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COMPUTERCHEMIST

Progressive Electronic • United Kingdom


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Computerchemist biography
Hungary-based UK project COMPUTERCHEMIST is the creative vehicle of composer and musician Dave Pearson. From the early 1980's and onwards he established his credentials as a musician and band member in bands such as Monteagle. In later years he has collaborated with former Hawkwind dancer/vocalist Nemesis, and in 2013 Pearson appeared as one of three members in project band Audio Cologne Project.

In 2006 Pearson decided to start a solo career. He established his own label Terrainflight to accomplish this, with Atmospheric (2006) the first production to be released on this label using the Computerchemist moniker. Following this initial solo album new productions have followed in quick succession. "Icon One" appeared in 2007, "Landform" followed in 2008, "Aqual Measure" in 2009, "Music for Earthquakes" in 2011 and in 2013 "Signatures I" and "Signatures II" appeared.

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Buy COMPUTERCHEMIST Music


Aqual MeasureAqual Measure
Terrainflight 2009
Audio CD$10.36
$15.39 (used)
AtmosphericAtmospheric
CD BABY.COM/INDYS 2007
Audio CD$10.38
$94.24 (used)
Icon OneIcon One
CD BABY.COM/INDYS 2008
Audio CD$10.36
$65.94 (used)
Music for EarthquakesMusic for Earthquakes
CD Baby 2011
Audio CD$14.79
Signatures 1Signatures 1
CD Baby 2013
Audio CD$17.05
Signatures 2Signatures 2
CD Baby 2013
Audio CD$16.93
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COMPUTERCHEMIST discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

COMPUTERCHEMIST top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 2 ratings
Atmospheric
2006
3.95 | 2 ratings
Icon One
2007
3.00 | 1 ratings
Landform
2008
4.00 | 1 ratings
Aqual Measure
2009
3.05 | 2 ratings
Music For Earthquakes
2011
4.00 | 1 ratings
Signatures I
2013
4.00 | 1 ratings
Signatures II
2013

COMPUTERCHEMIST Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

COMPUTERCHEMIST Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

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COMPUTERCHEMIST Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

COMPUTERCHEMIST Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Atmospheric by COMPUTERCHEMIST album cover Studio Album, 2006
3.00 | 2 ratings

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Atmospheric
Computerchemist Progressive Electronic

Review by admireArt

3 stars Dave Pearson a.k.a. COMPUTERCHEMIST's, first registered work here in PA, has to be listened closely, in order to appreciate what it has to offer to this, Progressive Electronic, sub-genre.

It takes no genius to figure out, this musician has some kind of "classical" music training. That is something easily detected in his sequencer scales and compositional structures. Now don't get me wrong, this is still "Electronic" music. Also it turns quiet impossible not to associate SOME of his musical "cadences", to the "empires" of the T Dream's kingdom.

But again if you listen closely, as told, it will be evident, that Dave Pearson's songwriting, has a place of its own, far beyond's TD's domain. In fact the music is well balanced, it never abuses, none of its tools, let them be drum boxes, sequencer riffs or synth atmospherics, all due to a very "tasty" songwriting. And to be honest his sequencer passages, are far more interesting, than TD's 80's ones.

To round things up, these "Atmospherics" are not ambiental. They are just "electronic instrumented" vocal less songs. It is enjoyable, well produced and composed. It lacks an all personal musical language, but enough to be considered and listened to.

***3 "Good, as a promising first release" PA stars.

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 Atmospheric by COMPUTERCHEMIST album cover Studio Album, 2006
3.00 | 2 ratings

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Atmospheric
Computerchemist Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars These days based in Hungary, UK composer and musician Dave Pearson have released a number of full length albums over the last few years using the artistic moniker COMPUTERCHEMIST, all of them made available through his own label Terrainflight. The first of these was "Atmospheric", which was unveiled back to 2006.

And it is an aptly named album to my ears. Distinct moods and accessible melodies appear to be the focus throughout, with gentle electronic rhythm and percussion details supplemented by steady drum patterns as the foundation, supplemented by dark and light layers of synths and sounds. Material fairly easy on the mind and ears paired of with constructions of a somewhat more challenging nature without ever reaching a level I'd describe as demanding from a listener point of view.

While we do get treated to compositions sporting slower paced, ambient inserts as well as shifts in intensity and thematic buildups, the majority of the material stays melodic and easy to follow, and whenever alterations do occur they rarely challenge you on any level, instead focusing on maintaining listener interest with smooth transitions and careful use of lead motifs. At least as I experienced this production.

