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PROG RELATED

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Prog Related definition



No musical genre exists in a vacuum. Not all of the bands that have been a part of the history and development of progressive rock are necessarily progressive rock bands themselves. This is why progarchives has included a genre called prog-related, so we could include all the bands that complete the history of progressive rock, whether or not they were considered full-fledged progressive rock bands themselves.

There are many criteria that the prog-related evaluation team considers when deciding which bands are considered prog-related. Very few bands will meet all of this criteria, but this list will give an idea as to some of the things that help evaluate whether an artists is prog-related or not.

1) Influence on progressive rock - The groundbreaking work of artists like Led Zepplin and David Bowie affected many genres of rock, including at times progressive rock. Although both of these artists created rock music in a dizzying array of genres, both contributed to the ongoing history of progressive rock several times within the span of their careers.

2) Location - Progressive rock did not develop at the same time all over the world. It may surprise some people that as late as the mid-70s the US had very few original progressive rock bands that did not sound like exact copies of British bands. Journey was one of the first US bands to present a uniquely American brand of prog-rock before they eventually became a mainstream rock band. We have collaborators from all over the world who tell us which bands helped the progressive rock scene develop in their corner of the globe, even if those bands were like Journey and were known more for being mainstream rock bands.

3) Members of important progressive rock bands - Although most of the recorded solo output of artists like Greg Lake and David Gilmour falls more in a mainstream rock style, their contributions to progressive rock in their respective bands insures them a place in our prog-related genre.

4) Timeliness - Like many genres, prog-rock has had its ups and downs. In the late 70s and early 80s prog-rock was barely a blip on the radar. During this time artists such as David Bowie and Metallica released albums that captured key elements of the spirit of prog rock and did so while contributing their own original modern elements to the mix.

5) Integral part of the prog-rock scene - Sometimes you just had to be a part of the scene during a certain time period to understand how some bands fit with the prog rock scene of their time. Although Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Wishbone Ash may seem like mere hard rock bands, in their time they stood apart from other hard rockers with their more serious lyrical content and more developed compositions. Put simply, in the early 70s every prog-rock record collector usually had full collections of all three of these artists. These three bands were very much part of the prog-rock scene without being total prog-rock bands them selves.

6) Influenced by progressive rock - From the late 60s till about 1976 the progressive tendency was in full effect in almost all genres of music. Once again, as we enter the second decade of the 21st century a melting pot of prog-metal, math-rock, progressive electronics and post-rock influences have once again made a progressive tendency in rock music almost more a norm than a difference. Yet in other periods of musical history receiving influence from progressive rock could really set a band apart and make them worthy of our prog-related category.
Being influenced by progressive rock is hardly the only factor we look at, and in some periods of musical history it is almost meaningless, but still, it is almost a given that most of the artists listed in prog-related were influenced by the development of progressive rock.

7) Common sense - Nitpicking over the above listed criteria is not necessarily the correct way to evaluate a band for prog-related. Sometimes you just have to use some common sense and look at the big picture.
A very good way to describe prog-related would be to imagine an exhaustive book that covered the history of progressive rock. Would such a book include references to led Zeppelin's 'Stairway to Heaven', David Bowie's 'The Man Who Sold the World' or Queen's 'Bohemian Rhapsody'? Probably so.
- Easy Money

Prog Related Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Prog Related | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.38 | 851 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN IV
Led Zeppelin
4.35 | 605 ratings
QUEEN II
Queen
4.27 | 703 ratings
A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
Queen
4.25 | 695 ratings
PARANOID
Black Sabbath
4.22 | 503 ratings
ARGUS
Wishbone Ash
4.19 | 626 ratings
BLACK SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.20 | 585 ratings
SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON
Iron Maiden
4.13 | 539 ratings
POWERSLAVE
Iron Maiden
4.16 | 402 ratings
THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS
Bowie, David
4.15 | 372 ratings
RISING
Rainbow
4.18 | 287 ratings
HUNKY DORY
Bowie, David
4.08 | 546 ratings
SABBATH BLOODY SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.08 | 519 ratings
MASTER OF PUPPETS
Metallica
4.03 | 637 ratings
PHYSICAL GRAFFITI
Led Zeppelin
4.04 | 408 ratings
RIDE THE LIGHTNING
Metallica
4.00 | 691 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN
Led Zeppelin
4.01 | 539 ratings
MASTER OF REALITY
Black Sabbath
4.03 | 411 ratings
HEAVEN AND HELL
Black Sabbath
4.17 | 170 ratings
SECRET TREATIES
Blue ÷yster Cult
4.01 | 410 ratings
BRAVE NEW WORLD
Iron Maiden

