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PROG RELATED

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Prog Related definition



No musical genre exists in a vacuum. Not all of the bands that have been a part of the history and development of progressive rock are necessarily progressive rock bands themselves. This is why progarchives has included a genre called prog-related, so we could include all the bands that complete the history of progressive rock, whether or not they were considered full-fledged progressive rock bands themselves.

There are many criteria that the prog-related evaluation team considers when deciding which bands are considered prog-related. Very few bands will meet all of this criteria, but this list will give an idea as to some of the things that help evaluate whether an artists is prog-related or not.

1) Influence on progressive rock - The groundbreaking work of artists like Led Zepplin and David Bowie affected many genres of rock, including at times progressive rock. Although both of these artists created rock music in a dizzying array of genres, both contributed to the ongoing history of progressive rock several times within the span of their careers.

2) Location - Progressive rock did not develop at the same time all over the world. It may surprise some people that as late as the mid-70s the US had very few original progressive rock bands that did not sound like exact copies of British bands. Journey was one of the first US bands to present a uniquely American brand of prog-rock before they eventually became a mainstream rock band. We have collaborators from all over the world who tell us which bands helped the progressive rock scene develop in their corner of the globe, even if those bands were like Journey and were known more for being mainstream rock bands.

3) Members of important progressive rock bands - Although most of the recorded solo output of artists like Greg Lake and David Gilmour falls more in a mainstream rock style, their contributions to progressive rock in their respective bands insures them a place in our prog-related genre.

4) Timeliness - Like many genres, prog-rock has had its ups and downs. In the late 70s and early 80s prog-rock was barely a blip on the radar. During this time artists such as David Bowie and Metallica released albums that captured key elements of the spirit of prog rock and did so while contributing their own original modern elements to the mix.

5) Integral part of the prog-rock scene - Sometimes you just had to be a part of the scene during a certain time period to understand how some bands fit with the prog rock scene of their time. Although Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Wishbone Ash may seem like mere hard rock bands, in their time they stood apart from other hard rockers with their more serious lyrical content and more developed compositions. Put simply, in the early 70s every prog-rock record collector usually had full collections of all three of these artists. These three bands were very much part of the prog-rock scene without being total prog-rock bands them selves.

6) Influenced by progressive rock - From the late 60s till about 1976 the progressive tendency was in full effect in almost all genres of music. Once again, as we enter the second decade of the 21st century a melting pot of prog-metal, math-rock, progressive electronics and post-rock influences have once again made a progressive tendency in rock music almost more a norm than a difference. Yet in other periods of musical history receiving influence from progressive rock could really set a band apart and make them worthy of our prog-related category.
Being influenced by progressive rock is hardly the only factor we look at, and in some periods of musical history it is almost meaningless, but still, it is almost a given that most of the artists listed in prog-related were influenced by the development of progressive rock.

7) Common sense - Nitpicking over the above listed criteria is not necessarily the correct way to evaluate a band for prog-related. Sometimes you just have to use some common sense and look at the big picture.
A very good way to describe prog-related would be to imagine an exhaustive book that covered the history of progressive rock. Would such a book include references to led Zeppelin's 'Stairway to Heaven', David Bowie's 'The Man Who Sold the World' or Queen's 'Bohemian Rhapsody'? Probably so.
- Easy Money

Prog Related Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Prog Related | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.38 | 930 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN IV
Led Zeppelin
4.37 | 664 ratings
QUEEN II
Queen
4.28 | 791 ratings
PARANOID
Black Sabbath
4.26 | 766 ratings
A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
Queen
4.53 | 144 ratings
BLACKSTAR
Bowie, David
4.23 | 719 ratings
BLACK SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.20 | 656 ratings
SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON
Iron Maiden
4.20 | 550 ratings
ARGUS
Wishbone Ash
4.19 | 486 ratings
THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS
Bowie, David
4.19 | 353 ratings
HUNKY DORY
Bowie, David
4.17 | 418 ratings
RISING
Rainbow
4.14 | 611 ratings
POWERSLAVE
Iron Maiden
4.09 | 631 ratings
SABBATH BLOODY SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.08 | 581 ratings
MASTER OF PUPPETS
Metallica
4.18 | 235 ratings
SCARY MONSTERS (AND SUPER CREEPS)
Bowie, David
4.05 | 697 ratings
PHYSICAL GRAFFITI
Led Zeppelin
4.04 | 618 ratings
MASTER OF REALITY
Black Sabbath
4.05 | 463 ratings
RIDE THE LIGHTNING
Metallica
4.17 | 199 ratings
SECRET TREATIES
Blue ÷yster Cult
4.00 | 759 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN
Led Zeppelin

