Header

NEUSCHWANSTEIN

Symphonic Prog • Germany


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Neuschwanstein picture
Neuschwanstein biography
This is German prog from the late seventies. Instrumentally, acoustic guitar, flute, harpsichord and a variety of keyboards lock together to make an extremely rich and beautiful musical backdrop, with some absolutely gorgeous themes. The music is melodic with detailed arrangements and interesting orchestration. The vocalist sounds remarkably like Peter Gabriel; lyrics are all in English. The sound could be described as "Planets" period ELOY meets "Moonmadness" period CAMEL, with a touch of MACHIAVEL. The reissue on CD of a real "must", a mythical disk from unknown musicians.

NEUSCHWANSTEIN MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s

NEUSCHWANSTEIN forum topics / tours, shows & news


NEUSCHWANSTEIN forum topics Create a topic now
NEUSCHWANSTEIN tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "neuschwanstein"
Post an entries now

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to NEUSCHWANSTEIN

Buy NEUSCHWANSTEIN Music


BattlementBattlement
Musea 2003
Audio CD$21.99
Alice In WonderlandAlice In Wonderland
Import
Musea 1973
Audio CD$15.86
$17.50 (used)
Right Now on Ebay (logo)

More places to buy NEUSCHWANSTEIN music online Buy NEUSCHWANSTEIN & Prog Rock Digital Music online:
  • AmazonMP3: Search for NEUSCHWANSTEIN DRM-Free MP3 Downloads @ AmazonMP3 (USA Only) | AmazonMP3 (UK Only)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN shows & tickets


NEUSCHWANSTEIN has no upcoming shows, according to LAST.FM syndicated events and shows feed

NEUSCHWANSTEIN discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

NEUSCHWANSTEIN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.93 | 33 ratings
Alice in Wonderland
1976
3.96 | 150 ratings
Battlement
1978

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

NEUSCHWANSTEIN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.96 | 150 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by mbzr48

5 stars Re-released on Musea in 1992, Battlement is a beautiful, lush work, and one of the best produced and sounding independently recorded releases I have heard in some time. The musicianship displayed on Battlement is absolutely top notch and vocalist/acoustic guitarist Frederic Joos will have many listeners swearing that Peter Gabriel himself provided the lead vocals for Neuschwanstien. The band's material is all stunning and well polished, reminiscent of Genesis during the time of Trick Of The Tail and Wind And Wuthering. Their music is well conceived and very well executed, with rich and melodious keyboards and guitar, beautiful flute breaks and very, very finely delivered vocals.

Every track on this re-issue is of good quality and a couple are almost good enough to qualify as what I call could call "masterpieces." "Intruders And The Punishment" is the highpoint of the album for me, with odd meter, rippling keyboards and lyrics that will perhaps remind the listener of the ordeals of Odysseus. Another wonderful moment is the track "Battlement," an almost unsettling number that features great vocals by bassist Rainer Zimmer. The final song on Battlement, "Zartlicher Abschied" is the only holdover from the band's original 1974 adaptation of Alice In Wonderland. It is a lovely instrumental track that lifts a well known theme from Genesis, and is, by the way, the only direct appropriation from the Charterhouse legends.

This is a true classic of continental progressive rock and is well deserving of the title. Highly Recommended! 4.5 Stars

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.96 | 150 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by Obersturmbannprogger

3 stars A bit overrated late 70s german symphonic prog album. Stylistically its a bit in early 70s Genesis style, but with some marks typical for other mid and late 70s German groups like Novalis, Eloy or Anyones Daughter. Singer is pretending to be much Gabriel like, although with a bit cheesy german accent (but not so tragic like in case of Eloy) and sometimes is a bit out of key too. Another small flaw for me is the somehow sterile production, there is too much hall added in the mix and overall the dynamics is a bit lacking in the sound. Otherways the sound of the album is very bold and warm. But overall its a pleasant and melodic album to listen, with many nice moments, but not very intriguing and without originality like many other german symphonic progrock groups from this era. Especially the old analogue synths are very present everywhere, so keyboard afficionados will sure like this album. Other musicians dont stand very much out. Nice album, but only for folks who have all other more essential 70s symphonic rock albums. 3 stars...

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Alice in Wonderland by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.93 | 33 ratings

BUY
Alice in Wonderland
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by herrkaiser

5 stars Well, I simply love it

In fact, is currently within my Top Three albums, which are Kayaks bard of the unseen and Genesis Foxtrot.

Maybe I am totally cought and "spoiled" by the somewhat naive charme and originality of this album.

I also very much like their more adult next (and untli now last) album, "Battlement", but really prefer this one.

The flute and keyboard dominate the album, but there are also some uptempo guitar parts. About 5% is spoken in german (The "Narrator"), which somehow adds to the charme.

