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PROG RELATED

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Prog Related definition



No musical genre exists in a vacuum. Not all of the bands that have been a part of the history and development of progressive rock are necessarily progressive rock bands themselves. This is why progarchives has included a genre called prog-related, so we could include all the bands that complete the history of progressive rock, whether or not they were considered full-fledged progressive rock bands themselves.

There are many criteria that the prog-related evaluation team considers when deciding which bands are considered prog-related. Very few bands will meet all of this criteria, but this list will give an idea as to some of the things that help evaluate whether an artists is prog-related or not.

1) Influence on progressive rock - The groundbreaking work of artists like Led Zepplin and David Bowie affected many genres of rock, including at times progressive rock. Although both of these artists created rock music in a dizzying array of genres, both contributed to the ongoing history of progressive rock several times within the span of their careers.

2) Location - Progressive rock did not develop at the same time all over the world. It may surprise some people that as late as the mid-70s the US had very few original progressive rock bands that did not sound like exact copies of British bands. Journey was one of the first US bands to present a uniquely American brand of prog-rock before they eventually became a mainstream rock band. We have collaborators from all over the world who tell us which bands helped the progressive rock scene develop in their corner of the globe, even if those bands were like Journey and were known more for being mainstream rock bands.

3) Members of important progressive rock bands - Although most of the recorded solo output of artists like Greg Lake and David Gilmour falls more in a mainstream rock style, their contributions to progressive rock in their respective bands insures them a place in our prog-related genre.

4) Timeliness - Like many genres, prog-rock has had its ups and downs. In the late 70s and early 80s prog-rock was barely a blip on the radar. During this time artists such as David Bowie and Metallica released albums that captured key elements of the spirit of prog rock and did so while contributing their own original modern elements to the mix.

5) Integral part of the prog-rock scene - Sometimes you just had to be a part of the scene during a certain time period to understand how some bands fit with the prog rock scene of their time. Although Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Wishbone Ash may seem like mere hard rock bands, in their time they stood apart from other hard rockers with their more serious lyrical content and more developed compositions. Put simply, in the early 70s every prog-rock record collector usually had full collections of all three of these artists. These three bands were very much part of the prog-rock scene without being total prog-rock bands them selves.

6) Influenced by progressive rock - From the late 60s till about 1976 the progressive tendency was in full effect in almost all genres of music. Once again, as we enter the second decade of the 21st century a melting pot of prog-metal, math-rock, progressive electronics and post-rock influences have once again made a progressive tendency in rock music almost more a norm than a difference. Yet in other periods of musical history receiving influence from progressive rock could really set a band apart and make them worthy of our prog-related category.
Being influenced by progressive rock is hardly the only factor we look at, and in some periods of musical history it is almost meaningless, but still, it is almost a given that most of the artists listed in prog-related were influenced by the development of progressive rock.

7) Common sense - Nitpicking over the above listed criteria is not necessarily the correct way to evaluate a band for prog-related. Sometimes you just have to use some common sense and look at the big picture.
A very good way to describe prog-related would be to imagine an exhaustive book that covered the history of progressive rock. Would such a book include references to led Zeppelin's 'Stairway to Heaven', David Bowie's 'The Man Who Sold the World' or Queen's 'Bohemian Rhapsody'? Probably so.
- Easy Money

Prog Related Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Prog Related | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.41 | 1275 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN IV
Led Zeppelin
4.49 | 426 ratings
BLACKSTAR
Bowie, David
4.36 | 906 ratings
QUEEN II
Queen
4.31 | 1079 ratings
PARANOID
Black Sabbath
4.29 | 1049 ratings
A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
Queen
4.27 | 750 ratings
THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS
Bowie, David
4.24 | 974 ratings
BLACK SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.24 | 759 ratings
ARGUS
Wishbone Ash
4.22 | 846 ratings
SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON
Iron Maiden
4.20 | 586 ratings
RISING
Rainbow
4.20 | 578 ratings
HUNKY DORY
Bowie, David
4.13 | 836 ratings
SABBATH BLOODY SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.13 | 818 ratings
POWERSLAVE
Iron Maiden
4.12 | 806 ratings
MASTER OF PUPPETS
Metallica
4.20 | 268 ratings
REMAIN IN LIGHT
Talking Heads
4.08 | 853 ratings
MASTER OF REALITY
Black Sabbath
4.10 | 679 ratings
RIDE THE LIGHTNING
Metallica
4.17 | 316 ratings
SECRET TREATIES
Blue Öyster Cult
4.12 | 475 ratings
LOW
Bowie, David
4.05 | 1047 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN
Led Zeppelin