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Latest Prog Related Music Reviews


 Tyr by BLACK SABBATH album cover Studio Album, 1990
3.22 | 177 ratings

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Tyr
Black Sabbath Prog Related

Review by Sergey Slenkoff

4 stars One of the most closest to prog albums by Sabbath. The central concept compostion consits of 3 parts - "The Battle of Tyr" (short Wagnerian instrumental for keyboards), "Odin's Court" (ballad), "Valhalla" (heavy epic). It is devoted to Scandinavian mythology and to the beliefs of the Vikings. Album was produced by Tony Iommi and Cozy Powell and probably it was Cozy who made acsent on drums and keyboads in the mix. I suppose that Cozy had "Stargazer" by Rainbow as a model of sound in his mind. Tony, Cozy and Leif Masses had made very contrast album. You are either listening to heavy metal riffs or to acoustic or ballad guitar sound. Heavy epics in the start ("Anno Mundi") and the middle of the album, real ballad (do you remember "Changes"?) and official single hit "Feels Good to Me", two dynamic tracks "Law Maker" and "Heaven in Black" (potential hits). Real hit (without single and video) "Jerusalem". What's not to like? Probably the most impressive record and most impressive lyrics by Tony Martin ever. It seems that album impressed mostly Scandinavian bands - you can listen to the albums by Tiamat, Bathory from 90s and they frequently used same manner of contrast sound.
 Forbidden by BLACK SABBATH album cover Studio Album, 1995
1.86 | 149 ratings

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Forbidden
Black Sabbath Prog Related

Review by Sergey Slenkoff

4 stars Give this album a second glance. Start to listen to it with the bootleg "Forbiden. Rough Mixes" with instrumental versions of the songs before producer Ernie C changed the sound having in his mind "Cop Killer" by Body Count as a model of sound. It could be great Sabbath album. Ernie C blurred guitars in his mix and added hollow wooden sound of drums - I suppose his idea was a kind of ethnic drums with Sabbath riffs. Result is rough doomish unpolished sound. Result is questionable but interesting. It didn't work back in 1995, but it works now. Negative reviews are based on comparings with previous Sabbath albums. Don't compare - simply relax and listen. Believe the album works for the listener and it grows with each listening. It's real Sabbath sound.
 Tweez by SLINT album cover Studio Album, 1989
3.18 | 17 ratings

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Tweez
Slint Prog Related

Review by LearsFool
Collaborator Post/Math Rock Team

5 stars They say that first impressions are everything, but in the case of "Tweez" it's context that's been everything. You'll probably remember "Tweez" as the diminutive brother of the stone classic post and math codifying opus "Spiderland", described as prototypical and paleful, for listeners an afterthought. But context!

In 1989, this was revelatory music. At the time, there were many proto-math bands, post-hardcore rockers deep underground who felt it best to crimp Crimson for odd time signatures to spice up their riffs. Now, these bands don't have a snowball's chance in Tartarus of getting into PA, and for good reason: their stuff was barely into the kind of face melting forms that Crimson themselves perfected with the likes of "Fracture" and the title track to "Discipline"; exhibit A is "Umber" by B*tch Magnet. But then a handful of math obsessives, such as the members of BM, got their hands on this little puppy straight outta Louisville, and were blown away. Here was a faceless, mysterious band that weren't afraid to rock hard and weird. We're talking the kind of math that wouldn't be seen again until Don Caballero. They were ahead of their time and timeless.

The album starts out strong with "Ron", tumbling through the embryonic form of "Nosferatu Man" fast and hard as someone complains about their headphones. This epic display leads into a quick moving and flowing sequence of tracks, sometimes rather short, blistering with speed, heaviness, and signature shifts. The album as a whole feels triumphant yet boxed in, dark, and unknowable. The vocals are the only thing here prototypical to "Spiderland", coming out randomly and strangely, not yet in line with the dour first person narratives of the follow up. But that matters not, as the music continues to bend and excite for a half hour - my only complaint is that there isn't more of it.

