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SYMPHONIC PROG

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Symphonic Prog definition

Symphonic is without doubt the sub-genre that includes†the most bands in Progressive Rock because for many people it's almost synonymous classic Prog, something†easy to understand being that†most of the†classic and/or †pioneer†bands†released music that could be included in this sub-genre, except JETHRO TULL and PINK FLOYD (who still blended some symphonic elements), even KING CRIMSON who very soon expanded their horizons to more experimental music, made their debut with a Symphonic album, "In the Court of the Crimson King" which is a cornerstone in the development of the genre.

The main characteristics of Symphonic are the ones that defined all Progressive Rock: (There's nothing 100% new under the sun) which among others are:
  • Mixture of elements from different genres.
  • Complex time signatures.
  • Lush keyboards.
  • Explorative and intelligent lyrics, in some cases close to fantasy literature, Sci Fi and even political issues.
  • Non commercial approach
  • Longer format of songs

In this specific case the main characteristic is the influence of Classical music (understood as Orchestral works created from the late Gothic to Modern Classical) using normally more complex structure than other related sub-genres like Neo Progressive (That's why sometimes the borderline that divides Symphonic from Neo is so unclear being that is based mostly in a degree of complexity rather than in an evident structural difference)..It is easy to find long keyboard solos reminiscent of Johan Sebastian Bach or melodic works that could have been written by†Handel.

As in any other genre, different Symphonic bands had different approaches to Classical music, for example YES and GENESIS are mainly influenced by the Baroque and Classical periods, while EMERSON LAKE & PALMER has a predilection for post Romantic and modern authors like Mussorgsky, Rimsky Korsakov, Bartok or Ginastera, being†that†their sound†is less melodic and more aggressive.

The peak of the genre starts in 1969 and lasts until the mid/late 70's† (more precisely until the release of A Trick of the Tail), when the genre begins to† blend more mainstream influences that took to the birth of Neo Progressive (a new approach for a new decade).


It†is important to remember that even though the creative peak of Symphonic Progressive†ended before the 80's,†we can find†a†second birth†in the 90's coming from the Scandinavian countries (specially Sweden with ANGLAGARD or PAR LINDH PROJECT) and even bands that still in the 21st Century recreate music from this period like SPOCK'S BEARD or ECHOLYN.

Before ending this short description I feel necessary to say (In order to be strictly accurate) that the term Symphonic is not 100% exact, because†these†bands†very rarely†played symphonies and was†probably used because the music that influenced the genre was†performed by Symphony Orchestras, but†it is†so†widely accepted†by the Progressive Rock community that†would be absurd and futile for†anybody to†attempt a change after so much time.

IvŠn Melgar Morey, Peru 2006



Symphonic Team

Current Team as at 09/07/17

IvŠn Melgar Morey (IvŠn_Melgar_M)
Anton Fritz (SouthSideoftheSky)
RdtProg (Louis)

Symphonic Prog Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Symphonic Prog | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.68 | 4856 ratings
CLOSE TO THE EDGE
Yes
4.65 | 4493 ratings
SELLING ENGLAND BY THE POUND
Genesis
4.61 | 3899 ratings
FOXTROT
Genesis
4.46 | 3869 ratings
FRAGILE
Yes
4.42 | 3434 ratings
NURSERY CRYME
Genesis
4.41 | 2932 ratings
MIRAGE
Camel
4.39 | 2499 ratings
MOONMADNESS
Camel
4.38 | 3331 ratings
RELAYER
Yes
4.36 | 1814 ratings
HYBRIS
ńnglagŚrd
4.31 | 3165 ratings
THE YES ALBUM
Yes
4.30 | 3224 ratings
THE LAMB LIES DOWN ON BROADWAY
Genesis
4.30 | 2495 ratings
THE SNOW GOOSE
Camel
4.28 | 2825 ratings
A TRICK OF THE TAIL
Genesis
4.32 | 1346 ratings
SCHEHERAZADE AND OTHER STORIES
Renaissance
4.35 | 804 ratings
FROM SILENCE TO SOMEWHERE
Wobbler
4.24 | 2264 ratings
EMERSON LAKE & PALMER
Emerson Lake & Palmer
4.29 | 906 ratings
DEPOIS DO FIM
Bacamarte
4.26 | 1146 ratings
VILJANS ÷GA
ńnglagŚrd
4.25 | 1092 ratings
HAMBURGER CONCERTO
Focus
4.23 | 1245 ratings
LEFTOVERTURE
Kansas

Symphonic Prog overlooked and obscure gems albums new


Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Symphonic Prog experts team

SKRYVANIA
Skryvania
TALES FROM AN ISLAND - IMPRESSIONS FROM RAPA NUI
Blank Manuskript
WELCOME TO THE FREAKROOM
Shadow Circus
POLLEN
Pollen

Latest Symphonic Prog Music Reviews


 Snow Live by SPOCK'S BEARD album cover DVD/Video, 2017
4.64 | 46 ratings

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Snow Live
Spock's Beard Symphonic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars It was one of the biggest shocks to hit the early 2000s prog scene: no sooner had Spock's Beard released Snow, an ambitious double concept album, band leader Neal Morse (who had composed a substantial majority of their material to date - including almost all of Snow) quit. His declared reason at the time was that he wanted to focus his time on making solo work exploring his religious beliefs, and didn't think it would be right to expect the band to follow him down that particular rabbithole; as he would later allude to on the Testimony 2 concept album, a health scare involving his young daughter may well have prompted him to want to pull out of band projects altogether and stay at home more. Ambitious plans to perform Snow live were shelved, never to see fulfillment...

...until 2016, that is. After shocking the prog world by quitting all his existing band projects in 2002, Neal shocked it again in 2009 by returning to band work, reforming Transatlantic. Between that, the brand new Flying Colors project, and The Neal Morse Band (in which, despite the name, songwriting duties are shared much more evenly than on Neal's solo albums), it became evident that Neal was now comfortable with working as part of a band again, even on projects which didn't have an overt, explicitly stated Christian focus.

He'd even make appearances with Spock's Beard, joining them onstage at a festival or two and even making contributions to the Brief Nocturnes and Dreamless Sleep album, though being careful to be credited as a guest rather than a full member of the band. This was a classy move, because that album was the debut of Ted Leonard as the group's full-time frontman (after filling in for a departing Nick D'Virgilio on some live gigs), and it's clear that whilst Neal was happy to stop by to help out, he was also humble enough not to upstage the new singer right when he needed that spotlight.

Snow Live, however, represents perhaps the biggest and most significant reunion of Neal and Spock's Beard to date: a full live performance of the album, performed at Morsefest. (Morsefest is Neal's homegrown fan convention, a bit like his version of Marillion's weekend bashes - one likes to think of him chatting with his Transatlantic bandmate Pete Trewavas between takes in the studio, picking his brains about the logistics of running such things.) This consists of the full Snow epic, plus two encores - old favourite June and Falling Forever, a track previously recorded by Neal and Spock's Beard for the First Twenty Years compilation album.