Latest Prog Related Music Reviews


 Filmmusik Vol. V by SCHMIDT, IRMIN album cover Studio Album, 1989
2.00 | 1 ratings

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Filmmusik Vol. V
Irmin Schmidt Prog Related

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
2 stars This one is in my view Irmin Schmidt's weakest album (the good thing of which is obviously that from here onward things get better again). It is mostly easy listening, which of course in the world of prog reviewers isn't a very good thing, and it suffers most from the typical soundtracks issue that what works well in a film doesn't necessarily have a good life on its own. The signature piece and single of this one is another German TV series title track, the opener "Zu Nah Dran" of "Reporter", sung by the lead actress Renan Demirkan, who is a great actress indeed but not remotely as exciting as a singer. It is an OK tune though, no complaints there. The problem is that the rest of the album is rather uninteresting. Instrumental, often based on the same theme as other material from the same soundtrack (four different ones are represented here), and then the musicians play around a bit, a sound is dropped here and there, and that's pretty much it. OK, it's still Trilok Gurtu and Michael Karoli, and also the others are good (Jaki Liebezeit only appears on Zu Nah Dran and doesn't show much there), and the whole thing is fair enough as a listen, but still, I get the impression that much less effort was invested here than in the best volumes of the series, both composition- and execution-wise. Almost all of this is still on the big Filmmusik Anthology 1, 2 & 3 sampler, but there's much better stuff on that one, too. 2.3 stars.
 Musk at Dusk by SCHMIDT, IRMIN album cover Studio Album, 1987
3.86 | 2 ratings

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Musk at Dusk
Irmin Schmidt Prog Related

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

4 stars And finally Irmin releases an album full of actual songs, sung by his own voice! That's quite something, I mean, for those who like his voice, which for sure takes some getting used to. The guy has studied composition and conducting, so he should be well aware what kind of thing is expected of a serious professional singer. But what he does is something completely different. His voice is deep and full, and he doesn't care that much for hitting the notes, but for sure this voice has something. Well, he is more Tom Waits than Pavarotti. You can picture him like the old guy in the corner who has seen a lot and gives you his view on it, and life has left its traces. It's at the same time understated but also warm and can be emotional and even erotic.

And then the album is full of melodies and a number of them stays in your ears, starting with the cute piano melody of the single (and quite good at that) "Roll On Euphrates", which actually was written for another TV show, despite having announced this as an autonomous non-soundtrack album in my last review, sorry! The dreamy Great Escape also makes quite a lasting impression, the melody here solemn and slow, something for the small hours, contrasting with the nervous drums and percussion by Can's great Jaki Liebezeit and grandmaster Trilok Gurtu. The Child in History is another one of Irmin's great dynamic waltzes that run through many of his albums. In fact I could say that this is very great, at more than 8 minutes something for the prog lover, except that you may think there's enough stuff of this kind already on the Filmmusik albums, although the singing adds a particular flavour to this one. Irmin likes dance rhythms, and the album is started off by a tango, Cliff Into Silence, including bandoneon; Villa Wunderbar has a cha-cha type rhythm, I believe, even though not being an expert at that. I'm maybe not a fan of every single composition ("Love"?), but the instrumentalists are great throughout; there's Michael Karoli again besides Jaki and Trilok, and the occasional horn and sax as we know it from Irmin.

I hadn't listened to this for quite some time before writing this review and thought it would come out around 3.5 stars, but it is so original overall, has more memorable melodies than I thought (I must have put some of them on the wrong album in my memory), very enjoyable instrumental performances (hell, I could listen to any album that has Jaki drumming on it *or* Trilok Gurtu *or* Michael Karoli just for their performances), and I actually love the singing (not everyone will) so much that I eventually rate it 4.2 despite a somewhat limited prog coefficient (you could call it pretty arty art pop maybe).