With circulating or repetitive gentle rhythms at heart and smooth, surging and swirling synth textures as key elements, associations go towards the likes of Jean Michel Jarre for the most accessible parts explored while the somewhat more daring and challenging movements inspires associations towards Tangerine Dream first and foremost. Occasional details used also gave me fain notions of early Gary Numan and on one occasion Deep Purple, but if those are accidental or planned I can't really tell. Most likely accidental, but you can never know.

All in all a well made debut album, filled with pleasant and memorable electronic excursions of a kind that I suspect will appeal strongest to those who have albums by aforementioned Jarre and Tangerine Dream side by side in their music collection, and in particular those fond of music of this kind that, as the name of the album implies, is atmospheric.

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 Icon One by COMPUTERCHEMIST album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.95 | 2 ratings

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Icon One
Computerchemist Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars UK composer and musician Dave Pearson, these days residing in Hungary, launched his solo career using the moniker COMPUTERCHEMIST back in 2006. Since then he has released an album a year on average. "Icon One" from 2007 is the second of these full length productions.

The material at hand is one that by and large will see many comparisons made in the direction of Tangerine Dream. The use of electronic rhythm details of a melodic nature in particular is one that in sound, scope and overall atmosphere inspires associations to this legendary German unit, but the surging synth motifs, mournful backdrops and occasional darker toned undercurrents are all of a kind that most likely will sound familiar to long time fans of Tangerine Dream.

The multiple part compositions Icon One and Icon Zero dominates the proceedings, clocking in at just over 15 minutes each, the former most alike the aforementioned associations while the latter incorporate a few additional elements that creates a stronger personal identity to the proceedings, at least to my ears. The clever use of frantic, toned down rhythms in particular an element that elevates the listener experience in the latter case. In general I'll also remark that some of the more tender movements, utilizing the piano as lead motif provider, does give me associations towards Austrian keyboard wizard Gandalf just as much as Tangerine Dream.

The circular nature of the somewhat shorter creation Timethorns is probably the most impressive track as far as my own taste is concerned here. Opening with a careful piano and synth motif that gradually shifts to a more distinct Tangerine Dream sound, the overall intensity growing and subsequently fading nicely before going full circle as the compositions shifts back to the opening theme at the end. Final track The Message, with it's alternating sparse piano driven and layered synth and guitar driven movements, is another one that makes a strong overall impression.

All in all this is an album I feel can safely be recommended to fans of Tangerine Dream and artists exploring similar waters, and in particular those amongst them who tend to enjoy accessible, melodic music of this kind.

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 Landform by COMPUTERCHEMIST album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Landform
Computerchemist Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

— First review of this album —
3 stars UK project COMPUTERCHEMIST is the creative vehicle of composer and musician Dave Pearson, and from his current base in Hungary he has released a number of albums from 2006 and onwards. "Landform" is his third full length production, and was issued through his own Terrainflight label in 2008.

As far as style and inspirations go, this is a production that will have an instant appeal for fans of Tangerine Dream. The use of electronic percussion with melodic intent, also described as sequencers by those more familiar with this type of music than I am unless I'm much mistaken, is a strong identity mark throughout and utilized in a fairly similar manner as the aforementioned legendary German band. An additional trademark feature are mournful digital strings of a kind I tend to associate with the Mellotron, with various effects and synth motifs coming and going as supplemental details alongside regular drums and guitars.

Despite the use of the latter two this is an album that can and should be safely regarded within an electronic music context however, to be placed somewhere pretty close to the accessible parts of the Berlin School movement.

Indeed, opening track After The Eclipse is careful and smooth enough to give rise to new age associations as well, and while that slight touch of an even gentler stylistic expression is a standalone feature on this album it does indicate that those more fond of minimalistic, challenging endeavors may not be a key audience for this production.

Tracks like Darklight Drive and in particular Landform explores the light and dark toned duality in a nice and effective manner, maintaining tension and drive through careful contrasts that crafts mesmerizing moods with ease, and while final composition Geoid with it's jazz-tinged subservient details doesn't manage to intrigue quite as much this one too is a pleasant specimen of it's kind. The one creation not yet mentioned, Cave Search, is more of a yin and yan affair. The opening half a splendid constellation of mesmerizing sounds that gels perfectly together to form just about the most intriguing few minutes I've come across by this artist so far, then shifts to explore a musical landscape that never rally managed to catch my attention. The roller-coaster ride of this production.

All in all this is a well made album, sporting a fair few examples of music that should have a strong appeal amongst fans of Tangerine Dream in general and amongst those among them fond of the melodic and accessible part of that band's repertoire in particular.

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 Aqual Measure by COMPUTERCHEMIST album cover Studio Album, 2009
4.00 | 1 ratings

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Aqual Measure
Computerchemist Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

— First review of this album —
4 stars Based in Hungary, UK composer and musician Dave Pearson have steadily released albums as Computerchemist from 2006 and onwards. "Aqual Measure" is the fourth of these productions, and was released on Pearson's own Terrainflight label in 2009.