Inevitably, such an undertaking involves Neal being prominently featured front and centre - a de facto reunion, even if just for this show (and a repeat in Europe a short while later). Snow was an extremely personal concept for him - it's basically him working through his feelings about quitting the band before he actually quit the band, he wrote almost all the music and lyrics, that's just inevitable.

Nonetheless, Neal and the band do a grand job of making the show less about Neal coming back and acting as frontman for one more night, and more about a celebration of the band's entire history. Far from sitting this one out, Ted Leonard is included in the show, the group doing a fine job of finding ways for him to contribute some lead performances as well as assisting with the backing vocals where it would serve the concept to do so. Likewise, Nick D'Virgilio came back for this gig, with the band using a two-drummer setup to allow him and Jimmy Keegan to play together, and he also contributes some vocals too in keeping with his role of frontman for the run of albums between Neal leaving and Ted Leonard joining.

(Having multiple vocalists on hand, in fact, turns out to be not just a bonus, but essential - after all, as with much early Spock's Beard stuff, there's some moments where they get into intricately intertwined vocals reminiscent of some of Gentle Giant's experiments in that vein; you might be able to do that solo in a studio by multi-tracking your voice, but you need a bunch of vocalists on hand to do that live!)

In other words, the album doesn't just include Neal Morse playing with Spock's Beard again - it also includes every single person who'd been an official member of Spock's Beard on a studio album up to this point. (Original bassist John Ballard isn't on it, but John was only in the band fairly briefly, departing before they recorded The Light.) The result is a performance of Snow which is somewhat warmer than the chilly title implies - and it works an absolute treat. Some credit has to be given to the delightful acoustics of the venue - it's Neal's local church, which gives the whole thing a nice, intimate sound, and on the whole I actually think the resulting performance sounds better than the rather clean, precisely-produced studio album.

The execution is absolutely spot on; despite the fact that neither Spock's Beard nor Neal's solo backing bands have performed all this material like this, they really nail it, like they've been playing this setlist regularly since Snow originally released. Or perhaps it sounds even better than that - maybe letting the material sit fallow for this long gave Neal and the group the appetite to really get their teeth into it now this wonderful opportunity had arisen. The fact that they deliberately only planned to play this show a very limited number of times, rather than doing a full Spock's Beard And Neal Morse Play Snow tour, might have also added a certain helpful frisson - nothing like knowing that you've got limited chances to get this right to focus the mind!

Of course, it'd be foolish to write off the possibility that Neal and Spock's Beard will perform this set again in future, or otherwise collaborate again - the very existence of this live album proves that all bets are off and "never say never" should be one's motto. But at the same time, if this is the last major collaboration between the two parties and it's just occasional guest appearances on a song here and there from here on out, this is a magnificent way for the Neal Morse-fronted incarnation of Spock's Beard to bow out, and does a fantastic job of providing the closure we never got back in 2002.

 The Single Factor by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 1982
2.65 | 552 ratings

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The Single Factor
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

2 stars The most commercial album by Camel and rightly so quite a disappointment for traditional progressive rock Camel fans. Latimer opened up to contemporary pop and mixed some progressive elements in it. Call it radio-friendly but it's not a shameful sell-out. From a pop/rock perspective, there are great moments here, especially for more introspective-oriented listeners. Singing goes best when it's not Latimer but another guest vocalist. Keyboards on some tracks are surprisingly retro Hammond whereas we hear introspective synths a la Genesis, listen to "Heroes".

Apart from the instrumental tracks, the ballads are another standout, the poignant "Heroes" that reminds of Alan Parsons Project just with a more traditional instrumentation. Of the two normal instrumental tracks, "Sasquatch" is the closest to a previous era Camel led by decent guitar.

The second half of the album is less inspired but without a hook or two and the emotional end by "A heart's desire" and "End peace" are pleasing.

Overall, this album cannot be recommended as a standout to neither pop/rock nor prog fans.

 Archive Collections: Volume I & Volume II by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2022
4.05 | 3 ratings

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Archive Collections: Volume I & Volume II
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The compilations of archive material can be frustrating, but it also depends very much on how to represent it. I certainly feel a special sympathy for this five-disc set of Anthony Phillips. Basically, as the title reveals, it brings together The Archive Collection Volume One (1998) and Archive Collection Volume 2 (2004) but goes beyond that. On the other hand, it's worth pointing out that I wasn't in advance familiar with those compilations, so this expanded set was all "new" to me and my reception may be much warmer than of someone already familiar with the original Archive Collections. Everything on them were previously unreleased, and so is the case with the extra material discovered from Ant's attic in more recent years. Of course the words "previously unreleased" refer, in several cases, to these particular versions -- demos, alternative mixes -- of tracks from Ant's studio albums, but there are plenty of previously unheard compositions as well. For each track there's a background information in the 60-page leaflet. Because of such huge quantity, I choose not to deal much with details in a track-by-track approach. And it's extraordinary how good the overall sonic quality is. Only a few tracks with the emphasis on the historic interest sound less clear.

As we all know, Phillips left Genesis in 1970 and released his debut album The Geese and the Ghost in 1977. Much of the material dates from the years in between and thus helps the listener to form a picture of his initial years and the development as a solo musician. Those Genesis afficionados who have a sweet tooth for the pastoral nature of the band's music (up to, say, 1977) will be delighted by a great deal of what's heard here. It's evident that Anthony Phillips was a crucial original member in shaping the sound and style of Genesis. [In his career he's often questioned about sounding so much like Genesis, and that must have been extremely frustrating for him!] Ant's music is most often instrumental solo pieces for either guitar or piano or other keyboards. These pieces often have the same pastoral feel as one can hear embedded in Genesis' more complex prog compositions. By the way, 'F Sharp' demo from 1969 that Ant recorded on 12-string with Mike Rutherford on bass and Richard Macphail on tambourine contains elements later used in 'The Musical Box'.

Volume One originally had just one full-length disc and only four tracks on the second disc. Here the second disc is expanded to 70 minutes. There are both completely unheard pieces and alternative mixes or demos of album tracks (from The Geese and the Ghost, Wise After the Event, Sides). For example: guitars only mix of 'Henry Goes to War', initial orchestral run-through of 'Regrets' and an instrumental mix of 'Greenhouse'. These moments of familiar stuff are happily in minority after all. The disc ends with a real surprise: a rock'n'roll song 'Pennsylvania Flickhouse' demoed by Ant's pre-Genesis Charterhouse group The Anon in 1966. Five pages of the booklet deal with The Anon. A rare history lesson!

Volume Two was a full 127-minute 2-disc set originally. The fifth disc on this box set is devoted to a previously unreleased project, titled "The Masquerade Tapes", and textwise this is by far the lengthiest part in the booklet. In 1979 Kit Williams released Masquerade, using the picture book format in a new innovative way. In the wake of the book's success there was an idea of a musical adaptation. Rupert Hine started working on it, helped by Ant, but soon Hine was too busy as a producer and Ant continued making music on his own. The 15-part suite recorded mainly in 1980-81 is all composed and played by Ant. Musically it's a very nice addition to the box set. Instrumental, apart from a beautiful song sung by Lindsey Moore.