Excepting "Discipline", this is the founding document of math rock, socks knocking and worthy in its own right.

 The Continuing Story of Radar Love by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1989
4.00 | 8 ratings

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The Continuing Story of Radar Love
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by uduwudu

4 stars If you need to start and maybe finish your Golden earring representation in your music collection this is probably the best start. First you get all the well known material and in full versions e.g. no single edit of Twilight Zone here.

Earring are not a prog rock band in the vein of classical fusion but they do have some sophisticated moments. She Flies on Str\tange Wings is both Part 1 and 2 if you ever had the single. I think I had quite a few from many, many years ago. But Strange Wings is a rocking, lyrical, dramatic intricate number.

I've no problem (don't want to be a snob) with arena rock in which Earring really belongs. Classic rock is a sales format not a style and arena hard rock is the Golden Earring area of expertise. So a couple of the last few numbers fit into this category.

The album works as a brief (2LP or 1 CD) introduction to Earring. Possibly a 2 or 3 Cd anthology might be more appropriate to get a picture of the band's work. However, this is a fine compilation and if you were not aware it was one you'd think you were listening to one fantastic effort. Which it is.

Oh by the way, if you want a little more Earring for your pleasure I'd throw in the '77 Live album as well; it underlines the very high quality arena rock standard, and this one emphasizes the generally best writing. Here's probably the best place to start.

cheers

 Blackstar by BOWIE, DAVID album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.53 | 144 ratings

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Blackstar
David Bowie Prog Related

Review by Dobermensch
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Stricken with grief, it took me three weeks before I could bring myself to listen to this after hearing of Bowie's death. How is it possible to feel so sad about the death of someone you've never met or even spoken to?

What makes it all the more painful is that this is far better than any album he's released since 1995's 'Outside' with which 'Blackstar' holds many similarities. It's almost an extension of that recording without Brian Eno twiddling knobs and pushing buttons. After 5 listens I have to admit that 'Blackstar' is a masterpiece. Bowie's 'Abbey Road' if you like.

Being very excited towards the end of last year with the release of the bizarre 'Blackstar' video I couldn't wait for more of this experimental Bowie. Everything was just great - the bandaged face - the scarecrows - the quirky, odd and frankly downright weird tune left me desperate for more.

January 10th 2016... The the sky fell down...

A whole new perspective on those 2 videos hit me like a hammer blow. How couldn't I see the wardrobe door as a coffin?, Major Tom's skull? The lyrics should have been obvious enough. The real giveaway were the buttons on the eyes similar to coins on the eyes of the dead who crossed the river Styx with a payment to Charon, the ferryman of Hades, in order that their souls don't haunt the living.

This has made listening to 'Blackstar' a very difficult experience. In a year's time I'm sure I'll look back and say that it was the most brilliant artistic departure anyone has made in music. Art in death. Death in art. Right now it hurts.

'Blackstar' is like a hammered together collection of tunes that vary in sound and emotion. From the very upsetting yet superb opener we move on to 'Tis a Pity she was a Whore' - which could almost be a missing track from 'Let's Dance' When I heard there were saxophones on this album I shuddered. Thankfully they are used tastefully. Bowie's voice is in fine fettle considering he could barely speak during those last months. I guess it was recorded early last year.

'Lazarus' sounds like a missing track lifted from 'Heathen' which is no bad thing at all. The deeply grim lyrics are enough to make a grown man burst into tears. Like the previous two tracks there's very little connection in sound - almost as though they were recorded for different albums. Surprisingly it works really well.

Sue (Or In A Season Of Crime) really gets things going with a stomping, frantic beat and excellent vocals. Quite similar in fact to the vastly underrated 'Earthling' from '97. It gets louder than war itself the nearer it reaches the end.

The undoubted highlight for me is the underwhelmingly named 'Girl Loves me'. This sounds like it was recorded for the middle segment of 'Outside' from '95. The expletives are all the more unsettling in that he passed away on Sunday whilst singing 'Where the f*ck did Monday go. This tune is a million miles away from anything on 'The Next Day' which in hindsight just appears to be a clearing of the decks for what was to follow.

'Dollar Days' displays that pastoral green fields of England thing that Floyd did so well in the early 70's. It's a lovely tune with Bowie crooning away just like in the good old days.

