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SYMPHONIC PROG

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Symphonic Prog definition

Symphonic is without doubt the sub-genre that includes the most bands in Progressive Rock because for many people it's almost synonymous classic Prog, something easy to understand being that most of the classic and/or  pioneer bands released music that could be included in this sub-genre, except JETHRO TULL and PINK FLOYD (who still blended some symphonic elements), even KING CRIMSON who very soon expanded their horizons to more experimental music, made their debut with a Symphonic album, "In the Court of the Crimson King" which is a cornerstone in the development of the genre.

The main characteristics of Symphonic are the ones that defined all Progressive Rock: (There's nothing 100% new under the sun) which among others are:
  • Mixture of elements from different genres.
  • Complex time signatures.
  • Lush keyboards.
  • Explorative and intelligent lyrics, in some cases close to fantasy literature, Sci Fi and even political issues.
  • Non commercial approach
  • Longer format of songs

In this specific case the main characteristic is the influence of Classical music (understood as Orchestral works created from the late Gothic to Modern Classical) using normally more complex structure than other related sub-genres like Neo Progressive (That's why sometimes the borderline that divides Symphonic from Neo is so unclear being that is based mostly in a degree of complexity rather than in an evident structural difference)..It is easy to find long keyboard solos reminiscent of Johan Sebastian Bach or melodic works that could have been written by Handel.

As in any other genre, different Symphonic bands had different approaches to Classical music, for example YES and GENESIS are mainly influenced by the Baroque and Classical periods, while EMERSON LAKE & PALMER has a predilection for post Romantic and modern authors like Mussorgsky, Rimsky Korsakov, Bartok or Ginastera, being that their sound is less melodic and more aggressive.

The peak of the genre starts in 1969 and lasts until the mid/late 70's  (more precisely until the release of A Trick of the Tail), when the genre begins to  blend more mainstream influences that took to the birth of Neo Progressive (a new approach for a new decade).


It is important to remember that even though the creative peak of Symphonic Progressive ended before the 80's, we can find a second birth in the 90's coming from the Scandinavian countries (specially Sweden with ANGLAGARD or PAR LINDH PROJECT) and even bands that still in the 21st Century recreate music from this period like SPOCK'S BEARD or ECHOLYN.

Before ending this short description I feel necessary to say (In order to be strictly accurate) that the term Symphonic is not 100% exact, because these bands very rarely played symphonies and was probably used because the music that influenced the genre was performed by Symphony Orchestras, but it is so widely accepted by the Progressive Rock community that would be absurd and futile for anybody to attempt a change after so much time.

Iván Melgar Morey, Peru 2006



Symphonic Team

Current Team as at 09/07/17

Iván Melgar Morey (Iván_Melgar_M)
Anton Fritz (SouthSideoftheSky)
RdtProg (Louis)

Symphonic Prog Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Symphonic Prog | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.66 | 4243 ratings
CLOSE TO THE EDGE
Yes
4.64 | 3939 ratings
SELLING ENGLAND BY THE POUND
Genesis
4.61 | 3429 ratings
FOXTROT
Genesis
4.44 | 3352 ratings
FRAGILE
Yes
4.41 | 3007 ratings
NURSERY CRYME
Genesis
4.40 | 2522 ratings
MIRAGE
Camel
4.38 | 2165 ratings
MOONMADNESS
Camel
4.36 | 2891 ratings
RELAYER
Yes
4.37 | 1638 ratings
HYBRIS
Änglagård
4.35 | 1236 ratings
SI ON AVAIT BESOIN D'UNE CINQUIÈME SAISON
Harmonium
4.30 | 2810 ratings
THE LAMB LIES DOWN ON BROADWAY
Genesis
4.29 | 2716 ratings
THE YES ALBUM
Yes
4.30 | 2179 ratings
THE SNOW GOOSE
Camel
4.28 | 2450 ratings
A TRICK OF THE TAIL
Genesis
4.42 | 509 ratings
FROM SILENCE TO SOMEWHERE
Wobbler
4.31 | 1126 ratings
SCHEHERAZADE AND OTHER STORIES
Renaissance
4.31 | 820 ratings
DEPOIS DO FIM
Bacamarte
4.24 | 1981 ratings
EMERSON LAKE & PALMER
Emerson Lake & Palmer
4.27 | 1040 ratings
VILJANS ÖGA
Änglagård
4.46 | 307 ratings
A DROP OF LIGHT
All Traps On Earth

Symphonic Prog overlooked and obscure gems albums new


Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Symphonic Prog experts team

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL DAY
Exodus
HIJOS DEL AGOBIO
Triana
ENTANGLED
Leitmotiv
SAECULA SAECULORUM
Saecula Saeculorum

Latest Symphonic Prog Music Reviews


 Close To The Edge by YES album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.66 | 4243 ratings

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Close To The Edge
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by jamesbaldwin
Prog Reviewer

4 stars "Close To The Edge" is the number ONE in the ranking of Progarchives. Is it the best progressive rock album of all time? My personal answer is no.

The Lp includes three songs: "Close To The Edge" (side A), "And You And I", and "Siberian Khatru" (side B).

"Close To The Edge", the song: Everybody here knows this suite very well... But is it a real suite? How is his structure? After having heard this suite for many years, here's to you my evaluation.

Close To The Edge (18:42) begins with country noises and a carpet of keyboards that gradually increases the volume, then comes an instrumental intro guided by Howe's guitar, which works on two lines: one does the solo, the other an underlying phrasing at great speed, which in fact marks a faster pace than that of Bruford's drums, which he prefers, with his creative jazzy style, not to beat too much on the snare drum, but works the rhythm at the hips. Meanwhile, Squire throws slashes with his mixed bass very high. The impression is therefore of listening to a polyrhythmic piece, without true melody, very well chiselled, refined, sophisticated, produced by the virtuosity of the musicians, which lasts about two and a half minutes, when Anderson's singing arrives to signal that it is time to start with the serious part, the storytelling. It is always Howe's guitar that leads, this time painting the melody, flanked by Squire's bass. The melody continues for a minute (up to about 3:50), then the rhythm stops and, punctuated by Bruford's drums, begins the hyperspeed rhythm that characterizes the verses of this long song. This time the keyboards of Wakeman arrive to support Howe's guitar, and together with Bruford's drums they beat the rhythm, while Squire produces some turns of bass to make it more lively. Anderson's singing begins, with its glacial timbre, and the very high, contralto tone, which somehow transcends the rock music in the background, turns off the heat like covering it with a white, pure, celestial liquid, and this it is the contradiction of Yes, well-marked by the critic Scaruffi: the romantic, warm, sentimental rock base is accompanied by the vocals of Anderson, cold, celestial, like icy water that extinguishes the fire. Therefore, a discrepancy is created, a conjunction of opposites, which produces a conflicting result, because Anderson's voice would be more suitable for slower, fluid, rarefied atmospheres of air or water, such as some kraut rock music (Hosianna Mantra) or some Canterbury (Wyatt's Rock Bottom) or the more recent post-rock. Instead this voice is associated with a melodic rock music, with a good rhythm, which tends to act more on a corporal than an astral level. All this produces conflict but also fascination, leaving in the music of Yes something that clashes, conflicts, but that makes it at the same time more fascinating, more stratified, less univocal, less simple, because it moves simultaneously in two opposite directions.