In short, this finely edited box set is a cornucopia that really deepens the picture of this fascinating musician. I personally would have enjoyed a chronological order too, but that's not a big deal.

 The Concerts in Japan by ENGLAND album cover Live, 2022
4.04 | 4 ratings

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The Concerts in Japan
England Symphonic Prog

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars The re-formed Symphonic Prog insider tip ENGLAND played two gigs at the famous rock venue Club Citta in Kawasaki, Tokyo, on the 8th + 9th July 2006. Initially available as a digital album solely, this one covers the original live recordings, remastered and extended to a twelve track item. Now in September 2022 the German NuMusi label have added this one to their portfolio. They are offering a double CD digipak that includes a 16 page booklet with extensive notes and background information about the concerts, the band, the instruments and illustrations by mastermind Robert Webb (keyboards, guitar, vocals). The line up also comprises founding member Martin Henderson (bass, vocals) as well as Alec Johnson (guitar, vocals), Steve Laffy (drums), and finally Maggie Alexander (vocals, keyboards). The art work on the other hand was contributed by ... well, Ed Unitsky, who really wonders?

During more than one and a half hours the band celebrate their song material in a very good mood and weight. And this includes their most important effort, the complete debut suite 'Garden Shed' from 1977, a highly praised item in prog circles. As expected from a live gig it all sounds consistent, rounded, although the vocals are not always perfectly to the point. The manifold keyboards, including Mellotron, are the real sensation. And yeah, you won't miss the mandatory drum solo on Open Up. For some time Masters Of War - later appearing on the 2017 album 'Book Circles' - runs like a relatively simple Boggie Woogie track. Though towards the end it will turn into a prog expression more and more. What especially appeals is the extract of the long track Imperial Hotel, a free give away issue that explicitly was produced for the Japan gigs. Or the closing Nanogram that comes with slight Supertramp and Renaissance leanings. I wholeheartedly recommend to be concerned with this awesome production.

 Close to the Edge by YES album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.68 | 4856 ratings

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Close to the Edge
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by AFlowerKingCrimson

5 stars This month marks the 50th anniversary of Close To The Edge. This was the fifth studio release by Yes, their third to feature guitarist Steve Howe, their second to feature keyboardist Rick Wakeman, and their last to feature original drummer Bill Bruford (who soon left to join Robert Fripp in a new version of King Crimson). Rounding out the lineup are Chris Squire on bass and Jon Anderson taking lead vocal duties. At this point the band had achieved major critical and commercial success with the release of the album Fragile which was their first to feature cover art by renowned artist Roger Dean. The song, Roundabout, which has since become a classic rock staple was released as a single and helped the album to become a big seller (eventually selling two million copies in the US alone). Close To The Edge would also become a big selling album(although without a top forty single like Fragile) and would be the second album to feature the Squire, Anderson, Howe, Wakeman and Bruford lineup. This same lineup minus Chris Squire would form the band ABWH (Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe) way later on but that's a whole other story.

The album Close To The Edge starts with the title track which begins with the sounds of a river complete with water sounds and birds. Apparently Jon Anderson found a tape with nature sounds and wanted to incorporate it into the band's work. The nature sounds soon give way to a blast of sound with the band, propelled by Squire's loud thumping bass and Steve Howe's fluid guitar work. Until the album relayer which came out two years later this section would probably be the bands most fusion sounding section in any of their music. After a few minutes of intense instrumental fireworks the piece settles down a bit and the vocals kick in (not counting the wordless vocals that appear during the instrumental part). Now we hear the main theme of the track. At some point after the vocal section this track gets really quiet and dreamy as if the band not only went close to the edge but over it and we are now floating dreamily in the river. We can hear what sounds like water drops and synth sounds. Vocals eventually kick in and then after that we are back to the main theme again but this time with a funky groove followed by a dexterous Rick Wakeman organ solo (which along with the one in Roundabout is one of his best). Eventually, the vocals kick in again and we are back to the original them again with the "seasons will pass you by.." lyric which eventually takes us back to the river sounds again which close out the title track. This is one of the most sublime side long epics in all of progressive rock.

Next up is "And You And I" which makes up half of side two. This one starts with acoustic guitar (with Steve Howe saying "OK"). Before too long we hear Chris Squire's thumping bass and then the vocals kick in. This track is one of the most orchestral sounding Yes songs that was done without an orchestra. The song is highlighted by a big mellotron crescendo but the whole song is arguably the best track on the album (and of their career). If this song doesn't move you then no progressive rock song ever will.

The third and final track on the album is "Siberian Khatru." This one starts out with electric guitar before kicking into high gear. At around one minute and five seconds the vocals kick in and then at around three minutes and five seconds an electric sitar can be heard and then a harpsichord solo and then a soaring guitar solo and then another guitar solo before the vocals kick in again. Towards the end we hear what sounds like wordless vocals that might be one of the strangest moments in Yes music up to that point in their career. It could be a bit jarring for those who aren't used to such a thing but it also gives the song an other worldy element that shows how adventurous and outlandish sounding the band could be (of course the relayer album would be even more wild). At the end we hear another Steve Howe guitar solo that gives his playing an almost 3-D kind of effect (that is if 3-D could be applied to music). This concludes the album.

While Close To The Edge is probably not my personal favorite album by Yes (that would be Relayer) it is their most iconic and widely considered (and rightly so) to be one of the quintessential albums in the history of progressive rock. All you need to do is go to the wikipedia page for this album to see all the accolades it has received over the years. Of course there really is no "best" prog rock album because everyone has their own personal taste but this one is an album that will possibly only become more legendary as time goes on.

 Kaleidoscope by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.84 | 661 ratings

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Kaleidoscope
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Before Kaleidoscope we hadn't really had what you could call a "business as usual" Transatlantic album. The debut saw them not having gelled yet as a group, Bridge Across Forever found them delivering a more cohesive sound and later took on extra weight due to immediately preceding the hiatus of the band, and The Whirlwind was not just the return of Transatlantic, but also a return of Neal Morse to working as a part of band projects.

Since then, Neal seems to have found a new balance between his turning out his overtly Christian-themed solo work on the one hand and participating in bands whose music have less specifically religion themes on the other hand; after The Whirlwind he'd also crop up in Flying Colours and make guest appearances live and in the studio with Spock's Beard.

With Neal's creativity spread out like this, one might expect him to take a back seat compositionally speaking - reserving his most Transatlantic-like ideas for this, using other ideas on projects better suited to them, and giving his other bandmates room to contribute. Certainly, it's hard to judge what proportion of the music is contributed by which band member on Transatlantic releases, since they generally share the credit communally - but I certainly hear more of The Flower Kings on here than I remember on previous albums, suggesting that Roine Stolt's quirky, sometimes Zappa-influenced approach to prog had a particularly big influence this time around. (He also sings lead on Black As the Sky and certain other sections.)

