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PROG RELATED

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Prog Related definition



No musical genre exists in a vacuum. Not all of the bands that have been a part of the history and development of progressive rock are necessarily progressive rock bands themselves. This is why progarchives has included a genre called prog-related, so we could include all the bands that complete the history of progressive rock, whether or not they were considered full-fledged progressive rock bands themselves.

There are many criteria that the prog-related evaluation team considers when deciding which bands are considered prog-related. Very few bands will meet all of this criteria, but this list will give an idea as to some of the things that help evaluate whether an artists is prog-related or not.

1) Influence on progressive rock - The groundbreaking work of artists like Led Zepplin and David Bowie affected many genres of rock, including at times progressive rock. Although both of these artists created rock music in a dizzying array of genres, both contributed to the ongoing history of progressive rock several times within the span of their careers.

2) Location - Progressive rock did not develop at the same time all over the world. It may surprise some people that as late as the mid-70s the US had very few original progressive rock bands that did not sound like exact copies of British bands. Journey was one of the first US bands to present a uniquely American brand of prog-rock before they eventually became a mainstream rock band. We have collaborators from all over the world who tell us which bands helped the progressive rock scene develop in their corner of the globe, even if those bands were like Journey and were known more for being mainstream rock bands.

3) Members of important progressive rock bands - Although most of the recorded solo output of artists like Greg Lake and David Gilmour falls more in a mainstream rock style, their contributions to progressive rock in their respective bands insures them a place in our prog-related genre.

4) Timeliness - Like many genres, prog-rock has had its ups and downs. In the late 70s and early 80s prog-rock was barely a blip on the radar. During this time artists such as David Bowie and Metallica released albums that captured key elements of the spirit of prog rock and did so while contributing their own original modern elements to the mix.

5) Integral part of the prog-rock scene - Sometimes you just had to be a part of the scene during a certain time period to understand how some bands fit with the prog rock scene of their time. Although Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Wishbone Ash may seem like mere hard rock bands, in their time they stood apart from other hard rockers with their more serious lyrical content and more developed compositions. Put simply, in the early 70s every prog-rock record collector usually had full collections of all three of these artists. These three bands were very much part of the prog-rock scene without being total prog-rock bands them selves.

6) Influenced by progressive rock - From the late 60s till about 1976 the progressive tendency was in full effect in almost all genres of music. Once again, as we enter the second decade of the 21st century a melting pot of prog-metal, math-rock, progressive electronics and post-rock influences have once again made a progressive tendency in rock music almost more a norm than a difference. Yet in other periods of musical history receiving influence from progressive rock could really set a band apart and make them worthy of our prog-related category.
Being influenced by progressive rock is hardly the only factor we look at, and in some periods of musical history it is almost meaningless, but still, it is almost a given that most of the artists listed in prog-related were influenced by the development of progressive rock.

7) Common sense - Nitpicking over the above listed criteria is not necessarily the correct way to evaluate a band for prog-related. Sometimes you just have to use some common sense and look at the big picture.
A very good way to describe prog-related would be to imagine an exhaustive book that covered the history of progressive rock. Would such a book include references to led Zeppelin's 'Stairway to Heaven', David Bowie's 'The Man Who Sold the World' or Queen's 'Bohemian Rhapsody'? Probably so.
- Easy Money

Prog Related Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Prog Related | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.38 | 890 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN IV
Led Zeppelin
4.35 | 637 ratings
QUEEN II
Queen
4.28 | 735 ratings
A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
Queen
4.27 | 741 ratings
PARANOID
Black Sabbath
4.21 | 669 ratings
BLACK SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.21 | 529 ratings
ARGUS
Wishbone Ash
4.20 | 623 ratings
SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON
Iron Maiden
4.17 | 432 ratings
THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS
Bowie, David
4.14 | 577 ratings
POWERSLAVE
Iron Maiden
4.17 | 397 ratings
RISING
Rainbow
4.18 | 305 ratings
HUNKY DORY
Bowie, David
4.09 | 588 ratings
SABBATH BLOODY SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.08 | 553 ratings
MASTER OF PUPPETS
Metallica
4.05 | 672 ratings
PHYSICAL GRAFFITI
Led Zeppelin
4.17 | 189 ratings
SECRET TREATIES
Blue ÷yster Cult
4.05 | 439 ratings
RIDE THE LIGHTNING
Metallica
4.02 | 578 ratings
MASTER OF REALITY
Black Sabbath
4.00 | 727 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN
Led Zeppelin
4.02 | 442 ratings
HEAVEN AND HELL
Black Sabbath
4.11 | 203 ratings
SCARY MONSTERS (AND SUPER CREEPS)
Bowie, David