There's a harmonica intro in 'I Can't Give Everything Away' that has been directly lifted from "A New Career in a New Town' in '77's 'Low'. It doesn't matter- the tune is beautiful. An almost perfect sendoff that could have been lifted from 'Black Tie White Noiise' but in a far more subtle manner.

Believe me - I don't give out 5 stars lightly. If an album deserves to be blown to pieces by a Howitzer, Im the man to do it. 'Blackstar' exceeded my expectations enormously. After the 'painting by numbers' 'The Next Day', this followup 'Blackstar' is just experimental enough to not alienate listeners. It's an album which displays an invention and creativity amidst a world of music that has come to bore me senseless during this decade. It's a thing of beauty that I just wish he'd recorded 20 years earlier.

 A Matter of Life and Death by IRON MAIDEN album cover Studio Album, 2006
3.64 | 373 ratings

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A Matter of Life and Death
Iron Maiden Prog Related

Review by FragileKings
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Ever since the Dickenson/Smith reunion album 'Brave New World', Iron Maiden albums seem to have had some... I hate to say gimmick but some selling point, as if they needed that. Of course the return of Bruce Dickenson on vocals was the greatest thing that could have happened to Iron Maiden, and with Adrian Smith back in the line-up as well things couldn't have looked better as the band opened the new millennium. In 2003, 'Dance of Death' was recorded all on analogue tape, and 'A Matter of Life and Death', according to the Wiki article, was not mastered but just put straight to disc to give it that 'what you hear in the studio' sound. Later came 'The Final Frontier', which many thought might be the final Iron Maiden album, and then in 2015 we had Maiden's longest album yet with an epic song that featured Bruce on piano.

From my perspective, Iron Maiden spent the first four albums perfecting their sound. What we hear on 'Piece of Mind' is THE Iron Maiden sound. They added a long composition for their fifth album 'Powerslave', guitar synthesizers for 'Somewhere in Time' and a concept album for 'Seventh Son of a Seventh Son'. After that, I don't know where they went, though I know many felt 'No Prayer for the Dying' was substandard and 'Fear of the Dark' was an attempt to keep Iron Maiden in vogue with the grunge scene happening all around. The Blaze Bailey albums, I don't know about. Perhaps I'll find out one day. I think many people agree, however, that from 'Brave New World' Iron Maiden were back in their soundscope and playing what us old fans love to hear.

Now honestly, I was not thinking to give this album four stars. After 'The Book of Souls' came out, I was impressed enough to buy the four albums from 'Brave New World' and on because I hadn't bought anything since 'Seventh Son'. Each album had some excellent songs with all the trademarks of excellent Iron Maiden songs. For a couple of weeks I listened to almost nothing but new Iron Maiden with a bit of the old classics thrown in for enjoyment's sake. But as months passed and loads of new music came to me, the thrill of many of the songs on this album faded. Recently I put some songs on mixed playlists and I found that I was not as impressed. The sound was too muddy. Dickenson's vocals were not clear and even sounded weak in parts, like he was straining his voice to keep the notes. When a song from this album followed a song from 'Powerslave' I really noticed the difference in recording clarity; 'Powerslave' sounded just so much better!

So tonight I cued up 'A Matter of Life and Death' and let it run through my ear buds and I found myself once more pleasantly surprised. The sound is a bit thick or muddy at first. I did feel that Bruce Dickenson's vocals don't stand out in the mix as they should. The band rocks out with the opening track 'Different World' and 'These Colours Don't Run' is slower but heavy as a Maiden song should be. Neither of them warmed my feelings toward the album though because of the recording quality.

So I notched the volume up one.

That made a big difference. From here on in, each song delivered things to impress. Some featured excellent heavy riffing like 'Brighter than a Thousand Suns' and 'The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg'. And many songs include what I call the Maiden musical journey. This is where the band go into an extended instrumental segment that is only partly devoted to guitar solos but is otherwise used for adding in new rhythms and riffs and changing tempo and meter. In a couple of tracks there were some surprise heavy riff parts like in 'The Longest Day' that don't crop up anywhere else in the songs. And in 'Lord of Light' I was surprised to hear a high wailing sound that turned out to be an electric guitar played in a way I've never heard done on a Maiden album. 'The Legacy' has an acoustic guitar and electric bass intro that I swear touches on renaissance music though I am no expert there at all. Bruce Dickenson still delivers his powerful vocals, and song after song just seems to sound great, some more so than others.