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Latest Prog Related Music Reviews


 Somewhere I've Never Travelled  by AMBROSIA album cover Studio Album, 1976
2.91 | 47 ratings

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Somewhere I've Never Travelled
Ambrosia Prog Related

Review by Progfan97402

2 stars I found their debut rather enjoyable, fans of crossover prog will have no trouble enjoying it (symphonic progheads might not find this so satisfying), lots of great music, and better than I expect it to be, given their hits were frequently featured on K-Tel soft rock hits compilations. However I can not be as so thrilled with Somewhere I've Never Travelled". The original LP on 20th Century features a cool pyramid gimmick that was lost on the 1978 Warner reissue. This album really left very little impression on me, and no matter how many times I've listened to it, it never grew on me. It's a good thing you can find their used LPs for next to nothing, sometimes found in thrift shops. I spent $1 for my copy of their debut (not at a thrift store, though) and was pleasantly surprised. I can't say this followup enthused me that way. The band abandoned prog for full-on AOR after this, Life Beyond L.A. is supposed to have soul influences, and did have that big hit "How Much I Feel", the kind of song that didn't give me a good impression of the band. I like their debut, but pretty much give this one a pass.
 Speaking In Tongues by TALKING HEADS album cover Studio Album, 1983
3.61 | 59 ratings

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Speaking In Tongues
Talking Heads Prog Related

Review by Chicapah
Prog Reviewer

3 stars After putting out four full-length LPs in as many years the popular Talking Heads enterprise took three years off to recharge their flagging, tour-jaded batteries. While some fans were worried such a long hiatus might spell the end of the group, "Speaking in Tongues" quickly put such fears to rest. Electronic synth pop music was all the rage in 1983 but this brave outfit took it to another dimension due to their unabated pioneering spirit that kept them out on the cutting edge rather than becoming lost as an indefinable part of the mob. It was ensembles like Talking Heads that were just progressive enough to keep our beloved genre from disappearing beneath the tide of MTV- infected wannabes that flooded the music scene in the early 80s. All proggers owe them at least a modicum of gratitude for staying weird.

The record opens with the inimitable "Burning Down the House." It's an iconic tune that was able to successfully incorporate the more admirable aspects of the New Wave phenomenon without succumbing to its banality. Chris Frantz's roiling drum track and percussive synth injections give it an irresistible drive that's offset by ghostly incidental wafts of sounds and David Byrne's exaggerated vocals. The fact that it rose to #9 on the singles charts did wonders for the album's visibility and it still holds up today as a stunning piece of music. "Making Flippy Floppy" follows, a busy funk presentation augmented by a salvo of adventurous synth experimentations and unusual percussion instruments and/or effects. Another highlight of the album is "Girlfriend is Better." I so admire their dedication to establishing a strong foundational groove first, something extremely important too many of their peers were prone to overlook. This number has one that's a mile deep. David's highly individual vocal style adds to the track's undeniable mystique. "Slippery People" is next. While other New Wave acts were striving with all their might to be viewed as cute oddballs this band was happy to be wandering off on their own uncommercial tangent. Here they bring in an R&B spirit to flow atop a bubbly soundtrack, creating a decent meld of unexpected influences.

"I Get Wild - Wild Gravity" has a bit of a casual Ska feel to it that runs through the tune from beginning to end. There's a clean, minimalist mindset at work here I find intriguing, especially considering the stilted era it came out in. "Swamp" is one of the better cuts. It owns a loping shuffle that keeps things from becoming overly predictable and Byrne's half-spoken delivery creates a semi-bluesy atmosphere. Not run-of-the-mill fare by any means and I love the delicate bizarreness of it all. "Moon Rocks" marks the low point of the proceedings due to its ordinariness. It sounds as if they came up with a basic repeating pattern one night and then starting adding things along the way. It's not a deal-killer by any means but I can't find much to brag about it. They close with "Pull Up the Roots." It sports kind of a Prince-styled pop-ish rhythm that has the potential to become boring in a hurry but David's intertwining vocal lines on the chorus are inventive and they grant the song a certain distinction. Still, it falls a tad short of being remarkable.