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Latest Prog Related Music Reviews


 Flex-Able by VAI, STEVE album cover Studio Album, 1984
3.60 | 60 ratings

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Flex-Able
Steve Vai Prog Related

Review by Prog Leviathan
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Flex-able is under-rated guitar virtuoso Steve Vai's first solo album, featuring a enjoyable mash-up of song styles and instrumental playing. While it's not exactly a guitar clinic or instrumental showcase, it is completely fun, infectious, and energetic.

Zappa's influence on Vai is all over this album; in fact, if one didn't know better, the album's opener "Little Green Men" could be mistaken for a lost Zappa track. It's a jaunty, highly complex and orchestrated song with diverse instrumentation like flutes and vibes. There's even an enjoyable send up of the Close Encounter's melody. This and the rapidly shifting time signatures and playful vocals/characterizations make a great first impression. It's a fun track that is cheesy enough to enjoy at a superficial level, but such a dense composition that there's actually a lot going on behind the surface. This description goes for much of the album.

That's not to say that Vai is just ripping off Zappa. There is a distinct guitar signature that we hear throughout on later songs. There are numerous instrumental transitions that show off Vai's ambitious and almost vocalized guitar sound. There's no shredding or in your face solos, just a lot of nice axe work incorporated into the fun vibe of these songs. I guess I'd call Vai's guitar playing as being sassy, as we hear in the apply named "Attitude Song". The Zappa influence acknowledged, I actually found just as much Fripp influence as well, as Vai's creativity comes across as the sort of tangled guitar sound we hear on Crimson's excellent Discipline album. Even Flex-able's "pop" songs, "Lover's Are Crazy" and "The Boy/The Girl Song" are too weird for most casual music fans to enjoy.

The lengthiest song on this album, "Junkie Song" is hilarious. It sounds like a send-up of a musical, or film score, and features an open-ended solo filled with crazy effects, bends, time changes, etc. A great song.

With Vai's excellent playing, a great supporting band, fun mix of songs, and hilarious exuberance, Flex-Able comes highly recommended for rock fans in the mood to have a good time enjoying experimental, warm, and eclectic music.

Songwriting: 4 - Instrumental Performances: 4 - Lyrics/Vocals: 3 - Style/Emotion/Replay:5

 The Book of Souls by IRON MAIDEN album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.48 | 24 ratings

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The Book of Souls
Iron Maiden Prog Related

Review by The Jester

3 stars As most of you know, Iron Maiden is one of the greatest and most popular heavy metal bands since the '80's. During their very long musical career, they released some albums that can be characterised as the "cornerstones" of Heavy Metal. But all that happened a long, long time ago. Speaking for myself, I believe that the last decent album the band released was 'Somewhere in Time' in 1986. As for their last really good album, (always in my opinion), it was 'Powerslave' which was released in 1984. (Here I should mention, that after 'Somewhere in Time' I stopped following the band and its releases). Despite all that, here I am in 2015, writing this piece about their new album 'The Book of Souls'. What we got here is the most ambitious album Iron Maiden ever recorded since the start of their career in the late '70's. It is a double CD including 11 songs, and has a total running time of almost 90 minutes. I listened to the whole album a few times so far, and my first impression is that it will not be very much appreciated by the - hardcore - fans of the band.

In 'The Book of Souls' Iron Maiden are trying a big turn in their style and sound, reaching towards Progressive Metal for good! So far, the only really 'Prog Metal' song the band ever recorded was the really amazing 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' from the album 'Powerslave'. And now, almost 3 decades after 'Powerslave', Iron Maiden are trying a general approach to Progressive Metal, which is very interesting and mature, to say the least. Here I will give you a small example: Let's say, that a few years ago somebody would tell you that Iron Maiden will record an album on which they will include piano and violin in their songs. Most probably you would think that he's crazy, right? But as they say, never say never!

Let's start now with the album's first impression: Taking a look at the songs for the first time, you will be surely surprised by their length. There are 3 songs over 10 minutes long, with the longest one being the 'Empire of the Clouds' which is maybe the album's highlight. As for the song's duration, is no less than 18.00 minutes! On the other hand, the shortest song has a running time of 5.00 minutes, and it is 'Tears of the Clown' written for the actor Robin Williams who commited suicide in 2014, as you probably have heard of.

