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PROG RELATED

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Prog Related definition



No musical genre exists in a vacuum. Not all of the bands that have been a part of the history and development of progressive rock are necessarily progressive rock bands themselves. This is why progarchives has included a genre called prog-related, so we could include all the bands that complete the history of progressive rock, whether or not they were considered full-fledged progressive rock bands themselves.

There are many criteria that the prog-related evaluation team considers when deciding which bands are considered prog-related. Very few bands will meet all of this criteria, but this list will give an idea as to some of the things that help evaluate whether an artists is prog-related or not.

1) Influence on progressive rock - The groundbreaking work of artists like Led Zepplin and David Bowie affected many genres of rock, including at times progressive rock. Although both of these artists created rock music in a dizzying array of genres, both contributed to the ongoing history of progressive rock several times within the span of their careers.

2) Location - Progressive rock did not develop at the same time all over the world. It may surprise some people that as late as the mid-70s the US had very few original progressive rock bands that did not sound like exact copies of British bands. Journey was one of the first US bands to present a uniquely American brand of prog-rock before they eventually became a mainstream rock band. We have collaborators from all over the world who tell us which bands helped the progressive rock scene develop in their corner of the globe, even if those bands were like Journey and were known more for being mainstream rock bands.

3) Members of important progressive rock bands - Although most of the recorded solo output of artists like Greg Lake and David Gilmour falls more in a mainstream rock style, their contributions to progressive rock in their respective bands insures them a place in our prog-related genre.

4) Timeliness - Like many genres, prog-rock has had its ups and downs. In the late 70s and early 80s prog-rock was barely a blip on the radar. During this time artists such as David Bowie and Metallica released albums that captured key elements of the spirit of prog rock and did so while contributing their own original modern elements to the mix.

5) Integral part of the prog-rock scene - Sometimes you just had to be a part of the scene during a certain time period to understand how some bands fit with the prog rock scene of their time. Although Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Wishbone Ash may seem like mere hard rock bands, in their time they stood apart from other hard rockers with their more serious lyrical content and more developed compositions. Put simply, in the early 70s every prog-rock record collector usually had full collections of all three of these artists. These three bands were very much part of the prog-rock scene without being total prog-rock bands them selves.

6) Influenced by progressive rock - From the late 60s till about 1976 the progressive tendency was in full effect in almost all genres of music. Once again, as we enter the second decade of the 21st century a melting pot of prog-metal, math-rock, progressive electronics and post-rock influences have once again made a progressive tendency in rock music almost more a norm than a difference. Yet in other periods of musical history receiving influence from progressive rock could really set a band apart and make them worthy of our prog-related category.
Being influenced by progressive rock is hardly the only factor we look at, and in some periods of musical history it is almost meaningless, but still, it is almost a given that most of the artists listed in prog-related were influenced by the development of progressive rock.

7) Common sense - Nitpicking over the above listed criteria is not necessarily the correct way to evaluate a band for prog-related. Sometimes you just have to use some common sense and look at the big picture.
A very good way to describe prog-related would be to imagine an exhaustive book that covered the history of progressive rock. Would such a book include references to led Zeppelin's 'Stairway to Heaven', David Bowie's 'The Man Who Sold the World' or Queen's 'Bohemian Rhapsody'? Probably so.
- Easy Money

Prog Related Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Prog Related | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.39 | 1087 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN IV
Led Zeppelin
4.51 | 305 ratings
BLACKSTAR
Bowie, David
4.35 | 773 ratings
QUEEN II
Queen
4.29 | 917 ratings
PARANOID
Black Sabbath
4.28 | 896 ratings
A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
Queen
4.22 | 829 ratings
BLACK SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.23 | 633 ratings
ARGUS
Wishbone Ash
4.22 | 625 ratings
THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS
Bowie, David
4.19 | 752 ratings
SEVENTH SON OF A SEVENTH SON
Iron Maiden
4.19 | 483 ratings
RISING
Rainbow
4.13 | 706 ratings
POWERSLAVE
Iron Maiden
4.12 | 700 ratings
MASTER OF PUPPETS
Metallica
4.15 | 469 ratings
HUNKY DORY
Bowie, David
4.15 | 322 ratings
SCARY MONSTERS (AND SUPER CREEPS)
Bowie, David
4.08 | 718 ratings
SABBATH BLOODY SABBATH
Black Sabbath
4.09 | 576 ratings
RIDE THE LIGHTNING
Metallica
4.06 | 822 ratings
PHYSICAL GRAFFITI
Led Zeppelin
4.04 | 895 ratings
LED ZEPPELIN
Led Zeppelin
4.05 | 716 ratings
MASTER OF REALITY
Black Sabbath
4.17 | 242 ratings
SECRET TREATIES
Blue Öyster Cult

