 2005 Revisited Records Edition) attempts to marry the stretched Berlin School schulzian soundscapes with classical music. Subtitled "Sechs Musikalische Biographen", this tenth opus consists in six pieces, or biographies, each one evoking an artist or intellectual who inspired the German musician. Some tracks incorporate classical instruments, such as cello and violin, and even an entire orchestra, the "Orchester Des Hessischen Rundfunks".

It should be noted that Schulze already manipulated the recordings of a string orchestra in his 1972 debut "Irrlicht", resulting in eerie drone landscapes of desolation. However, this time, the symphonic parts are not modified. Musically speaking, the electronic parts borrow the extended static impressions of "Timewind" as well as more melodic and percussive elements in the vein of "Moondawn" and "Body Love". When we think about it, the symphonic genre is perfectly suited to Klaus' universe and compositional style. After all, he always had a great admiration for the classical composers ("Timewind" was a tribute to Richard Wagner). Therefore, this mixture of genres was an unavoidable exercise for him. With VANGELIS, Schulze was maybe THE 70's electronic artist for such an experiment.

Nevertheless, great ambitions does not necessarily make constant quality, especially during two hours of music. So, didn't Klaus Schulze went too far with "X"?

Disc 1 is still rather dominated by synthesizers. After its ambient contemplative opening, "Friedrich Nietzsche" mixes Harald Grosskopf's percussions, a superb chorus, electronic loops and trippy synthesizer soli to create a slowly evolving, immersive and melancholic soundscape. You travelled through the cosmos to land on a deserted extraterrestrial landscape. One of Schulze's greatest compositions from the seventies! The next two biographies are only ones not including classical music elements. "Georg Trakl" was an Austro-Hungarian poet. This cool piece is a short, calm and mysterious interlude, resembling a little TANGERINE DREAM's hazy style. Klaus was also a science fiction fan: Frank Herbert is the only personality of "X" not of German culture. The track starts with a dark and pulsating sequence in the vein of a TD soundtrack. The result is even more futuristic than Schulze's next album, "Dune". Nonetheless, there are hardly no changes at all during these 11 minutes. Wilhelm Friedemann Bach was a German composer from the family of Johann Sebastian. His musical biography differs slightly from the others of the first disc, as this is the first genuine track to marry classical and electronic music. The atmosphere is tragic, thrilling, reinforced by B. Dragic's frightening solo violin interventions and strange sound effects. An anguishing nightmare when you're in a maze dating back to the Renaissance, trying to escape from an invisible threat. The ending is quite chaotic and enigmatic. 4 stars.

Disc 2 incorporates more classical music elements, but is unfortunately less inspired. In collaboration with an orchestra conducted by Wolfgang Tiepold, "Ludwig II Von Bayern" is the composition where the marriage of Schulze's electronic soundscapes and the symphonic style is the most successful. Using a passage from Vivaldi's 11th concerto in D minor for two violins, cello and strings, it exposes the German artist's admiration for the great classical composers. Supported by a fast synthesizer loop, the first third is superb, elegant and epic. Magic! Nonetheless, this refined musical sculpture only lasts the first ten minutes. The second third is difficulty understandable. An uninteresting and repetitive orchestral passage, sounding as if the record was broken. Was Klaus' part forgotten in the final mix? The last section just recycles the theme from the first third. In fact, this track could have been shortened to its 10 first minutes. Named after a German writer, "Heinrich Von Kleist" features Wolfgang Tiepold at cello. This slow piece is mainly ambient, calm and melancholic, even experimental at times. The problem is that, except the contemplative chorus, nothing really happens during these 30 minutes, which finally become rather boring. 2 stars.

The 2005 Revisited Records Edition is not very essential. The bonus track, "Objet d'Louis", is a poor quality recording of a 1978 performance of "Ludwig II von Bayern", with an orchestra. The reissue also features the original 26 minutes version of "Georg Trakl", rather monotonous.

Ambitious, uneven, daring, however undoubtedly original, "X" is a colossus containing both gorgeous musical pieces and less interesting moments. A controversial release, some will love it immediately, others won't enter this beautiful and nightmarish world at first listen. I personally find this tenth offering a little overrated, but this fusion of electronic and classical elements had to be tried. If "X" had been a single album, consisting in the first disc with the first 10 minutes of "Ludwig II Von Bayern" replacing "Frank Herbert", then it would have been a masterpiece.

As you may understand, this double symphonic opus is not very accessible and definitely not the one to start with for newcomers. However, this ambitious effort remains essential for anyone wanting to explore Klaus Schulze and progressive electronic. After all, the marriage with classical music is not that common in this genre.

"X" unfortunately marks the end of Schulze's 'golden' era. After this one, the quality of his albums will become less regular...