"Speaking in Tongues" was released on May 31, 1983 and peaked at number 15. Not too shabby a showing after the quartet had been somewhat invisible for three years. It was also done without the production genius of Brian Eno (who had moved on to help mold U2 into an industry juggernaut). Standing on its own it's not going to blow any proggers away but when analyzed in the context of what was going on in music in 1983 it deserves to be afforded a certain amount of respect for its character alone. 3.2 stars.

 Short Stories  by TANTALUS album cover Studio Album, 1996
2.23 | 7 ratings

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Short Stories
Tantalus Prog Related

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

2 stars By mid-90's the duo of Max Hunt and Rupert Willder had added a third regular member to the core of Tantalus, it was Steve Meston, who played the bass and sung the backing vocals on the upcoming second effort of the band ''Short stories''.However the 2002 version of the album would be completed with a pair of numbers, where several guest musicians participated, so these pieces were technically performed by a normal full-band.This work originally came out independently in 1996.

For the most of its length ''Short stories'' is easily comparable to the previous Tantalus album albeit much more uneven.Stylistically it sounds like classic British Neo Prog, where you can encounter several poppy vibes, melodic touches and even post-New Wave atmospheres.As a result the material is rather average, guitar and keyboard works are mostly decent and the vocals come in an emotional manner, but the music is pretty easy-listening and not particularly memorable, recallng JADIS' weaker moments or even compatriots Jump's commercial principles.Additionally some of the keyboard values are pretty pale, while the generally slow tempos make this one sounds a bit monotonous, despite the good songwriting efforts.All these are valid till' reaching ''Wherever you turn'', this is some pretty tasteful Neo Prog with both synth and organ runs and some complex moves reminiscent of ABEL GANZ and even some Classical touches in the keyboard parts.Even better is the following ''Toccata & fugue in D minor'', title says it all, this is dramatic, all instrumental Symphonic Rock with E.L.P. and Italian Prog vibes, featuring Neo-Classical guitar leaks and powerful organ themes, do not wonder why, this is the first piece on the album performed by the normal full band credited on the CD.The other one is the closing ''Can't say no'', a beautiful, laid-back electroacoustic ballad with some PINK FLOYD influences and emotional vocals.

Original version of ''Short stories'' is rather thin Neo Prog/Melodic Rock with no particular highlights.The 2002 issue with the bonus tracks is pretty attractive and comes recommended, so this is propably the one to choose of the pair...2.5 stars for the original entry.

 Sanctuary by IRON MAIDEN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1980
2.76 | 27 ratings

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Sanctuary
Iron Maiden Prog Related

Review by thwok

2 stars The primary concern for rating music here at Prog Archives is, of course, its "progressiveness". This "Sanctuary" single by Iron Maiden, one of the most innovative bands in metal history, ranks fairly low on the progressive scale. This is pretty straightforward metal. I like Paul Di'Anno's singing, even though he is a very different singer from Bruce Dickinson. As others have said, Paul's voice fits Iron Maiden's musical style at this point.

This collection of primarily live music really demonstrates the talents of Clive Burr and Steve Harris. The guitarists, on the other hand, don't seem to be in sync. A listener would certainly expect better from Dave Murray. Of the three songs on this single, the title track would be my favorite. The sound quality is adequate. In conclusion, this is a good listen if you're already a fan of Iron Maiden.

