Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

NEUSCHWANSTEIN

Symphonic Prog • Germany


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Neuschwanstein picture
Neuschwanstein biography
This is German prog from the late seventies. Instrumentally, acoustic guitar, flute, harpsichord and a variety of keyboards lock together to make an extremely rich and beautiful musical backdrop, with some absolutely gorgeous themes. The music is melodic with detailed arrangements and interesting orchestration. The vocalist sounds remarkably like Peter Gabriel; lyrics are all in English. The sound could be described as "Planets" period ELOY meets "Moonmadness" period CAMEL, with a touch of MACHIAVEL. The reissue on CD of a real "must", a mythical disc from unknown musicians.

NEUSCHWANSTEIN forum topics / tours, shows & news


NEUSCHWANSTEIN forum topics Create a topic now
NEUSCHWANSTEIN tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "neuschwanstein"
Post an entries now

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to NEUSCHWANSTEIN

Buy NEUSCHWANSTEIN Music



More places to buy NEUSCHWANSTEIN music online

NEUSCHWANSTEIN discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

NEUSCHWANSTEIN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.95 | 213 ratings
Battlement
1978
3.72 | 60 ratings
Alice In Wonderland
2008
4.00 | 22 ratings
Fine Art
2016

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 213 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by The Ace Face

4 stars Sometimes copying can sound inspired! I knocked Marillion for lifting direct parts from Genesis on Script for a Jester's tear, but this album sounds literally like a lost Genesis album. I give it 4 stars for the stunning perfect mimicry of their entire vibe, down to the Gabriel-esque singer. Lots of flute as well. Some may disagree, but listening to it, the effect is overwhelming: you literally feel as if you have found their lost album between Foxtrot and Selling England by the Pound. The instruments obviously don't sound exactly like Hackett and Collins' unique sounds, but tied all together, chiming 12 string passages, synthesizers sounding like A Trick of the Tail, man. Very, very good.
 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 213 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by Squire Jaco

4 stars The obvious comparisons to Genesis begin with the French lead vocalist who sounds very English and very Gabriel. But these German musicians also replicate the Genesis musical sound in most of these 7-8 minutes songs - without ever ripping off any of Genesis' melodies or riffs. (I should note that the title song is actually sung by the bass player in a more Eloy-ish sounding manner.) This is a real joy to sit down and listen to straight through; no songs rated below an 8 for my tastes. Surprise, surprise - the production is not top-notch, but certainly nothing to complain about. Compare this group's style also to England's "Garden Shed".

If you loved early Genesis, this is about as close as you can get to the Rael thing.

4-1/2 stars

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 213 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nº 350

"Battlement" is the second studio album of Neuschwanstein and was released in 1978. It was released independently. It sold all the 6.000 copies that were made, at the time, when progressive rock music was in decline, surpassed by music styles, like the new wave and the post-punk music. Besides the good reception at the time, the concept of the album became stronger, with time, and today, it's considered a mythical album. The music produced by the band is melodic with magnificent arrangements with detailed and an interesting orchestration. The vocalist sounds like Peter Gabriel of Genesis and the lyrics are all in English. The instrumental part could be described as a mixture of Genesis era Gabriel with Eloy, period of the album "Planets", and with Camel's period of "Moonmadness", with a touch of Machiavel.

Relatively to the musicians that participated on this album, there are some slight differences from their previous and first debut studio album "Alice In Wonderland", but only released in 2008. After "Alice In Wonderland", Neuschwanstein made several international live shows, and in one of them, in Moselle, France, the band knew the French vocalist Frédéric Joos, which would become their lead singer on "Battlement". As a guest musician Herman Rarebell, the drummer of Scorpions, in those times, also participated on drums on the first song of "Battlement", "Loafer Jack".

So, the line up on "Battlement" is Frédéric Joos (lead vocals and acoustic guitars), Klaus Mayer (flutes and synthesizers), Roger Weiler (guitars), Thomas Neuroth (keyboards), Rainer Zimmer (vocals and bass), Hans-Peter Schwarz (drums) and Herman Rarebell (drums).