Many of the melodies, or rather "themes" are simply beautiful. You might compare the music to the very best Camel, Focus and Jethro Tull, but it is still very original and charming.

If like your prog on the heavy, jazzy, or eclectic side, this is not for you. If you like symphonic prog like early Genesis and the above mentioned, give it a try!

Yes, there are weaknesses. There are some (not many, really!) dull moments, and the sound quality is (understandably) not so great.

But, oh those catchy themes ....

Can't give it less than 5 !

P.S. There is a reunion going on with the band (two original members) and they are planning to release a new album this year! I am really curious how that will turn out :)

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.96 | 150 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by seventhsojourn
Special Collaborator RPI

5 stars Battlement (1978) by German band Neuschwanstein has drawn many comparisons with Genesis. I personally think such comparisons are a little unfair, although there can be little argument that main singer Frederic Joos sounds like Peter Gabriel. Uncannily so. Whether or not the Genesis comparisons are justified, the music here is of such quality that I'll happily overlook any similarities. Neuschwanstein includes twin keyboard players and guitarists, which ensures the sound is richly endowed with more tones, textures and timbres than I can do justice to in my descriptions. Throw in a whopping great dollop of woodwinds and an imaginative rhythm section and you've got all the ingredients for a classic '70s Prog album. Plus, of course, some great songs. There are seven in total here and all but one are in the 6- to 7-minute category.

The album opens with the rather jaunty Loafer Jack, a very commercial sounding little song with sing-along melody and catchy woodwind flourishes. As with much of the material here the synthesizer features prominently, although we also hear tasteful electric guitar and organ that seem to have Genesis written all over them. Now here's an example of where I'm often guilty of something. In my introduction I question whether so-and-so sounds like someone else, then I immediately go on to compare them to that very artist! However, I don't believe Neuschwanstein are clones of Genesis (or Marillion for that matter, who they pre-date in any case!). Anyway, it's another 'don't do' for my future reviews. Ice With Dwale begins in pastoral manner, again with flute and acoustic guitar. Fizzing electric guitar and rippling piano then pick up the baton to introduce the main part of the song. This is another very accessible tune, with vocalist Joos sounding so much like Gabriel it's kinda freaky. Mellotron and drums erupt at the start of Intruders And The Punishment, soon joined by berserk synthesizers (with Klaus Mayer playing like the man possessed!). Thanks to the presence of the two keyboard players the overall sound is very lush, with Mellotron and synthesizer pouring out of every orifice. Beyond The Bulge has a brooding intro that once again showcases Mayer's wonderful flute playing. This song is heavily laden with Mellotron- strings, but it's the all-too brief Mellotron-choir around midway that has me hitting the repeat button every time I listen. What an incredible sound, both scary and beautiful at the same time.

Bass player Rainer Zimmer does the singing on the title track, which is also the only song on the original disc not to feature Mellotron. Zimmer wrote the lyrics for this one, which is the reason he gets to sing them I guess. For the record, Weiler wrote the words on all other songs. Zimmer's voice is pleasant enough, subdued and certainly lacking the drama of Frederic Joos. However given the subject matter of the song it's entirely appropriate: 'The Duchesse of Kirkcaldy sings a song for the Scottish Queen, Who is dying on the scaffold, dying on the scaffold, Bagpipes singing a dead song over the battlement'. These lyrics refer to a fictional character taken from a song on The White Album. This song includes lashings more synthesizer, but it's the Thomas Neuroth electric piano and Roger Weiler electric guitar duet that dominate the track. The next song, Midsummer Day, is an example of that most uncommon of beasts, the worthwhile bonus track. I'll go as far as to say this is the best track on the album, so 'thank you' to whoever was responsible for the song's inclusion. Anyway, Midsummer Day is colossal. Guitar and synthesizer take the melody in turns and it claws at your guts, but in a beautiful way!! After a few minutes the song speeds up, with flute and bass exchanging phrases, before it fades out. After the briefest silence we hear something resembling a child's musical box, then the song reprises with some gusto! Frederic Joos spits in Paddy's eye with an aggressive vocal and the synth/guitar melody repeats to a finish. Awwwsumm! The final track could have been an anti-climax after this song, but it successfully manages to avoid falling into that trap. Zartlicher Abschied is an instrumental constructed around different tempos and moods and seems to feature every instrument in the Neuschwanstein armoury. You won't hear any complaints from me though. Sometimes more is more!