Latest Prog Related Music Reviews


 Équinoxe Infinity by JARRE, JEAN-MICHEL album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.93 | 8 ratings

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Équinoxe Infinity
Jean-Michel Jarre Prog Related

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Legendary French electronic icon Jean-Michel Jarre returns with a `sequel' to one of his most highly regarded works in 1978's `Equinoxe', and even if it's rarely ever too challenging or ground-breaking, and doesn't actually remind of the original much at all, 2018's `Equinoxe Infinity' still has plenty to offer. Jarre brings his army of digital and analogue keyboards to deliver a punchy and endlessly melodic set of bubbly electronica, sleek synth-pop, spacier dramatic themes, New-Age/ambient touches and one or two dancier spots, and like many of Jarre's past works, the pieces (all subtitled with `Movement') seamlessly segue into each-other forming an ever-evolving aural collage...or kind of like a cool spacey mix-tape!

The first half/side A is particularly strong, and `The Watchers' is a suitably announcing opener with fizzy electronics and the first use of a stirring main synth melody that will pop up elsewhere in the disc, sounding reliably like the Jarre albums of the Seventies. The twinkling electronica of `Flying Totems' teems with life with a victorious and dramatic theme, and the moody `Robots Don't Cry', one of the strongest moments of the disc, is a slinking head-nodding electronic brood with seductively clipping programming bringing a buoyant energy, and scratchy Mellotron and ringing electric piano motifs rise up out of its lush ambient caresses. `All That You Leave Behind' is an uneasy ambient interlude with tolling bells that lurches into a spacey heavy grind, but the brief `If The Wind Could Speak' wraps the first half with glitching synth-pop and slightly kitsch female voice samples flitting in and out.

However, the flip-side's `Infinity' is going to be the breaking point for some listeners! The catchy dance piece, all inane wordless vocal samples and clichéd repeating synth theme is probably the closest the artist has come to delivering something as obnoxiously cheesy and lightweight as a `Summer Dance Anthem', but while the track is not really surprising considering Jarre's diversity and desire to keep one foot in the door of commercial relevance and modern dance music culture, it's still a little grating (although some will probably appreciate its uplifting positivity). Thankfully the disc fully recovers with `Machines Are Learning', a mix of darting sequencer programming and whirring cut-up robotic voices, the superb `The Opening' has a confident and defiant recurring dramatic theme over pulsing beats (lovely ambient outro as well) and `Don't Look Back' elegantly weaves cello-like samples over glistening electronic trickles. The unhurried seven minute closing title-track `Equinoxe Infinity' is unexpectedly subtle and subdued, reprising earlier musical themes and revealing slowly unfolding ambient passages of Tangerine Dream-modelled deep-space atmospheres and fusing them with a Vangelis-flavoured cinematic soundtrack-like sophistication.

While there's often not a lot of depth to it, and Jean-Michel clearly slapped a fancy arty Hipgnosis/Storm Thorgerson-like cover on it and used the 'brand name' title to attract more fans even when there's not much to suggest this has any proper connection to the earlier album at all, `Equinoxe Infinity' is a classy work with a slick polished production from a legendary electronic artist that's easy to enjoy, with several moments that lift to real greatness, and plenty of Jarre fans should get exactly what they want with it!

Four stars.

 After the Dance (w/ John Renbourn) by JANSCH, BERT album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1992
5.00 | 1 ratings

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After the Dance (w/ John Renbourn)
Bert Jansch Prog Related

Review by SteveG

— First review of this album —
5 stars My last walk down memory lane with the late John Renbourn features, exclusively, all instrumental collaborations with his old Pentangle sparring partner Bert Jansch. After The Dance is a compilation that focuses exclusively on the dynamic solo recordings that showcase the interplay between the two acoustic guitar virtuosos and even includes five Pentangle tracks that also focus on the duo's playing. Starting off with the mesmerizing "Tic-tocative", from the album titled Bert And John, we are quickly followed by the jazzy Pentangle jam like song titled "Waltz" from the group's first album. The millisecond timing between the two is still breathtaking even 50 years after the fact. The jazzy "Piano Tune" is a perfect opener before the duo launch into the scrumptious Mingus standard "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat" with, again, a heavy emphasis on jazz juxtapositions before being followed by the manic "Hole In The Coal" from Pentangle's second album "Sweet Child". The duo start to morph into more blues based playing on songs like 'Lucky 13", Stepping Stones" and "Red's Favorite" before switching back to jazz grooves on "Orlando", "Bells", and this compilation's title track "After The Dance".