"Battlement" has seven tracks. All music was composed and arranged by Neuschwanstein and all lyrics were written by Weiler, except "Battlement", which was written by Zimmer. The first track "Loafer Jack" opens the album in a very happy and catchy manner. It shows clearly the vocal similitudes between Joos and Gabriel. This is a very melodic track with a magnificent work by Mayer on flutes and synthesizers and Neuroth on keyboards. Still, it's the keyboard work that shines with some lovely melodic touches. The second track "Ice With Dwale" shows a song with a more introspective mood. It's a track mainly composed on acoustic guitar chords and flute lines. It also contains some delicate piano notes. It goes to more languid places, displaying a more introspective mood. This is a very Genesis' song with some great pastoral moments. The third track "Intruders And The Punishment" is a serious highlight with some stunning keyboard lines, a much more complex instrumentation and where the vocals are extremely dramatic. The aggressive keyboards and the guitar performances are some of the best made on the entire album. It displays a captivating epic sensitiveness without losing the touch of the melodic richness. The fourth track "Beyond The Bugle" is a song with a melancholic intro with a fluttering flute work and a magnificent vocal section. This is a track that displays a very captivating epic sensitiveness with a very melodic richness. The closing synthesizer solo is magnificent and shows that Neuroth is simply brilliant. The fifth track is the title track "Battlement". It allows for plenty of instrumental breathing room, featuring some truly melancholic guitar solos and, after the obligatory vocal part, features, once more, some fantastic keyboard and piano works. It comprises also some of the best musical segments on the album with great dreamy passages. The sixth track "Midsummer Day" brings back some of the romantic vibe of "Ice With Dwale". It features the strongest vocal segment, sounding more like a version of Eloy's Frank Bornemann, than Gabriel. The middle portion of the track even sounds briefly as a similar style to early Eloy. This is another great atmospheric piece of music that features another lovely vocal performance. The seventh and last track "Zärtlicher Abschied" is the only instrumental track on the album. This is a track dominated by great acoustic guitar and flute works perfectly supported by a glorious keyboard work. It proves to be another highlight of a fantastic album. It's a perfect way to end this album.

Conclusion: I remember to see the cover of this album on the window of a record store, in my youth and in my country, when the album was originally released. However, I never bought it because in those days, I didn't have much money and I would rather spend it in other more known things. So, it was only few years ago that I bought my CD version of the album. "Battlement" is, in reality, a great album. The seven very melodic and harmonic compositions on the album feature a warm sound, pleasant shifting moods, some sensational breaks, lush keyboards, beautiful flute, a sensitive electric guitar, twanging acoustic guitar, a very decent rhythm section and good English vocals with a truly charming accent. This is a very exciting and impeccably performed album with a sound very similar to early Genesis. Compared to early Genesis, Neuschwanstein's instrumentation and recording capabilities were considerable higher, and this German group got rather close to writing music that was equally as good as those early Genesis' classic years.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Alice In Wonderland by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.72 | 60 ratings

BUY
Alice In Wonderland
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 349

Neuschwanstein was a progressive rock band from Germany and was formed in 1971 in the city of Volklingen in the district of Saarbrucken. The name of the group is derived from Neuschwanstein Castle which is a Romanesque revival palace built by Ludwig II of Bavaria in Bavarian Alps as a retreat and as a homage to Richard Wagner. It became a huge name of the symphonic progressive rock scene in Germany. Today, it has been regarded as a legendary band by all prog rock fans, like other bands of the 70's. The founders of the band were Thomas Neuroth and Klaus Mayer, who had an interest on the music of Rick Wakeman. The band did covers of the keyboardist, in the beginning, and King Crimson.

Neuschwanstein drew attention for the first time in 1974 when they won a musical competition with an adaptation of "Alice In Wonderland". Between 1974 and 1978 Neuschwanstein earned certain fame in their native homeland, the Sarre, because they were the opening act for several prog rock German bands, such as, Novalis and Lucifer's Friend.

In 1978 they released "Battlement". It was released independently and sold all the 6.000 copies. Besides the good reception at the time, the album became stronger with time and today is considered a mythical album. The music produced by the band is melodic with magnificent arrangements with detailed and an interesting orchestration. In 2009, was released a CD with the original recordings made in 1976 of the musical adaptation by Neuschwanstein of "Alice In Wonderland". The album was released with the same name. Personally, I'm very glad this album finally was released.

So, "Alice In Wonderland" is the debut studio album of Neuschwanstein and was recorded in 1976 and released in 2008. As I said before, this is a conceptual album about "Alice's Adventures In Wonderland", commonly shortened to "Alice In Wonderland", a novel written by the English writer Lewis Carroll, in 1865. It tells a story of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting popularity with adults and children too. It's considered one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre.

The line up on the album is Klaus Mayer (flute and synthesizer), Roger Weiler (narration and 6 & 12 string electric guitars), Thomas Neuroth (piano, organ and synthesizer), Rainer Zimmer (bass) and Hans-Peter Schwarz (drums and percussion).

