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GOLDEN EARRING

Prog Related • Netherlands


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Golden Earring biography
Founded in The Hague, Netherlands in 1961 - Still active as of 2018

A complete bio of this group would take up a few pages. A concise one would still take up much space. This is one of the rock groups, that along with the Stones and Status Quo have been around for over 4 decades. And they're still a vital musical force ! So here is a brief overview :
Golden Earring was formed in 1961 in The Hague by 13-year-old George Kooymans and his 15-year-old neighbour, Rinus Gerritsen. Originally called The Tornados, the name was changed to Golden Earrings, when they discovered that The Tornados was already in use by another group.Their name was from a song originally sung by Marlene Dietrich in 1947 and a hit for Peggy Lee in 1948, with which they opened their concerts.
They achieve their first success in 1965 with "Please Go," as a pop rock band with Frans Krassenburg as lead singer. It reached number 9 on the music charts in The Netherlands. Their next single "That Day",went up to # 2 on the Dutch charts, stopped only by the Beatles "Michelle". Come 1968, they top the Dutch charts for the first of many times with "Dong-Dong-Di-Ki-Di-Gi-Dong," a song that spread their name through Europe.
By 1969, the rest of the lineup had stabilized, with lead vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Barry Hay and drummer Cesar Zuiderwijk. As with many late 60s groups, they find themselves looking for their own style for several years before settling on straightforward hard rock, initially much like that of the Who, who invited them to open their 1972 European tour.
From '69 and their first tour in the U.S., through their Europeen treks in the early 70s, the group slowly builds up a following. By '71, they are a regular presence on Dutch charts, and are starting to climb up the ladder in Germany. They sign on to the Who's Track label, which released a compilation of Dutch singles, Hearing Earring, helping the group break through in England. Already on the way up to stardom in Europe, 1973 becomes their big year.That most driven of driving songs is released on the world. Golden Earring have grabbed the golden ring with "Radar Love" and the album "Moontan". They hit the American market for long tours with such acts as Santana, the Doobie Brothers, & J Geils. The world seems theirs. But the lack of a follow-up hit ensured that their popularity remained short-lived in America, even though they remained a top draw in Europe over the rest of the 1970s, as their singles &...
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GOLDEN EARRING discography


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GOLDEN EARRING top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.06 | 13 ratings
Just Ear-Rings
1965
1.74 | 16 ratings
Winter-Harvest
1967
2.18 | 17 ratings
Miracle Mirror
1968
2.40 | 21 ratings
On The Double
1969
3.81 | 63 ratings
Eight Miles High
1969
3.85 | 57 ratings
Golden Earring [Aka: Wall of Dolls]
1970
3.60 | 58 ratings
Seven Tears
1971
3.31 | 44 ratings
Together
1972
3.91 | 119 ratings
Moontan
1973
3.01 | 51 ratings
Switch
1975
3.13 | 53 ratings
To the Hilt
1976
3.12 | 41 ratings
Contraband
1976
2.31 | 23 ratings
Grab It for a Second
1978
2.80 | 23 ratings
No Promises ... No Debts
1979
2.62 | 26 ratings
Prisoner Of The Night [Aka: Long Blonde Animal]
1980
3.14 | 31 ratings
Cut
1982
2.53 | 19 ratings
N.E.W.S.
1984
2.60 | 15 ratings
The Hole
1986
1.58 | 14 ratings
Keeper Of The Flame
1989
1.98 | 21 ratings
Bloody Buccaneers
1991
2.35 | 12 ratings
Face It
1994
2.30 | 11 ratings
Love Sweat
1995
2.65 | 12 ratings
Paradise In Distress
1999
3.00 | 12 ratings
Millbrook U.S.A.
2003
3.62 | 17 ratings
Tits'n Ass
2012

GOLDEN EARRING Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.79 | 30 ratings
Live
1977
3.00 | 12 ratings
2nd Live
1981
2.54 | 8 ratings
Something Heavy Going Down (Live From the Twilight Zone)
1984
2.62 | 14 ratings
The Naked Truth
1992
4.14 | 7 ratings
Naked II
1997
3.67 | 6 ratings
Last Blast From the Century
2001
4.00 | 7 ratings
Naked III Live in Panama
2006

GOLDEN EARRING Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

GOLDEN EARRING Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 1 ratings
Hits Van De Golden Earrings
1967
4.05 | 2 ratings
Hearing Earring
1973
4.00 | 10 ratings
The Continuing Story of Radar Love
1989
2.05 | 2 ratings
Collections
2006