 Primus & the Chocolate Factory by PRIMUS album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.33 | 11 ratings

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Primus & the Chocolate Factory
Primus Prog Related

Review by Tom Ozric
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Primus And The Chocolate Factory. This is how the soundtrack would've been reflected had Willy Wonka laced his fantastic candies with LSD........ Here, Primus' Les Claypool has re-imagined the musical backing of Gene Wilder's 1971 classic fantasy film Charlie And The Chocolate Factory. And let's welcome back drummer Tim (Herb) Alexander, who seems to come and go as he pleases. What an eccentric collection of pieces this release contains. Typically quirky, 'out-there' and rather complex, nothing is 'normal' when it comes to Primus. This is one, curious band that's certainly difficult to classify. Also featuring the 'Fungi Ensemble' (Matt Dillon - Tabla, Vibraphone, Marimba) and Sam Bass ('Cello), the songs mainly feature Les on his upright bass, with sparse appearances with his resonator and regular electric basses, Tim playing his kit and nik-naks like how an orchestral percussionist would, Ler playing his skewed guitar lines as usual, and contributing lead-vocals (!) to a track. Let's just say that this album is a blast - it's pure humour, joy, and very Primus. Only Les can get away with twisting and old-fashioned classic into such a modern sounding, freaky extravaganza. And even my 14 y.o. neice gets a kick out of this one. Mostly made up of shorter, incidental links, main tracks that are stretched out beyond the 4 minute mark stand on their own as only Primus can arrange - heavy, avante and plain weird. Classic examples being the manic intensity of Candy Man and the child-like glee of Golden Ticket (traditional Primus). These 2 tracks are pure-gold, just like the ticket !! Elsewhere you can hear the Wonka 'magic' of Cheer Up Charlie, Pure Imagination, Semi-Wondrous Boat Ride and Wonkmobile, interspersed with the various Oompa- Loompa ditties offering the amusing lyrics (especially presented with Claypool's nutty delivery), and various instrumental snippets. I should mention that the Hello Wonkites and Farewell Wonkites pieces remind me of the intro of Pink Floyd's Dogs Of War track. This album may not be the funkified metal extravaganza their fans have been waiting for in the wake of the cool Green Naugahyde album, but it's still has enough fun/enjoyment, and replay value for me to give it a 4th star. And the 'Chocolate' brown vinyl makes it even more delectable......

 Iron Maiden by IRON MAIDEN album cover Studio Album, 1980
3.82 | 430 ratings

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Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden Prog Related

Review by HunterD

4 stars Atomic metal punks! Steve Harris can disavow the UK punk scene all he wants, but there is a punk steam wafting up from the metal grates in the dank alleys of Iron Maiden's memorable debut. It may even be the earliest ancestor of crossover, alongside the road dogs in Motorhead.

Of course, this is due to a few elements, one being that the musicianship of the band had yet to reach that level of refinement that they would further hone on "Killers," before bringing Bruce Dickinson into the mix and elevating Eddie from a street punk with eggs in his hair, to a figure bigger than the Devil. The other element is Paul Di'Anno, who brought a grungy element to Maiden's sound during their first two albums. This punky tone Di"Anno brought to the game felt a bit out of place once Adrian Smith joined and the band could really wail those guitars to perfection on "Killers," but he's the right guy for this record. It's not the Iron Maiden we came to know and love, but it's a great album, listening to it is like watching an Enzo G. Castellari movie where scary punks rule the streets, with a gothic edge.

 Cross Purposes Live  by BLACK SABBATH album cover DVD/Video, 2003
2.65 | 8 ratings

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Cross Purposes Live
Black Sabbath Prog Related

Review by HunterD

2 stars I've always had a keen interest in Black Sabbath's back pages, the days without Ozzy or Dio, when it was a chaotic line-up from album to album with Tony Iommi at the eye of the storm. For awhile, Iommi found a stable presence in the form of singer Tony Martin, who served behind the mic during many thankless years. It's true that Martin was a bit of a poor man's Ronnie James Dio, but the guy was a good singer. He cleaned up well on "Eternal Idol" and "Tyr" went on to be unexpectedly influential in Nordic metal circles.

What the "Cross Purposes" live video reveals, though, is how deficient he was as a stage presence with Sabbath. Dio always looked a bit silly in his medieval elf outfits, but he had such a way of owning it that his charisma won out and made us love him as he pointed the horns at the audience. Martin just doesn't seem to know what to do, and his hair makes matters worse.

Still, I always enjoy seeing how Sabbath's rogues gallery of singers handle the classic songs over the years (Ian Gillan in particular was a scream). Getting to hear Martin handle the classic material is what makes this a "fans only" affair. He's best, though, when handling his own songs, like "Anno Mundi" and "Psychophobia," which are both fantastic tunes. In the end this video may have been better with more of his material, but you can't do a night of deep cuts from "Eternal Idol" and "Headless Cross" at a Sabbath show without expecting to incite a riot. The book has been shut for awhile now on this era, and some of the records are tough to come by these days, but it's an interesting look at a show during Sabbath's lean years, which judging by the crowd, would probably make most bands fat.