It's not that the other members are absent here - far from it. Neal's combination of uplifting, soaring crescendos, lyrics which you can read a Christian meaning into if you want but don't have to, and nods to the 1960s pop scene that early prog grew out of are all here too, Portnoy and Trewavas are still pulling their weight in the rhythm section, this might be a Kaleidoscope but it isn't a revolution in the band's sound.

Since their reunion, Transatlantic haven't exactly been cranking out albums at a massive rate - part of that is probably down to everyone having day jobs with other musical projects to balance, of course, but to my ears it seems like they're also trying to make sure that each Transatlantic release is a little special. As I said at the start of this review, they hadn't put out a "business as usual" album before this one - and they don't do it this time either.

 The Oblivion Particle by SPOCK'S BEARD album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.87 | 361 ratings

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The Oblivion Particle
Spock's Beard Symphonic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars The second studio album of the Ted Leonard era of Spock's Beard finds the band exploring another fresh blend of prog sounds. Minion, for instance, starts out by reminding me of what might happen if Kansas ended up jamming with Jadis, with a combination of harmony vocals, sunny neo-prog guitar lines and synth - but then adds in jazzy drum fills and heavier moments to shake up that combination just as I think I've got it figured out. Much of the rest of the album is the same - there's a deeper, richer bench of influences than just the usual touchstones that retro-prog bands often go to time and time again, and the new subtlety and sophistication in how the band blend them together showcased on Brief Nocturnes and Dreamless Sleep continues to surprise.

As foundational as the Neal Morse era was for Spock's Beard, I think it only produced two absolutely top-tier classics (The Light and V), with the other albums of the era being good - often very good - but a little patchier. As for the Nick D'Virgilio era of the band - well, I think Nick was no slouch and did a fine job of stepping into the lead vocalist role under challenging circumstances. However, there's no getting around the fact that the band had to switch from a mode where Neal Morse was composing most of their material to one where they needed to all pitch in more to get those songs pieced together - and while they quickly righted the ship, none of the Nick-fronted albums quite hit the five-star tier.

This Ted Leonard era of the band, however... that's got me intrigued. Brief Nocturnes and Dreamless Sleep I thought was the band's first five-star classic since V - in fact, I sneakily think it was better than that - and I actually think this one has the edge on it, not least because Ted Leonard gets to show more personality. (Mental note: revisit the Enchant back catalogue, this Ted guy's clearly got something good going on.) The centre of gravity of the album puts me in mind of a somewhat more avant-garde take on Crucible, whose Tall Tales so deftly mashed up the approach of Trick of the Tail-era Genesis and classic Kansas back in 1997.

 Close to the Edge by YES album cover Studio Album, 1972
4.68 | 4856 ratings

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Close to the Edge
Yes Symphonic Prog

Review by Dapper~Blueberries

5 stars So in a Google doc, I have written 99 reviews so far. 99 is the number of albums I have rated and reviewed. I have reviewed albums in the past, many albums in fact, but I never got seriously dedicated to the craft until I decided to review Neroli by Brian Eno. That was when I found a big passion for myself, and so I started this passion project to share my opinion out there with the world. I cannot believe it has gotten this big in almost a year, and it seems to never be stopping any time soon. Likewise, this reflects a bit of my musical journey. I got into music during my Freshman year of high school and honestly, it all changed my life. I know it sounds silly but I got really into music and bands through the Japanese manga known as JoJo's Bizarre Adventure. That manga did things for me, and the author, Hirohiko Araki managed to introduce me to a world of music that I never thought imaginable. However, one music genre stood out for me, and that was Progressive Rock.

You see, I was not always a big Prog head as I am now. I pretty much had no real musical knowledge outside of video game music and the occasional Imagine Dragons songs that I would listen to sparingly in my middle school years. However something clicked in me when I first heard a song that every Prog head in the world knows by heart, and that was The Court Of The Crimson King by King Crimson, specifically The Condensed 21st Century Guide compilation album version. It was different for me, and probably so many others. It was music that I never even knew could've been made. It was weird, almost inconceivable. I could never fully grasp what it was that I loved about it, but because of that first listening experience, everything shifted. It felt like a door opened in my mind that allowed me to be adventurous in my musical landscape. Those mellotrons, Greg Lake's vocals, Robert Fripp's guitar, all of it made me realize what I truly love in life, and that was music. Progressive Rock, at that point in my life, was practically unknown to me, but everything changed thanks to King Crimson. I decided to listen to the full album that song was on and it all blew me away. At first, I didn't get it, but over time I realized how amazing this style of music was. I became instantly hooked. I decided to binge all of King Crimson's discography, and get attached to the new lineups and sounds the band introduced. It was new yet I still felt like I was in Crimson territory. After listening to those albums, I was still left hungry. I wanted more of those rich symphonic, that awesome jazz flavors, and highly advanced levels of experimentation. I wanted it all and then some.

Therefore I decided to check out some bands, for example, Gentle Giant and Pink Floyd. Gentle Giant has and always will be a bit of an enigma for me, even after hearing their first album and their subsequent releases throughout my life somehow they never worked up to me that King Crimson did, even though I like the commonality between those two bands' first albums being a dude's ugly mug. However, Pink Floyd did work their way into my heart with Meddle. I heard of Dark Side and Piper before, but Meddle was when I realized that Prog is more than just classically enriched rock music, it could be more space-like, atmospheric, and a lot more psychedelic. Everything felt so right, I started to check out artists like Rush, Jethro Tull, Frank Zappa, Emerson Lake, and Palmer. I loved it all, the entire scope of progressive rock, the longer stretches of music, the experimentation, to everything around it. It all became my bread and butter, so safe to say that I would fall into an attachment to Yes pretty early on right? Well sort of.

Yes, and I have had an interesting relationship. In my early years of music, I knew who they were, and I knew about Roundabout and Owner Of A Lonely Heart, but nothing much beyond that. However, that would all change during the Spring break of last year. I and my dad went on a road trip, and one of the stops was a record store. I was at the time into collecting records, and I still am now, so going into one always gave me excitement. I was like a kid going to the toy store all over again. I was browsing through the shelves, finding and seeing what caught my interest. Anything to pique the interest of the mind of an intermediate Prog head. I was looking for In The Court of the Crimson King since I was in a King Crimson phase in which I would listen to nothing but King Crimson, minus the occasional Pink Floyd and Gentle Giant songs in the mix. I was looking for the album, but when luck failed, I decided to look elsewhere. I wanted something good, something nice to listen to, and while at the used section, I shifted through the alphabet, from A to Y. I saw some neat albums, cannot remember them though, but I know they looked interesting, but not interesting enough to pick up in physical format, maybe stream. That was until I found something that caught my attention. It was weird. I picked it up, and the cover immediately struck me. It was a black and green cover, with the words "Close To The Edge" and "Yes" on it. I could only know it was a Yes album by the title alone, but something felt different from this album. Something about it made me want to get it. I don't know if it was hope driving me, or intrigue, but I got the album, plus a copy of Red by King Crimson they had.