A common denominator throughout this album is a subtle but distinct presence of Tangerine Dream, at last to these relatively novice ears as far as electronic music is concerned. Most of all I'm reminded of the early 80's material by this influential and highly productive German band, first and foremost due to Pearson's use of distinctly rhythm oriented yet melodic synth motifs throughout. Set up in a manner which inspired inspirations to Tangerine Dream albums such as "White Eagle".

Ardent fans of Tangerine Dream shouldn't rush out to by this album due to this description alone however, as "Aqual Measure" is an album with a bit more to it than this particular detail. Darker tinged, subtly more industrial and bleak sounding atmospheres closer to the likes of Kraftwerk does make the occasional appearance, and playful, positive and energetic displays that adds something of an Ozric Tentacles flavor to the proceedings are other details to take note of.

But the arguably most striking additional dimension is the way drums and guitars supplements the electronic instrumentation. At times reminding ever so slightly of the aforementioned Ozrizs, at other times creating more of an Hawkwind-tinged atmosphere but most often giving these compositions more than a touch of Pink Floyd. In a fairly accessible, late 70's manner that is. On final composition Atlantic Rift we're even treated to both an electronic noise-scape and an elongated movement sporting dark, massive guitar riffs as the driving force supported by steady drums and frail fluctuating electronics in an almost prog metal oriented manner.

While some of these creations do become a tad too one-dimensional at times, this is first and foremost an enjoyable excursion that should find Cavour amongst those who enjoy the music of Tangerine Dream and Pink Floyd both. As long as you don't expect to encounter an artist that have rewritten the rulebook, but instead is able to enjoy a creator of music that have chosen hos framework and operates with assured knowledge within it, this is an album that merits an inspection by those who recognize themselves in the description previously given.

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 Signatures II by COMPUTERCHEMIST album cover Studio Album, 2013
4.00 | 1 ratings

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Signatures II
Computerchemist Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

— First review of this album —
4 stars Hungarian based project COMPUTERCHEMIST is the creative vehicle of UK composer and musician Dave Pearson, who have released a steady stream of albums using this moniker since 2007. "Signatures II" is, rather unsurprisingly I guess, the companion album to "Signatures I", both albums released in early 2013.

A characteristic trait for all songs on this most recent Computerchemist production is that these aren't compositions in the traditional sense. We're not dealing with creations that have a regular starting point followed by a development to a more or less logical conclusion. Instead these are mood and atmosphere explorations, setting up a distinct mood and exploring it in more or less subtle variations before finding a suitable manner in which to conclude. While not quite as one-dimensional as this description might sound like, those fond of and accustomed to compositions with a traditional development might find this aspect of the CD not quite to their taste.

Apart from that detail, a central feature throughout is the unmistaken influence of Tangerine Dream. Be it in subtle details like gently hammering synth motifs or more dominant thematic details, there's a distinct presence of this highly influential German band running throughout this album. Paired off with quite a few additional tendencies mind you.

Strangeness in 13 features a gentle piano motif that brings Austrian keyboard wizard Gandalf to mind, while Goodbye Moszkva Ter and to a somewhat lesser extent Forgotten Memory does add a certain Hawkwind presence to the proceedings by way of cosmic sounds and longing guitar soloing. Floor Zero with it's darker, dystopian atmosphere gave me associations to the likes of Gary Numan, and while the alternating more or less distorted guitar and synth themes of Commution, alongside the gentle piano interludes with careful unreal sound effects, didn't give me any distinct associations as such it's still an intriguing ride. An elongated drums and piano insert a nice and effective break on this epic length track.

The final trio of songs are all in varying degrees creations I'd describe as a blend of Pink Floyd and Tangerine Dream in style. Smeem has what appears to be a stronger basis in blues though, The Needs Of The Many has a stronger identity mark in surging and soaring synth motifs, while final piece Bongo in 4 opts to replace the careful Floydian guitar details with digital strings in the final phase, creating a very distinct and different atmosphere by way of replacing an instrument.

Pearson's compositions are obviously mapped out in a manner that doesn't in any manner make them mere replicas of the artists the individual listener will associate with the different songs, associations that most likely will differ from one listener to the next. I've seen artists like Ozric Tentacles thrown in the association mix for this album too, and of my own associations I suspect that my Gandalf and Gary Numan pointers will be rather uniquely my own, and probably accidental ones as well. The associations game does give a few indications to potential buyers however, and hopefully some of the ones intrigued by the descriptions given will take the time to listen to this album. That is, after all, the point in writing a review.