 Zinc (Green Album) by JOBSON, EDDIE album cover Studio Album, 1983
3.16 | 54 ratings

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Zinc (Green Album)
Eddie Jobson Progressive Electronic

Review by Kingsnake

5 stars I really don't understand the low score for this impeccably wonderful piece of work.

To me this album encompasses the ultimate of the ultimate form of progressive music. Just like the Rupert Hine-trilogy (not on this site), Edwin finds a way to combine pop, rock, jazz, fusion, avant-garde, minimalism, ambient into an adventurous album, which I keep coming back to.

The album features some progressive rock-song with vocals but has some short instrumental interludes as well as an intro and outtro to the album.

Edwin may not be an excellent vocalist, but I prefer him to John Wetton. The most beautiful part of this album is the three-song epic Prelude-Nostalgia-Walking From Pastel wich features gorgeous piano and violin work by Edwin.

The songs Easy for You to Say, Turn It Over, Easy for You to Say and Listen to Reason are the most pop-rock influenced songs, bu with some really progressive/fusion elements.

The songs Resident and Through the Glass are the most difficult songs, especially drummer Barsimanto is a star in these songs. Other musicians on the is album include Gary Green (Gentle Giant).

As said the music has elements of progrock and jazzrockfusion. I want to add synthpop to it. So maybe it has a "dated" sound. But I really like that sound. As with Rupert Hine's trilogy of the same day and age.

I can really, really recommend this adventurous album and must emphasize it's an absolute masterpiece.

 Exit by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Studio Album, 1981
3.46 | 198 ratings

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Exit
Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

Review by stefro
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Underrated for far too long, the 1981 album 'Exit' was the 14th studio album from Tangerine Dream in a little over 12 years, and came at a time when when the group were becoming involved with Hollywood. One of two albums issued that year, 'Exit' proved popular enough amongst fans but was somewhat overshadowed by the soundtrack album to Michael Mann's existential crime thriller 'Thief', which effectively kick-started the German outfit's Hollywood career after a four-year break from soundtrack work. Pre-'Exit', the group's one-and-only soundtrack album had been for William Friedkin's costly adventure film 'Sorceror', and although reviews for the album had been mostly positive, the film itself proved something of a disaster, costing round twenty million dollars to produce, drawing strong criticism and subsequently tanking at the box-office. The failure of 'Sorceror' virtually ruined the career of director Friedkin, who had previously enjoyed huge critical-and-commercial success with both 'The French Connection' and 'The Exorcist', and, for a while, also seemed to blow TD's chances of furthering their Hollywood ambitions. The release of 'Thief', however, proved something of a watershed moment, and TD spent much of the 1980's producing a number of soundtrack albums, with 'Thief' followed by the likes of 'The Keep', 'Firestarter', 'Miracle Mile' and 'Near Dark'. Although originally conceived as a studio album, 'Exit' would also hit the silver screen, when, much to the group's surprise, writer-director Paul Brickman included several of the album's tracks in his 1983 film 'Risky Business'. A slick consumerist satire posing as a commercial teen-flick, 'Risky Business' featured a young Tom Cruise, was a sizeable box-office hit, and proved perfect for the gleaming synthesizers and carefully-layered melodies of 'Exit'. Both the film and the music complimented each other nicely, and as a result the original album took on far more relevance. The key piece proved to be the atmospheric title-track, with it's throbbing bass pulses, rainy effects and rhythmic keyboard runs showcasing TD's rapid muscial evolution from 1970's psychedelia to full-blown electro- ambient rockers, whilst also proving perfect for the high-chic eighties look and crisply-shot photography of Brickman's glossy film. Elsewhere, 'Exit' is ideally framed by the churning repitition of the classic-era style 'Network 23', the slow-burning atmospherics of the glacial opener 'Kiew Mission', and 'Choronzon's' rapid percussion intro and stabbing keyboard melodies, all of which added yet more layers to the carefully-styled proto-futuristic sheen of the group's singular musica style. Constantly evolving, the music of TD has always relied on technology, and 'Exit' is filled with an array of technological tricks and effects. A sleek, powerful and carefully-crafted record, 'Exit' perhaps presents the last strains of TD's intial brilliance, before the changing trends of the 1980's, the wear-and-tear of a lengthy career and the group's dalliance with Hollywood took it's creative toll. For many original fans, the real Tangerine Dream faded away sometime around 1987 or 1988, and whilst the group will always be cherished for their earlier albums, this deeply-affecting album must surely rank as one of their last significant releases, and it's inclusion in the excellent 'Risky Business' only enhances it's many qualities. STEFAN TURNER, STOKE NEWINGTON, 2016
 Body Love Vol. 2 by SCHULZE, KLAUS album cover Studio Album, 1977
3.94 | 92 ratings

BUY
Body Love Vol. 2
Klaus Schulze Progressive Electronic

Review by Modrigue
Prog Reviewer

4 stars It's even better the second time

Despite the title and the sensual cover art, "Body Love 2" is not the soundtrack to a sequel to Lasse Braun's erotic movie. The three compositions were initially candidates to the "Body Love" score, but were finally not retained. However, as Island Records asked Schulze an accessible electronic record, in the vein of "Moondawn" and "Body Love", the German artist choose to release these tracks as an official studio album. By the way, when did Klaus sleep? This ninth opus was already its third one of 1977!