 At Hammersmith Odeon by GILMOUR, DAVID album cover DVD/Video, 2008
2.00 | 1 ratings

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At Hammersmith Odeon
David Gilmour Prog Related

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
2 stars I borrowed this DVD from library. I'm actually reliefed I didn't run to it on a second-hand shop and buy it, because honestly this is so weak as a concert film I even pressed the skip button a few times, and feel no wish to view this ever again, since there are much better Gilmour DVD's available -- also on my own shelf. What makes me wonder the most is the fact that the original VHS release from 1984 contains some (seemingly pretty worthy) extras that are lacking here. Why? Usually the DVD re-releases are fuller in contents compared to the VHS, not the other way round! I believe I'd follow the VHS reviewers' concensus and rate it with three stars, but this 62-minute concert film alone does not deserve more than two stars.

In 1984 Gilmour released his second solo album About Face which I concider terribly lacklustre in its straight, progless pop-rock. Naturally this Hammersmith gig from 30th April 1984 concentrates heavily on the then-new album. But that's not the only reason for the overall weakness. The visual quality is rather poor and the camera work uninspired. Obviously the filming equipment wasn't of very high quality. The cheap nature of this DVD is evident the very minute you start viewing it. The irritating and criminally too long publisher's insert (Crime Crow; the cartoon figure snapping its fingers to blues music) is directly followed, in a clumsy VHS manner, by the beginning of the first track of the live set, 'Until We Sleep'. Both that song and the next one, 'All Lovers Are Deranged', totally failed to interest me much. Two songs from the debut David Gilmour (1978) improve things a bit. It's nice to see Roy Harper joining David on their collaboratively written 'Short and Sweet', even though the song itself is pretty boring. The audio quality is OK and the musicians do their jobs just fine, but as I said, don't expect any prog finesse. The sax and keys are very much of the time. Even the lead instrument, Gilmour's guitar, is not as impressive as on later DVD's.

'Run Like Hell' understandably receives enthusiastic applause from the audience; The Wall had only a little earlier been a mega success for Pink Floyd. The song certainly brings some needed spark here. Three more songs from About Face, and the main body of the set is over. The encore 'Comfortably Numb' is musically the ultimate highlight, and Nick Mason enters behind the drum kit.

I can't seriously recommend this DVD to anyone except for a completionist and a diehard Gilmour fan who greatly enjoys even his weakest solo output. What's best here, ie. the two concert favourites from The Wall, are present on most other Floyd/Gilmour DVD's. As for the About Face stuff, well, you either have the studio album or you don't care of it enough to own it, and in both cases this live set is not that necessary to get.

 David Gilmour by GILMOUR, DAVID album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.54 | 368 ratings

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David Gilmour
David Gilmour Prog Related

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars Gilmour's first solo album will please Pink Floyd and intelligent pop/rock fans. The album is mostly well constructed and accessible. We can hear the interesting warm vocal by Gilmour and his typical slightly restrained guitar playing.

There are only three instrumentals but all worth repeated listening. "Mihalis" reminds me slightly of Camel; just that guitar playing is more dominant here. "Raise my rent" has a Floydian guitar and playfulness. Absolutely tasty playing and smoking solos. "It's deafinitely" is the most prog-sounding composition but at the same time, compositionally rather weak. It's dynamic pace sets guitar/synths/drums at the same winning position.

The sung tracks are melodic, allow more space for keyboards and even harmonica. My favourite is "So far away" especially when the guitar and female vocal reach the climax. It has the typical laid-back PF feeling.

Despite quite a convincing output, I think this is not an essential piece of prog.