GOLDEN EARRING Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

GOLDEN EARRING Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Moontan by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.91 | 119 ratings

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Moontan
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I must admit I had no idea how many albums this band has put out or the fact they formed in The Netherlands in 1961! Originally they called themselves THE TORNADOS. First studio album was released in 1965 by which time they had already changed their name to GOLDEN EARRING. "Moontan" is their ninth studio album released in 1973. I have a feeling that cover sold a few copies to teenage boys over the years. Mind you it's not the only cover they used for this one and to confuse matters more there are different track listings depending on the copy you have. I have the U.S. version with five tracks. Yes this band probably has the ultimate Classic Rock song in "Radar Love". For someone like me who has spent a great deal of time listening to my music while driving I must admit this is one of the ultimate driving tunes. Just that relentless beat along with the vocals and lyrics makes this my favourite track on here by far. Honestly for me the good music ends when that opener finishes. Just not into this record at all surprisingly. The guitarist and horn player composed the music and that sax player adds flute. Some keyboards and moog from the bass player. We get a few guests adding slide guitar, vocals and additional sax. One of the sad things for me in a way was that even "Radar Love" has become stale to me after all these years.
 Seven Tears by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.60 | 58 ratings

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Seven Tears
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N 465

Golden Earring is the best known, and internationally is the most successful rock band to come out of the Netherlands. Formed in 1961, Golden Earring has been active for more than fifty years non-stop, which makes of them the world's longest surviving rock band in the world, formed a year before The Rolling Stones. The current line up has been intact since 1970. In 1961 George Kooymans and his neighbour Rinus Gerritsen formed The Tornados in their home town of The Hague, the Netherlands. In 1963, as the band found out that there already was a British band called The Tornados, they decided to change their name into The Golden Ear-rings. Under the Golden Earrings moniker the band eventually recorded four albums between 1965 and 1969 in the Netherlands, "Just Ear-Rings" in 1965, "Winter-Harvest" in 1967, "Miracle Mirror" in 1968 and "On The Double" in 1969, besides twelve hit singles, 10 of which reached the Dutch Top 10.

The band's international career only started, and modestly, to take off in 1969, the year of the release of the fifth album, the psychedelic "Eight Miles High", their first tour of the U.S. and also the year in which the band name was slightly changed into The Golden Earring. On their early U.S. tours, their long, wild cover version of The Byrds' classic "Eight Miles High" impressed audiences and press alike. 1970 saw a dramatic shift in Golden Earring's musical style. After the melodic, often Beatle esque 60's beat of The Golden Earrings and a brief phase of psychedelica and hippie rock, Golden Earring's trademark became heavier, a riff based brand of rock with catchy hooks. It marked the start of a decade of domestic and international glory. Between 1970 and 1973, Golden Earring released more four albums, "Golden Earring" aka "Wall Of Dolls" in 1970, "Seven Tears" in 1971, "Together" in 1972 and "Moontan" in 1973. Their international popularity increased, mainly after their single "Radar Love" and the lengthy 1972 tour of Europe, supporting The Who.

Besides the guitarist George Kooymans and the bassist/keyboardist Rinus Gerritsen, the band's lead singer during the early Golden Earrings years was Frans Krassenburg. He was replaced by Barry Hay in 1967. The band's drummer for much of the 60's was Jaap Eggermont. His successors were Sieb Warner in 1969 and, in 1970, Cesar Zuiderwijk, Golden Earring's definitive drummer. So, the line up that is still active today is Barry Hay (lead vocals, guitar and flute), George Kooymans (vocals and guitar), Rinus Gerritsen (bass, harmonica and keyboards) and Cesar Zuiderwijk (drums).