 Destiny by MATUCHNIAK, PETER album cover Studio Album, 2014
2.00 | 1 ratings

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Destiny
Peter Matuchniak Prog Related

Review by Conor Fynes
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
2 stars 'Destiny' - Peter Matuchniak (44/100)

To hear something called 'adult contemporary rock' is descriptive enough to conjure a fairly precise expectation of what the music will be like. That is surprising too, considering the only musician I know of who has ever adopted this seemingly contradictory style has been Peter Matuchniak, a progger-turned-soft-rocker (or is it the other way around?) I've had the pleasure of knowing for a couple of years now. While his work with Gekko Project fell into the realm of true-to-conventions prog rock, his unassuming solo debut Uncover Me was a more appealing and personal statement. Following it up with Destiny, Peter's second dive into solo work shares many of the same strengths and weaknesses as the first. The music benefits from a feeling of 'coffee shop' variety intimacy you don't often hear in soft rock, but severe issues with the beyond-sterile production on Destiny are more than enough to hold the album back.

The musicianship on Destiny is certainly capable, but there isn't much of an impression they're playing together as a band. Peter's production is remarkably clear and well-mixed, but there is something about the way it comes together that doesn't set right. There is plenty musicianship and experience to go around on Destiny, but where is the chemistry? Where is the organic interplay that should go with the territory? The production and multi-layered arrangements earn points on technical grounds, but there's no magic in the combined result. Granted, with today's largely digital home recording standards, it's easy to fall into this hole. With the fortunate exception of Matuchniak's guitar solos (which carry fitting resonance), it sounds as if the instruments were recorded in a closet one at a time with no direct collaboration between the musicians, only to be cut-and-pasted into the end result. The unfeeling execution isn't enough to damn Destiny entirely, but Peter and his friends are good musicians, and deserved to be heard in a better context.

One part of the sound that escapes the shortfalls of the instrumentation are the vocals. There is a certain warmth inherent to the human voice that, when sung with feeling, cannot be robbed by the most antiseptic production. Peter Matuchniak is a vocalist that acknowledges the limitations of his range, and makes the best of it regardless. There is a plain charm to his subdued performance that befits mellowed music like this more than a bombastic frontman ever could. The lyrics (which tend to revolve around a familiar apprehension towards modern society) are most often cheesy, but it's hard to make an issue of that when they're sung with passion (that, they are.) The only major gripe with the vocals comes in the form of a sort of spoken word mode Peter likes to go into per occasion; it's pretty awful, and sounds like a sleep-deprived Lou Reed talking to a mirror in preparation for a half-baked beat poetry night. Even that might be making it sound more interesting than it is. Mixing singing with spoken word is most often a recipe for disaster, and this is certainly no exception.

The biggest joy on Destiny are actually the female 'guest' vocalists; Natalie Azerad and Peter's daughter Alyssa. Alyssa Matuchniak is a boon to the band's sound; she sounds like a one-woman gospel choir, vocalizing behind the instrumentation to some great effect. Natalie Azerad's voice is showcased on the song "Spies", an exotic jazzy piece that ranks up with the best tunes the album has to offer. Hearing the vocorder'd female voice on "Go Slow" made for a pleasant surprise as well.

Even though Peter Matuchniak has networked within prog circles (his Gekko Project was indisputably proggy in nature) it would be a real stretch to call most of Destiny prog to begin with. The 'adult contemporary rock' term Peter labels his music with rings true in the slow, consonant mood of the songs. The fact that the last three tracks comprise a fourteen minute prog rock suite seems to clash directly with the rest of the album. In any case, I'm glad it did. "Reprisal", "Chaos", and "Victory" go a long ways towards redeeming the otherwise somnolent atmosphere on the rest of the album. While the performance doesn't quite escape the 'cut- and-paste' impression, the suite goes a hell of a greater ways to exposing the instrumentalists as great musicians.