How this great sounding and excellently remastered album is not essential listening for all up and coming guitar players is quite beyond me. 5 stars for something that has never been duplicated since on any record.

 Blackfield II by BLACKFIELD album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.71 | 381 ratings

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Blackfield II
Blackfield Prog Related

Review by TCat
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Blackfield II is the 2nd (of course) album by the Steven Wilson/Aviv Geffin project. The music is very similar to Porcupine Tree's music, but in much shorter run times and more radio friendly. This album is quite similar to the first album where Wilson was heading the band as far as what you hear, but Geffin wrote most of the lyrics. Wilson also sings most of the songs except for 'Miss U'. This is the only track Geffin sings this time around except for where he shares lead vocals w/Wilson on 'Epidemic', 'Where Is My Love?' and 'End of the World'.

The songs are in the same vein as the debut album, drenched with strings and keyboards with only some short instrumental breaks. The songs are mostly around the 4 minute mark and only one, 'End of the World' slightly surpassing the 5 minute mark. The tracks are a little better developed on this album, but still seem to be lacking in this department.

Wilson's intention for Blackfield was to let Geffin eventually have control over the project, and while these songs are more penned by Geffin, they still have much influence from Wilson, and it really sounds that way too as it has his familiar tone and sound to the music, which is a good thing. The next album, 'Welcome to My DNA' would see Wilson step more into the background, and thus the quality of the music immediately suffered for it.

As for this album, it is still great music with great lyrics and great emotion from Wilson's influence. It still suffers from being more radio friendly and thus a lack of song development. Still, these are great, mostly straightforward songs that merit 4 stars. Porcupine Tree lovers will still love it and so will some others that don't like the extensive use of instrumentals in PT's music. For me, it suffers from there not being enough exploration, but I still find these songs a step above the normal radio friendly songs. The album is only slightly better than the debut album in I think the songs are better, but others may disagree. Nevertheless, the improvement is slight and not enough to elevate the rating over the debut album. Still, it's worth checking out.

 Journey by JOURNEY album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.39 | 147 ratings

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Journey
Journey Prog Related

Review by The Crow
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Debut album from the AOR legends Journey!

Nevertheless, here is no AOR to be found because Journey is a symphonic prog album much in the vein of Emerson Lake and Palmer and Yes, with some influences from more commercial prog acts like Kansas or even hard rock glimpses much in the vein of Free or UFO.

The musicians are all splendid (except the mediocre vocals...) and the songs intricate and complex enough. But the problem is that they are not catchy enough. Maybe the most commercial songs like Play Some Music or Mystery Mountain are the best here, because the most progressive ones are sadly also the worst.

Just boring, guys. It's no surprise that this album did not sell well back then!

Best Tracks: Play Some Music, Topaz (the best instrumental sections of the album in my opinion) and Mystery Mountain (energetic and funny hard rock tune)

Conclusion: if you are searching for the origins of the Journey that are famous today, maybe you should start with Infinity. Because in this debut (and in their second and third record too) these guys were still in the search of their true identity.

And sadly, they were in the search of true compelling songwriting too.

My rating: **

 Black Sabbath by BLACK SABBATH album cover Studio Album, 1970
4.22 | 829 ratings

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Black Sabbath
Black Sabbath Prog Related

Review by TCat
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This is where Black Sabbath begins, and hence the first really metal album. Hard to believe this little record that was rather inconspicuous would have such a long lasting effect on the music world, not only with heavy metal, but also progressive metal.

Again, we have an album that has been reviewed so many times, that if you haven't heard it, you feel like you have. By the way, if you haven't heard it, then you need to understand that it is extremely influential. Even though the boys had a lot of room to grow from this album, and grow they did, it is near perfection and it also set the bar. Of course "Paranoid" the next album, raised the bar even higher, but before this album, one would be hard pressed to find an album that was as heavy as this one.