As a conceptual album, the music flows naturally. Despite "Alice In Wonderland" be practically an instrumental album, there are vocals, namely a narrative voice where Weiller tells the story of "Alice In Wonderland", in all due shortly in German, and in between, there is instrumental music heard. And this is especially marked by Mayer's flute and keyboards that recall at this stage of the band's history, especially to Wakeman. This isn't strange because the idea of "Alice In Wonderland" was inspired by the project to create a work that could compete with Wakeman's "Journey To The Centre Of The Earth". In addition, the guitarist Weiler was a big fan of Genesis, especially of "Supper's Ready". The Genesis' influence was also reflected in the non musical stage show. The band used bizarre costumes and background projections for the stage, like Genesis. Musically, the album contains dreamy symphonic progressive rock, interrupted in a few moments by spoken parts, which try to get the listener into the tale's atmosphere of the album.The sad thing, for those who aren't familiar with the German language, like me, is that all lyrics are written and sung in their native language. But, musically you will be rewarded to the maximum by the album's pure beauty and symphonic splendour. From the dominant moog solos and driving organ, the similarities with Novalis are evident, to the classical piano and light harpsichord, all musical soundscapes are created by the heavy and inspiring use of keyboards by Mayer and Neuroth duo. The guitar echoes are truly melodic and inspiring yet carefully presented and Eloy and Anyone's Daughter are good reference points. However, it's the flute work of Neuroth that makes the difference here. From the melodic interplays with the keyboards to the strong driving parts, Neuroth "catches" the best periods of Camel, Genesis and Focus, at least in the flute parts, and throws them into the mix to make the sound even richer and more symphonic.

Conclusion: "Alice In Wonderland" is a great album and an historical document. Fans of early times of Novalis, Eloy, Holderlin and of course Anyone's Daughter, will love it. All these bands helped to create the German contribute to the progressive rock music. "Alice In Wonderland" has forty minutes of very interesting music with strong melodic lines, joyful interpretation of batch delicate guitars, great warp painted by synthesizer sounds, with its dynamic flute solos. If we can judge this album on its own merits, we can conclude that Neuschwanstein has made a beautiful and a very warm sounding album in the genuine symphonic rock musical tradition with a classical undertone and very pleasant vintage keyboards. The fans of the 70's of Genesis, Camel and Focus will be pleased with it too. Listen to it and enjoy it.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 213 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by The Crow
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Second album from this interesting German band!

But let's face the truth. Just like many other prog-rock bands in the second half of the 70's, Neuschwanstein were trying to emulate the Genesis sound with more or less success, offering a collection of fine symphonic prog rock songs much in the vein the aforementioned group but maybe a bit more folk given the intensive use of flutes.

Nevertheless, the most interesting fact about this album is the curious bridge that it makes between the symphonic prog of the 70's and the more modern neo-prog of the 80's. Just like other neo-prog bands, they took lots of Genesis elements, but the synthetizers's sound are just in between the more classic early 70's ones and the typical from the 80's of bands like Collage and Pendragon.

Best Tracks: Loafer Jack (a very up-tempo song, funny and charming), Battlement (great rhythms and beautiful keyboards) and Z'rtlicher Abschied (fine instrumental song)

Conclusion: Neuschwanstein are faithful Genesis imitators, but at least they made it in the right way. And having appeared in the decadence of the classic 70's symphonic prog and before the birth of 80's neo-prog, I consider them a true and stimulating connection between the two genres.

My rating: ***

 Alice In Wonderland by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.72 | 60 ratings

BUY
Alice In Wonderland
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by TenYearsAfter

3 stars Musea mentioned that the CD release (1992) of Neuschwanstein's Battlement was one of their best selling items. In the booklet of Battlement you can already read about the epic composition Alice In Wonderland (based on Lewis Caroll's famous book) that has been put on this CD: in 1974 it was premiered at a musical competition at the Saarbrucken playhouse and Neuschwanstein won the first prize. Later th band members were wearing monk suits during the performance of Alice In Wonderland, supported by an elaborate light-show and dry ice. Those were the progrock days but how about the music on Alice In Wonderland, finally on CD after more than 35 years.

Well, let me tell you that on one hand it's unfair to compare the highly acclaimed classic album Battlement (1979) with the concept story Alice In Wonderland (1974). But on the other hand I cannot avoid doing it, because I am sure that most progheads, including me, are expecting music like on Battlement, so high expectations!