With their seventh studio album "Seven Tears", Golden Earring laid a good, if not full fledged successor to their two previous exceptional works "Eight Miles High" and "Golden Earring". "Seven Tears" has seven tracks. The album begins with "Silver Ships" which is a wonderful psychedelic ballad, a real gem in their complete oeuvre. The stark counterpart to the dreamy "Silver Ships" is the second track on the album, the powerfully dry piece, "The Road Swallowed Her Name". Musically, the piece is somewhere between Deep Purple and Uriah Heep settled. It's a riff based song, combining guitar and bass works, with a dynamic style. "Hope" moves in the field of rock ballads, interspersed with some interesting tempo changes and enriched with powerful organ and saxophone inserts. "Don't Worry" is a straightforward rocker, a typical Golden Earring piece. It's an energetic track using piano as music filler, while the bass plays a very dynamic and tight basslines. The same goes for "She Flies On Strange Wings", although the piece in the intro suggests something psychedelic. But then no strong rock sound dominates, interspersed with unbelievably enthralling hooklines. In short, "She Flies On Strange Wings" is one of the best rock songs of the year 1971. As a single release, the piece internationally unfortunately couldn't build on the success of the hit "Back Home". "This Is The Other Side Of Life" sounds unfamiliar, too poppy, but thanks to the great guitar work of George Kooymans, the track can convince. It has nice bass guitar lines and it flows in simple with a straight line structure. His whole class is once again proved on their next final track, "You're Better Off Free". Despite the track sounds a bit cumbersome at first, it knows how to convince after repeated listenings. The song suits its position as a concluding track and is very inspiring, really.

Conclusion: All in all, "Seven Tears" is really a very good album, which draws its charm not least from the enormous craftsmanship and wealth of ideas of the band. For Golden Earring fans, the album is a must, and if you want to hear 70's hard rock, away from stale riffs, you should definitely listen to this album. This album is in the same vein as their previous recordings but not as inventive. There's a touch of prog here but mostly it's straight ahead hard rock. I really don't know if "Seven Tears" is one of the most proggiest albums of Golden Earring but I'm convinced that it's one of the most balanced in their entire career. It's true that it's an album without highlights, but on the other hand, I can't find any weak points on it, really. Although, I know that overall "Seven Tears" is more like a collection of songs than a fully realized album, but still are enough strong enough moments to make it worthwhile for hardcore Golden Earring fans.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Grab It for a Second by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Studio Album, 1978
2.31 | 23 ratings

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Grab It for a Second
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

2 stars Somewhere between the release of Moontan and Cut, the two most popular albums by Golden Earring, the band continued it's aimless wandering of trying to find their next hit, and the proof of their wandering is probably most evident in their 1978 release "Grab It For a Second". With the release of each album during this time, their popularity kept waning as their music just seemed to keep missing the mark. The band was constantly trying to get notoriety, but it seems they were having a lot of trouble trying to find that sweet spot, pushing their music to be more rock oriented, radio friendly and less progressive.

There really isn't much to say about "Grab It for a Second" since it just doesn't have a lot to offer. What you have here is a very short album with 8 songs on it, only one of them exceeding the 6 minute mark. Throughout the album, you hear the band missing opportunities left and right to make some great music, even if it isn't progressive, yet they can't seem to pull that off. Neither Hay nor Kooyman's vocals show any kind of emotion. The entire band just seems like they are going through the motions of "hurry and release another album and fill it with songs that were written in 5 minutes and sound like they were recorded in 2 minutes".

There really is only two tracks that stand out on this lackluster album: "Leather" which is a mid-tempo blues rocker that also appears on their "Continuing Story of Radar Love" compilation (which you would be better off getting than this album), and "Against the Grain" which breaks from the boring formula of rock beats to be a bit more heartfelt and more ballad-like, even hinting at some progressiveness, but not enough to really waste your time with this album.

The album goes by rather quickly with hardly anything on it to make any impression on the listener. It's all just less-than- mediocre music that has no soul or great hooks. If the performers can't bring out any enthusiasm for the music, than how can you expect their fans to get excited about it. Once again, Golden Earring misses the mark, but this time, seemingly even further than before.

 Golden Earring [Aka: Wall of Dolls] by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.85 | 57 ratings

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Golden Earring [Aka: Wall of Dolls]
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N 425

Golden Earring earned a unique place in the Dutch rock music history. Golden Earring was formed in 1961 in The Hague, Holland and still is active in our days, albeit slowing down on their prolific discography. Golden Earring is one of those bands who have literally been cranking out albums since the days when The Beatles were launching the British invasion all over the world. During all these years, the band released an impressive amount of albums and toured many times. After a debut single and album in 1965 the band continued to release new material in every decade that followed. The classic line up of the band came together in 1970 and is still going strong today. Golden Earring continues to perform monthly, performing electric and acoustic shows. No other band in Holland comes near these statistics, really.