At last I'll compliment the rhythms department in general and the contributions of drummer Zsolt Gálanta in particular, whose contributions does elevate the listener experience with fine arrays of suitably complex patterns that fits the material at hand in mood and atmosphere both.

All in all "Signatures II" is a solid production, with fans of Tangerine Dream and Pink Floyd both a likely key audience.

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 Signatures I by COMPUTERCHEMIST album cover Studio Album, 2013
4.00 | 1 ratings

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Signatures I
Computerchemist Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

— First review of this album —
4 stars Hungary-based project COMPUTERCHEMIST is the creative vehicle of Englishman Dave Pearson. He started issuing material using this alias back in 2006, and have a total of seven full albums to date. The two most recent of these are Signatures I and Signatures II, both of them released in January 2013 as separate entities rather than as a double feature. Both of them featuring the talents of Zsolt Galantai on drums.

What separates these two productions, if anything, is something time will have to reveal for me personally. But as far as the first chapter of Signatures goes, it is an interesting excursion into a realm whose founding fathers were Tangerine Dream and Kraftwerk. The traces of the former a distinctive feature throughout, but with occasional details and subtle traces of the latter appearing on occasion.

Pearson's approach as a composer is one that some might describe as somewhat one-dimensional. His creations doesn't head off into unexpected directions, and he isn't too fond of applying dramatic effects either. In fact, my impression is that something of a feature throughout this album is that some care has been taken to avoid any truly dramatic occurrences whatsoever. Instead, these musical journeys open up, quickly establish one or more lead motfis or ongoing musical details that will stick with us until the end, and then the song gradually, subtly and carefully develops. Textures, instruments and patterns come and go in a logical, fine flowing and unobtrusive manner. It's like Pearson have looked at a "hush, don't disturb" sign and used that as something of a vision, we're taken on a journey where we're invited to enjoy the journey itself rather than the promise of surprises along the way.

Just how intriguing the eight journeys presented to us here will be is a matter of individual taste more than anything though. It is something of a prerequisite to enjoy compositions developing in the matter outlined obviously, but apart from that it will be an individual case just how compelling each composition will be. Personally I found the creations exploring the darker moods most intriguing, Corporatosaur and Six Phase Mains first and foremost. Complete with gently hammering electronic yet melodic effects and effective synth effects, a fine coating of drum patterns courtesy of Galantai and atmospheric guitar details of a kind that should find instant recognition by those familiar with late 70's Pink Floyd. Most impressive of all to my ears is the concluding piece though, listed as a bonus track. Landform 2012 is something of an exception to what's previously described, as this short piece utilize a fair degree of dramatic effects, although applied and utilized with care, and at least to my ears the arrangements are somewhat more intricate too, with several contrasting patterns and motifs creating a stronger nerve throughout.

All in all a fine piece of electronic music of the progressive variety, employing and utilizing elements from the art rock realms to good effect. Floydian guitar details in particular, but drummer Galantai appears to be a musician well versed in sophisticated music too and adds a vibrant, organic and skilled touch to the proceedings that does elevate the overall experience.

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 Music For Earthquakes by COMPUTERCHEMIST album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.05 | 2 ratings

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Music For Earthquakes
Computerchemist Progressive Electronic

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Hungary based project COMPUTERCHEMIST is the creative vehicle of UK composer and musician Dave Pearson, who have released seven full length production using this moniker since 2005. "Music for Earthquakes" from 2011 is the fifth of these.

I'd wager a guess in stating that this is a production featuring music of a kind few have ever encountered before. Or rather, the specifics of this creation are rather peculiar, even if the expression and style of music may not be that spectacular. In short, Pearson was inspired by a minor earthquake in Hungary, and managed to get the seismological data recorded at three different earthquake stations, ran them through something called a harmonic generator and at some point compressed the hour long data recording into pieces clocking in at about 30 minutes each. So while Pearson arranged this album and the compositions, the credits for instruments is in this case The Earth's Teutonic Plates, which at least for me is a new one.

The end result are two long creations of ambient noise. Rather one-dimensional in scope, and of a kind that will appeal to a select audience only I guess. The first part comes across as distant wailing, ghostly voices on top of a dark, dampened noisescape, interrupted by dark, booming noises for the more dramatic part of the earthquake and it's after shocks presumably.

The second soundscape is subtly different in scope. This one brings closer associations to the sounds one might imagine in deep space, although the ghostly presence is still in effect it's not quite as dominant here, and the more dramatic sounds of the earthquake itself now sounds closer to what I'd imagine would be the case when a spaceship passes by.

All in all an album that will have a very limited appeal I surmise, but if anyone is curious about how an earthquake sounds like when translated into musical forms or is just plan interested in ambient, musical noise of a minimalistic nature then this production should appeal.

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Thanks to windhawk for the artist addition.

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