Listening to Alice in Wonderland I notice that at some moments Neuschwanstein sound like 'an embryonal version of Battlment'. But in general it's more in the vein of Seventies Camel and Focus and less obvious mid-Genesis inspired. And the music is also less elaborate, more laidback and remarkably is the omnipresent flute play (reminding me of Camel, Jethro Tull and Solaris), often accompanied by sparkling Grand piano work. And coloured with very tasteful vintage keyboards, ranging from warm string-ensemble and powerful Hammond organ to fat synthesizer flights and swinging Fender Rhodes electric piano. This along some sensitive electric guitar in the vein of Steve Hackett. Most of the 8 tracks contain short German narration and even some German vocals, it's funny to hear words like 'Wer bist du denn?', it reminds me of other German bands like Novalis and Grobschnitt that also made albums in the German language.

My highlights on Alice In Wonderland are the long compositions Old Father's Song (varied and dynamic with lush vintage keyboards, swirling flute and beautiful interplay, very harmonic) and Palace Of Wonderland (again lush vintage keyboards, a wonderful Hackett-like guitar solo and lots of bombastic eruptions).

If I judge this album on its own merits (so no comparisons with Battlement), I conclude that Neuschwanstein has made a beautiful, very warm sounding album in the genuine symphonic rock tradition with a classical undertone (flute and Grand piano) and very pleasant vintage keyboards, the fans of Seventies Camel, Focus and Genesis will be pleased.

My rating: 3,5 star.

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 213 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars With lead vocalist Frédéric Joos doing a pretty amazing Genesis-era PETER GABRIEL impersonation, the band has the makings of a GENESIS clone, but they are not. The music is lush and often complex, drawing from a variety of influences and sonic palettes.

1. "Loafer Jack" (4:42) add GRYPHON to the early lineup of GENESIS and this is what you might get: some great prog with layers of acoustic and electric instruments woven together as if melding old traditions with the new technological advances in electronic gear. Then, of course, put PETER GABRIEL up front to tell his mythologic folk tales and you have this. (9/10)

2. "Ice With Dwale" (6:21) same solid layers of ancient folk instrumentation with the modern keys and guitars and Gabriel story telling and you have another wonderful Trespass-like composition--only better: more mature, sophisticated, and polished. (9.25/10)

3. "Intruders And The Punishment" (7:34) opens with a little more bombast than the previous two and then quickly settles into a very GENESIS-familiar pulsing rhythm and groove. The instrumental composition of this song is noticeably different from the previous two, as well, with far less use and prominence to acoustic instruments and much heavier reliance on layers of keys and other electronic gear. When Joos begins singing in the third minute he seems to be channeling Lord GABRIEL--but then, so are the drummer and keyboard player. It's new enough--not a pure ripoff of any single GENESIS song--but the number of instances of pure familiarity are a bit excessive. (13/15)

4. "Beyond The Bugle" (7:31) flanged guitar with picked 12-string woven into a kind of slow drumless "Entangled" run for a full two minutes before Frédéric joins in. At the three minute mark drums, bass, and more electronic keys join in. The whiplash up-and-down bass play is prominent. At 4:00 a new MOODY BLUES-like acoustic guitar strum signals the start of a whole new section--very wild circus ride-like with uptempo pacing and theatric voice. AT 5:00 there is another shift (how mathematically oriented these guys are!) The heavily treated/doubled singing in the second half of the sixth minute sound a bit like one of PETER GABRIEL's dramatic theatric song finishes--but the song still has a minute left. (All instrumental.) Weird disjointed song. (13/15)

5. "Battlement" (7:05) opens with a TANGERINE DREAM weave while ordinance explosions occur all over the soundscape. New bass line emerges at the end of the second minute to usher in some new instruments (Arp synth, percussives, pizzicato bass, organ) as a more metronomic KRAFTWERK-like section plays. Fuzz guitar solo in the third minute just before very regal instrumental chorus. Then it's back to the KW fuzz guitar motif and another chorus. At 4:15 all instruments save for a Fender Rhodes leave while Frédéric sings in a very delicate, quiet voice. Other keyboard instruments flit in and out as the singing continues until a new full band instrumental section unfolds in the sixth minute. Lots of synth solo and layering on display here. (12.75/15)

6. "Midsummer Day" (7:42) * a song added to the 1992 MUSEA Records CD re-release. The music is not quite as GENESIS-imitative more in the ELOY ball park--which makes me question the veracity of the decision to include this song as part of an album of music that should be representative of this band's 1978 compositions and output. The acoustic guitar work to launch the middle section is good, bass player sounds poorer, drumming is a little off, flute is awesome, and singing is the least GABRIEL-esque of any song on the original album.