 Rote Erde - Originalmusik zur Fernsehserie by SCHMIDT, IRMIN album cover Studio Album, 1983
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Rote Erde - Originalmusik zur Fernsehserie
Irmin Schmidt Prog Related

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
3 stars Here is a further soundtrack offering by former Can-keyboarder Irmin Schmidt. His next album will be an autonomous non-soundtrack, but will only follow four years later. The previous Filmmusik albums were collections of selected music from different soundtracks, but this one has all music of the TV series Rote Erde. This series was a major success in Germany, and probably for this reason it was decided to release the soundtrack as full album. As a consequence, unfortunately, most music here cannot stand quite as convincing on its own as the exciting and adventurous Filmmusik 2, 3 & 4. Also, the music is mostly melodic, nicely consumable, and somewhat repetitive, with the main theme used in various ways (as makes sense for a soundtrack). In fact, as a soundtrack, this worked very well, and furthermore the main theme (Titelmusik) is stunningly beautiful (if not exactly progressive, despite the somewhat nonstandard chord progression), so chances are this sold quite a bit better than Irmin's earlier collections; let's not forget all of this came at a time when progressive music wasn't exactly loved by the media.

For the (prog) music lover who wants to listen to this independently of the TV series, however, this is a weaker offering, and Irmin probably agrees with this, as only three tracks found its way on the Filmmusik Anthology 1, 2 & 3 sampler that is probably the best way of buying Irmin's earlier soundtracks these days (the previous Filmmusik albums are almost fully represented there). I adore the main theme, and the album is for sure a good listen and evokes a peaceful melancholic atmosphere, but for 44 minutes it doesn't have that much excitement on offer. Note the presence of Soft Machine's John Marshall on drums, although he doesn't do that much. Michael Karoli is also present again, as are Irmin's usual collaborators Schoof, Dudek, and Ferrara (whose accordion often takes centre stage here). 2.9 stars.

 Filmmusik Vol. III & IV by SCHMIDT, IRMIN album cover Studio Album, 1983
4.00 | 1 ratings

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Filmmusik Vol. III & IV
Irmin Schmidt Prog Related

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
4 stars Irmin's next soundtrack collection of 1983 came as a double LP, accordingly numbered 3 & 4. Jaki LIebezeit and Michael Karoli of Can are again present as well as this time temporary Can and ex-Traffic percussionist Rebop Kwaku Bah, along with further long standing collaborators of Irmin, namely Manfred Schoof and Gerd Dudek. Famous Indian percussionist Trilok Gurtu has a guest appearance.

This album is similarly eclectic and top quality as the previous Filmmusik 2. As an additional bonus we have vocals on some tracks, mostly done by Irmin himself, who is clearly not a singer, however he has a mysterious deep voice that works pretty well when used in the right places (which he does). In fact I love these songs (You Make Me Nervous, Mary In A Coma, Moerderlied) a lot. For all its quality, Schmidt's instrumental music can be quite abstract, experimental, and up in the air, and the tricky but memorable singing melodies (and particularly the whistled one in Mary In A Coma) give the listener something to cling to. Mary could almost get away as a single but has some properly confusing instrumental stuff thrown in. Moerderlied is a diabolical murder story delivered as a calm but nervously shivering waltz, and my favourite track. We also hear Jaki Liebezeit speaking in Fuerst von Atlantis.

Most of the remainder in rather experimental, with free jazz and contemporary classical influences, but mostly carried by the phantastic and hypnotic drum and percussion work that not only Can fans will love; once more Can values are generously delivered. An element that Can hadn't used is the wind instruments by Dudek, Schoof, and Ferrara, partly pretty atonal, but still very breathing and lively. And there's more melancholic and dreamy Irmin piano, which gets its highlight on the 14 minutes Aller Tage Abend Walzer together with Ferrara and Dudek on accordion and sax, a fascinating mix of slow lyrical parts, crescendos, and atmospheric interplays using mysterious harmonies.

Once more I say that most of this is very valuable, atmospheric, and fascinating, with maybe the odd inclusion that follows more a film logic than a "listen to it on its own" logic. Some of Schmidt's music here may sound close to some other of his material, but his music is for sure very characteristic, he doesn't sound like anyone else.

The material is, as far as I can see, fully on the Filmmusik Anthology 1, 2 & 3 sampler, which is on bandcamp. 4.2 stars.

 Filmmusik Vol. II by SCHMIDT, IRMIN album cover Studio Album, 1981
4.00 | 1 ratings

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Filmmusik Vol. II
Irmin Schmidt Prog Related

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
4 stars This could be seen as another lost Can album, as Jaki Liebezeit drums on all tracks, and we have also Michael Karoli, Holger Czukay, and Rosko Gee present, although much of this is written by Irmin (Michael has co-composer credits for the opener).