I wrote before, that the devoted fans of the band will not appreciate this album very much, and I stand by it. Because everything sounds different here in comparison with the band's previous works. Yes, the killer and "catchy" guitar riffs are still here in some ocassions, but the general pace is slower, the compositions are more complex by far, and there is no obvious "hit" song. Nothing like 'The Trooper', or 'Fear of the Dark' for example. As far as I heard, the album's first (and probably last) single is 'Speed of Light', which I didn't like if I want to be honest. Also, I should mention that Bruce Dickinson's voice is not like it used to be, and that's something more than obvious.

For me, the highlights of the album are the songs 'The Red & the Black' (13.30), Tears of a Clown (5.00) and of course the epic 'Empire of the Clouds' which is based on the 1930 R101 airplane crash.

I'll conclude this, saying that 'The Book of Souls' is an interesting album, which will need more than 3-4 listens in order to be appreciated.

My rating would be 3.00 out of 5.00 stars.

 Crystal Ball by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.10 | 129 ratings

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Crystal Ball
Styx Prog Related

Review by Prog Leviathan
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Crystal Ball is a good representation of Styx's output: lush, heavily orchestrated pop-rock, sometimes interesting, sometimes nauseating. With Tommy Shaw's joining of the band, Crystal Ball skews more towards the pop-rock. This isn't something to immediately shy away from, because Shaw's guitar playing is excellent, and his vocals are solid, too. In fact, I'd a Shaw-led Styx over a DeYoung led Styx anytime; however, Crystall Ball as a whole fits into a wishy-washy middle ground of classic rock that is enjoyable to listen to at the time, but not memorable or appealing enough to remember for long afterwards.

The album opens with a bouncy, lush, and dynamic rock tune "Put Me On." Terrible lyrics aside, the song writing starts off nicely and shows off the band's flair for blending styles. Unfortunately the next two songs are throw aways; especially the somewhat insulting "Jennifer." If songs about underage girls or that feature gibberish choruses are your thing, than you'll like it more than me. Luckily the title track, "Crystal Ball" stands out as an excellent song thanks to its contrast of hard rock/ballad feel. Easily the best song on the album. The closing tracks are also fair tunes that are sort of semi-ballads with some interesting variety and occasionally standout instrumental work. The album closes to more lazy songwriting in the form of gibberish vocals.

After several listens of this brief album the only thing I can remember with clarify is the Shaw-led title track, and DeYoung's cartoonish vocals everywhere else. Not a great place to start for newcomers interested in learning more about this iconic prog/pop group, and not a very good album in general, though still fun for the occasional listen.

Songwriting: 2 - Instrumental Performances: 3 - Lyrics/Vocals: 2 - Style/Emotion/Replay: 2

 Remain In Light by TALKING HEADS album cover Studio Album, 1980
4.15 | 154 ratings

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Remain In Light
Talking Heads Prog Related

Review by ZowieZiggy
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I had weird expectations before listening to this TH album (a bit the same feeling before reviewing their prior album). My previous listenings (yes, I put this album three times before this review in a few days) dated from the time of purchase (which is date of release).

I remember that I reall didn't like this ''Remain In Light'' when I purchased it.

Actually, some thirty five years later, it doens't seem too bad after all. But, my problems are these (too) funky rhythms. The feeling starts with the opening number ''Born Under Punches'') and its follower '' Crosseyed and Painless''. At least both of them have a joyful chorus and are rather OK. But no more more.

The first track I really liked (and still do) is the following ''The Great Curve''. Although rather funky, it features a splendid and hypnotic beat. The longest track of this offering is also one of the best of it. Still, my preffered song is the catchy and melodic ''Once in a Lifetime''. Sounds have been taking out of their best record as far as I am concerned 'More Songs''. The highlight as far as I am concerned.

As Hughes as accordingly said in his good review (as always), the A-side of this vinyl album was usually the only one that was listened to. The flip side being rather hermetic to the early days fans (of which I fully belong).

It was really painful for me to listen to it in a row? In these ancient times as well as today.

Only one bearable song (''Houses In Motion''), a good one ''Listening Wind'' and two ''press next'' type of tunes. Especially the closing and dark '' The Overload''. Gosh!

In all, I was rather surprised with this listening soooooooo many years after my purchase. I would have easily rate this work with one star if I wouldn't have listened to it nowadays.

After doing this excerise, I will upgrade it from 2,5 to 3 stars. But the worse it about to come, unfortunately.