7. "Zärtlicher Abschied" (5:42) opens with harpsichord-sounding acoustic guitars, deep bass thrum and then flutes before morphing into a kind of CAMELish PINK FLOYD "Hey, You" (or, better, HARMONIUM, CELESTE, or MAXOPHONE). Fast guitar strumming at the end of the first minute serve notice of the TONY BANKS keyboard-loaded section to ensue. At 3:45 we downshift a bit, allowing room for an electric guitar solo before amping back up into the flute-and-Moog solo work. Very nice instrumental. (9.25/10)

* Absent from LP release

Total Time: 46:37

88.33 on the Fishscales = B+/4.5 stars; a near-masterpiece of neo progressive rock music.

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 213 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Let's face it: if you're going to clone and update the classic Genesis sound, you'd best bring your "A"-game, because there are plenty of people happy to do the exact same thing, and the original Genesis albums themselves are some pretty excellent releases all told.

One of the best bands to pull off this sort of borrowing is Neuschwanstein, whose 1978 album absolutely nails the trick of playing material clearly inspired by Genesis but also updating and progressing the sound a little. A big part of the album's success can be laid at the feet of lead vocalist and acoustic guitarist Frédéric Joos, whose Gabriel impression is outright uncanny: it's perhaps no coincidence that the title track, which veers slightly away from the Genesis sound to something more like Camel, has vocals from bassist Rainer Zimmer instead.

On the musical side of things, keyboardist Thomas Neuroth, guitarist Roger Weiler, and the synthesiser wrangling of Klaus Mayer (who also provides some nice flute here and there) combine to add a dark electronic edge to the Genesis sound, a certain harshness which was mostly absent from Gabriel-era Genesis but fits the album's more foreboding tone nicely. The whole package is not quite a five-star classic - in particular, I'm not entirely taken with Zimmer's vocals on the title track - but it's certainly one of the better overlooked gems of 1970s prog.

 Alice In Wonderland by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.72 | 60 ratings

BUY
Alice In Wonderland
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

3 stars This is a bit of prog archaeology on the part of Musea. See, for a good long while Neuschwanstein were seen by much of the prog world as one-album wonders, with only the Battlement release to stand as evidence of their existence. However, the lucky few who had seen Neuschwanstein live back in the day knew that there was more to it than that - that they'd also developed a conceptual stage show based around the classic Alice In Wonderland story, and had indeed first come to the notice of the German prog scene by winning a competition with this creation. This album consists of demo recordings made in 1976 of the music and narration of the stage show.

Much like Happy the Man's Death's Crown or Soft Machine's Spaced, then, this is an archival release of material originally intended to accompany a visual performance on stage - and as with those releases, it's a little flawed as a result. Listeners will likely find the recording quality very frustrating; there's clearly some very nice Genesis-esque pastoral prog being played here, but with that appalling background hiss in the way it simply doesn't sound as good as it might have had it been recorded to a professional studio standard. And the occasional narration breaking up the instrumentals is a bit obtrusive and hurts the flow of things.

Uiltimately, listening to a piece like this you are only getting half the picture; like the albums I've mentioned (or, for that matter, Pink Floyd's The Wall), this was created with a particular visual experience in mind, and without those visuals the material is somewhat hampered. On top of that, the recording quality just cuts the album's legs out from under it. It's a testament to Neuschwanstein's talents that it still sounds pretty good despite all that, but this is very much a shiny curiosity rather than a long-lost classic.

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.95 | 213 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by Obersturmbannprogger

3 stars A bit overrated late 70s german symphonic prog album. Stylistically its a bit in early 70s Genesis style, but with some marks typical for other mid and late 70s German groups like Novalis, Eloy or Anyones Daughter. Singer is pretending to be much Gabriel like, although with a bit cheesy german accent (but not so tragic like in case of Eloy) and sometimes is a bit out of key too. Another small flaw for me is the somehow sterile production, there is too much hall added in the mix and overall the dynamics is a bit lacking in the sound. Otherways the sound of the album is very bold and warm. But overall its a pleasant and melodic album to listen, with many nice moments, but not very intriguing and without originality like many other german symphonic progrock groups from this era. Especially the old analogue synths are very present everywhere, so keyboard afficionados will sure like this album. Other musicians dont stand very much out. Nice album, but only for folks who have all other more essential 70s symphonic rock albums. 3 stars...
Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to NotAProghead for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.