The title track is considered the first doom metal song, and the way it starts with the sounds of a storm and a tolling bell, then suddenly a very hard and heavy riff that is not easy to forget. Imagine yourself in 1970 and hearing this, and wondering what level of Hell you would find yourself in when it was over. Then, throughout the album, the heavy dark music doesn't really let up much. It invades the senses and makes you want to bang your head.

Of course, through history, Black Sabbath would be known for their infectious riffs and dark music, but they would also be innovative, not settling on just being a loud band, but also producing music that would continue to challenge, change and surprise. Even with the heaviness, there is an abundant and effective use of dynamics, meter changes and multiple melodies within each song.

All of these things are apparent, even in the first album, which comes across as rather raw and somewhat unpolished, but that only makes things better. Yes there would be better albums to come, but it is hard to replace this one as being the thing that would kick start an all new genre. Black Sabbath's debut album is 100% essential. Not quite yet a masterpiece, though, but that would come along in the next album. But it is still an album that should not be missed.

 John Renbourn by RENBOURN, JOHN album cover Studio Album, 1965
3.00 | 1 ratings

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John Renbourn
John Renbourn Prog Related

Review by SteveG

— First review of this album —
3 stars John Renbourn's first official solo album release is naturally of greater historical as opposed to artistic value. It does have many high points such as showcasing, for the one and only time, what an awesome slide guitar player Renbourn was especially on the track "Louisiana Blues" It also showcases Renbourn's Achilles heal which was his limited vocal abilities which was always magnified whenever Renbourn tried to sing American blues songs. His thin nasal voice , while working well on British traditional songs was just sorely out of place on songs like "John Henry", "Candyman", and "Motherless Children".

A couple of oddities almost make this album essential and that's the two instrumental duets that he performed with the future Pentangle partner Bert Jansch. Indeed, while "Blue Bones" is interesting, "Noah and Rabbit' is phenomenal and points the way for the duo's future jazz/blues fusion projects on the album titled Bert And John and the early Pentangle albums like their eponymous debut and it's follow up titled Sweet Child. 3 stars due to the album's up and down characteristics seems about right.

 The John Renbourn Group: Live In America by RENBOURN, JOHN album cover Live, 1982
5.00 | 1 ratings

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The John Renbourn Group: Live In America
John Renbourn Prog Related

Review by SteveG

— First review of this album —
5 stars John Renbourn's on again off again post Pentangle collective known as the John Renbourn Group made a spectacular live album that also served the purpose of releasing more "new music" by this group. They were even nominated for a folk album Grammy Award for The John Renbourn Group: Live In America. The only British folk or folk artists to be nominated in the era of the 70s and 80s as far as I know.

Pairing up with former Pentangle vocalist Jaqui McShee and old mate flautist Tony Roberts, Renbourn also recruited fiddle player Sue Draham from the Albion Band and renowned tabla player Keshav Sathe to fill out the band's sound. Sathe was an inspired choice as he fills the often used hand percussion role that Pentangle mate Terry Cox filled on many of Renbourn's instrumental guitar albums. The group's first album together A Maid In Bedlam from 1977 was chock full of traditional British folk songs and fit the void left by the beak up of Pentangle quite well, while it's follow up The Encahnted Garden stuck to more moody pre Renaissance fair that was too stiff and stately and therefore was not as exciting as the group's debut.

For the Live In America dates, the group toured with fiddler and vocalist John Molinuex who replaed Draham in The Enchanted Garden sessions. Another inspired choice as the man's basso voice excellently rounds out the vocal mix of McShee, Renbourn and Roberts which is so exquisite on songs like "Lindsey", the unacompanied "Ye Mariners All", "John Dory" and the perenial "So Early In The Spring". Just to distingusih her self from the males, McShee does an acapella version of the "Cruel Mother", itself a companion song to the Pentangle's take on the traditional song "Cruel Sister" and of course the audience is spell bound. Renbourn does a few solo turns on guitar on the incrdible droning and fast as lightning "English Dance" and "Breton Dances" instrumentals before being joined on the psuedo Eastern "Sidi Braham" which features snake charmer flute from Roberts and a tabla solo by Sathe. Molinuex takes a solo vocal on the old trad. song "Farewell Nancy" before the group all join in on a somewhat conjested version of "John Barleycorn" which closes the album. That song is the only misstep in the concert performances as the overlapping vocals by various group members are a bit too sloppy when compared with the studio version found on The Enchanted Garden.