It is clear that Anderson's voice really characterizes the music of Yes and not everyone likes it. The fact that it goes on another level with respect to the music, combined with its super-high tone, almost falsetto, it could irritate or tire many listeners. Personally it took me several years to get used to Anderson's vocals, since I come from the classic (heartland) rock. I know that many lovers of classic rock don't tolerate Yes more for the voice of Anderson than for their songs, convoluted and full of virtuosic instrumental pieces.

But ... Let's go back to the song! The singing arrives: verse, second verse and immediately the chorus that then fades into a short solo by Howe that connects it to the bridge, at a more relaxed pace, then again comes the refrain, which in the final salt of tone touch a solemn epic climax ("I Get Up, I Get Down").

This structure, in fact an easy-listening melodic pop (beat style) song, represents the backbone of everything in Close To The Edge.

A piece of connection follows where Squire's bass is in evidence, then the keyboards report to the main melody: verse, second verse, chorus. All played with a different rhythm by Bruford and with greater use of the bass. In the refrain, more Wakeman's keyboards begins to be heard. Then bridge (where Howe's guitar feels good and there is an intermittent super high-pitched sound, I don't know if it's still produced by Howe or by Wakeman), then new chorus, which ends when we're at 8 minutes.

Following is a piece centered on low tones that introduce us to the instrumental break dominated by Wakeman. The music slows down, the rhythm section disappears, the song is deconstructed, leaving only abstract landscapes dominated by keyboards. It seems to be in a cold cave and in fact you can hear the sound of drops falling. Wakeman combines the sound of the synthesizer with that of organ and mellotron, and comes the singing of Anderson, in a doubled voice, at ease in this ethereal atmosphere. He starts again from the bridge, sung with slow rhythm, alternating with choirs of the chorus. This time Anderson's singing is intimate, confidential, and alternate to the choirs: my opinion is in this context that gives the best of himself, when his singing is confidential, and does not stand on the high notes ... or alternatively, when it grows on the high notes, if it is flanked by a melodic musical crescendo, and it's just happening now: the vocals "I Get Up, I Get Down, I Get Up" push the music to its peak, a marvelous epic, majestic, solemn climax after the long bridge / chorus; the voice rises in tone, and then the Wakeman church organ follow the vocals, and it sounds perfect for this musical juncture. We are a little longer than 12 minutes, and finally the song touches one of the highest peak of quality in the entire Yes's discography. Still Anderson, singing: "I Get Up, I Get Down", he leads the organ to lower notes, and after just over 14 minutes, the rhythm of the melody returns, with Bruford distinguishing it again from jazz preciousness.

The keyboards come back, and finally the singing starts again, on the hyperspeed rhythm with which it started the song: verse, second verse, bridge this time before the chorus, and finally again: "I Get Up, I Get Down", which closes in fading returning to the initial country noises.

Close To The Edge, in my opinion, is not a real suite. It is a song verse-chorus dilated to no end, which repeats the chorus (refrain) 6 times in total. Yes have created a new song format, they take a commercial easy-listening pop song with a verse-chorus (refrain)-bridge-chorus (refrain) structure and then they dilate it, speed it up, slow it down, accompany it with changes of rhythm and arrangement, support it with instrumental digressions and get to almost 20 minutes: and here's to you a beat song disguised as a classical suite. The (high-class) operation unites a simple substance: an easily accessible music, to a complex form: its clothing with a high quotient of virtuosity, refined arrangement, polyrhythmic instrumental pieces.

Rating high: 8,5/9. Successful song.

Now side B. Will side B be able to maintain the same level of quality?

"And You and I" (10:08) begins acoustically with a pastoral guitar phrasing, then comes the singing of Anderson, who sings two verses with a folk background, marked however by Wakeman's synths. The melody is pretty, but nothing more. Bruford's drums come together for a nice bridge "in crescendo", where Squire's bass performs numbers on the bass. The verse returns, which ends by raising the tone, and introducing a multi-level Wakeman solo, which brings the song from pastoral-folk to almost psychedelic-space rock, until the singing of Anderson returns, on the notes of the bridge, to making this orchestral crescendo celestial which, in effect, tends to rise towards the sky. In this way a nice climax is reached, which ends around 6 minutes. The music stops, the acoustic guitar phrasing returns, quite similar at the beginning, it comes to support it the rhythm section, then again a solo of keyboards / synths, this time a digression on the theme, above which the voice of Anderson returns, accompanied by the choirs, for the third bridge. The music rises for the "great finale", but again it stops, and Anderson's voice returns for the last 40 seconds. They should have avoided closing by repeating the verse, as the song has already repeated itself too much.

The song was virtually finished after 6 minutes, after reaching the climax. The remaining 4 minutes do not add much in terms of musical material, and would at least be cut by a minute. In this case, in expanding the song to get a mini suite, Yes don't get the same remarkable result achieved in Close To The Edge. As a quality, the song would have been better if it ended after 6 minutes. But even if they wanted to repeat the initial folk melody, they would have to end the song in an instrumental way without extending it so much. Rating: 8.

"Siberian Khatru" (9:00) brings the atmosphere back to the initial guitar rock, with more emphasis on keyboards. From the beginning the song appears quite repetitive and less inspired than Close To The Edge. Also in this case, the melody is pretty but not excellent. Anderson prefers to be accompanied by choirs, but it is above all the instrumental work that is more repetitive and less inspired than the first two pieces. After two verse-chorus pieces, the instrumental solo arrives, left first at Wakeman's celesta and then at Howe's guitar. The piece, however, does not sound with the same conviction as the other two. After 4 and a half minutes, Anderson's crystalline voice comes as fresh air to invigorate the piece, then starts the refrain, with Bruford beating drums and cymbals like a madman and Squire making the numbers. Again a slowdown, the singing of choirs, Bruford to make the numbers, and finally an instrumental queue that is too long, two and a half minutes, since it doesn't add anything particularly new compared to the repeated rhythm as a possessed from beginning to end. The Yes add a syncopated piece of percussion and vocals to break the rhythm. But on the whole, like "And You And I", the musical material is too little to justify the 9 minutes of the song, and Yes can't always do miracles, as in "Close To The Edge", to make original simple music that could be compressed in three minutes. Here, in fact, they try, and they are to praise, not to make the song dull, between percussion and the slashes of bass by Squire, which characterizes the ending of the piece, but overall the result is not compelling, and in short the song seems in effect, compared to the other two, a filler pulled too long. Rating: 7,5.

Side A: Rating 8,5/9. Side B: Rating 8. Rating album: 8,5 for the quality, 8,5/9 for his unity and coherence. Four and a half Stars.