 Kestrel by KESTREL album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.90 | 45 ratings

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Kestrel
Kestrel Prog Related

Review by Matti
Collaborator Neo-Prog Team

4 stars As a reviewer for Colossus prog magazine I've received a lot of reissues by Esoteric Recordings, often by completely forgotten bands from the early 70's. And often I haven't questioned at all why they are forgotten. Now here's a happy exception! Of course KESTREL has become a cult favourite among the most advanced prog listeners, but it was practically a new acquaintance for me until last Friday. [A personal note to my local music friends: yes, this band was on the additional list, not in the book.]

Newcastle-based Kestrel's sole album contains melodic, quite song-oriented prog featuring Mellotron, and it can be compared to the likes of SPRING, FANTASY or CRESSIDA, and actually for the benefit of Kestrel whose mature songs have more 'kick' as there are pretty good guitar contributions too. With one exception, the music is composed by the guitarist Dave Black. Perhaps the idea of a cross between the classic GENESIS and the '68-'72 era MOOY BLUES wouldn't be totally out of place? There aren't the theatrics of the former, nor does the singer have any Gabriel colour in his voice, but we certainly are dealing with the vintage Symphonic Prog tendencies, even though the compositions don't get very complex. (But still, I find it underestimating to stamp this as "Prog Related".)

Mellotron isn't quite as strongly present as on the SPRING album, but the grander is the effect when it comes to the fore. I haven't yet had time to listen to the album many times (which is why I'm not going into track-by-track approach), but I have a feeling I'm going to like it more and more. I strongly believe that with the support of a more prog oriented record company capable of merchandising, Kestrel would be nowadays known as a prog classic. In this sense I place it next to ENGLAND (Garden Shed, 1977). Indeed this is an album I would have loved to hear already two or three decades ago!

The ER re-issue contains a detailed article and a Bonus Disc of slightly under 30 minutes; placing the six tracks as bonuses on the same disc would have been MUCH more convenient. (This is something I always complain about, even if some album buyers probably appreciate the multiple CD format on all kinds of re-releases and Special DeLuxe-whatever Editions repeating basically the same material in slightly different versions over and over. Gosh, I'm not into that at all! Sorry, back to Kestrel...). Four of them are single/alternate versions of the album songs, two are pretty good "new" songs. Sadly the liner notes don't give any information on the bonuses.

 Alpha  by ASIA album cover Studio Album, 1983
2.78 | 252 ratings

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Alpha
Asia Prog Related

Review by Magnum Vaeltaja

2 stars Unlike Asia's self-titled debut, "Alpha" cannot be let away from the proghead-driven hate bandwagon so easily. While "Asia" retained at least some of each group members' stylistic approaches and more open, progressive structures, "Alpha" dropped the ball. A far greater percentage of the album's content is generic pop fare and the group members' individuality doesn't shine through nearly as well. Really, there isn't any reason at all to give this album a listen unless you're a devout fan of 80's AOR and pop rock. I would, however, encourage any fan of Roger Dean's artwork to go and buy a copy (or at least a print) of the cover because it is a very fine painting of his. Mine currently sits beautifully on my shelf and makes for great eye candy when I listen to early 70's Yes, which the music on "Alpha" does not resemble in the slightest.
 Asia by ASIA album cover Studio Album, 1982
3.15 | 425 ratings

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Asia
Asia Prog Related

Review by Magnum Vaeltaja

4 stars Progheads tend to give this album, and band, a hard time and that's completely understandable. Putting myself in the shoes of an original prog fan whose upbringing was blessed by the classic incarnations of the genre's giants like King Crimson, Yes, Genesis, Pink Floyd et al and then waking up one day to find your favourite musicians collaborating together, promoted under the art of Roger Dean and hearing little more than AOR and 80's synthpop, it's agonizing! If I had lived out that experience myself I know I would have developed some major trust issues. However, being a younger (i.e. younger than 40) prog fan and unswayed by the powerful forces of 70's nostalgia, I feel that I can shine a brighter light on an album that's, frankly, pretty darn good.