Fast forward to the last day of Spring break and I have listened to my copy of Red a couple of times, and I haven't given that mysterious green album a go, so I figured it was a good time to see what it was all about. When the first track started to play, I felt weird. I did not know what I was expecting but it struck me as extremely odd. I did not know if I could process or even want to process what the rest had in store, so I turned off the record player and put the album back on the shelf. Tomorrow at school, I couldn't shake that first few seconds out of my head. It felt like the album was beckoning me, like some spiritual thing calling towards me. After school, I decided to give it a full listen-through, and at first, I still didn't know what to think. My mind did not know what to make of it, but I did know I liked it, and so throughout I would occasionally listen to it. The more I heard it the more I got out of it, but it still never clicked for me. That was until after another listening section, something snapped into place in my mind, and it felt like a third eye was opened. I never realized it then, but looking back on it now that was when I truly became the progressive rock lover I am today. That feeling of realization of how godly this album was euphoric, and even today, a little remnant of that feeling lingers whenever I hear this album.

It all starts with the title track, first and foremost. I have heard this numerous, heck even countless times. Can you blame me though? This 18-minute ensemble of 4 brilliantly executed pieces has gone on to become the best song I have heard in my life. The first movement of The Solid Time Of Change is where we get the first movements of greatness. It starts with this slowly rising field recording of birds chirping as it all bellows out into these strange and wobbly guitars, bass, and drums. That soon goes through these beautiful crescendos that dip into obscurity, only to be reborn anew. The rebirth of these instruments goes into a strange mix of surf rock, reggae, and progressive rock that is mixed perfectly with how well each member's playing styles are. Steve Howe on guitar plays the magic, having a distinct and recognizable style. The late Chris Squire on bass, creating rhythm in the void and subsequently establishing himself into the sound to become one with it. Bill Bruford, is delicate, but precise, and has the most complex yet incredibly provocative drumming. Rick Wakeman on keyboards sets the atmosphere and is symphonic, showing off that classical charm Yes is known for. Lastly is the start of the show, Jon Anderson, with his beautiful vocals setting the entire mood going forward with amazing harmonies, and a unique singing voice that resonates through me. This part revolves around these big choruses that the listener will have to get used to through the album, and they are the best parts here, being necessary viewing points in every retrospect.

The second part of this suite comes in as Total Mass Retain, where it continues what the last part did, but in a way where it is noticeable to the listener that something new will happen. Chris Squire's bass is chunky and full, and Jon's voice is a lot more echoey. It all feels a bit more sinister, but still very much like Yes. When you expect a normal chorus, you get hit with a rhythmic array of randomly mishmashed versions of "Close to the edge, round/down by the corner/river" until it all goes back around to The Solid Time of Change where it goes back to normal, or as normal as it can be. It feels so new yet still feeling as though it is a part of one song, one stream of music as a whole. No matter what, Yes is a band that knows what they are doing, and when they do not you can tell, but when they do they create some of the greatest music to ever come out of a record. They are consistent in their changing tides, but consistent in their sound as well, straying slightly from the path to reach new ones.

However the most strikingly profound part is I Get Up, I Get Down. It all goes quiet, with a few atmospheric guitars and keyboard playing from Rick Wakeman and Steve Howe. Everything is now purely space-like, with no drums, no rock elements, just pure bliss throughout. Jon's vocals here drive us forward, having this dream-like charm to them until interrupted by soul-piercingly sharp organs. When I heard this part, I thought it was kind of weird, and sort of dumb, but I was an idiot then, and now I see what this part means. It is a beautiful piece of art, one where at first you might think of it as annoying, or pretentious. While those claims may be true in some regard, especially towards Rick Wakeman, I feel like people often get the wrong view of what this type of music is. It isn't trying to show off, but rather it tries to shove you in and let you embrace what it truly is, and that is art. You might not fully get a painting, but if you see it numerous times, it will bind to you like permanent ink. This part is beautiful as the piece of art it truly is.

Lastly is the fourth part Seasons of Man, as if reprises the first two parts we get a repeat of sorts from the birth, death, and rebirth of the very same intro the song had in the beginning, however things feel different, it feels more developed, more nuanced. It was almost like the last part was the band reflecting and understanding what to do next, and that was to have a similar, yet different instrumentation compared to their first parts. This all comes to the forefront for the best closure a song could ever ask for. How they start to play the chorus, but things feel different. I felt like you went on a journey, and your reward is in spades of glory. How it builds into this beautiful finale where Jon just belts out into this beautiful harmony as the band plays at their maximum efficiency. It all feels so right, so perfect, so godly. It is just euphoria in song form, it is more than just that, my words could never describe how profoundly provocative this is to hear, no matter if you hear it through a streaming service, a vinyl record, or a CD. It all still feels amazing to hear, even more than amazing, it makes you feel like you are floating because it is that good. It is a song that alone would make this album an all-time masterpiece, however, the band did not stop there.

Side 2's first song, And You And I are on the same level of godly power that Close To The Edge holds, but in a different aspect. The song is a lot more folk-like, and while it does still retain some symphonic qualities, it does harken back to the band's first three albums, being a lot more psychedelic and baroque. It is a mixture of something like The Clap, Time and a Word, and even a tiny bit of Survival, mixed into one 10-minute song. You can feel the band's energy in this song and it is glorious. The more Celtic feel makes this song almost nostalgic in a way. The song reminds me of the fall season, orange leaves falling to the ground, colder winds, and drinking delicious pumpkin-flavored beverages. This song encapsulates all that for me, and it allows itself to be different but stands on its own two feet as another immaculate song from this album.

We round things off with Siberian Khatru, and this song is definitely the most different track from the bunch, but it still lands a soft place in my heart. This song is just a good ol' time. It is a lot more rock-focused, but you can still hear that Yes sound dripping through it. This is where I think Steve Howe and Chris Squire are at their best. You can hear the care and think put into each strum of their guitars as you are pushed into a whirlwind of an awesome jam. Those two have become an essential part of Yes' sound, and for good reason, because they are godly on their respective instruments. Everyone else on here is still on their highest common denominator, all of them are at a 10 even after making 2 big songs. It seems like they cannot be stopped, but time doesn't last forever. My only gripe with this album has to be that it doesn't last an eternity, but everything else is so divine that I am left satisfied either way.

This album has been in my heart for a good 2 years now, and I do not think it'll get out of there anytime soon. It is an album that'll live on in the next centuries, long after I am gone, but I know it'll live on in some shape or way because music like this is eternal even if it is merely 37 minutes long. If anything the power this album holds on me is greater than none, and I would not have it any other way. Coincidentally enough I am writing this review on the album's 50th anniversary, and I am as surprised as you are to hear that this album is now 50 years old. That is insane, and people still talk about it today. It shows that good music lasts with you, but truly great music lasts forever. No matter how many times I put that record needle on my vinyl copy, I am always swept off my feet.