The first outlines of Golden Earring emerge in the early 60's in The Hague, inspired by the British music. In those times, the music scene in The Hague starts to thrive, thanks to hundreds of brand new bands who perform in local clubs and halls. It doesn't take long for Golden Earring to become one of the prominent faces of this new era in the Dutch music. In the years that follow Golden Earring show a spectacular artistic growth. The band embraces new influences, while creating their own distinguished sound. Meanwhile the albums from the band began to coming, "Just Ear-Rings" in 1965, "Winter-Harvest" in 1967, "Miracle Mirror" in 1968 and "On The Double" in 1969. The band's growth has its consequences and in 1969, Golden Earring tours America, a first for any Dutch band. Later that year the band returns to the States to promote their new album "Eight Miles High" of 1969. That album became the first true classic album to Golden Earring, a very important mark to the band, showing that the band continues expanding their horizons. Their self-titled new album, also known as "Wall Of Dolls" by many fans, shows the sound of Golden Earring with a new style.

So, "Golden Earring" is the sixth studio album of Golden Earring and was released in 1970. The line up on the album is George Kooymans (lead and backing vocals and guitar), Barry Hay (lead vocals and backing vocals, guitar and flute), Rinus Gerritsen (bass guitar, piano, organ and Mellotron) and Cesar Zuiderwijk (drums and percussion).

"Golden Earring" is a hard rock album with its roots firmly in the blues with a touch of the psychedelic music. The flute is one of the main instruments used on the album. Some music lovers associate the flute work with Jethro Tull. And no matter how similar it is to Jethro Tull or not. In this case, we have almost a tracing from Ian Anderson. Musically, the music on the album can be divided into two categories, the heavy blues-like ballads and hard based rock with repetitive riffs. These riffs often cause a dj vu sensation because it seems you have already heard all this somewhere. Sometimes Golden Earring tries to trample across the Led Zeppelin field. Still, other hard rock heroes will not be overlooked like The Rolling Stones and Deep Purple. At the same time it seems that Barry Hay and George Kooymans try to imitate Robert Plant. The bass lovers should also pay attention to Rinus Gerritsen and to George Kooymans for his guitar playing. By the way, John Bonham influences can also clearly see in the Cesar Zuiderwijk drumming style.

The album begins wisely with "Yellow And Blue", a folky title dear to Kooymans. The acoustic guitar and the ambient flute work confirm their standing in psychedelic with a bluesy style. But, as soon as the second title, we get to the heart of the matter with "The Loner" where the guitar riff is heavy and the bass has a bass sound. "This Is The Time Of The Year" is more melodic, in turn angry and softer to the psychedelic and with a throbbing chorus. "Big Tree Blue Sea" is a kind of a mid-tempo electric trip, a little bit scary and where the flute, invariably, brings us back to Jethro Tull. "The Wall Of Dolls" is a simple music piece but magnified by the echo of the guitar. It's a superb track just like "Back Home". "Back Home" is another great track in Jethro Tull's style, especially during the superb opening. They returned to folk with "See See" that combines heavy prog with rock elements, before returning to heavy riffs with "I'm Going To Send My Pigeons To The Sky". This is a wacky track reminiscent of Budgie. The final track "As Long As The Wind Blow" is an epic ride song that brilliantly closes these forty minutes of magic rock music, which at times has many prog traces.

Conclusion: "Golden Earring" is a very well balanced album. Undoubtedly, it represents one of the best albums of this classic Dutch rock band. In reality, we can't say that this is properly a truly prog rock album, but I can see prog traces on some of its tracks. It has some complicated riffs and it reminds me some other bands like Led Zeppelin, Gravy Train and even Jethro Tull. It has some great tracks and nice arrangements too. This is typically a good Golden Earring album. It's full of guitar oriented blues rock with some nice vocals. Like most of their albums it's well produced and full of quality material. There's a little psychedelic and a little prog, and a lot of rock and roll. It can be considered a classic album of the golden era of the 70's. It's recommended to anyone who wants to discover the band in their prime career.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Eight Miles High by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Studio Album, 1969
3.81 | 63 ratings

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Eight Miles High
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N 415

Golden Earring had and still has a leading role in the history of the Dutch rock music. Golden Earring was formed in the mid of 1960 in The Hague, Holland and still is active in our days, albeit slowing down on their prolific discography. They've managed to maintain a big popularity in many European countries all over these years. Golden Earring had made their name in their native Holland by dominating the charts with a series of The Beatles- aping singles. In between this early stage of Golden Earring's existence and the career zenith of "Radar Love", there lies a transitional period covering the years 1970-72. During these years the band played a brand of rock popular as many headlining European groups of the era, a blend of the two budding genres of progressive rock and heavy metal, with an emphasis on the contrast between the heavy and the light. This resulted in an overlooked period of the band's history which produced three excellent albums of the genre, the 1969's "Eight Miles High", the 1970's "Golden Earring", also known as "Wall Of Dolls" and the 1973's "Moontan". The first of these three albums is the one which will be the subject of this my review.