Is "Close To The Edge" the masterpiece of progressive rock? Not in my opinion. It is an almost masterpiece, in terms of quality. The first part is a masterpiece, the second is not. In my personal ranking the rating is 8.5 / 9 that is four and a half stars. Even if it were 5-star, it would be a small masterpiece, which remains a bit far from the peaks of King Crimson and Van Der Graaf Generator. Close To The Edge has the characteristic of being the emblem of the canons of progressive rock that in 1972 had its greatest flowering. It has one side filled with just one suite, and the other with two mini-suites or long songs: the maximum (for prog) would be one suite per side, as Yes will do in the next, double album "Tales From Topographic Oceans". Here the songs are not real suites, but very dilated melodic pop-rock songs (while on Tales and Relayer Yes will compose real suites). Then Yes provide a great rate of virtuosity, rhythm changes (or polyrhythmic rhythms), instrumental variations on the main melodic theme; they add baroque arrangements (the church organ and the celesta played by Wakeman) to the songs that have a simple rock or folk structure; in short: in this album Yes exemplify with the maximum coherence the canons, the schemes, the patterns of progressive rock. And they put, in the first side, and partly in And You And I, excellent sound content, musical progressions coupled with singing that reach climax, a high rate of pathos.

But all this is affected by the excessive expansion of duration of the songs, especially in the second side. As often happens, the main representatives of an artistic movement, those who shape the patterns, have more historical importance than a universal recognition for the quality of their works. That is, it is often those who are inside an artistic movement without respecting all the canons to be those who, subjected to the scrutiny of the historical judgment, come out better. Yes are the quintessence of the progressive rock of the golden age. Certainly they weren't just gifted musicians, they created an imaginary, they have always been visionaries, both musically and narratively. However, the quality peaks achieved in their albums, in my opinion, are not the highest achieved within the progressive rock movement. This Lp got high, but not very high quality, in my opinion. This record, in fact, represents the artistic peak of Yes discography ("Fragile" and certain parts of "Tales" are close to its) and, as my critical judgment, while praising the first side, which gives me great pleasure in listening, the pleasure ends up arriving at sixth minute of And You and I. The rest is not ugly, on the contrary, it is of good level, but not of great level. And this justifies my rating of four and a half stars. If "Heart of the Sunrise" had been here instead of Siberian Khatru, "Close To The Edge" would have been a real masterpiece that could be close to the top results of Van Der Graaf Generator and King Crimson.

 Trilogy by EMERSON LAKE & PALMER album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.13 | 1524 ratings

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Trilogy
Emerson Lake & Palmer Symphonic Prog

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

4 stars To me, Emerson, Lake and Palmer's album Trilogy was an attempt to curb to their enthusiasmafter the ambitious undertaking of Tarkus, providing much more restrained, polished songs while also maintaining some ambition and bombast from Tarkus, making a perfect middle ground betweem the two albums. This is definitely my favourite album by the band, as the issues that the previous albums had have been fixed for the most part, with much more focus on songwriting rather than showing off talent while also maintaining focus throughout the album. Just like previous efforts, there is still great focus on making an energetic, fun experience, except this time I feel they execute it extremely well without any major problems. One thing that I have noticed in this album is that many sections seem to take strong inspiration from certain other symphonic prog bands of the time, especially Genesis and Yes.

The Endless Enigma is definitely one of the highlights of the album, a 3 part suite switching between hyperactive instrumentation and melodic power with what feels like some Genesis inspiration, including Greg Lake at times sounding quite similar to Peter Gabriel, especially during the rising crescendo of a chorus. The song overall has an extremely powerful, grandiose tone to it that I feel is rarely matched by the band, or many other classic prog bands at all for that matter, and find this to easily be one of the greatest songs by the band, with the varied percussion and frantic piano in Fugue to add an additional layer of depth to it. The album continues going strong with my favourite slow song by the band, From The Beginning, which begins sounding extremely similar to the intro of Roundabout before developing into a relaxed beat with various kinds of percussion, as Greg Lake's wonderfully nuanced voice carries the listener along smoothly, with this being such a wonderfully relaxing song. On the other hand, the album is far from a quiet one, after all, it's ELP, with an extreme amount of energy being released in one of their best classical reimaginings, Hoedown. This is without a doubt one of the most entertaining songs the band has put out, constantly keeping the amazing, fast pace and high energy of the song and displaying the extent of Keith Emerson's keyboard playing. My favourite part is easily once various melodies begin crossing over one another in the final half minute of the song, fully displaying the insanity capable of the band. Trilogy is another song split up into multiple sections, although this time not in any way other than compositionally, with no different section names or the like. I personally don't find this song to be quite up to the same level of the previous ones, but it is still quite an impressive song. Living Sin is a surprisingly dark sounding piece, with a much lower, more foreboding tone of voice used by Lake, while still maintaining his charm. While the song is more simplistic than others here, that isn't an issue when it is made up for immensely through just how enjoyable it is.

The album does unfortunately have two songs in which I am not particularly keen on, those being The Sheriff, which has a similar ragtime feel to Jeremy Bender, albeit better in this case, but not by enough to elevate it beyond mediocrity, and Abaddon's Bolero. WHile I love the idea behind this song, taking the inspiration of the Bolero by creating an ever crescendoing instrumental, I don't find it to be particularly interesting beyond the fact that it sounds like an intense war march. While these two songs don't dampen the experience by an extreme degree, I do still find them to be somewhat disappointing, especially The Sheriff, which didn't have the benefit of being interesting in concept.

Despite a couple of more minor flaws, I find this to be Emerson, Lake and Palmer's best work, being highly consistent and polished all the way through with very minor flaws for the most part. I also like the fact that in many respects, this is a far more restrained approach to the band's songwriting, with far fewer moments of pure bombast and excess, embracing the more subtle side of songwriting to write some truly unforgettable tracks. This is where I'd recommend newcomers of the band to start off, as it's more refined and subtle than previous albums and seems like a much easier entry point into the band.

Best songs: The Endless Enigma, From The Beginning, Hoedown

Weakest songs: The Sheriff, Abaddon's Bolero

Verdict: A more refined, subtle album by Emerson, Lake and Palmer that displays increased maturity, leading to a more well rounded album. Definitely my favourite by the band and an ideal starting point for those interested.

 Tarkus by EMERSON LAKE & PALMER album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.05 | 1719 ratings

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Tarkus
Emerson Lake & Palmer Symphonic Prog

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

2 stars When it comes to my enjoyment of an album, I need consistency in order to want to listen to it, I want a more complete listening experience in which everything fits together cohesively, not necessarily a concept album, but something that feels properly planned out and conceived. This is a big reason why Emerson Lake and Palmer's Tarkus fails so miserably, it doesn't matter how great your side long epic is guys, the rest of the material sucks and greatly drags everything down. While I found their debut album to be quite rough around the edged with a lack of polish and tight songwriting causing to to be much less enjoyable than it could have been, this album feels more like an ill conceived mess, with a single good song in its entirety.

To be fair, this one good song happens to be Tarkus, so it's not as if this album is completely worthless, as despite the fact that I don't find this quite as good as other epics of around the time such as Supper's Ready, Plague of Lighthouse Keepers and Close To The Edge, this is nonetheless an excellent track all the way through. One aspect I really love about this song is how it manages to control the bombast and relentless desire for showing off, making for a technically impressive song that doesn't go overboard with wandering jams, instead moving between each section seamlessly, with a strong jazzy tinge to Keith Emerson's playing. Furthermore, the song has a great progression to it, continuously switching between quiet, beautiful moments, and chaotic, bombastic instrumental sections that sound like an off kilter war march in certain respects, especially in terms of the wailing moog. One of my favourite moments of the song is definitely Mass, which is just so wonderfully groovy and energetic, building up to a drum solo that impresses me every time, which is balanced out by continuing to push the melody and rhythm, stopping the isolated, dull feeling that the drum solo of Tank created. Honestly, this is one of ELP's crowning achievements, being able to create a 20 minute epic without a single moment of filler.