 The Red Planet by WAKEMAN, RICK album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.81 | 196 ratings

BUY
The Red Planet
Rick Wakeman Symphonic Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Yet another Rick Wakeman album (it has become quite impossible to track down how many solo releases the keyboard wizard has, but this one would around the eightieth, I believe). What is there to say about it? A seasoned veteran who has achieved everything, and has really done everything in his career, is desiring to have some fun, releasing a collection of grandiose keyboard compositions, with the help of other very well-rounded and experienced musicians (billed as the English Rock Ensemble). All fine, as Wakeman is proposing a fiesta of the full possibilities of modern technology, adopting a myriad of sounds, and playing around with his set of innumerable keyboards to deliver these songs that are said to make up a concept album about 'The Red Planet'.

I consider this record a great and enjoyable sit-down listen, if you will to have a slice of keyboard wizardry, or just get that retro 70s feel, when the instrumental prog rock album was a thing, and people loved it - but 'The Red Planet' could not and does not bring much to the table. Rick Wakeman is doing what he does best in creating explosive and mind-blowing pieces on his keys, but we have all heard that in full bloom four decades ago (and he has not stopped doing it ever since!) Some do consider this a masterpiece, and I also consider it a must-listen for prog rock and especially Rick Wakeman fans, but this is not universally compelling, or a genre-bending masterpiece, it is simply a very good instrumental album that is fun, well-written and perfectly well-performed.

 Compendium of a Lifetime by ROME PRO(G)JECT, THE album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.78 | 8 ratings

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Compendium of a Lifetime
The Rome Pro(g)ject Symphonic Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars If one wishes to seek out some classic yet current symphonic prog of the very highest quality, then look no further than the Rome Pro(g)ject from the supremely talented Roman keyboardist Vincenzo Ricca, whose fifth studio album is the pinnacle of the style. Obviously, when you are able to easily summon some of the "crema della crema" progressive rock icons to join in on the fun, the results can only be celestial. Such luminary names as the venerable Steve Hackett, and his brother John, Tony Levin the master basso profundo, singer Bernardo Lanzetti (PFM, Acqua Fragile, Mangala Vallis) , Nick Magnus on keys and Dave Jackson of VDGG fame on sax are joined by the next generation : bassist Roberto Vitelli (Ellesmere, Tapobran, Areknames, The Samurai of Prog), Frank Carducci on guitar and bass, Ranestrane drummer extraordinaire Daniele Pomo, and the fascinating voice of Tony Patterson (Re-Genesis and solo). If one takes a gander at the ratings on PA for all five albums, you kind of wonder why this project is not on all radars and in most hearts! Especially when taking into consideration that there is a historical theme that should fascinate most inquisitive minds, the once opulent power of the Roman Empire. If ever you travel to the Eternal City (a mesmerizing bucket list event), you would be invariably enveloped into a visually and culturally fascinating city that should capture your heart and mind, often both! It did provide me with numerous sublime anecdotes that seem Fellini-esque in its ingenious playfulness, inflexibly passionate charm and of course, magnificent vistas waiting just around each corner of its numerous streets.

Imagine the sheer audacity of a symph-prog album that starts out with a church organ overture played by Vincenzo, his brother Paolo on electric guitar and Daniele pounding away on his kit, this sounds like a piece off The Six Wives of Henry VIII album. The whopping epic 13 minute+ title track sets the bar real high ASAP, with Jackson's flute and winds uniting with Carducci on 12 string and bass, surely channeling his Rutherford muse, and who else but the graceful Hackett guitar to illuminate the skies, all led by powerful waves of mellotron, organ and synths. While Lanzetti's strangled voice has always been a struggle for some, it gets more comfortable with repeated listens, his throttling vocal cords can be quite effective, theatrically speaking. The passion, the atmosphere, and the melodies (PAM) are front and center, the playing verging on the impossibly sublime, Hackett and Jackson both positively shining on their respective instruments. Steve actually pulls off a noteworthy solo that harkens back to his classic Firth of Fifth days, a flurry of long, extended and excruciatingly gorgeous, sustained notes, all wrapped up in cascades of howling mellotron. Orgasmic.

How about a little volcanic eruption, since Pompeii is not that far from Rome? "Vesuvius" starts off as a moderate rumble, slowly ratchetted up by Paolo Ricca's ornate guitar upsurge, rushing organ imitating lava flows, and the inexorable doom it may represent for the unfortunate populace. On the segueing "The Last Night in the World", the consequences of the eruption are aptly handled by Tony Patterson, who happens to be one hell of a vocal talent, as his long career with ReGenesis and amazing solo albums will attest, his rendering of the iconic Peter Gabriel is the best anywhere. Uncanny, this is better than the lawn-mowing masked wonder himself. With Roberto Vitelli on bass, Nick Magnus on opulent piano, and another sizzling flurry from Hackett, this is a timeless prog piece, drenched in melody and sonic beauty.

The following four tracks form a loose suite, the first part offering no rest with the grandiose "Have Caesar", awash in a harrowing torrent of colossal choir mellotron, Vincenzo shows off some stunning and twirling synth leads that one can really Banks on (excuse the pun), yet always devoted to the mood and the melody. Paolo Ricca spits out a crystalline solo, lush with emotion and feeling. Levin and Pomo keep the Roman army on the march through Rome, heading towards the Colosseum where the gladiators await their fate. "Morituri te Salutant "(Those who will die , salute you) is a proper segue onto the soon to be blood stained sands that will appear on "Gladiators" , a thrilling bombastic showcase underpinned by a wickedly evil bass solo by Levin that proves once and for all his mighty mettle, encouraging romping organ and synths, massive waves of mellotron, John's flute, brother Steve ripping off some blistering runs (note: he can play very fast too, its not always slow and gentle, sentimental) and Pomo thundering away on his skins. A reprise of the main delirious melody that began with "Have Caesar", concludes their epic, cornerstone piece with unimpeachable bravado and gusto (musical Romulus and Remus), a real symphonic prog treat.

As a bonus track a 2021 reworking of the title track from their extraordinary preceding album, Exegi Monumentum (my first purchase of theirs and which I urge anyone to hunt down and possess). It has all those ingredients that make Rome Pro(g)ject such a joy to behold: magnificent arrangements with creative and visibly inspired guest musicians, inventive melodies that will sear one's brain, and a common theme, Rome's eternal history. Some of Steve Hackett's most brilliant playing is to be found among the 5 project albums, arguably more than on his numerous solo albums. Obviously, Steve has the freedom to totally let loose, a liberty given to him by Vincenzo Ricca' s stunning compositions. Nowhere better than on this exquisite finale.

If ever the question arises of what kind of great modern symphonic prog could one suggest: the answer to me is quite clear: "The Rome Pro(g)ject" is the place to go.