In some ways, the prog suite comes too late to the party. Even past the lack of warmth in the production, I wonder if the typical songwriting might be too smooth, too mellow to have kept my full attention. Destiny does not appear to go out of its way to impress, nor does it. There is good material here, but the problems are profound enough to make it a mixed success at best. Even so, none of these issues are necessarily inherent to the art of Peter Matuchniak and his friends; heard live, I don't imagine musicians with their good intention and sincerity would have a hard time creating feeling in me if I ever saw them live. I hope I get the chance someday.

 The Fire Theft by FIRE THEFT, THE album cover Studio Album, 2003
4.02 | 6 ratings

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The Fire Theft
The Fire Theft Prog Related

Review by TCat
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Three musicians from the band Sunny Day Real Estate became known as The Fire Theft after the break up of the first band. For the most part, they rid themselves of the emo sound they had and created a new band in the style of indie/alternative bands. The music is not standard though, it doesn't really follow the traditional patterns of popular rock. The vocals are well done and don't feel self-pitying. The instrumental back ups and breaks are very well and tastefully done, with the band occasionally exploring new and interesting sounds.

Now, this is not a full fledged progressive band, nor do they claim to be. But they take on some progressive, or at least some original sounds, phrasing and very cool harmonics. There are some nice surprises throughout their only full album that give each and every song on here a personality of it's own. I am always afraid of indie or alternative bands that have a few good songs and then pattern all of their other songs after the same mold and the songs end up becoming non-interesting because nothing stands out. Not so with this album. It's hard to find anything that is not interesting here. The music flows forward and doesn't become stagnant. The addition of hooks that come at you from way out in left field at times keep the music fresh and interesting. The interesting harmonics that show up on occasion also make things original.

There are times when I hear a tendency to lean toward a slight post-rock sound, but not quite. In fact, there are passages, especially in the atmospheric chorus to the louder verses of "Chains" that reminds me of the more atmospheric songs of Oceansize, but without quite reaching the full development of that band. But the attempt is legitimate and impressive enough to not have to worry about the songs being weak copies of a better band. Then the longer track "Sinatra" is a decent attempt at something a little more challenging and really approaches progressive music with nice original song structure and dynamics. This is very enjoyable music.

Most of the songs feature great vocals, but there are a few instrumentals here including the short, but interesting "Waste Time Segue", the backward sounding guitar on the otherwise forward sounding song "Backward Blues", and the changing rhythms and moods of the mostly instrumental song "Rubber Bands" are not filler, but have purpose and life of their own. They feel like they belong on the album with the rest of the songs.

I am surprised that the band didn't manage to put out anymore material. I know there was another album planned and also a video album, but neither of these happened for whatever reason. I can't help but think they may have tried a little more experimentation, but I suppose we'll never know.

Anyway, if you are feeling like something a little more mainstream, but not traditional with hints of prog and a lot of originality, this would be the album you are looking for. It's not mindless cookie- cutter material and has just enough individualistic tendency to be considered an excellent addition to your collection. If you can find it, which I still see copies of it around, then by all means, give it a try. I think you will be as surprised as I was.

 Gentlemen Take Polaroids  by JAPAN album cover Studio Album, 1980
3.01 | 65 ratings

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Gentlemen Take Polaroids
Japan Prog Related