However and strangely, their unique brand of Rock'n'Roll has largely been overlooked by the American audiences. In reality, the long lived Dutch rock band is of course best known for the most casual music fans in the United States for approximately two songs, by their 1973 worldwide breakthrough hit "Radar Love" recorded on their ninth studio album "Moontan", which is an arena rock milestone that had been deliberately constructed to appeal to the American marketplace, and for their 1982's hit "Twilight Zone", which was recorded on their sixteenth studio album "Cut". This is a very curious and interesting thing because ironically enough, the music that Golden Earring created has always been exactly what America likes, pure and honest Rock'n'Roll that acknowledges but never gives in to the current trends.

This 1969 album shows a great band at the peak of their powers. On the scale of great psychedelic albums this should be high. Listen to Barry hay's flute open track, "Song Of A Devil's Servant", and you are transported somewhere else entirely, which is the achievement of only truly great music. As well as being highly psychedelic this album is also a very heavy rock album at times. The band had evolved from a very good pop band on their first album to a very serious psychedelic hard rock band on this, their fifth album. However, the band didn't make an album this psychedelic again.

The line up on the album is George Kooymans (lead and backing vocals and lead guitar), Barry Hay (lead and backing vocals, flute and rhythm guitar), Rinus Gerritsen (bass, organ and piano) and Sieb Warner (drums and percussion).

"Eight Miles High" has only five tracks. The album is divided into two parts, four tracks on the first side of the LP and one lengthy track fills the entire second side of the LP. So, among the favorite tracks of the band is certainly the over eighteen-minute song "Eight Miles High", the track that fills the entire side two of the album. Golden Earring in 1969 was still pretty much at the beginning of their musical career. The title song caused a worldwide sensation with its extensive guitar duels, the imaginative drumming and many surprising tempo changes. This marathon version of The Byrds' classic was sometimes extended to over 45 minutes during live concerts and had hardly any resemblance to the original, except for the chorus. The bass set the tone here and was the dominant instrument. It was wonderfully rowing with its lines alternated with long-lasting and stretched to the madness of single tones. But, in between, there were wonderful drum escapades, which culminated in a solo that was about four minutes long. The whole thing was enhanced by orgiastic screams and wild moaning. But the four other titles, which are on the first side of the LP left a very strong impression too. In the opener "Landing", Gerritsen plays very well his organ that paired with a rousing lead guitar, the band fires here a great job. With a quiet flute intro begins "Song Of A Devil's Servant". The title is steadily increasing through the use of an acoustic guitar and quiet vocals, before Golden Earring then bring out the heaviness again. It's probably the catchiest song of the album. Central here too is a class solo by Kooymans on the guitar. On "One Huge Road" we can see so much dynamism and power in this title. A heavy and sluggish with very intense lead vocals, but on the other hand, "Everyday's Torture" comes out of the speakers. That is a highlight of this album, too.

Conclusion: "Eight Miles High" is one of the better things that Golden Earring ever produced. The transition from the beat/pop to rock is pretty well complete by this release. Its sound is hard rock and heavy psych with some 60's vibes. It's nice to see how Golden Earring can implement progressive rock elements without ever losing the rock feel, which is a pretty rare thing. As I mentioned above, the band didn't make an album this psychedelic again, but if you like of this album and you haven't heard their music before, besides "Radar Love" and "Twilight Zone", try "Golden Earring", "Moontan" or even "Seven Tears". You aren't losing your time cos all these albums have some great musical moments.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Live by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Live, 1977
3.79 | 30 ratings

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Live
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Golden Earring was a beat group in the mid-sixties, a psychedelic proto-prog group around the turn of the decade and a more regular rockgroup with some Americana flair in the mid-seventies. To me it sounds like the band's sound was heavily influenced by Quicksilver Messenger Service's 'Happy Trails' record. The band was particularly good on stage and stayed that way well into the 21th century. It is strange then that there are so few live albums of the band playing at full force. 'Live' in 1977 features some of the band's stronger cuts and material from their by that time latest record 'Contraband'. The band is supported by Eelco Gelling (of Cuby and The Blizzards fame), one of the best Dutch guitarist of his generation. The band has a nice rhythm and blues rock vibe and the guitars sounds great here. Golden Earring was one of those bands that fluently improvised within its song formats and allowed the songs to grow on stage.