The unfortunate thing is that after this absolutely monumental track, the rest of the album is without a doubt extremely painful to listen to. For one, most of the songs are quite generic, with barely anything of interest to be found at all. At the very least, both Bitches Crystal and The Only Way (Hymn) feel like there was an effort made in them, although the latter, while somewhat nice to listen to, is extremely boring, although the church organ and the way it picks up at the end stops it from being bad. The former feels rushed with parts that feel unnecessary, like, in such a bombastic, insane song, there is no need for the quieter moments, it's Emerson, Lake and Palmer, excess is everywhere and in spades, so I find it annoying that a time where this could be used to their advantage ends up being wasted. Time and a Place and Infinite Space (Conclusion) are both songs I have very little to say about, as they are simply beyond dull and unneccesary, further damaging an album that is already slipping. The final nail in the coffin is that this album has not one, but two comedic songs in them, both of which are awful. Jeremy Bender employs a sort of ragtime style to a very simple melody, and it's just really bad all around, especially since it comes straight after Tarkus. Are You Ready Eddy on the other hand is nothing short of utter garbage, and definitely one of the most unbearable songs the band has ever put out, trying to take a more classic rock and roll approach, but falling on their face so embarrassingly with every step. Furthermore, this is the song the album closes off on, leaving a sour taste in my mouth afterwards.

Honestly, if the band decided to maintain the same kind of magic and focus as Tarkus displayed, I think I'd absolutely adore this album, but as it stands, it's by far my least favourite of the peak of Emerson, Lake and Palmer's career. It's amazing just how different in quality the two halves of this album are, and just how obnoxious and bad I find the second half, making me treat this album as a single, 20 minute track instead most of the time, as I just have no desire to listen to it in full. If not for the masterpiece of the first half, this would be an easy 1 star, but I'll rate it 2, since I can't call this album good, but would be horribly wrong to completely write it off.

Best tracks: Tarkus, which is definitely a high point in the band's meterial

Weakest tracks: While the second side is all bad, Jeremy Bender and Are You Ready Eddy stand out immensely in this category

Verdict: An uneven mess of an album with its first side being incredible, but it's second side being borderline unlistenable. I only relistened to anything the second side had to offer in order to be able to give this a fair review.

 Serge Fiori - Seul Ensemble by HARMONIUM album cover Studio Album, 2019
4.93 | 6 ratings

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Serge Fiori - Seul Ensemble
Harmonium Symphonic Prog

Review by bertolino

5 stars "Tout change, tout me dérange Je me reconnais plus » - Serge Fiori, opening words of L'Exil" from l'Heptade.

"All changes, everything bothers me. I don't recognize myself anymore". This would summarize Serge Fiori's thoughts at the result of a tribute album in honor of his oeuvre under the guise of Harmonium. Hopefully this is not, because he has been involved, low and behold, in the recreation of "Serge Fiori, Seul Ensemble", a double-cd set resuming the three records of Harmonium plus few additions. Few words about it later. But I won't delay my conclusion further: it's a thing of amazement, and a triumph!

I did report on this blog's site, a few years back, about the parution of a new solo album, simply titled "Fiori". Short of the "Prog Principle" it still had plenty to taste and rejoice, the quality of his voice still intact, within a simpler format, not too far from the first eponymous Harmonium record. Did look for a way to have it added here, and left the plot unfinished. Much had been said since about Fiori's psychic recovery and that, at this point, he would even dare to dream of going back to stage, at well past his sixties! To add to these considerations ,I strongly recommend , to anybody not being aware that Harmonium had been celebrated last year at the Quebec "Gala des artistes" , local equivalent of anyones' Grammies and Junos, to go to youtube and enjoy the ten minutes symphonic medley celebration, and further, the climbing on the scene off all the past members of the band. But be prepared to swallow your tears!

And then, as a Quebecois far from home, I stumbled on a cheap copy of l'Heptade in a (now rare) record store and was happy to refresh my cd version. Looking to few more info about the record, I went to my favorite archive site (here evidently) and stopped cold dead in front of the picture of "Fiori Seul Ensemble" DOUBLE CD SET full to the brim of nearly all the three original albums. Quick research toward my virtual Quebec thought me that Fiori and a trio of young contemporary musicians had agreed to the task of adapting Harmonium's music to a conceptual show by "Le Cirque Eloize", one of these clever modern versions of the traditional circus now firmly a trademark of Quebec with "Cirque du Soleil" and beyond. Physical copies being elusive out of Quebec, I paid ten european bucks for the download and here I am. So, few words for the wise: this is an adaptation for a visual show's purposes. In consequence, as overall changes and recreation matters, you will be confronted with more concise and dynamic versions of the songs. In many instances a new rhythm section is mixed as the song progresses, some aggressive electric guitar sometimes appears and you may feel it is done in order to add a "oomph factor" to the artistic / athletic performance on stage. Don't be worried though, as it truly doesn't butcher the songs. Still there will be place for debate (on some nation's fate). Main critics could converge toward the cutting of "magnum opuses" durations. On that I won't take a clear position, simply saying that some of the reworking had been so cleverly done that indeed I could take a few minutes more of these new versions?

Before I go for the song by song review, owing it to you all by the fact that I will be the very first reviewer, I will just resume by that amazing calculation: You will have onboard four out of eight songs from the first self-titled album, all five glorious ones from "Si On Avait Besoin D'Une Cinquieme Saison" and all but one (the often neglected "Lumieres De Vie") from l'Heptade, even adding for good measure two songs from his duet album "Deux Cent Nuits a  l'Heure". A massive covering aficionados only could have dream of. So here we go:

I-1. Vert (6:24) What a nice way to open the project ! "Vert" is the overture of "Une Cinquieme Saison". The integrity of the song is preserved, better leave it pretty untouched anyway. Still there is something brilliant added here. The atmospherics and vocals of the title cut of "Deux Cent Nuits a  l'Heure", a Fiori album with Richard Seguin right after the dissolution of Harmonium is mixed within the first minute. Clever! Already, one of the features of these new versions, a "drum'n bass" section during the middle section of the song adding some edge and bravado. A less wandering closing left the song cut by a minute.

I-2. Comme un fou (7:40) First real song from L'Heptade, it's probably in that position to open the show in fashion. Pretty much untouched, by separating it of the orchestral overture of origin and trimming it from it's classical arrangement's, the song feels more concise and dynamic. More a matter of context than actual modifications.

I-3. En pleine face (5:28) A strange feature here: a longer version! The opening of face two of "Une Cinquieme Saison" is yet close to the original, but much clearer, Fiori's voice triumphant, with choir added. This becomes the definitive version! One feel that in the context of the shows, Fiori and cohorts, being prudent, have chosen to present the initial songs with not too much altering.