This is my favourite album to come out of Germany and it's also my favourite from the year 1978. The songs are all very approachable, carefully crafted and wonderfully orchestrated with a lush sound that contains lots of what my wife calls 'twiddly bits'. 5 stars.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Alice in Wonderland by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.93 | 33 ratings

BUY
Alice in Wonderland
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

4 stars A huge name of the symphonic scene in German, NEUSCHWANSTEIN were formed in 1971 in the city of Volklingen in the district of Saarbrucken.The big forward step for the band came in 1974,when they won a musical competition in Saarbrucken,adapting on stage a rock form of Lewis Carroll's ''Alice in wonderland''.The album was re-issued on Musea in 2002.

A stunning story-telling prog rock release,''Alice in wonderland'' contains dreamy Symphonic Rock,interrupted in a few moments by spoken parts,which try to get the listener into the tale-atmosphere of the album.The sad thing, for those unfamiliar with the German language, is that all lyrics are written and sung in NEUSCHWANSTEIN's native language...but musically you will be rewarded to the maximum by the album's pure beauty and symphonic splendour.From the dominant moog solos and driving organ (NOVALIS similarities are evident) to the classical piano ans light harpsichord,all musical soundscapes are created by the heavy ans inspiring use of keyboards by the Klaus Mayer/Thomas Neuroth duo.The guitar echoes are trully melodic and inspiring yet carefully presented and mid-70's ELOY and even better ANYONE'S DAUGHTER are good reference points.However it's the flute work of Neuroth in here which will leave totally speechless!From the melodic interplays with the keyboards to the strong driving parts,Neuroth ''catches'' the best periods of CAMEL ,GENESIS and FOCUS (at least in the flute parts) and throws them into the mix to make the sound even richer and more symphonic.

''Alice in wonderland'' is oversaturrated in melody, interplays and calmness and it is marked by my side as one of the most important releases from a German Symphonic Rock band.Absolutely essential,followed by 4 shining stars!

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.96 | 150 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by comp of nss

4 stars Thank you all for your enthusiasm in our music we made in 1978, naturally influenced by all these wonderful music during this period. Some people may say and said: "Hey, this CD sounds like Genesis." But the CD is not the original music, the musicians recorded on tape. The CD is a remix. Remixed by a nice producer and a Genesis fan. Without the intention, the charme and this unmistakable sound of the seventies. So, if you can, hear the vinyl. Only on vinyl "Battlement" is truthful.

And here are the news: In 2009, composer and keyboarder Thomas Neuroth and flutist Klaus Mayer revitalized the band. With a new lineup they are working on a new album, which will be released in spring 2010. Inspired by life and death, happiness and tragedy. Lyrical, rock, symphonic.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Alice in Wonderland by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.93 | 33 ratings

BUY
Alice in Wonderland
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by toroddfuglesteg

3 stars Slightly frustrating.

This German band has recreated the story of Alice In Wonderland with German spoken words inbetween the music. The main leading instruments is flute and keyboards. Guitars adds texture when needed.

The music is mostly a symphonic floating sort of new age. It is beautiful. It is also pretty boring without much happening throughout. ELOY is a good reference here. JETHRO TULL and FOCUS has to be mentioned too due to the overuse of the flute. It is the dominating instrument here. It is so dominating that I am pretty sure this album can be used as background noise and mood enhancer in a supermarket. Therein lays the problem with this album. It is pretty dull. But it also has some uptempo parts where the band sounds like a crossbreed between ELOY, YES and FOCUS. These are the best parts of this album. Some funky jazz parts is also detected here too.

This is by no means a bad album. It has some good parts and some bad parts. I am not willing to endure thirty five minutes of flutes and five minutes of guitars/keyboards and that is why I am not rating this album very highly.

3 stars

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Alice in Wonderland by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.93 | 33 ratings