Where I feel there might be any reason to be disappointed other than the sound which could have been clearer is basically in the Iron Maiden formula approach to the song writing. I mean, Maiden established their sound and style over the first four albums and I feel that 'A Matter of Life a Death' treads barely any discernable new territory. Why should no mastering of the recording be a big selling point? This album is the same as the previous two with some long songs over seven or eight minutes and some shorter ones under six minutes. There's a standard approach of intro, verse, pre-chorus, chorus, repeat, instrumental journey interlude, pre-chorus, chorus, repeat the song title 8 to 12 times, and return to the intro to wind the song down. Six of the ten songs begin with a slower intro of clean electric guitars and bass and most of those end the same way, sometimes seemingly unnecessarily so. 'Let's just play the slow intro for the last few bars, gentleman, after the big thundering finish, you know, to make it all tie together'. The beginning of 'Out of the Shadows' harkens back to 'Revelations' from 'Piece of Mind'. And some of the drum rhythms are the same, in particular the "ONE... two... three... ONE... two... three" approach that's in 'The Pilgrim' and 'For the Greater Good of God', which is also in songs on their other recent albums.

In a way, Iron Maiden have what I call AC/DC syndrome, which is where the band basically follows the same approach album after album, musically and lyrically, and every album has its great songs that typify the band's ability and style but also have some songs that just seem to rely so heavily on that formula that they sound redundant.

Okay, that sounds like some harsh criticism and a reason to not buy this album. But as I mentioned earlier, once I started listening to this album all the way through, there were great moments in every song with some being greater than others. I was feeling really good about the songs and believing the album to be actually worthy of four stars after all.

Yes, I guess it is too late in Iron Maiden's career for them to pull an Opeth and go off in a very different direction and I think no one would want them to. Their fans know what they're going to get on an Iron Maiden LP and that's what the band is expected to deliver. And they do. Very well. And this album is no exception.

 Iron Maiden by IRON MAIDEN album cover Studio Album, 1980
3.85 | 491 ratings

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Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden Prog Related

Review by DamoXt7942
Forum & Site Admin Group Moderator

4 stars Amazing connection with various rock subgenre elements, they had (and have).

This album can be thought as one of the vanguards that merge punk, hardcore, (so-called) progressive, and especially pop, into heavy metal basis. Yes we should consider the reason they would have got to be a popular combo all over the world. Like to say that pop / melodious hard rock might be one of their early strategies for splashing their creation out into the worldwide rock scene in 1980s. Their methodological heavy riffs should addict us so slowly, gradually as if we might continue getting little poisonous liquid again and again or get a bunch of body blows.

Their artistic methods can be summarized and condensed into one of their masterpieces here "Phantom Of The Opera", we can get notified. Not only massive drumming expansion or violently explosive guitar sound bullets along with uptempo verse-chorus-interlude- verse-chorus repetitions but also intentional irregular rhythmical alterations via theatrical variations can be heard ... we must get surprised and amazed in such a musical development over 3 decades ago! Nope they were too innovative to avoid such an approach for metal freaks.

Anyway it's so cool to know their ballad number "Strange World" be beautiful and flowery, psychedelic, enough blended with hard, metallic sound delight. Wondering what essence should drive heavy metal combos to do such a gracious work, not only as for Iron Maiden but almost all HM artists. They might know how to control their melody-scape well, I imagine. Another metal outfit aside, they COULD navigate and manage their inner melody line upon stage and in a recording studio, unless they could directly got the revelation of Metal Guru.

As a result, the word "epochmaking" is pretty suitable for this eponymous debut, and why can we avoid the horrible and impressive sleeve? ;)

 Live in Santa Monica'72 by BOWIE, DAVID album cover Live, 2008
3.40 | 16 ratings

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Live in Santa Monica'72
David Bowie Prog Related

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Widely bootlegged before it finally got an official release in 2008, this album captures Bowie plus Spiders on the Ziggy Stardust tour of the US. Slipping in a preview of the next album in the form of Jean Genie, for the most part it's a fast- paced and energetic runthrough of the best of the preceding four albums from Bowie's 1969 self-titled release to Ziggy Stardust itself.

The band are in a rough and ready mood, giving the material a big injection of garage rock that really teases out the proto-punk attitude of the louder numbers and makes the renditions here contrast interestingly with the studio works. Perhaps the biggest deviation comes in the performance of Space Oddity, where wild vocal improvisations take the part of some of the instrumental sections (like the "liftoff" sound) that would have otherwise been tricky to reproduce on stage at the time.