For a second time Irmin puts together music for three films (with three somewhat different line-ups) on an album. This offering is much stronger than the first one, with all instrumental music that can stand very well on its own. Endstation Freiheit has a very strong later Can jamming out feel with Jaki's typical infectious rhythms. The other two films (but also Loony's Walk) showcase a more experimental avantgarde side of Irmin's work with much emphasis on sound and a more subtle and understated use of rhythm on Flaechenbrand (where the melancholic accordion gives the title track a quite intimate feeling). Excellent jazzer Manfred Schoof adds insistent trumpets, jazzy and dreamy on the title track, but dominant and dark on Lurk.

The almost 15 minutes of Man on Fire are the central piece of the bunch, dark, threatening, and tense. The heart is beating and we feel that something is going on even if we can't see it. In fact the film is not needed to get the feeling across. The main motif stays but the rhythm changes, we're getting very nervous. In a change of scenes we get a piano waltz interplay reminding a bit of what Can did in Oh Yeah; once more we can create our own film to this if we don't watch the original one. Afterwards the rhythm becomes more intense and we get a rather unique take on how to work with a simple motif throughout a long track. Much violin here, too.

This one scratches at 5 stars although as a collection of soundtracks it doesn't quite have enough cohesion. Hardly any of this needs the film to work, rather it inspires the listener to create their own film in their head. Ultimately this is a great album that I recommend for sure to the Can fan, but also to any lover of adventurous cinematographic music. Irmin is listed as prog-related but some of his albums including this one are about as prog as it gets, eclectic in style between Kraut, psychedelic, and RIO. 4.4 stars.

PS: Almost all of this is available on Filmmusik Anthology 1, 2 & 3 these days.

 Toy Planet (with Bruno Spoerri) by SCHMIDT, IRMIN album cover Studio Album, 1981
4.90 | 2 ratings

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Toy Planet (with Bruno Spoerri)
Irmin Schmidt Prog Related

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

5 stars This is a remarkable instrumental progressive electronic album, actually one of the best. It's done by Irmin on keyboards and electronics, and Bruno Spoerri, saxophone and probably also the odd electronic sound thrown in. There are two main aspects to this album., atmospheric sound landscapes with some rhythm and structure but also meditative qualities, and occasionally uplifting circus/variete-like melodies over straight rhythms in The Seven Game (a marvellous opener bringing all the main elements of this album together), Two Dolphins Go Dancing, and Yom Tov (with Klezmer influence). This makes for a very unique overall impression. The atmospheric tracks make some use of sampled sounds and come generally with a lot of life, moving and colourful, even though in particular Toy Planet and Rapido de Noir evoke tension and mystery. Irmin uses the latest sound generators here that could bring far more warmth and human touch into the sound than what was on offer in the seventies, and the saxophone is a surprise welcome addition to the electronic sound and adds a light relaxed element. Irmin also throws in some of his background as an academically educated composer (Stockhausen student). The album is a joy, never predictable, and throws ideas left, right, and center at the listener. I got this maybe a year after it came out, and it still feels as fresh as it did back then.

This is really a jewel in the crown of Irmin's work. A pity only that he hardly ever (except in some isolated soundtrack tracks) followed up on this style.

 Kamasutra - Vollendung der Liebe (with Inner Space Production) by SCHMIDT, IRMIN album cover Studio Album, 2009
4.00 | 1 ratings

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Kamasutra - Vollendung der Liebe (with Inner Space Production)
Irmin Schmidt Prog Related

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
4 stars This album should maybe better count as a Can album. It was recorded in 1968. Inner Space Productions was an earlier name Can gave themselves, however the album was released only in 2009 with Irmin's name on it. It is a soundtrack commissioned by Irmin for a German erotic film; this was how Can earned money in those days.

Irmin may deserve to have his name in big letters on the album as he is credited as composer, but there is much improvisation on it, so the other Can members didn't just execute compositions here.