5 Legionnaires

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Symphonic Prog bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
21. PERON Turkey
35 TAPES Norway
5BRIDGES Netherlands
7 OCEAN Belarus
ABBHAMA Indonesia
ABSTRACTION LAYER Brazil
ACCENT Romania
ACHE Denmark
ACUITY United States
AD ASTRA United States
ADVENTURE Norway
AETHER Brazil
AFTER CRYING Hungary
AFTER THE FIRE United Kingdom
AGENTS OF MERCY Sweden
AGNUS Argentina
AGNUS GRAAL Brazil
AIRLORD New Zealand
AJALON United States
AKACIA United States
ALAMEDA Spain
ALASKA United States
ALBATROSS United States
ALL TRAPS ON EARTH Sweden
ALMS Spain
ALPHA CENTAURY France
ALPHA III Brazil
ALTER ECHO Sweden
LEON ALVARADO United States
SERGIO ALVAREZ Argentina
AMAGRAMA Argentina
AMENOPHIS Germany
AMOS KEY Germany
AMUZEUM United States
ANABIS Germany
ANCIENT VISION United States
ANDERSON - BRUFORD - WAKEMAN - HOWE United Kingdom
ANDERSON / STOLT Multi-National
ANGE France
ANGIPATCH France
ńNGLAGŇRD Sweden
ANIMA Argentina
ANIMA DOMINUM Brazil
ANIMA MORTE Sweden
ANIMA MUNDI Cuba
ANOXIE France
ANTARES Germany
ANYONE'S DAUGHTER Germany
APH…LANDRA France
APHRODITE'S CHILD Greece
APOCALYPSE Brazil
APOCALYPSE United States
AQUAPLANAGE United Kingdom
ARABESQUE United States
ARACHNOID France
ARCABUZ Spain
ARION Brazil
ARS NOVA (JAP) Japan
ARS PRO VITA Brazil
ART IN AMERICA United States
ARTEFACTRON Mexico
ARTNAT Portugal
ASA DE LUZ Brazil
XAVIER ASALI Mexico
ASIA MINOR France
ASTRň United States
ASTURC”N Spain
ATILA Spain
ATLANTIS PHILHARMONIC United States
ATLAS Sweden
ATMOSPHERA Israel
ATOLL France
AUTUMN United Kingdom
AUTUMN BREEZE Sweden
AVIVA (AVIVA OMNIBUS) Russia
AXCRAFT United States
AZABACHE Spain
BABYLON United States
BACAMARTE Brazil
BANAAU / HOLLOWSCENE Italy
BANANA Argentina
BANZAI Belgium
BAROCK Norway
ZELJKO BEBEK & PODIUM Yugoslavia
BEGGARS OPERA United Kingdom
ROBERT B…RIAU Canada
ED BERNARD Canada
BLACK SEPTEMBER United States
BLŇKULLA Sweden
BLANK MANUSKRIPT Austria
BLEZQI ZATSAZ Brazil
BLUE SHIFT United States
TOMAS BODIN Sweden
BONDAR & WISE United States
LARS BOUTRUP'S MUSIC FOR KEYBOARDS Denmark
BOX OF SHAMANS United States
BRESK Norway
BILL BRESSLER United States
BRIMSTONE United States
BURNING CANDLE Germany
BUSKER Canada
CAF…ŌNE France
CAI Spain
CAIRO United States
CAJA DE PANDORA Mexico
CAL Spain
CAMEL United Kingdom
LOS CANARIOS Spain
CANNABIS INDIA Germany
CARAVELA ESCARLATE Brazil
ALEX CARPANI BAND Italy
CAST Mexico
CATHEDRAL United States
CELLAR NOISE Italy
CHAKRA United States
CHALCEDONY United Kingdom
CHAOS CODE United States
CHRONOS MUNDI Brazil
JOS… CID Portugal
CINEMA Japan
CIRCLE Germany
THE CIRCLE PROJECT Spain
CIRKUS Canada
CITIZEN CAIN United Kingdom
CLEARLIGHT France
THE CLIVEDEN SET United States
CODA Netherlands
C”DICE Mexico
COLLEGIUM MUSICUM Slovakia
COT” EN P»L Spain
COUSINS AND CONRAD United Kingdom
COVENANT United States
CRACK Spain
CRAFT United Kingdom
CRESSIDA United Kingdom
CRONICO Mexico
CROOKED MOUTH United Kingdom
CRUCIBLE United States
CRUCIS Argentina
CZYSZY Poland
DAWN Switzerland
DEJA-VU Japan
DELUGE GRANDER United States
DIALOGUE (DAWN DIALOGUE) Ukraine
DIAPAS√O Brazil
DISCIPLINE United States
DOCMEC Switzerland
DOGMA Brazil
DORACOR Italy
DR. COENOBITE Netherlands
DRAGONFLY Switzerland
DRAMA France
DRUCKFARBEN Canada
DRUID United Kingdom
EARTH AND FIRE Netherlands
EARTHRISE United States
ECCENTRIC ORBIT United States
ECHOLYN United States
ECLAT / ECLAT DE VERS France
ECLIPSE Brazil
EDEN Canada
EGGROLL Israel
EIEMEL Argentina
EIK Iceland
ELLESMERE Italy
ELOHIM France
ELOITERON Switzerland
EMERSON LAKE & PALMER United Kingdom
REDJY EMOND Canada
ENGLAND United Kingdom
THE ENID United Kingdom
EPIDAURUS Germany
EPIGNOSIS United States
EPISODE United States
EQUILIBRIO VITAL Venezuela
ESPÕRITU Argentina
ESTRUCTURA Venezuela
ETCETERA Denmark
…TERNIT… Canada
ETHOS United States
EVERFRIEND United States
EX-LIBRIS Canada
EX-VAGUS France
EXODE France
EXODUS Poland
EZRA WINSTON Italy
FAITHFUL BREATH Germany
FALLING EDGE Canada
FANTASY United Kingdom
FARMHOUSE ODYSSEY United States
JAROD FEDELE United States
FICCI”N Venezuela
FINCH Netherlands
FIREBALLET United States
FIRST AID United Kingdom
FLAGSHIP Sweden
FLAME DREAM Switzerland
FLAMING BESS Germany
THE FLOWER KINGS Sweden
FL‹GHT Mexico
FLYTE Belgium
FOCUS Netherlands
FOREVER TWELVE United States
THE FOUNDATION Sweden
FRŃGIL Peru
FRAGILE Germany
FRIGHT PIG United States
FROMAGE Japan
FRUUPP United Kingdom
FUSONIC Netherlands
G.A.L.F. Brazil
GALASPHERE 347 Multi-National
GALI… Mexico
GENESIS United Kingdom
GENS DE LA LUNE France
THE GIFT United Kingdom
GLASS United States
GLASS HAMMER United States
G“TIC Spain
GOVEA Mexico
GRACIOUS United Kingdom
GRANADA Spain
GRAND STAND Sweden
GRANDBELL Brazil
CLAY GREEN'S POLYSORBATE MASQUERADE BAND United States