The mix isn't always the best and the band do get sloppy here and there, but there's an undeniable energy to the performances which will win over all but the cloth-eared - and as Bowie notes on the back cover, Mick Ronson was absolutely on fire during this gig.

 Kestrel by KESTREL album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.82 | 49 ratings

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Kestrel
Kestrel Prog Related

Review by FragileKings
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Always looking for something interesting from the seventies, I noticed a review of Kestrel's one and only album and decided to check it out.

It's not anything of the highly advanced prog variety. It's nothing like Yes, Genesis, ELP, King Crimson or any of the other prog elite from this decade. Kestrel's music is very song oriented where it seems the musical interludes were built around the songs. Tom Knowles' lead vocals hold up well and strong, though I can't help but feeling they are a little on the ordinary side for the mid-seventies.

The band has a good sense of composition and are all talented players. They aren't exactly symphonic prog but more like a rock version of Uriah Heep stretching out a little. Kestrel rarely get very hard or heavy mind you though they do pound the organ and drums in places. Overall, very solid rock with some lighter interludes featuring piano. Not so much in the way of acoustic guitar, however. There are lots of easy to catch vocal melodies, too.

The first few times I listened to this album I was left with little impression. I threw songs on playlists to see if anything would arrest my attention but mostly that was "The Acrobat" and "August Carol". Listening again for this review, I found the music more engaging and enjoyable. Lots of organ, piano, electric piano, and Mellotron. "In the War" has some of the more interesting prog music approach but the sung parts are a little too obvious in their stand against war. Again, it reminds me of some old and lost Uriah Heep.

The second disc with the Esoteric Recordings release includes the single version of "August Carol" which is bewilderingly the second half of the full-length version of the song and begins with the drum intro and Mellotron part rather than the Heep-ish start the first half of the song has. An alternate full version of the same song appears here as well. The single version of "Wind Cloud" isn't particularly outstanding as the album version is better and the alternate version of "The Acrobat" sounds more like a demo with a weak mix compared to the album version. Two other songs, "The Searcher" and "Part of the Machine" are as good as the rest of the album material and a welcome addition.

My conclusion is that this album has some very good songs and music. I just feel there's something missing to give it that memorable bite. None of the songs play over and over in my head, demanding to be heard though some of the melodies are easy enough to recall.

I can't say it's an excellent addition to any prog collection but I do say it's a fairly decent one. Not as exciting as some other albums but not dull or disappointing either. At least worth checking out.

 Florrmat by BUCKETHEAD album cover Studio Album, 2016
1.00 | 1 ratings

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Florrmat
Buckethead Prog Related

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE Team

— First review of this album —
1 stars PIKE 225- FLORRMAT 6th album released by BUCKETHEAD in 2016 Released January 27, 2016 All instrumental exclusively by BUCKETHEAD

Near half hour mark at 28:59 This one has seven shorter tracks all titled "Florrmat" all under five minutes WTF does FLORRMAT mean? A florist who is easily taken advantage of? Sure, why not

"Part 1" (4:26) is a simple hard rocking riff that alternates with a slower part. Bass and drums interact accordingly to the guitars. Typical, meh, next

"Part 2" (5:25) starts out with an echoey guitar, bass and drums. Sounds the same as the first. Ha some semi-interesting riff timings seldomly but basically meh, next. The main riff actually has a Pantera thrashy riff that is lifted from "Domination" but only a castrated version of it

"Part 3" (4:48) is another alternative rocker that borders on metal but not quite. Another meh track

"Part 4" (3:57) starts off with a mellow mid tempo guitar, bass and drum. Not a bad melody and then gets a little more rockin'. Best track so far but that's not saying much.

"Part 5" (3:40) continues unnoticed with a hard rock riff that is kind of thrashy but too soft to qualify. Ok but too week to be metal and just another meh track

"Part 6" (2:53) pretty much continues the mediocrity.

"Part 7" (3:50) and continues the same boring riff. Snooze

This year my ratings have gotten stricter as these PIKEs seem ever more unnecessary. Well played but nothing new and this one not even so great as background sounds. Yawn

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ALWAYS ALMOST United States
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ROGER HODGSON United Kingdom
HORIZONT Sweden
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