I-4. De la chambre au salon (5:25) Following "En pleine face ", this demonstrates how well the pacing had been thought of. Similar light folk feeling, a continuation of the preceding one. Like other songs of the first eponymous disc, this one truly benefits of the new recreation. Here we are treated with the string quartet chamber like version. And this is one of the songs where we may hear new lines of Fiori's singing. A better diction, and less Quebecois accented or so it seems. This is now the best version available without a doubt, lighter and more joyful.

I-5. Ca fait du bien (8:31) This one seems to continue the « happy-go-lucky » segment. His origin is interesting. Never recorded by Harmonium, but finally served on "Deux Cent Nuits a  l'Heure", this maybe secondary to ProgArchives followers, but not for any Quebecois who did attend Harmonium shows, more mass or rituals actually, as this was the closing song of l'Heptade concerts. One can imagine the crowds singing in unison, a cappela for a while, often in tears of happiness, 'till Denis Farmer would bang his drums for the coming back of the band and the final wham! Still unforgettable souvenirs, forty years later.

I-6. Viens danser (5:16) If the attendance is not up on their feet at this stage of the show , this is a desperate cause! It is the second in a row of the songs added from the Fiori/Seguin album. The funny feeling and upbeat rhythm is in direct contradiction with Fiori's lyrics about the distress and disillusion of a pop star. Sweet and sour for that effect when one remember that he will then soon disappear for nearly thirty years from the music front. The song has new power added, in line with the show's purposes. But i doubt many here may compare.

I-7. Chanson noire (4:14) Keeping in with the feeling of happiness, the third song of l'Heptade, being cut by half, seems more effective for that matter. One can regret the Subirana's gymnastics on varied winds, but a more soulful version is offered in compensation, gospel choir included, and works nicely at this stage.

I-8. Depuis l'automne (9:36) A better way to close the first disc in beauty? If many may think that "Histoires sans paroles" is the chef-d'oeuvre of the second album, for me this is it. And still mostly preserved in due respect, losing a light thirty seconds in his new fashion. The middle atmospheric break truly gains, if possible, by the addition of a drum pattern and a trumpet solo reminiscent of the title cut of the first album, over the celebrated mellotron kept intact. And the remixing brings Fiori's chant and vocalese to the front, like in most of these new versions. The closing "Si c't'un reve reveille-moi donc", since recognized like a true national anthem, is augmented by a new rhythm section to close with vigor. A triumph!

II-1/ 2. Prologue (4:19) / Le premier ciel (7:16) Evident as an overture to the second disc, the orchestral intro often despised by those who don't like their prog "chamberised". Interestingly, the opening of l'Heptade is coupled here with the fourth cut of the original album instead of « Comme un fou ». "Le Premier Ciel" is chopped from four minutes of fat (moog), in the most effective way. Apart of this more concise version, few changes would be objects of discussion. Nice to have in the flow, especially in regard of what's following.

II-3. Le corridor (7:17) This one came to be my most revered song of l'Heptade, thanks to the celestial singing of Monique Fauteux. Here they decided to chop and cut the song. And I like it! The song opens with the closing of the original version. How did they dare? Following then, the second solo part of Fauteux, and entering a new instrumental segment, we're treated to a crescendoing moog solo lying over a now usual added rhythm section. The ending, having been used at the opening, is replaced by one of these deviled Chotem orchestral segments, augmented by electronics effects. Nicely done. II-4. Aujourd'hui, je dis bonjour a la vie (7:09) This one is at a strategic place, right in the middle of two revered songs, spiritual anthems of sorts. So it's interesting to have one song of the first album, following one from the third, and opening to one of the second. And it doesn't disappoint! For that purpose a longer instrumental guitar closing, nearly a minute and a half of atmospheric and yet heavy jangling acoustics does the job. Another one of the first album which seems improved.

II-5. Histoires sans paroles (7:07) Now, in a way this one could be the main offender of the whole project. Imagine the revered magnum opus of "Une Cinquieme Saison" chopped of a whole ten minutes. But how do it otherwise, in order to fit all the material on a double cd? And still it works. As long as you can accept one of these drum and guitars crescendo added right in the middle of it. Still some things have been improved. The closing female singing being added some choir like effects. At the end one can feel cheated but it's still a work of mastery.

II-6. L'exil (9:21) Nowhere else the cutting is more effective than on the last song of the first record of the double 'L'Heptade". At nearly four minutes less, you can still enjoy a whole plus nine minutes of it. Fiori's voice upfront, never may you feel more the distress and resentment which will lead Harmonium to counted time. A sense of alienation rendered more touching by a mostly preserved version of the original, apart of the mixing of the voice, until the strangely joyful ending -but more poignant for that! benefits from a more powerful mixing of the rhythm section.

II-7. Dixie (3:31) A sense of loss and depression had altered what should have been a matter of rejoice, not talking of the perspective of a circus show. So what better antidote than "Dixie" 's depicting summer from "Une Cinquieme Saison" The overall feeling left intact, and still all's changed, or so it seems. A banjo added, spoons removed, clarinet being cut but a whole wind section "A  la rescousse". So you guess, the pleasure is great to have now two "Dixies" for the price of one.

II-8. Harmonium (5:40) Closing the one/two punch with « Dixie», one may imagine the curse of the show following a growing intensity. In 1974 Harmonium happened to the world with a bang with this swinging, almost bossa-novaed eponymous song. A rare one of the first album mainly left untouched, with his melodious trumpet preserved, and from which the "Depuis l'Automne" addition is inspired.

II-9/10. Comme un sage (5:13) / Epilogue (2:44) L'Heptade closing has been amputated of ten minutes of variations on the famous melody. Here on this site many had expressed that they felt it was wandering and overlong so this shouldn't bother too many. Me I'm kind of devastated though. Yet I understand the reasons. At least we're left with the nicest part of the singing, and a clearer Fiori. As a gift, in the closing segment, being added to the choir, we're treated to small extracts of other Harmonium singalong sections which make for a nice addition. A rousing electric guitar solo reminds us of the live version of "Harmonium en tournee". And the orchestral coda is augmented by nice additions of instruments, percussive and acoustic guitar. The door is thus left open for

II-11. Un musicien parmi tant d'autres (4:13) The ending of the record is the most evident thing for any Quebecois, and very understandable in the context of the show for which the music is adapted. This is the celebrated anthem of the first, self-titled record and thus may be less revered by adepts of this site. They choose to cut the song of his first segment, open with the singalong one "On a mis quelqu'un au monde on devrait peut-etre l'ecouter" (freely translated by "We've gave birth to one, maybe we should listen to him"), and close with the ringing acoustic guitar. A very fitting end for a show.

And to an overlong review. But I thought this should deserve it, as a first review of a great achievement, maybe conceived as a testament. May I dare it's not?