The music was recorded before Can's official debut Monster Movie, probably about the same time as the later released Delay 1968, which also has David C. Johnson on it (as opposed to Monster Movie). Malcolm Mooney appears only on one track (another version of this one is on Delay 1968), and there is another one with vocals by Margarete Juvan, which I find quite charming; it reminds me of the more melodic style that Amon Düül II shows on many tracks after 1972. There are many short tracks, some more and some less interesting (it's a soundtrack in the first place), some using Indian and middle eastern influences, hinting at Can's strong interest for music from all over the world. The music doesn't yet have the relentless hypnotic qualities Can became famous for, but it is quite interesting how Jaki, Michael, and Holger find their style here; on some tracks their characteristics are very clear, on some others they play relaxed psychedelic music with some jazz and blues influences. There is hardly any keyboard on this album, however I have read somewhere that Irmin mainly plays guitar here - try telling his parts apart from Michael's! In fact much is done with two guitars at the same time, quite certainly not done both by Michael.

Overall I find the album pretty interesting, not only as a document of early Can, even though the individual tracks are a bit hit and miss, some could have done with more elaboration. Chances are at the time they didn't find this worthwhile to release, but of course the standard of their regular albums is very high from Monster Movie onwards, so there is still some fun to be had with what they didn't consider of top quality. There is a good variety in the various tracks, and some very relaxed meditative quality in the music, and if you can get around the at times a bit amateurish sound, this is a very nice listen. 3.6 stars, 4 stars are generous but 3 are not enough.

 Filmmusik by SCHMIDT, IRMIN album cover Studio Album, 1980
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Filmmusik
Irmin Schmidt Prog Related

Review by Lewian
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
3 stars Irmin Schmidt is well known as keyboarder of Can, but he also has a quite comprehensive discography on its own. I have the resolution to add his albums one by one and to write short reviews on the fly as far as I have time.

From his beginnings in the 1960s Irmin has done film and TV soundtracks, together with Can and also on his own. His first solo album is a collection of at the time recent soundtracks ("Filmmusik") covering the films Im Herzen des Hurricans, Messer im Kopf, und Der Tote Bin Ich. The album is fully instrumental. I like the album, however much of this album follows a soundtrack logic and supports the film in the first place, without the original intention to have a life on its own. The music is atmospheric and good to hear, but on its own not very memorable and mostly not very adventurous. This should become better on his later Filmmusik albums. Some of the tracks are quite repetitive (which is typical for non-autonomous soundtrack music), however the three scores are quite different from each other, so Irmin already shows the broad range of his composition, styles, and influences here.

Im Herzen des Hurrican is enjoyable if not all too exciting melodic rock music, and we get Can's Michael Karoli on guitar playing two great soli. In Der Tote Bin Ich Irmin plays with Swiss saxophonist Bruno Spoerri; Irmin's keyboard work is very minimalist and Spoerri plays dreamy solos. Atmosphere-wise these are the tracks I like most. Das Messer im Kopf is done by Irmin on its own and shows some typical chord sequences that would turn out to be quite characteristic in his later work.

Most of the album is these days available on the Filmmusik Anthology 1, 2, and 3 sampler.

As I wrote a good album but probably, even though Irmin's first, not the best starting point to discover him, as later work (including soundtracks) would stand better on its own without the films.