The first record opens with the wild and urgent 'Candy's Going Bad', what a way to get a rock party started. Especially the inciting pre-chorus gets me going. 'She Flies on Strange Wings' needs little introduction. It is a classic rock favorite. The version of 'Mad Love's Coming' is simply one of the best recordings of the bands career. A stellar tight opening section with the slightly overdrive twin guitars, the bluesy and expressive vocals of Barry Hay (as magical here as Jim Morrison was a decade earlier) and a great instrumental ending sections with great solo's and a thick hardrock sound. On their famous cover of The Byrds' 'Eight Miles High' the band also shows its instrumental prowess and quite frankly kills the album version of 1969. 'The Vanilla Queen' has some symphonic rock elements and is treated with some more extended soloing. The second vinyl is quite the opposite. To my ears all songs sound very dull, excluding the extended version of 'Radar Love' - which the band plays slightly more psychedelic and lively than the original.

The first record of this 2lp deserves a four star rating and I don't think the weaker second record should prevent you from picking up this still widely available lp. Just make sure you hear this version of 'Mad Love's Coming' at least once before you die.

 The Hole by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Studio Album, 1986
2.60 | 15 ratings

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The Hole
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

2 stars Golden Earring had just had their 2nd break with the song "Twilight Zone" and the album "Cut", their first break coming with "Radar Love" from "Moontan". The thing that both songs had in common was that they both had bass heavy riffs that made them both easy to rock out to and fun to listen to. The problem is, both times the band tried so hard to capitalize on that sound that they ended up overdoing it twice. Not only that, but they took everything progressive out of their music trying to lean more toward popular music. History repeated itself for the band almost step for step. Both albums responsible for the hits were huge sellers in North America and the following albums seen the popularity slack off as the band and the record label worked on lowering the standard and quality of the songwriting and musicianship.

"The Hole" is the 2nd album after the release of "Cut", and you can tell they were working hard to not have history repeat itself. The music on this album is mostly formulated off of their successful songs. The sound has that dark, criminal undertone to it through almost every song on this album. They had a pattern and they tried to follow it on each song to the point that, other than maybe "They Dance", the pattern gets worn thinner and thinner with each song that follows. Plus, each song is kept down to a radio-friendly time limitation, so there really is not much time to be inventive, progressive or to even put down a decent jam. "Quiet Eyes" is the track that is the obvious attempt at a single, but it lacks any hook whatsoever and, except for the repetitive chorus, is not very memorable. By the time the 3rd track "Save the Best for Later" comes around, you already know what the pattern is going to be for the rest of the album, and, in the end, you have a bunch of songs that sound pretty much like they were cut with the same pattern.

"Have a Heart" actually has an interesting bass line that could have been utilized better, but the song is too short and the singing never stops. The synth "hits" also date the track making it sound outdated. The guitar break in the middle sounds like it could have gone somewhere, but there is no time for that on this album, and it ends way too soon. Things continue in a downward spiral when "Love in Motion" sounds like an attempt to bring back disco with some really bad brass filler, even in 1986. The music continues in the same vein through the remainder of the album, sounding out of date even for the year it was released.

The band would at least continue to see success in Europe for a while longer, but this would be the last time the band would break the top 200 in America. People weren't going to give them another chance after this album, even if they could manage to pull off a great album again. Of course, their own country never gave up on them, but eventually, the rest of the world would. Not only did they wear out a great thing but they tried to water it down with mediocre songs cut from the same cloth. The band did take a short hiatus after this album during which the two frontmen Hay and Kooeymans each put out solo albums, but soon returned trying to repeat their success a 3rd time. But, as the title of the album "The Hole" suggests, the band was stuck in a hole they could never climb out of.

 Hearing Earring by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1973
4.05 | 2 ratings

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Hearing Earring
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars On the surface, "Hearing Earring" may seem like an odd compilation. For a collection of tracks, it could have taken the best tracks from their previous discography which included 9 albums at the time this compilation was released. Yet, it compiles 8 tracks from only 2 albums (3 tracks from "Seven Tears" and 5 tracks from "Together"). So the burning question is, why would this compilation be necessary? Well, earlier that year (1973), the album "Moontan" was released, and this album was the band's breakthrough album in many countries since it featured their first big international hit "Radar Love". Suddenly, there were a ton of new fans that wanted to hear more of the Earring. Instead of delving back into 1965 (when their first album was released), the record companies wanted to just cull some songs that sounded somewhat similar to the direction the band was going when "Moontan" was released, and naturally, the two albums directly previous to that one was the safest and best bet to keep these new fans interested and appeased while waiting for a new album, and for some countries, beyond "Moontan", this was, at the time, the only other album available.