ASIA's main selling point is its lineup; it is a supergroup after all. Steve Howe is on it, though it's no "Close To The Edge". Carl Palmer is on it, though it's no "Tarkus". John Wetton is on it, though it is most certainly no "Larks' Tongues In Aspic". What these three, plus Geoff Downes, who featured on Yes' "Drama", do create, however, is a fresher, more sophisticated alternative to the generally uninspired genre of 80's AOR. Several of the tracks on side 1, such as "Heat of the Moment" and "One Step Closer", are fairly typical 80's rock fare and make for friendly radio tracks. There aren't too remarkable, though "Sole Survivor" and "Time Again" are great songs that make use of the band's talents in a format that is very accessible to new listeners. "Time Again" in particular is one of the album's strongest tracks and features quality, though short, jazz-based soloing from Steve Howe. The album's second side, while not veering too far from standard rock song structures, does allow for slightly more instrumental exploration, especially on the ballad "Without You" and "Cutting It Fine". "Wildest Dreams" is one of the album's highlights, featuring some great drum soloing by Carl Palmer and political-yet-emotive lyrics that are spine-chilling at times.

"Asia", while not pure progressive rock, makes for good crossover material and serves as a good introduction to certain elements of the genre for those who find it difficult to access. This makes the album a good recommendation for people who aren't quite into 70's symphonic prog but would like to get there eventually. "Asia" isn't just for prog beginners, though; there are aspects of it that a seasoned prog veteran can appreciate.

Progressive rock can be described as many things. Emotional? Certainly! Ambitious? No doubt. Breathtaking? Of course! Exploratory? Perhaps. But one category that you probably won't find "Lizard" or "Tales From Topographic Oceans" chalked under is fun. Sure, serious, intelligent music is great to listen to in many situations but it's very difficult to enjoy all its facets when you're out for a night on the town with your buds or living it up at a house party. "Asia", however, is music that you can crank up loud when you're cruising the main drag on a summer evening while not degrading into lifeless, brain-dead pop. Is it a masterpiece in the pantheon of prog triumphs? Probably not. But "Asia" is still a quality rock record that's easy to digest, so set aside your prejudices and give it a try.

 Equinox by STYX album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.45 | 138 ratings

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Equinox
Styx Prog Related

Review by Prog Leviathan
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Styx has never been one of my favorites; in fact, the first time I heard of the band was when Homer Simpson referenced hearing them on an episode of the "King Biscuit Flower Hour." This was when I was about 13-years old, so give me a break. Later, my first boss introduced the band to me, knowing I was a fan of Journey and eager for more music. I got a "best of" album of theirs that I pretty much hated. I gave it a 1-star review here at Prog Archives, saying that it "contains every stinky-sweet radio anthem the group ever recorded... and it's terrible." After listening to Equinox a half-dozen times, I happily hold to the opinion of that album, because Equinox contains a much more diverse, interesting, and enjoyable collection of songs than the schmaltzy, synth-dominated mess of the band's hits. In fact, Equinox is pretty darn good!

Equinox opens with two very catchy songs. "Light Up" is a laid back party song (surprise), and "Lorelei" is an upbeat sing your heart out kind of FM anthem. Once the band gets those out of the way, the album gets interesting. "Mother Dear" is a great demonstration of the band's blend of artist/progressive elements with legitimately enjoyable hard rock. A nice blend of sounds, singing, and energy. This blend continues to the conclusion of the album, with "Born for Adventure" and "Suite Madame Blue" standing out to me as the winning tracks. "Midnight Ride" dips back into a Deep Purple-ish party song, but I caught myself toe-tapping regardless. The songs are catchy without sounding obnoxiously poppy, and big without sounding overly-ambitious. I still think DeYoung's solo vocals are awful, but they don't spoil the show. Luckily there are enough instrumental moments and vocal harmonies that Equinox isn't dependent on a front man to be enjoyable.

All in all a good, proggish album. It didn't blow me away but I've let go of my Styx hatred after listening.

Songwriting: 3 - Instrumental Performances: 3 - Lyrics/Vocals: 2 - Style/Emotion/Replay: 3

 Fotheringay  by FOTHERINGAY  album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.56 | 27 ratings

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Fotheringay
Fotheringay Prog Related

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Jazz-Rock/Fusion/Canterbury Team