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Prog Related bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
10CC United Kingdom
14 BIS Brazil
801 United Kingdom
ABEDUL Spain
ABSOLUUTTINEN NOLLAPISTE Finland
ACIDENTE Brazil
AERODROM Yugoslavia
AGNUS DEI Austria
DON AIREY United Kingdom
ALBERO MOTORE Italy
ALWAYS ALMOST United States
THE AMBER LIGHT Germany
AMBROSIA United States
JON ANDERSON United Kingdom
ARIEL Australia
ASIA United Kingdom
ATLANTIS United States
PETER BARDENS United Kingdom
SYD BARRETT United Kingdom
LUCIO BATTISTI Italy
BEAU DOMMAGE Canada
BIJELO DUGME Yugoslavia
BLACK SABBATH United Kingdom
BLACKFIELD Multi-National
BLODWYN PIG United Kingdom
BLUE ÖYSTER CULT United States
JEAN-PASCAL BOFFO France
THE BOLLENBERG EXPERIENCE Belgium
DAVID BOWIE United Kingdom
BRAM STOKER United Kingdom
BUCKETHEAD United States
BUDGIE United Kingdom
BYZANTIUM United Kingdom
JOHN CALE United Kingdom
CARNEGIE United States
CASA DAS MÁQUINAS Brazil
THE CHURCH Australia
CITY Germany
CITY BOY United Kingdom
CLOUDS United Kingdom
STEWART COPELAND United States
CRUACHAN Ireland
MARTIN DARVILL & FRIENDS United Kingdom
BRIAN DAVISON'S EVERY WHICH WAY United Kingdom
FABRIZIO DE ANDRÉ Italy
CHRISTIAN DÉCAMPS France
DEUS Belgium
DIABOLUS United Kingdom
DIR EN GREY Japan
DRAGON New Zealand
DREAMLAND United States
ER. J. ORCHESTRA Ukraine
ESQUIRE United Kingdom
EVOLVE IV United States
EX CATHEDRA United States
EXIT Switzerland
FAIRPORT CONVENTION United Kingdom
THE FIRE THEFT United States
FLIED EGG / STRAWBERRY PATH Japan
FLIGHT 09 Uzbekistan
FLYING COLORS United States
FM Canada
FOTHERINGAY United Kingdom
ELOY FRITSCH Brazil
FUGATO ORCHESTRA Hungary
AVIV GEFFEN Israel
DAVID GILMOUR United Kingdom
GORDON GILTRAP United Kingdom
ROGER GLOVER United Kingdom
GOD BLESS Indonesia
GODLEY & CREME United Kingdom
GOLDEN EARRING Netherlands
GROUNDHOGS United Kingdom
GTR United Kingdom
GUDDAL (YNGVE) & MATTE (ROGER T.) Norway
GYGAFO United Kingdom
THE HAPPENINGS FOUR Japan
HAPPY END Japan
HELP YOURSELF United Kingdom
KEN HENSLEY United Kingdom
ROGER HODGSON United Kingdom
HORIZONT Sweden
INDIGO Austria
IRON MAIDEN United Kingdom
JACKSON HEIGHTS United Kingdom
BERT JANSCH United Kingdom
JAPAN United Kingdom
JEAN-MICHEL JARRE France
JON & VANGELIS United Kingdom
BRYAN JOSH United Kingdom
JOURNEY United States
KALEVALA Finland
ERIC KAMPMAN United States
KESTREL United Kingdom
KING'S X United States
KINO United Kingdom
KLAATU Canada
KORNELIJE KOVAč Yugoslavia
KREUZWEG Germany
GREG LAKE United Kingdom
LANA LANE United States
LED ZEPPELIN United Kingdom
GEDDY LEE Canada
LIFE United Kingdom
ALEX LIFESON Canada
JOSIPA LISAC Yugoslavia
JON LORD United Kingdom
MAGELLANMUSIC United States
MAGNA CARTA United Kingdom
MAGNUM United Kingdom
YNGWIE MALMSTEEN Sweden
MÅNS MOSSA Sweden
GERARD MANSET France
PHIL MANZANERA United Kingdom
NICK MASON United Kingdom
MASTERPLAN Multi-National
MATTER OF TASTE Austria
PETER MATUCHNIAK United States
MAX WEBSTER Canada
MERCURY REV United States
METALLICA United States
MINDFIELDS Poland
MOONDANCER Japan
MUSE United Kingdom
NATURE AND ORGANISATION United Kingdom
NOW United States
OFFENBACH Canada
OM ART FORMATION Bulgaria
OYSTERHEAD United States
JIMMY PAGE - ROBERT PLANT United Kingdom
THE PARLOUR BAND United Kingdom
ALAN PARSONS United Kingdom
SHAWN PHILLIPS United States
PHISH United States
I POOH Italy
DAVORIN POPOVIć Yugoslavia
PRIMUS United States
QUEEN United Kingdom
RAIN FOR A DAY Germany
RAINBOW Multi-National
JOHN RENBOURN United Kingdom
TERRY RILEY United States
LAZA RISTOVSKI Yugoslavia
ROCKFOUR Israel
MIKE RUTHERFORD United Kingdom
SADISTIC MIKA BAND Japan
SATIN WHALE Germany
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