Overall, the selected tracks from those albums were pretty good choices. The result was a pretty strong album with songs that reflected the direction of the band. It is a bit strange that it has only been released in LP form even with many people demanding that a CD reissue be done. Besides having an excellent track listing (even the order is shifted around a lot and that even works well here), the album cover listed the songs not only in writing, but in raised Braille lettering, which was a pretty neat gimmick at the time. Many fans that had no other album to purchase at the time had high praise for this album, and for many, they were unaware of other albums that had been released.

The compilation actually does deserve high praise as it arranges the songs in a cohesive order and includes two of the mini epics (7-8 minutes) from the albums, the excellent "She Flies on Strange Wings" and the percussion heavy "Brother Wind". But, the album starts off quite well with the track "Jangalene" which begins with a long acoustic section which continues when the vocals come in and then half-way through, it explodes into a powerful rocker. Both "Avalanche of Love" and "Silver Ships" are also quite worthy of a "best of" compilation and work to strengthen this album. But the two previously mentioned longer tracks are the highlights here and are the tracks that people will keep going back to, however, the other songs support these well and don't feel like filler at all, but truly fleshed out tracks that even feature enough progressiveness to keep everyone happy.

This is quite an excellent compilation as it is and if you have a hard time finding any GE albums released before "Moontan", then this is the album you should look for, even though it will probably only be found in a "Used" condition. If, otherwise, you have no problem finding earlier albums or if you already own them, then it probably wouldn't be as attractive of a compilation. It does work quite well as an album however and substitutes well if you need earlier tracks from the band. It's quite solid, though it may not be as essential as it once was, however it is quite a strong album in and of itself.

 Moontan by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.91 | 119 ratings

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Moontan
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N 317

Golden Earring is a rock band which was formed in 1961 in The Hague, Holland. For over fifty years, Golden Earring has been probably the Holland's greatest rock band. They've managed to maintain their great popularity in many European countries all over these years. However, and strangely, their unique brand of Rock'n'Roll has largely been overlooked by the American audiences. Their career trajectory closely followed that of the similarly fated iconic U.K. rock band, Status Quo. From the flowery psychedelic rock band in the 60's to the more rock titans in the 70's and beyond that, Golden Earring still is active today, albeit slowing down on their very prolific and long career. However, the band has remained virtually intact throughout their entire career, in this way echoing the longevity of The Rolling Stones. These comparisons aside, Golden Earring has always done things their way. Maybe staying largely out of the spotlight in the U.S. has allowed the band to travel their own path and create music without having to cater to the American market like so many other bands have been forced to do. Ironically enough, the music that Golden Earring create has always been exactly what America likes, pure and honest Rock'n'Roll that acknowledges but never gives in to the current trends.

Golden Earring released their debut album 'Just Era-Rings' in 1965, their second 'Winter-Harvest' in 1967, their third 'Miracle Mirror' in 1968 and their fourth and fifth 'On The Double' and 'Eight Miles High', both in 1969. In 1970 they released 'Golden Earring', aka 'Wall Of Dolls', in 1971 'Seven Tears', in 1972 'Together' and in 1973 'Moontan'. Their classic albums of their golden era are three, 'Eight Miles High', 'Golden Earring' aka 'Wall Of Dolls' and 'Moontan'.

So, 'Moontan' is the ninth studio album of Golden Earring and was released in 1973. The line up on the album is George Kooymans (vocals and guitar), Barry Hay (vocals and flute), Rinus Gerritsen (bass guitar and keyboards) and Cesar Zuiderwijk (drums). Eelco Gelling (guitar), Bertus Borgers (sax) and Patricia Paay (vocals), participated as guests.

Released three years after, Golden Earring had finally settled down into the stable line up that heave remained the core of the band to this day, especially due to two clasic albums from them, their fifth studio album 'Eight Miles High' released in 1969 and their self-titled sixth studio album also known as 'Wall Of Dolls'. With 'Moontan', Golden Earring delivers pretty much what most people want from an early 70's guitar oriented rock album, namely big riffs, musical pyrotechnics, extended song structures, killer choruses, and no small amount of virtuosity, without sounding like that they were just demonstrating how many notes they could play in a set amount of time. In reality, 'Moontan' never loses sight of the fact that the rock music should be fun and entertaining, and as a result of that, each of the six tracks on the album are absolutely vital to the balance and the general vibe of one of the frequently forgotten rock gems of that era.