4 stars This was Sandy Denny's breakaway album from FAIRPORT CONVENTION--before she went on a solo career--and amazing record it is! She is joined by four stellar musician/vocalists--male--in ECLECTION's Trevor LUCAS on guitars and Gerry CONWAYon drums and POET AND THE ONE MAN BAND's Jerry DONAHUE on guitars and Pat DONALDSON on bass. This is a deceptively powerful album due to its rather soft, slow, and laconic song starts. But you need only follow Ms. Denny's incredibly emotive storytelling and the way the band joins in to build toward each song's climax before you will find yourself hooked. Only three songs are penned by Denny and they are jewels but the male-lead vocal songs are quite good as well. What makes Fotheringay such a powerful album is the amazing recording and powerful emotions in both Sandy Denny's vocals and lyrics but also all of the accompanying musicians. I just love the clarity and feel of the mix of the guitars, piano, and drums. Each and every song is artfully done, with subtle flourishes and idiosyncracies that make them so delightful to listen to time and time again. If there's a weakness in the album, it's in the recording of the vocalist's voices--especially in songs which try to display the band's singing in harmony like 'The Ballad of Ned Kelly' (3:36) (7/10) and, to a lesser degree, 'Peace in the End' (4:03) (8/10). But the listener can easily get past this as, let's face it: there have not been many vocalists in the history of recorded music with the gifts that Sandy Denny had.

Favorites: Denny's three: 1. 'Nothing More" (4:39) (10/10),'2. 'The Sea" (5:33) (9/10), and 'The Pond and the Stream' (3:20) (8/10); the most proggy tune on the album, 9. 'Banks of the Nile' (8:04) (10/10); the wonderful harmonized vocal approach to Gordon Lightfoot's 'The Way I Feel" (4:45) (9/10), and;'the delicate 4. 'Winter Winds' (2:13) (8/10)

In 2008 Jerry Donahue released an album entitled Fotheringay 2 using previously unreleased material from the band's original 1970 recording sessions'some of which had seen the light of day on 1970s releases by FAIRPORT CONVENTION and SANDY DENNY. It is an equally wonderful album--definitely worth checking out!

 Fear Of Music by TALKING HEADS album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.67 | 84 ratings

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Fear Of Music
Talking Heads Prog Related

Review by ZowieZiggy
Prog Reviewer

3 stars In these late seventies, I was quiete into what was called the ''New Wave'' with several bands I have already lentioned in my earlier reviews. ''Talking Heads'' was one of them.

Since I really was charmed by their previous effort, there was no question about buying this one. Just until I heard ''I Zimbra''. The type of song I can't stand. Funky as crazy, absolutely no melody and every Fripp can't make it better. Another of this type will be featured later on this work (''Animals''). The lyrics though are rather disrespective about the animals in general. I don't aprreciate this.

Some excerpts : '' They say they don't need money, They're lvinign on nuts and berries, They say animals don't worry, You know animals are hairy? What the hell does this last sentence mean ? And this one '' They're never there when you need them, They never come when you call them''. So untrue.

Fortunately, my ''TH'' comes back with the next two tracks ''Mind'' and ''Papers'' which could have sit on their previous release (but not as highlights). Still, ''Papers'' is one of my fave here. The beat and the song construction is typical and it is a good feeling to listen to such pleasant track.

Hopefully, ''Cities'' is of the same vein. Actually, I was a bit worried when starting my review. My souvenir of this work was not excellent (to say the least). And since it must be some 35 years that I didn't listen to it, my memory didn't serve me well. Of course, there won't be many great songs featured here, unlike on their great ''More Songs''; but if you except the opener, so far this album is enjoyable.

''Life During Wartime'' is a little harder than usual (maybe the theme?). There's a blink to the famous CBGB where they played as early as 75. The lyrics though are rather incoherent and jumps cahotically from one subject to another.

My fave by far here is when I fully embrace the band again with the very catchy ''Air''. Same ingredients as before (rhtym, melody). A classic should I say.

I guess that the band wanted to make another ''Big Country'' while they play ''Heaven''. Even if it is not of the caliber of this great predecessor, I have to admit that it is quite a fine melodic song (but Byrne is of course a good songwriter).

The end of this album is less catchy and interesting to my ears. The closing ''Drug'' is rather dark (but with such a theme?).

This album holds of course no prog related music. According to my standards, I catalogued ''Talking Heads'' in 1977 as a New Wave band. And there is no reason to change this.

Three stars.

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10CC United Kingdom
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ABSOLUUTTINEN NOLLAPISTE Finland
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AERODROM Yugoslavia
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ALWAYS ALMOST United States
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DREAMLAND United States
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ESQUIRE United Kingdom
EVOLVE IV United States
EX CATHEDRA United States
FAIRPORT CONVENTION United Kingdom
THE FIRE THEFT United States
FLIED EGG / STRAWBERRY PATH Japan
FLIGHT 09 Uzbekistan
FLYING COLORS United States
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GODLEY & CREME United Kingdom
GOLDEN EARRING Netherlands
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