GREENSLADE United Kingdom
GREYFIELD Spain
GROBSCHNITT Germany
SHAUN GUERIN United States
GUILDENSTERN Germany
HALLOWEEN France
HANDS United States
BO HANSSON Sweden
HARLEQUIN MASS United States
MARIANO HAYON Argentina
HECENIA France
HELIOPOLIS United States
ANDERS HELMERSON Sweden
HIGH WHEEL Germany
TERUTSUGU HIRAYAMA Japan
HOGGWASH Ukraine
HOKUS POKUS Norway
LYLE HOLDAHL United States
HOLDING PATTERN United States
HOLY LAMB Latvia
HORIZONT Russia
HOT FLASH United States
HYACINTUS Argentina
I.C.U. Germany
III MIL NIO Brazil
ILVCIA Spain
IN SPE Estonia
INDEX Brazil
INDIGO Germany
INFINITOME United States
INFINITY United States
THE INNER ROAD United Kingdom
INQUIRE Germany
JACK INTVELD United States
INVISIBLE Argentina
IRON DUKE Denmark
ISILDURS BANE Sweden
ISOPODA Belgium
IZZ United States
JELLY FICHE Canada
BJ÷RN JOHANSSON Sweden
JORDSJō Norway
KAIPA Sweden
KAIPA DA CAPO Sweden
KAIZEN Brazil
KALABAN United States
KALO Japan
ANTONY KALUGIN Ukraine
KANSAS United States
KARDA ESTRA United Kingdom
KARFAGEN Ukraine
KARMAKANIC Sweden
KDB3 United States
KHATSATURJAN Finland
KING EIDER Netherlands
KLOCKWERK ORANGE Austria
KOGAION Romania
KORNMO Norway
KOTEBEL Spain
KVAZAR Norway
KYRIE ELEISON Austria
LADY LAKE Netherlands
LANVALL Austria
LŃQUESIS Argentina
LAZA I IPE Yugoslavia
LEGACY United States
LEGACY PILOTS Germany
LEI SECA Brazil
LEITMOTIV Canada
LETHE Netherlands
FRANCIS LICKERISH United Kingdom
LIFE LINE PROJECT Netherlands
LIFT United States
PńR LINDH AND BJ÷RN JOHANSSON Sweden
PńR LINDH PROJECT Sweden
LITTLE TRAGEDIES Russia
LIVE Germany
CAILYN LLOYD United States
THE LOAD United States
LOCH NESS Brazil
LORD FLIMNAP Israel
LUNAR CLOCK Netherlands
M-OPUS Ireland
DUNCAN MACKAY United Kingdom
MADAME CLAUS Argentina
MADISON DYKE Germany
MAGDALENA Japan
MAGIC PIE Norway
MAGIC SPELL Switzerland
MAGICIAN'S RED Finland
NICK MAGNUS United Kingdom
MAGRATHEA United Kingdom
MAHOUJIN Japan
MAINHORSE Switzerland
MALDOROR France
MANDALABAND United Kingdom
MANDRAKE Japan
MANGROVE Netherlands
BRUNO MANSINI Brazil
MANTICORE Sweden
MANTRA Spain
LA MŃQUINA DE HACER PŃJAROS Argentina
MARCO Mexico
MARYGOLD Italy
MASQUE PREMIERE United States
MAZE OF TIME Sweden
MEDINA AZAHARA Spain
MELVIN'S NOSEHAIR Netherlands
MEMORIANCE France
JACQUES MENACHE Mexico
MERLIN Germany
METABOLISME France
MEZQUITA Spain
MIA Argentina
MIDAS Japan
MIKLAGŇRD Sweden
MIKROMIDAS Norway
MILKWEED Canada
MARIO MILLO Australia
DAVID MINASIAN United States
MIND SKY United States
MINOTAURUS Germany
MINUS TWO Germany
MIRROR Netherlands
MISTER ROBOT Russia
MIZUKAGAMI Japan
MONA LISA France
MONOLITH United States
GUSTAVO MONTESANO Argentina
MOON SAFARI Sweden
MOONGARDEN Italy
MORGAN United Kingdom
MORILD Norway
MORSE CODE Canada
NEAL MORSE United States
TIM MORSE United States
MOSAIK Sweden
MOTH VELLUM United States
MOURNING KNIGHT United States
MUGEN Japan
JESŕS MU—OZ FERNŃNDEZ Spain
MYTHOPOEIC MIND Norway
NAUTILUS Switzerland
IAN NEAL United Kingdom
NEGASPHERE Japan
NESSIE Belgium
NETHERWORLD United States
NEUSCHWANSTEIN Germany
NEVERNESS Spain
THE NEW GROVE PROJECT Sweden
NEXUS Argentina
THE NICE United Kingdom
NOSTRADAMUS Hungary
NOTTURNO CONCERTANTE Italy
NOVALIS Germany
NOVELA Japan
OAKSENHAM Armenia
OCEAN Germany
OCTOPUS (NOR) Norway
ODYSSICE Netherlands
OMNIA Argentina
ONE Argentina
ONIRIS France
OPUS Yugoslavia
L' ORIENT D'‘ Canada
ORION France
OUTER LIMITS Japan
PABLO EL ENTERRADOR Argentina
PAGEANT Japan
PALE ACUTE MOON Japan
PANDORA Sweden
PANTA RHEI Hungary
PARAGONE United States
PARTHENON Venezuela
PATCHWORK CACOPHONY United Kingdom
PAZZO FANFANO DI MUSICA Japan
PELL MELL Germany
PENTACLE France
OTA PETRINA Czech Republic
PETRUS CASTRUS Portugal
PH2 France
ANTHONY PHILLIPS United Kingdom
PHOG France
PHYLTER Belgium
PI2 Spain
PICTORIAL WAND Norway
PIG FARM ON THE MOON Venezuela
THE PINK MICE Germany
MICHAEL PINNELLA United States
PO«OS & NUVENS Brazil
P’HJA KONN Estonia
POLLEN Canada
PRE United States
PRISMA Netherlands
PROGRESSION BY FAILURE France
PROJECT / PPRY Finland
PROTO-KAW United States
PROUD PEASANT United States
PULSAR France
PUPPET SHOW United States
PYTHAGORAS Netherlands
QUANTUM Brazil
QUATERNA REQUIEM (WIERMANN & VOGEL) Brazil
QUERCUNIAN CAMERATA Spain
QUILL United States
R-U KAISER Chile
RAIN United Kingdom
RAINBOW THEATRE Australia
RAISON DE PLUS France
RAK Switzerland
REALM/ STEVE VAIL United States
RECORDANDO O VALE DAS MA«√S Brazil
REFUGEE United Kingdom
RELAYER United States
RENAISSANCE United Kingdom
RING OF MYTH United States
RING VAN M÷BIUS Norway
ROCKAPHONICA Argentina
ROCKET SCIENTISTS United States
RAIMUNDO RODULFO Venezuela
THE ROME PRO(G)JECT Italy
KURT RONGEY United States
ANTON ROOLAART United States
JAIME ROSAS Chile
ANDREW ROUSSAK Russia
ROUSSEAU Germany
RUMBLIN' ORCHESTRA Hungary
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