A very good concert recording helps to make this double album a real treat and it ranks with the best that was offered by the Pentangle a decade earlier. 5 stars.

 Greatest Video Hits 1 by QUEEN album cover DVD/Video, 2002
3.39 | 34 ratings

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Greatest Video Hits 1
Queen Prog Related

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator RPI / Symphonic Prog Team

3 stars It looks like everybody is in Queen mode since the release of the movie "Bohemian Rhapsody". But for me, I am more in surround mode, and that's why I bought this video collection of songs that I know for a long time. This is a collection from their early days who was a little better than later days. It starts with their best song ever the "Bohemian Rhapsody" from their masterpiece album. I am always amazed by that opera style multi-part vocals. It took a week to do the surround work on this song alone. This surround DTS sound is spectacular with vocals and guitars spread out in the back left and right. Most of the songs are showing the band playing in a live set-up in a studio or with a real crowd. The picture could be poor at times and I have some good laugh watching some videos with all the naive lyrics and especially the "Bicycle Race videos". Not every song is great but Queen still has a unique singer and guitar player giving an overall sound that can't be matched. The second disk his in stereo with live performances. I have enjoyed enough this one to buy the greatest video hits volume 2.
 Billy Breathes by PHISH album cover Studio Album, 1996
3.47 | 50 ratings

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Billy Breathes
Phish Prog Related

Review by TCat
Prog Reviewer

4 stars 'Billy Breathes' is Phish's 6th regular studio release, and is also the album that helped to connect the band to a wider audience. It turned out to be the band's biggest seller, even if it was less commercial than the previous album 'Hoist'. Most of this is due to the single released from the album 'Free', which is the first on the album. Some of the music on the album had already been perfected in concert performances, which is a technique Phish often uses.

This is a pretty good Phish album, though not their best, it still has some great music on it. It starts out with the very popular 'Free' and continues in the upbeat, rocking vein with the next track 'Character Zero'. Both songs are quite straightforward rock tunes, and are enjoyable, but not really progressive. Following this is 'Waste' which is a slower and more acoustic track, with that unique Phish-Folk feel. The song does build to a strong chorus and bridge, but remains driven by acoustic piano and guitar throughout. From that, we move to the next song that rhymes with the previous. 'Taste' starts out with a quick piano riff and a clacking cowbell. This one is more complex with an almost tropical feel as it builds as it goes along until it reaches a great climactic instrumental ending.

'Cars Trucks and Buses' is an instrumental that has quite a sly organ riff/melody and an infectious beat. The intermediate section is a great improvised jazzy piano solo supported by the rest of the band which ends the song. 'Talk' ends the first half of the album with another mostly acoustic tune that once again hints at Phish's version of prog-folk.

The 2nd half of the album is more of an experimental feel. It starts off with one of my favorite Phish tracks 'Theme from the Bottom'. It is the most upbeat song on this side of the album and probably most accessible, but it has the vibe of the best Phish classics like 'Chalk Dust Torture' or 'Maze' It is more progressive, slightly, and is much better developed. It starts off quiet and builds in intensity to the chorus, then follows an alternating pattern until the last half where it gets heavier and remains intense to the ending. The last half of this track gives you a good idea how tight this band is, especially in their concerts, where they act as a single unit to create amazing improvised music unlike any other band out there. Then suddenly, near the end, all of the music drops off as the band harmonizes together in a ridiculous, but catchy vocal riff.

After this, the album turns quite soft and mellow. Next is 'Train Song' written and sung by Mike Gordon. It is a solo guitar and vocals, with Trey doing some harmonies, but the lyrics are silly and complex at the same time. Later, a xylophone joins the guitar. This song sounds simple, but is strangely complex. 'Bliss' is another short track which features a solo processed acoustic guitar with a nice echoing effect. Next comes a very complex and progressive 'Billy Breathes'. Remaining in the soft, acoustic vein, two vocal melodies start to form, sometimes contrasting and sometimes coming together. Again, we get that folk-ish feel in a more progressive context. Soon a weird horn (?) joins with a banjo as more vocal layers harmonize and contrast with each other. Halfway through, piano, bass and electric guitar compliment each other in an atmospheric and lovely instrumental section.