 Calling All Stations by GENESIS album cover Studio Album, 1997
2.50 | 957 ratings

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Calling All Stations
Genesis Symphonic Prog

Review by cjde341

3 stars I think time has softened many opinions on this, their final album. While it would have been more than fitting for Genesis to go out after We Can't Dance, especially with 'Fading Lights' as the last ever Genesis track, I can't hold it against the band for trying to make a go without Phil. The fans might have appreciated more of an in-house iteration of the band, say, with Chester Thompson in the line-up, but there would always be the issue of replacing the vocalist/front man. While there are real stinkers like 'Congo' and 'Small Talk,' there are some great ones too, like the title track, 'The Dividing Line' and 'Shipwrecked.' The vocals are serviceable, and I think Ray Wilson earns props for sheer effort and guts for stepping into some very big shoes. Too bad Simon Collins wasn't quite old enough to step in.
 Fly From Here - Return Trip by YES album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.06 | 75 ratings

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Fly From Here - Return Trip
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars The way it should have been from the start

The Yes line-up that created Drama in 1980 reunited in 2011 to record a belated follow up album. Yet, even though all five members from the Drama-era where right there in the studio, the band decided to hire a new lead vocalist in Benoit David letting original Drama vocalist Trevor Horn remain in the producer's chair during the proceedings. My theory as to why this was the case is simply that the band where planning to tour and that Horn never felt comfortable as a front man in the live setting. So, in preparation for the tour it made sense to them at that time to use David as lead vocalist also on the studio album. The truth is though that as a studio unit, the five man line-up had all the vocal resources they needed without hiring any more people. With no disrespect whatsoever intended towards Benoit David, who did a fine job on the album and live, the fact is that had it not been for the plan to tour, they never would have needed him in the first place.

This new 2018 version of Fly From Here, subtitled "Return Trip", proves my point. Horn has now remixed the album and added his own lead vocals, and made some other subtle changes to the mix as well. A couple of less subtle changes is the addition of a previously unreleased track on which Steve Howe sings lead, called Don't Take No For An Answer, and an extended version of Hour Of Need.

It is interesting for fans to notice the differences between the two versions, but for newcomers it is quite enough with one version. And my recommendation is that the 2018 version is the one to go for. The rating has to remain the same as for the 2011 version, it is after mainly all the same album.

 Calling All Stations by GENESIS album cover Studio Album, 1997
2.50 | 957 ratings

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Calling All Stations
Genesis Symphonic Prog

Review by patrickq

4 stars Calling All Stations is a neo-prog album released in 1997. I think this group was influenced by Genesis. I mean, no one would confuse the singer for Phil Collins, and the album is darker than any Genesis work in years. But the first half of "Alien Afternoon" reminds me a little of "I Can't Dance," and I can almost imagine Collins singing "Shipwrecked" or "If That's What You Need." Plus, a lot of the drumming, especially in the later songs like "The Dividing Line," "There Must Be Some Other Way," and "One Man's Fool" sounds like Collins.

As others have suggested, I think Calling All Stations would be better reviewed if it weren't a Genesis album. But it's not bad compared to the group's previous albums. So the lyrics are a little shallow in places, and the instrumentation is a little restrained, but what else is new? In my opinion it's in the same league as Invisible Touch and Genesis. And to me, it's clearly better than We Can't Dance.

I agree with a lot of reviewers who have criticized the sappiness of "If That's What You Need" and "Not About Us," and I must admit that I expected that the schmaltz would evaporate as soon as Collins left. However, I do have a soft spot for "Shipwrecked," schmaltz and all. Along the same lines, the much-disparaged "Small Talk" is not progressive: "all of this is with regret; I'm sure you will agree." But it's kind of catchy. I think if I went back in time and gave a copy of Calling All Stations to my twelve-year-old self, I'd've loved it and would still love it today.

And I do, in fact, love two tracks on Calling All Stations. First, "Congo" is a great song. Great melody, great drumming. The "into my heart" bridge is a nice nod to Collins. And then there's "One Man's Fool." More often than not, "Alien Afternoon" seems to be cited as the most - - or only - - progressive song on the album, and it's pretty good. But to me, "One Man's Fool" is clearly "proggier." It even has two movements, the second starting at around 3:50 with what amounts to a second introduction. And as good as the first movement is, the second stands on its shoulders. The lyrics aren't exactly poetry, but they're not bad, especially compared to those on most of Calling All Stations. "One Man's Fool" features singer Ray Wilson at his best, and while the drumming is strong throughout the album, Nir Zidkyahu outdoes himself here.

There's too much filler on Calling All Stations. It doesn't seem like an album needs to be 68 minutes long for the customer to get his or her money's worth. But I can't award fewer than three stars to an album with "Alien Afternoon," "Congo," and "One Man's Fool." It's not Foxtrot, and it's not A Trick of the Tail. It may not even be Abacab. But it's a good enough art-rock album. I'd suggest that fans of post-Gabriel Genesis, or accessible prog of any form, give this a spin.

 New Horizon by ADVENTURE album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.12 | 13 ratings

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New Horizon
Adventure Symphonic Prog

Review by Second Endeavour

3 stars It took a while, but today I am capable to present my humble review... What specific references should be found on CD 'New Horizon' if you go to this release featuring the twelve cuts? A pastoral opener 'Slow Fanfare' belongs to the instrumental type of sympho-prog overture that brings a classic Genesis-like vibe. On the other hand, it's a case of influence rather than imitation. The muscular track 'Destiny' runs through the dynamic rhythm and strong melodicism matched with the paradigm of Uriah Heep (John Lawton era). To be honest, I got a dual feeling about 'Horizon Suite' which contains the radically different movements. The first four minutes offer a sort of mellow composition featuring gentle piano, fragile vocal courtesy, tasty guitars, delicate keyboards and pleasant rhythmic backdrop. By contrast, the next part suddenly turns into overly aggressive hard-rock orgy accompanied by narrative inputs. There's no wonder that I savor the former and dislike the latter. After that, the potent outing 'Eirene (Goddess Of Peace)' which holds the captivating lead vocals, multiple harmonies, swirling keyboards, excellent guitar lines, competent bass and tight drums. Then, Adventure lean towards 'You Belong' bearing the stylistic parallels to Blind Guardian. Despite of its brief duration, superlative interlude 'With Tears In Their Eyes' manages to touch my heart and soul. The longest plot on the disk, 'Lighthouse' embodies kinda a cross between Uriah Heep, Jethro Tull, Deep Purple and Genesis. The subsequent, fast track 'Here To Stay' sounds like a melting pot of the piercing guitar attacks, vintage keyboard layers, stirring bass loops and competent drum work. Unfortunately, this fruition was spoiled by the awful voice of female lead singer. I also have some scepticism concerning two following songs, as both of them ('Nothing Will Change' and 'In Search Of (A New Life)' are sticking to the formula of trivial pop-music. That's not quite right with the progressive rock album. Being a penultimate item, the short interlude 'For the Fallen' has mainly a nice combination of soothing piano and spoken narration. The final track 'Refugees' is another nod to Uriah Heep (late 70's). To conclude.. You may find the critical remarks above somewhat redundant, but they are here for a very simple reason - comparing with the previous album by Adventure, CD 'New Horizon' has a handful of drawbacks. Nevertheless, it's a decent effort as a whole.
 We Can't Dance by GENESIS album cover Studio Album, 1991
2.66 | 1114 ratings

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We Can't Dance
Genesis Symphonic Prog

Review by patrickq

2 stars I used to think of We Can't Dance as basically Phillip and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Album. Now I see it as a veteran band's sincere, and ultimately unsuccessful, attempt to stay relevant.