Completely different from the icy depressive soundscapes of his previous effort, "Mirage", the style is - as you expect - pretty much similar to the "Body Love" soundtrack. Supported by Harald Grosskopf's percussions, the music is more melodic, spacey and futuristic.

Longest track of the disc, "Nowhere / Now Here" starts with an ambient and cosmic overture. Slowly evolving with progressively appearing drums, this first half is just mesmerizing, possessing a little floydian feel. The pace suddenly accelerates for the second half, mystical whirlwinding keyboards weave a mysterious web over a quite robotic sequence. The strange ending section is simply stellar! Space-time is distorted, get ready to travel through a sonic wormhole. From nowhere to now here, that's what it is. All makes sense. A brilliant tour de force!

"Stardancer II" is just a (very slightly) rearranged version of the original "Stardancer" from the first opus, maybe a bit more futuristic. The record concludes with "Moogetique", which surprisingly takes us back to Schulze's early years. Contrasting with the other compositions, this track resembles Klaus' drone experiments from "Cyborg" or even "Irrlicht", with added eerie sound effects. A hazy introduction deploys a claustrophobic and gloomy atmosphere. You're wandering into a cold world of sadness and darkness. Enjoyable, but probably my least favorite.

Let's go straight to the point: if you liked "Body Love", you'll enjoy Volume 2. Furthermore, I find this album is more consistent and less monotonous than the movie score. Again, this is neither sensual nor romantic music, but rather a soundtrack to fly between the stars at any speed you want aboard your spaceship.

Although one of Klaus Schulze's lesser-known release, "Body Love 2" is one of his best offerings from the seventies. Don't miss it!