BUY
Alice in Wonderland
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by Cesar Inca
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars A few years before Neuschwanstein conceived their masterpiece "Battlement" (to many, including myself, one of the best symphonic prog albums ever from Germany), the band had already written an album-worthy set of tracks that, together, made the concept of a progressive opus inspired by Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland". I suspect that this was done when the band was still a 5-piece (before the arrival of Frederic Joos), but you can tell that by then the fivesome had found out their own voice within the realms of symphonic prog rock. There aren't too many lyrics in "Alice in Wonderland", and most of them are narrated. The opener is literally an intro that comprises brief atmospheres based on floating piano washes and eerie cymbals, until the instrumentation settles in for 'The Gate to Wonderland', lyrically structured across a prominent presence of bucolic ambiences provided by the playful flute lines and the elegant interventions on synth (orchestration and solo). All in all, it is mostly a second intro, and a "third intro" arrives with the slightly more mysterious 'Pond of Tears', which is where the synth layers become more relevant, and also there is a more noticeable presence of the guitar phrases alongside the ever haunting flute lines. The melodic display is definitely more ambitious than on the preceding track, but it still feels like a sequence of amalgamated snippets than a track with a power of its own. Track 4 is the first piece in this concept that benefits from a proper development - it starts very lyrical, like a symphonic journey with heavily pastoral accents, but soon the piece reveals a colorful imagery of sound that alternates density and lightheartedness in an ultimately symphonic fashion. Influences from Camel, Novalis, Eloy and Focus' introspective side are (or seem to be) very transparent here, with some touches of early 70s Jethro Tull. Regarding the sense of magic delivered through the global instrumentation, you can also tell that there are also coincidences with what Happy the Man were doing at the time on the other side of the Atlantic for their "Death's Crown" project - it is no wonder, since this album's tracklist and that HTM project were both conceived as musical bases for visuals and theatrical deliveries. 'Five O'Clock-Tea' is segued to the last notes of the preceding track's enthusiastic closing portion, bringing back a ceremonious note that works really well due to the clever architecture that ordains the various moods and motifs. This is the sort of grandeur that I wished earlier for tracks 2 and 3 - at this point, the musical ideas are becoming gradually more robust. After a brief sung section, the track shifts toward a sense of sheer, dramatic intensity without losing its melodic drive. The last section is a joyful imitation of cabaret-oriented jazz, which makes an efficient contrast against the solemn note that signals the start of the following track 'The Marching of the Queen - Palace of Wonderland'. The band's ability to create beautifully crafted melodic developments of motifs and the easily flowing transitions comes to its full fruition on this one - even though you won't find as many dramatic shifts than on previous tracks, this one never gets boring or monotonous. The portions where the band gets to Celtic and Renaissance territories, the sonic beauty becomes irresistibly sublime. 'The Court of the Animals' starts with the mandatory narration over a piano sequence (electric and grand, simultaneously): some more amazingly beautiful melodies and textures get in, and then some exciting interludes bring warm Tullian airs. The closer 'Alice's Return' wraps up the concept with a reprised motif. All in all, "Alice in Wonderland" is not as gloriously genius as "Battlement", but it is not a disposable progressive album at all; no, it is an excellent addition (albeit with a not too great sound production) to any good prog rock collection. 3.90 stars!

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.96 | 150 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by Nightfly
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

3 stars Anyone listening to Battlement for the first time cannot fail to notice the similarity between vocalist Frederic Joos and Peter Gabriel. The Genesis comparisons don't end there either; Neuschwantein musically also tread similar ground to the English symphonic prog legends in the Gabriel era, though less complex, particularly in the rhythm department. Hans-Peter Schwarz though no slouch holds a steadier beat most of the time compared to Phil Collins dextrous excursions. The use of Flute also adds to the Genesis comparisons.

Released in 1978, Battlement is the second album from this German Symphonic prog band and pretty good it is too. Loafer Jack however is not the most impressive of openers with its simple melody and structure for the most part, though a keyboard dominated instrumental break adds some interest. From here though things get more interesting with all the rest of the tracks being longer than Loafer Jack though no epics, most being around the 7 minute mark but long enough for the band to add some enjoyable instrumental sections. There's some nice use of acoustic guitar (Frederic Joos again) and enjoyable keyboard work in seventies tradition from Thomas Neuroth; a fine player indeed.

One of the best tracks is Intruders And The Punishment with its many changes, enjoyable melodies and long instrumental passages. Joos despite sounding like Gabriel does however lack his character and has a weaker voice, thus leading to the vocals being the weakest area not only here but elsewhere on the album. No such problem on title track Battlement with its long opening haunting instrumental section before vocal duties are passed to bassist Rainer Zimmer.

Overall then an enjoyable listen though I'm not blown away by it. A band that are worth checking out for fans of seventies symphonic prog, particularly if you like early Genesis.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

 Battlement by NEUSCHWANSTEIN album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.96 | 150 ratings

BUY
Battlement
Neuschwanstein Symphonic Prog

Review by b_olariu
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Neuschwanstein second album to date from 1978, after their musical adaptation of Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland from 1974, entitled Battlement is a real joy to listen, from capo al fine. One of the true lost gems of german symphonic prog of the '70's. The music is like everybody observed Genesis meets Camel and even Eloy in places , specialy on vocal parts. But besides this influences this album is a good one in every way with a lots and fine keyboards arrangemets, synthesizers who sound very inteligent for such an unknown band. They've taken the name after King Ludwig castel from Bavarian Alps . The voice reminds me of Gabriel and even in places as I said with Eloy's voice Bohreman. Every single piece from here is a winner, from acustic instrumentation to explosive keys with guitar interplays, this album is a good aquire for every serious listner. The fact that some of the reviewers considered this a Genesis clone, that don't bother me at all, I'm realy impresset by this lost treasure of the late '70's. So all in all an excellent addition to every collection, a real surprise for me, in a good sense. Recommended.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to bhikkhu for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 1.48 seconds