Two very short tracks follow. 'Swept Away' is strummed acoustic guitar and Trey's vocals with a little harmony. 'Steep' moves from this quiet song to a more dischordant track which is a little unsettling, and two vocal melodies work against each other. Strange, processed noises ensue as things get psychedelic. Eventually, this all flows into the closer 'Prince Caspian'. A strummed electric guitar and piano takes us out of the noise mode into a more peaceful feel. Things flow for a little while, then vocals start again, this time with a more conventional sounding melody. Drums join in and things meld together nicely as intensity increases. The melody is nice here, but the lyrics are a little too repetitive. Nevertheless, it is a nice closer that seals that album together.

Again, this wasn't their best album, but it was better than the previous album, as it pulled the band back to their original feel. Overall, you get a good mix of straightforward rock and progressive folk with a little bit of an experimental and psychedelic feel. It is not so much of a jamming record, and is a little light on the progressive side, but it is still challenging enough to keep the progressive listener interested, yet accessible enough to not be over indulgent. Great album.

 Hungarian Rhapsody - Live In Budapest by QUEEN album cover Live, 2012
3.92 | 3 ratings

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Hungarian Rhapsody - Live In Budapest
Queen Prog Related

Review by Kingsnake

4 stars A very nice 80's live album by Queen, recorded July 27th 1986 at the Nepstadion, Budapest, Hungary. The Magic Tour was the last tour the band did as Taylor/May/Deacon/Mercury.

Most live albums by Queen are from the eighties (only recently did they release a couple of 70's live albums), so most of the songs on this album are already on other live albums (Wembley, Montreal etc.). On the other hand this album shows a very playful Queen, especially during the acoustic section (where they play the rock'n'roll medley in acoustic form, and end in pure heavy rock'n'roll).

The rest of the album rocks really nice. The production is very good, Freddy has a powerful voice and the drums/guitar sound amazing. I can highly recommended this live album to all Queen-fans and rock-fans. This is a rock (with rock'n'roll segments) party album, not a progressive rock-album. But eventually a very good live-album.

Eventually it's almost the same as Live at Wembley, but the overall sound is better.