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Progressive Electronic bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
12 FOLLOWERS United States
6LA8 Pakistan
ACI Germany
AEON France
AETHENOR Multi-National
AFTERLIFE United States
ILDEFONSO AGUILAR Spain
PEKKA AIRAKSINEN Finland
AIRSCULPTURE United Kingdom
ALBERGO INTERGALATTICO SPAZIALE Italy
ALIO DIE Italy
ALLEGORY CHAPEL LTD United States
DAEVID ALLEN MICROCOSMIC United Kingdom
ALLUSTE Italy
ALPHA WAVE MOVEMENT United States
ALTO STRATUS United Kingdom
AMBER ROUTE United States
AMON Italy
PETER ANDERSSON Sweden
ANDROMELOS Japan
ANNA SJALV TREDJE Sweden
ARC United Kingdom
ARPANET United States
EDWARD ARTEMIEV Russia
ARZATHON Sweden
ASCOIL SUN Finland
ASHRA Germany
THE ASTROBOY Portugal
ATOMINE ELEKTRINE Sweden
AUBE Japan
AUTOMAT Italy
AWENSON France
MARVIN AYRES United Kingdom
HARVEY BAINBRIDGE United Kingdom
AIDAN BAKER Canada
SIMON BALESTRAZZI Italy
BAFFO BANFI Italy
BASS COMMUNION United Kingdom
PETER BAUMANN Germany
BAUMANN/KOEK Germany
BEAR BONES LAY LOW Venezuela
BOBBY BEAUSOLEIL United States
CARLOS BELTRÁN Mexico
LÁSZLÓ BENKő Hungary
PHILIPPE BESOMBES France
BETWEEN INTERVAL Sweden
MAURIZIO BIANCHI Italy
BIG ROBOT Norway
BIOSPHERE Norway
TIM BLAKE France
BLUE MOTION Switzerland
BLUE SAUSAGE INFANT United States
WOLFGANG BOCK Germany
DIDIER BOCQUET France
IAN BODDY United Kingdom
GASTON BORREANI Italy
ADAM CERTAMEN BOWNIK Poland
MICHAEL BRÜCKNER Germany
FRANCESCO BUCCHERI Italy
HAROLD BUDD United States
MICHAEL BUNDT Germany
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CALDERA United States
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CHRISTINE 23 ONNA Japan
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CRAWL UNIT United States
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DEAD VOICES ON AIR United Kingdom
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DIONNE - BRÉGENT Canada
DOLULUS Switzerland
HEINRICH DRESSEL Italy
E-MUSIKGRUPPE LUX OHR Finland
EARTHSTAR Multi-National
EDEN France
ELEKTRIKTUS Italy
ELICOIDE Italy
EMERALDS United States
J.D EMMANUEL United States
ENDOPLASMIC FLOW Multi-National
BRIAN ENO United Kingdom
ENVENOMIST United States
EXPO 70 United States
F.G EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY Switzerland
FRANCO FALSINI Italy
FANGER & SCHÖNWÄLDER Germany
FARBFELDE United States
FASER Germany
FATHER MOO & THE BLACK SHEEP Japan
FFWD United Kingdom
FHIEVEL Italy
FIVE THOUSAND SPIRITS Italy
FLAMEN DIALIS France
FOVEA HEX Ireland
FREE SYSTEM PROJEKT Netherlands
FRIPP & ENO United Kingdom
EDGAR FROESE Germany
PETER FROHMADER Germany
KEITH FULLERTON WHITMAN United States
FUTURO ANTICO Multi-National
GALACTIC EXPLORERS Germany
MICHAEL GARRISON United States
MORT GARSON Canada
GRAHAM GETTY United Kingdom
SACHA GIBSON United Kingdom
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GIRÓN Spain
MATHIAS GRASSOW Germany
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GREGOR CÜRTEN & ANSELM ROGMANS Germany
RANDY GREIF United States
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IVERSEN Norway
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OSE France
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PETER M. Italy
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QUARKS Chile
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NIK RAICEVIC United States
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REALTIME Germany
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REDSHIFT United Kingdom
JONAS REINHARDT United States
ALEJANDRO VILLALÓN RENAUD Mexico
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RICHARD WAHNFRIED Germany
CHRISTIAN RICHET France
WOLFGANG RIECHMANN Germany
STEVE ROACH United Kingdom
HANS JOACHIM ROEDELIUS Germany
ROGUE SPORE Ireland
THOMAS RONKIN United States
RUNE MARTINSEN & ØYSTEIN JØRGENSEN Norway
SAB Japan
SAFIYYA United States
SANGIULIANO Italy
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SATAN ALFA BEEL ATEM Japan
SAYER United States
GÜNTER SCHICKERT Germany
SCHLOSS TEGAL United States
CONRAD SCHNITZLER Germany
EBERHARD SCHOENER Germany
ROBERT SCHROEDER Germany
KLAUS SCHULZE Germany
SEESSELBERG Germany
SEQUENTIA LEGENDA France
SERGE RAMSES France
SHOGUN KUNITOKI Finland
MARK SHREEVE United Kingdom
FREDERICH SHULLER Romania
SIJ Ukraine
SIL MUIR Italy
THE SILVERMAN United Kingdom
SINIAALTO Finland
SINOIA CAVES Canada
JAKOB SKØTT Denmark
SOFTWARE Germany
SONISK BLODBAD Multi-National
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SPERM Finland
STARDRIVE United States
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STELLARDRONE Lithuania
SUBINTERIOR Italy
SYRINX Canada
JUTA TAKAHASHI Japan
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TANGRAM Hungary
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THREE SUNS Austria
THROBBING GRISTLE United Kingdom
ASMUS TIETCHENS Germany
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TONTO'S EXPANDING HEAD BAND United Kingdom
TORTURE GNOSIS Multi-National
TOTAL STATION Russia
TRANCE United States
TRANQUILLITY Germany
TRANSPARENT ILLUSION United Kingdom
ROLF TROSTEL Germany
UDDER MILK DECAY United Kingdom
MATTEO UGGERI Italy
UNATTA United States
URNA Italy
VAKO Spain
VANDERSON Poland
JOEL VANDROOGENBROECK Switzerland
PATRICK VIAN France
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VIETGROVE United Kingdom
VOICE OF EYE United States
VOLT Netherlands
ADELBERT VON DEYEN Germany
VON HAULSHOVEN Netherlands
ADRIAN WAGNER United Kingdom
IGOR WAKHEVITCH France
WAVESTAR United Kingdom
PHILLIP WERREN Canada
WHITE NOISE United Kingdom
PATRICK WIKLACZ France
TERJE WINTHER Norway
WINTHERSTORMER Norway
WO0 Serbia
BERNHARD WÖSTHEINRICH Germany
RENÉ VAN DER WOUDEN Netherlands
X-TG United Kingdom
XIU Italy
BERNARD XOLOTL France
YELLOW MAGIC ORCHESTRA Japan
YEN POX United States
YETI RAIN United States
YOU Germany
ZA SIÓDMA GÓRA Poland
EDWARD M. ZAJDA United States
ZANOV France
ZED France
ZOLTAN United Kingdom
ZOMBI United States
ZORCH United Kingdom
ZOVIET FRANCE United Kingdom
ZYGOAT United States

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