We Can't Dance can be seen as four sets of three songs:

I. Decent pop/rock: "No Son of Mine," "Jesus He Knows Me," "I Can't Dance." Five singles were released from We Can't Dance in the US, and these are the three that hit the rock airplay chart. None approaches "Turn it On Again" or "Misunderstanding" - - and "No Son of Mine" is way too long - - but this is actually the best material here.

II. Longer-form we're-still-prog songs: "Driving the Last Spike," "Dreaming While You Sleep," "Fading Lights." Ugh. I mean, they are trying, but in my opinion it's just not working. Each song here has a kernel which probably could have been developed into a Decent Pop/Rock Song. There is also an occasional cool riff here and there, but most of it comes off as a stretch. (I mean that literally; these songs average over nine minutes each.)

III. Mushy adult-contemporary schlock: "Never a Time," "Hold On My Heart," "Since I Lost You." After Phil Collins's singles started charting higher than Genesis singles, some people began complaining that one Genesis song or another "sounds like a Phil Collins song." That was meant derisively, but in my opinion, it depends on the song - - for example, how bad would it be for a Genesis song to sound like "In the Air Tonight" or "Inside Out"?

But on the other hand, how bad would it be if a Genesis song sounded like "One More Night" or "Groovy Kind of Love"? Unfortunately, we got to find out.

IV. Filler: "Tell Me Why," "Living Forever," "Way of the World" OK, look: We Can't Dance is more than 72 minutes long. What harm would've been done by leaving these songs off the album? Without them, We Can't Dance still would've been ten minutes longer than Invisible Touch or Genesis or Abacab.

Some have pointed out that We Can't Dance represented a return to more of of "rock" sound - - that the band had realized that they'd "gone to far" with Invisible Touch and its remix-friendly pop/dance fare. Personally, I think the change of direction on We Can't Dance was more a reflection of the times. Invisible Touch was their biggest hit ever. Why change the formula?

Invisible Touch debuted on the Billboard Top 200 album chart on June 28, 1986. Synth-heavy rock was at its peak, with 5150 (Van Halen), Raised on Radio (Journey), The Other Side of Life (Moody Blues) and So (Peter Gabriel) all in the top 10. On the other hand, when We Can't Dance debuted at #4 the last week of November 1991, the other rock albums in the top ten were Nevermind (Nirvana), Use Your Illusion II (Guns N' Roses) and Metallica (Metallica).

Things were changing in the music business, and by 1991, Genesis was reacting to those changes, not shaping them. We Can't Dance is not a good album, nor an important album. Kudos to the three members of Genesis for realizing that drastic measures would be necessary for the band to remain relevant - - though sadly, such measures were unsuccessful. Nonetheless, no matter how great or terrible We Can't Dance is, it hardly tarnishes the Genesis brand identity. We'll always have A Trick of the Tail, Seconds Out, and the rest of the highlights of the Collins Era.

 Emerson Lake & Palmer by EMERSON LAKE & PALMER album cover Studio Album, 1970
4.24 | 1981 ratings

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Emerson Lake & Palmer
Emerson Lake & Palmer Symphonic Prog

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

3 stars After an onslaught of Dream Theater reviews that honestly left me burnt out on everything to do with the band for the time being, I decided to just stop with them for the time being and move onto a band that I have extremely mixed opinions on, Emerson, Lake and Palmer. Overall, I find the band to have a very particular sound to them unlike much other prog at the time, with much more on the nose classical influence to the point of reimagining various classical pieces, an extreme focus on keyboards and drums, and an all around more energetic, chaotic, jam focused sound to them. Out of all the classic prog bands, this is easily one of the most pompous and excessive of them all, only issue being that it only works some of the time, an issue present through every one of their albums. Their debut is definitely their most restrained work by an extremely wide margin, but even here, there is still a lot of time dedicated to simply showing off the incredible talent of the band members, rather than on making enjoyable music. Both Keith Emerson and Carl Palmer are extremely skilled at their respective instruments, and Greg Lake is one of my favourite vocalists, but the music itself is quite a mixed bag, with a lot of it sounding like more work could have been done in order to polish things significantly.

Despite the band largely providing its riffs and melody through the keyboards, The Barbarian kicks off the album with a sludgy guitar tone, before increasing in speed, starting off slowly before the beat evolves into a gallop. I love the way everything cuts out in order for the frenetic drumming and tense piano playing to come in, providing the mental image of being chased, at least to me. I love the intensity of this song, and it's without a doubt one of my favourite songs on the album, and is at the very least, what I'd consider to be the most perfect. Take A Pebble is a very different affair however, starting off very strongly, highly reminiscient of the earlier King Crimson ballads such as the first couple of minutes of Moonchild, with similarly amazing vocals and an overall powerful beauty to it. The issue here is that a lot of the middle instrumental section feels very unecessary, being quite dull with what I consider to be fairly unappealing country - blues section that feels as if it comes out of nowhere and lasts far too long. In a way, I guess I can compare it to Moonchild, both starting out excellently before devolving into pure boredom, with any magic the song contained being drained away. Knife Edge proves to fare far better, being a pleasant, bluesy song with much more restraint placed upon it, with nothing getting too out of hand, and some really great concepts explored, especially the baroque section, which is simply to die for. The song feels a bit stilted in placed, but is definitely enjoyable.

The Three Fates feels like the polar opposite of Knife Edge, with it sounding like the band just decided to abandon all restraint and see how much punishment their instruments could take before they broke. What is created from this is a wonderfully chaotic instrumental that switches between mildly dull to downright awesome, the latter being much more prominent in the third movement of the song, and at the very least, it's simply more proof that Keith Emerson is incredible on his respecitve instruments (if it was somehow not already extremely obvious from everything else here), but once again, the song could have used a bit of trimming. Tank is definitely an interesting song, having some of the greatest instrumental interplay that the band has ever composed in my opinion, with an amazing driving energy behind it. The issue here is that once again, the excessive, pompous side of the band ends up getting the better of it in the form of a 2 minute drum solo which becomes almost painfully dull by the end. I honestly want a version of this song with a shortened version of the drum solo, as this would otherwise be one of my absolute favourite songs by the band if not for how much the energy is ruined. Lucky Man is definitely a beautiful track and one that I can quite easily see how it became the most popular, well known song by the band, as it's peacful, melodic, and absolutely beautiful. There is nowhere near the same amount of chaos and intensity as previous songs, but does close off in a way that sums up the whole album very well, with a poorly conceived moog solo that disrupts the beauty, although the song is still incredible despite this.

Overall, while 5 of the 6 songs on this album are good overall (Take A Pebble, not so much), almost all of them are flawed in the same general way, with the exception of The Barbarian. Each of them could have used further editing and polishing to make for some really great listening, as the songs all have incredible potential in one way or another. As it stands though, while I do really enjoy listening to this album, I often end up becoming mildly irritated at the many flaws it has, which is definitely enough for me to knock this down to 3 stars. I'd highly recommend this album to those who enjoy heavily classical influenced music and also can get behind a lot of excess. This is definitely their most restrained album of their peak material, which is honestly a good thing in certain respects when looking at some of their later efforts where they allowed their pretentiousness to go unchecked.