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Prog Related bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
10CC United Kingdom
14 BIS Brazil
801 United Kingdom
ABEDUL Spain
ABSOLUUTTINEN NOLLAPISTE Finland
ACIDENTE Brazil
AERODROM Yugoslavia
AGNUS DEI Austria
DON AIREY United Kingdom
ALBERO MOTORE Italy
ALWAYS ALMOST United States
THE AMBER LIGHT Germany
AMBROSIA United States
JON ANDERSON United Kingdom
ARIEL Australia
ASIA United Kingdom
ATLANTIS United States
PETER BARDENS United Kingdom
SYD BARRETT United Kingdom
LUCIO BATTISTI Italy
BEAU DOMMAGE Canada
BIJELO DUGME Yugoslavia
BLACK SABBATH United Kingdom
BLACKFIELD Multi-National
BLODWYN PIG United Kingdom
BLUE ÖYSTER CULT United States
JEAN-PASCAL BOFFO France
THE BOLLENBERG EXPERIENCE Belgium
DAVID BOWIE United Kingdom
BRAM STOKER United Kingdom
BUCKETHEAD United States
BUDGIE United Kingdom
BYZANTIUM United Kingdom
JOHN CALE United Kingdom
CARNEGIE United States
CASA DAS MÁQUINAS Brazil
THE CHURCH Australia
CITY Germany
CITY BOY United Kingdom
CLOUDS United Kingdom
STEWART COPELAND United States
CRUACHAN Ireland
MARTIN DARVILL & FRIENDS United Kingdom
BRIAN DAVISON'S EVERY WHICH WAY United Kingdom
FABRIZIO DE ANDRÉ Italy
CHRISTIAN DÉCAMPS France
DEUS Belgium
DIABOLUS United Kingdom
DIR EN GREY Japan
DRAGON New Zealand
DREAMLAND United States
ER. J. ORCHESTRA Ukraine
ESQUIRE United Kingdom
EVOLVE IV United States
EX CATHEDRA United States
FAIRPORT CONVENTION United Kingdom
THE FIRE THEFT United States
FLIED EGG / STRAWBERRY PATH Japan
FLIGHT 09 Uzbekistan
FLYING COLORS United States
FM Canada
FOTHERINGAY United Kingdom
ELOY FRITSCH Brazil
FUGATO ORCHESTRA Hungary
AVIV GEFFEN Israel
DAVID GILMOUR United Kingdom
GORDON GILTRAP United Kingdom
ROGER GLOVER United Kingdom
GOD BLESS Indonesia
GODLEY & CREME United Kingdom
GOLDEN EARRING Netherlands
GROUNDHOGS United Kingdom
GTR United Kingdom
GUDDAL (YNGVE) & MATTE (ROGER T.) Norway
GYGAFO United Kingdom
THE HAPPENINGS FOUR Japan
HAPPY END Japan
HELP YOURSELF United Kingdom
KEN HENSLEY United Kingdom
ROGER HODGSON United Kingdom
HORIZONT Sweden
INDIGO Austria
IRON MAIDEN United Kingdom
JACKSON HEIGHTS United Kingdom
BERT JANSCH United Kingdom
JAPAN United Kingdom
JEAN-MICHEL JARRE France
JIMMY PAGE - ROBERT PLANT United Kingdom
JON & VANGELIS United Kingdom
BRYAN JOSH United Kingdom
JOURNEY United States
KALEVALA Finland
ERIC KAMPMAN United States
KESTREL United Kingdom
KING'S X United States
KINO United Kingdom
KLAATU Canada
KORNELIJE KOVAC Yugoslavia
KREUZWEG Germany
GREG LAKE United Kingdom
LANA LANE United States
LED ZEPPELIN United Kingdom
GEDDY LEE Canada
JOSIPA LISAC Yugoslavia
JON LORD United Kingdom
MAGELLANMUSIC United States
MAGNA CARTA United Kingdom
MAGNUM United Kingdom
YNGWIE MALMSTEEN Sweden
MÅNS MOSSA Sweden
GERARD MANSET France
PHIL MANZANERA United Kingdom
NICK MASON United Kingdom
MASTERPLAN Multi-National
MATTER OF TASTE Austria
PETER MATUCHNIAK United States
MAX WEBSTER Canada
MERCURY REV United States
METALLICA United States
MINDFIELDS Poland
MOONDANCER Japan
MUSE United Kingdom
NOW United States
OFFENBACH Canada
OM ART FORMATION Bulgaria
OYSTERHEAD United States
THE PARLOUR BAND United Kingdom
ALAN PARSONS BAND United Kingdom
PHISH United States
I POOH Italy
DAVORIN POPOVIć Yugoslavia
PRIMUS United States
QUEEN United Kingdom
RAIN FOR A DAY Germany
RAINBOW Multi-National
JOHN RENBOURN United Kingdom
TERRY RILEY United States
LAZA RISTOVSKI Yugoslavia
ROCKFOUR Israel
MIKE RUTHERFORD United Kingdom
SADISTIC MIKA BAND Japan
SATIN WHALE Germany
SERÚ GIRÁN Argentina
SIGNS OF ONE Canada
DAVE SINCLAIR United Kingdom
PETER SINFIELD United Kingdom
SLINT United States
SOLSTICE COIL Israel
STEELEYE SPAN United Kingdom
STRAWBERRY FIELDS Poland
STREAM OF PASSION Netherlands
STYX United States
SUI GENERIS Argentina
SUPER FURRY ANIMALS United Kingdom
SVANN Poland
SYMPHONIC SLAM Canada
SYNERGY United States
SYNOPSIS Estonia
ALDO TAGLIAPIETRA Italy
TALKING HEADS United States
TAMOUZ Israel
TANTALUS United Kingdom
TIRED TREE Sweden
TITANIC Norway
TOY MATINEE United States
TRAVELLERS Poland
TRIANGULUS Sweden
TRICANTROPUS Spain
TRIUMPH Canada
STEVE VAI United States
ANNEKE VAN GIERSBERGEN Netherlands
VANGELIS Greece
VICTOR Canada
OLIVER WAKEMAN United Kingdom
WALRUS Japan
JOHN WETTON United Kingdom
WHALEFEATHERS United States
WHEATSTONE BRIDGE United States
WHIMWISE United Kingdom
WHITE United Kingdom
ROBIN WILLIAMSON United Kingdom
WISHBONE ASH United Kingdom
THE WISHING TREE United Kingdom
ERIC WOOLFSON United Kingdom
ZON Canada

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