Review by Cylli Kat

4 stars Granted, this is prog RELATED. Not straightforward prog. But this is a well crafted album brimming with the proggy basslines of the late Mick Karn, the smooth vocals of David Sylvian (n' Batt), the solid drumming of David's brother Steve Janse, as well as the synth craftings of future Porcupine Tree member Richard Barbieri. I have extremely fond memories associated with this album and its follow-up Tin Drum. So I have a mixed approach to this rating: I love the album and give it 5 stars. BUT it is not exactly prog, so for the sake of those who want a "prog" rating would have to give it 3 stars. Conclusion, 4 stars. Your mileage may vary...
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Prog Related bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
10CC United Kingdom
14 BIS Brazil
801 United Kingdom
ABEDUL Spain
ABSOLUUTTINEN NOLLAPISTE Finland
ACIDENTE Brazil
AERODROM Yugoslavia
AGNUS DEI Austria
AGUA DE ANNIQUE Netherlands
DON AIREY United Kingdom
ALBERO MOTORE Italy
ALWAYS ALMOST United States
THE AMBER LIGHT Germany
AMBROSIA United States
JON ANDERSON United Kingdom
ARIEL Australia
ASIA United Kingdom
ATLANTIS United States
PETER BARDENS United Kingdom
SYD BARRETT United Kingdom
LUCIO BATTISTI Italy
BEAU DOMMAGE Canada
BIJELO DUGME Yugoslavia
BLACK SABBATH United Kingdom
BLACKFIELD Multi-National
BLODWYN PIG United Kingdom
BLUE ÷YSTER CULT United States
JEAN-PASCAL BOFFO France
THE BOLLENBERG EXPERIENCE Belgium
DAVID BOWIE United Kingdom
BRAM STOKER United Kingdom
BUDGIE United Kingdom
BYZANTIUM United Kingdom
JOHN CALE United Kingdom
CARNEGIE United States
CASA DAS MŃQUINAS Brazil
THE CHURCH Australia
CITY Germany
CITY BOY United Kingdom
CLOUDS United Kingdom
STEWART COPELAND United States
CRUACHAN Ireland
MARTIN DARVILL & FRIENDS United Kingdom
BRIAN DAVISON'S EVERY WHICH WAY United Kingdom
FABRIZIO DE ANDR… Italy
CHRISTIAN D…CAMPS France
DEUS Belgium
DIABOLUS United Kingdom
DIR EN GREY Japan
DREAMLAND United States
ER. J. ORCHESTRA Ukraine
ESQUIRE United Kingdom
EVOLVE IV United States
EX CATHEDRA United States
FAIRPORT CONVENTION United Kingdom
THE FIRE THEFT United States
FLIED EGG / STRAWBERRY PATH Japan
FLIGHT 09 Uzbekistan
FLYING COLORS United States
FM Canada
FOTHERINGAY United Kingdom
ELOY FRITSCH Brazil
FUGATO ORCHESTRA Hungary
AVIV GEFFEN Israel
DAVID GILMOUR United Kingdom
GORDON GILTRAP United Kingdom
GOD BLESS Indonesia
GODLEY & CREME United Kingdom
GOLDEN EARRING Netherlands
GROUNDHOGS United Kingdom
GTR United Kingdom
GUDDAL (YNGVE) & MATTE (ROGER T.) Norway
GYGAFO United Kingdom
THE HAPPENINGS FOUR Japan
HELP YOURSELF United Kingdom
KEN HENSLEY United Kingdom
ROGER HODGSON United Kingdom
HORIZONT Sweden
INDIGO Austria
IRON MAIDEN United Kingdom
JACKSON HEIGHTS United Kingdom
JAPAN United Kingdom
JEAN-MICHEL JARRE France
JON & VANGELIS United Kingdom
BRYAN JOSH United Kingdom
JOURNEY United States
KALEVALA Finland
ERIC KAMPMAN United States
KESTREL United Kingdom
KING'S X United States
KINO United Kingdom
KLAATU Canada
KORNELIJE KOVAC / KORNELL KOVACH Yugoslavia
KREUZWEG Germany
GREG LAKE United Kingdom
LANA LANE United States
LED ZEPPELIN United Kingdom
GEDDY LEE Canada
JOSIPA LISAC Yugoslavia
JON LORD United Kingdom
MAGELLANMUSIC United States
MAGNA CARTA United Kingdom
MAGNUM United Kingdom
YNGWIE MALMSTEEN Sweden
MŇNS MOSSA Sweden
GERARD MANSET France
PHIL MANZANERA United Kingdom
NICK MASON United Kingdom
MASTERPLAN Multi-National
MATTER OF TASTE Austria
PETER MATUCHNIAK United States
MAX WEBSTER Canada
MERCURY REV United States
METALLICA United States
MINDFIELDS Poland
MOONDANCER Japan
MUSE United Kingdom
NOW United States
OFFENBACH Canada
OM ART FORMATION Bulgaria
OYSTERHEAD United States
PAGE AND PLANT United Kingdom
THE PARLOUR BAND United Kingdom
ALAN PARSONS BAND United Kingdom
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I POOH Italy
DAVORIN POPOVIC Yugoslavia
PRIMUS United States
QUEEN United Kingdom
RAIN FOR A DAY Germany
RAINBOW Multi-National
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