Best songs: The Barbarian, Knife Edge, Lucky Man

Weakest songs: Take A Pebble

Verdict: Highly technical, complex muwsic that has a habit of becoming too overtly complex for its own good. Songs can both have moments of genius, and moments of ill conceived noodling, but for the most part, it's an entertaining album overall, albeit very flawed in certain respects.

Data cached

Symphonic Prog bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
21. PERON Turkey
5BRIDGES Netherlands
7 OCEAN Belarus
ABBHAMA Indonesia
ABSTRACTION LAYER Brazil
ACCENT Romania
ACHE Denmark
ACUITY United States
AD ASTRA United States
ADVENTURE Norway
AETHER Brazil
AFTER CRYING Hungary
AFTER THE FIRE United Kingdom
AGNUS Argentina
AGNUS GRAAL Brazil
AIRLORD New Zealand
AJALON United States
AKACIA United States
ALAMEDA Spain
ALASKA United States
ALBATROSS United States
ALL TRAPS ON EARTH Sweden
ALMS Spain
ALPHA CENTAURY France
ALPHA III Brazil
ALTER ECHO Sweden
LEON ALVARADO United States
SERGIO ALVAREZ Argentina
AMAGRAMA Argentina
AMENOPHIS Germany
AMOS KEY Germany
ANABIS Germany
ANCIENT VISION United States
ANDERSON / STOLT Multi-National
ANDERSON BRUFORD WAKEMAN HOWE United Kingdom
ANGE France
ANGIPATCH France
ÄNGLAGÅRD Sweden
ANIMA Argentina
ANIMA DOMINUM Brazil
ANIMA MORTE Sweden
ANIMA MUNDI Cuba
ANOXIE France
ANTARES Germany
ANYONE'S DAUGHTER Germany
APHÉLANDRA France
APHRODITE'S CHILD Greece
APOCALYPSE Brazil
AQUAPLANAGE United Kingdom
ARABESQUE United States
ARACHNOID France
ARCABUZ Spain
ARION Brazil
ARS NOVA (JAP) Japan
ARS PRO VITA Brazil
ART IN AMERICA United States
ASA DE LUZ Brazil
XAVIER ASALI Mexico
ASIA MINOR Turkey
ASTRË United States
ASTURCON Spain
ATILA Spain
ATLANTIS PHILHARMONIC United States
ATLAS Sweden
ATMOSPHERA Israel
ATOLL France
AUTUMN United Kingdom
AUTUMN BREEZE Sweden
AVIVA (AVIVA OMNIBUS) Russia
AXCRAFT United States
AZABACHE Spain
BABYLON United States
BACAMARTE Brazil
BANAAU / HOLLOWSCENE Italy
BANANA Argentina
BANZAI Belgium
ZELJKO BEBEK AND PODIUM Yugoslavia
BEGGARS OPERA United Kingdom
ROBERT BERIAU Canada
ED BERNARD Canada
BLACK SEPTEMBER United States
BLAKULLA Sweden
BLANK MANUSKRIPT Austria
BLEZQI ZATSAZ Brazil
BLUE SHIFT United States
TOMAS BODIN Sweden
BONDAR & WISE United States
BOX OF SHAMANS United States
BILL BRESSLER United States
BRIMSTONE United States
BURNING CANDLE Germany
BUSKER Canada
CAFEINE France
CAI Spain
CAIRO United States
CAJA DE PANDORA Mexico
CAL Spain
CAMEL United Kingdom
LOS CANARIOS Spain
CANNABIS INDIA Germany
CARAVELA ESCARLATE Brazil
ALEX CARPANI BAND Italy
CAST Mexico
CATHEDRAL United States
CELLAR NOISE Italy
CHAKRA United States
CHALCEDONY United Kingdom
CHAOS CODE United States
CHRONOS MUNDI Brazil
JOSÉ CID Portugal
CINEMA Japan
CIRCLE Germany
THE CIRCLE PROJECT Spain
CIRKUS Canada
CITIZEN CAIN United Kingdom
CLAY GREEN'S POLYSORBATE MASQUERADE BAND United States
CLEARLIGHT France
CODA Netherlands
CÓDICE Mexico
COLLEGIUM MUSICUM Slovakia
COTO EN PEL Spain
COUSINS & CONRAD United Kingdom
COVENANT United States
CRACK Spain
CRAFT United Kingdom
CRESSIDA United Kingdom
CRONICO Mexico
CROOKED MOUTH United Kingdom
CRUCIBLE United States
CRUCIS Argentina
DAWN Switzerland
DEJA-VU Japan
DELUGE GRANDER United States
DIALOGUE (DAWN DIALOGUE) Russia
DIAPASAO Brazil
DISCIPLINE United States
DOGMA Brazil
DORACOR Italy
DOUG WOODS & COLIN POWELL United Kingdom
DR. COENOBITE Netherlands
DRAGONFLY Switzerland
DRAMA France
DRUCKFARBEN Canada
DRUID United Kingdom
EARTH AND FIRE Netherlands
EARTHRISE United States
ECCENTRIC ORBIT United States
ECHOLYN United States
ECLAT / ECLAT DE VERS France
ECLIPSE Brazil
EDEN Canada
EGGROLL Israel
EIK Iceland
ELLESMERE Italy
ELOHIM France
ELOITERON Switzerland
EMERSON LAKE & PALMER United Kingdom
REDJY EMOND Canada
ENGLAND United Kingdom
THE ENID United Kingdom
EPIDAURUS Germany
EPIGNOSIS United States
EPISODE United States
EQUILIBRIO VITAL Venezuela
ESPIRITU Argentina
ESTRUCTURA Venezuela
ETCETERA Denmark
ÉTERNITÉ Canada
ETHOS United States
EVERFRIEND United States
EX-VAGUS France
EXODE France
EXODUS Poland
EZRA WINSTON Italy
FAITHFUL BREATH Germany
FALLING EDGE Canada
FANTASY United Kingdom
FARMHOUSE ODYSSEY United States
JAROD FEDELE United States
FICCION Venezuela
FINCH Netherlands
FIREBALLET United States
FIRST+AID United Kingdom
FLAGSHIP Sweden
FLAME DREAM Switzerland
FLAMING BESS Germany
THE FLOWER KINGS Sweden
FLÜGHT Mexico
FLYTE Belgium
FOCUS Netherlands
FOREVER TWELVE United States
THE FOUNDATION Sweden
FRÁGIL Peru
FRIGHT PIG United States
FROMAGE Japan
FRUUPP Ireland
FUSONIC Netherlands
G.A.L.F. Brazil
GALASPHERE 347 Multi-National
GALIE Mexico
GENESIS United Kingdom
GENS DE LA LUNE France
THE GIFT United Kingdom
GLASS United States
GLASS HAMMER United States
GÒTIC Spain
GOVEA Mexico
GRACIOUS United Kingdom
GRANADA Spain
GRAND STAND Sweden
GRANDBELL Brazil
GREENSLADE United Kingdom
GREYFIELD Spain
GROBSCHNITT Germany
SHAUN GUERIN United States
GUILDENSTERN Germany
HALLOWEEN France
HANDS United States
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