'Candy's Going Bad' rocks hard. The riff rolls over everything like a steamroller, bluesy in its simplicity. The chorus is awesome, very catchy and ful sounding. Beautiful bass and keyboards really bolster the sound. This is a very good track. 'Are You Receiving Me' is one of the two best tracks on the album. The choruses are very good. I'm not a big fan of rock horns in general, but they really work on the choruses of this song, adding pomp to the already bombastic chorus. The song features a very long and great instrumental. This is really a great track. 'Suzy Lunacy (Mental Rock)' is the only weak track on the album. A bluesy acoustic guitar is backed by a drunken piano and a wobbly bass. It's not bad but, in my humble opinion, it fails to stick out. 'Radar Love' is a classic rock radio staple with influences of bands like Steppenwolf and The Doors. It's an enjoyable, if somewhat repetitive and maybe a too long song. Despite that and a few faults, it's still quite a good song. 'Just Like Vince Taylor' reflects Taylor's popularity in the continental Europe. Slightly cliche, it's a very European interpretation of the early British R&B. It sounds somewhat inauthentic and dated, but it has its own European flair and charm. Still, it's a good track too. 'The Vanilla Queen' is the most prog rock track on the album. It's drenched in synths, fantasy based lyrics, and gentle acoustics. This is really a great classic of an era where the grandiosity in music was accepted and revered. It's an amazing track that closes the album in a perfect way.

Conclusion: 'Moontan' is a very good album, really. It's legitimately a great classic rock album of the golden era of the 70's that certainly retains its great charm even today, particularly for those of us that are partially to the classic and prog rock music. While Golden Earring are not a band who are name dropped with any regularity, many of their albums, and particularly 'Eight Miles High', 'Golden Earring' and 'Moontan', deserve to be reassessed as great rock classics of the 70's. You can easily find them and I would recommend picking them up, particularly 'Moontan' is a great starting point to discover the discography of a much underrated and somewhat forgotten band. As a conclusion, 'Moontan' is a necessity for Golden Earring fans, and a worthwhile listen for anyone interested in 70's rock at its most adventurous.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Eight Miles High by GOLDEN EARRING album cover Studio Album, 1969
3.81 | 63 ratings

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Eight Miles High
Golden Earring Prog Related

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

3 stars This album represent the first turning point in Golden Earring's career, turning from a typical beat music band (but do check-out the beautiful song 'I just Lost Somebody') to a.. well whatnot band. Heavy psych, doom blues, folk-infused, heavy prog and jamband? A style the band would continue on its 'Puppet Wall' follow-up, before turning towards a more radio friendly sophisto-rock group with the Moontan album. For its year of release (1969) 'Eight Miles High' could be seen as the frontier of progressive rock, as well as hardrock. The production isn't particularly bad for its time (and I own an old, mistreated vinyl), but it does sound a bit 'out there somewhere'. I would be interested to hear what modern mastering techniques could achieve here.

The almost doom-metal sound achieved on 'Everyday's Torture', one of my favorite songs of the band, is really impressive. 'Song of a Devils Servent' is a dive into ethnic influenced rock. On side two the band elaborates on The Byrds' famous 'Eight Miles High' song. Oh boy does George Kooymans improve on that main lead guitar melody. I always felt like early Golden Earring sounded heavily influenced by Quicksilver Messenger Service's 'Happy Trails' record when it comes to vocals and overall sound. Taking on the jamband coat the band falls a bit short of a great drummer, whereas Cesar Zuiderwijk would join after this record. The opening section is legendary and the guitar jams following it sound great. The 19 minute tracks is however in danger of falling flat after a mediocre drumsolo and only a slightly more interesting fuzz bass solo (amazing sound by the way!) by Rinus Gerritsen. The ending section is better but sounds a bit rushed and unfinished. The song would evolve during live concerts into the great '77 cut on the excellent Earring's 'Live' album.

Conclusion. Not a perfect album, but full of great moments of interest to collectors of early progressive, heavy psych, bluesrock and hardrock. Would give it three-and-a-halve stars.

Thanks to debrewguy for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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