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ZEUHL

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Zeuhl definition

Zeuhl is an adjective in Koba´an, the language written by Christian Vander, drummer and founder of the French band Magma.

Pronunciation: zEU(h)l, while the EU are like a French E with a slight U, and the (h) is a semi-silent letter which is an integrated part of the EU, totaling in a "syllable and a half".

The word means celestial, although many times it is misunderstood as meaning "celestial music", since the members of Magma describe the genre of their music as Zeuhl. Zeuhl Wortz, though, means Music of the universal might.


The genre is a mixture of musical genres like Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Modernism and Fusion. Common elements: oppressive or discipline-conveying feel, marching themes, throbbing bass, an ethereal piano or Rhodes piano, and brass instruments.

Current team members (20/05/2016):
Raffaella (Raff)
Luca (octopus-4)
Ian (Nogbad_The_Bad)
Keishiro (DamoXt7942)
Ori (frippism)

Zeuhl Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Zeuhl | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.31 | 819 ratings
MEKAN¤K DESTRUKT¤W KOMMANDÍH
Magma
4.27 | 570 ratings
K.A
Magma
4.25 | 413 ratings
EROS
DŘn
4.28 | 182 ratings
4 VISIONS
Eskaton
4.19 | 436 ratings
╦M╦HNT╦HTT-R╔
Magma
4.19 | 287 ratings
CHRISTIAN VANDER: TRISTAN ET ISEULT [AKA: ẀURDAH ¤TAH]
Magma
4.23 | 160 ratings
WEIDORJE
Weidorje
4.14 | 319 ratings
F╔LICIT╔ THÍSZ
Magma
4.13 | 350 ratings
1001░ CENTIGRADES [AKA: 2]
Magma
4.43 | 56 ratings
MAIS ON NE PEUT PAS R╩VER TOUT LE TEMPS
Thibault, Laurent
4.11 | 395 ratings
KÍHNTARKÍSZ
Magma
4.16 | 115 ratings
INFERNAL MACHINA
Top, Jannick
4.04 | 381 ratings
MAGMA [AKA: KOBA¤A]
Magma
4.14 | 110 ratings
THE MAGUS
Universal Totem Orchestra
4.31 | 45 ratings
BONDAGE FRUIT II
Bondage Fruit
4.07 | 107 ratings
LES MORTS VONT VITE
Shub-Niggurath
4.09 | 79 ratings
RITUALE ALIENO
Universal Totem Orchestra
4.06 | 92 ratings
EIDER STELLAIRE I
Eider Stellaire
4.08 | 72 ratings
GU╔RISON
Setna
4.17 | 45 ratings
ARCHA¤A
Archaia

Zeuhl overlooked and obscure gems albums new


Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Zeuhl experts team

HUNDRED SIGHTS OF KOENJI
Koenjihyakkei
C'╔TAIENT DE TR╚S GRANDS VENTS
Shub-Niggurath
NEFFESH MUSIC :GHILGOUL
Seffer, Yochk'o
TOSCCO
Happy Family

Latest Zeuhl Music Reviews


 Kawana by ZAO album cover Studio Album, 1976
4.10 | 40 ratings

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Kawana
Zao Zeuhl

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Jazz-Rock / Fusion / Canterbury Team

5 stars With a line-up of musicians such as this you really shouldn't go wrong:

- Franšois Cahen / Yamaha acoustic piano, Fender electric piano, Korg synthesizer - Didier Lockwood / acoustic & electric violin, artianal bass violin - GÚrard PrÚvost / Fender bass, hors phase bass, acoustic bass - Yochk'o Seffer / Soprano & Sopranino saxes, vocals, piano on F.F.F. - Jean-My Truong / orange double drums

1. "Natura" (7:03) sounds so much like a modern Pat Metheny Group epic--but it pre-dates all that! Piano, chunky and jazzy bass, and nasal soprano (sopranino?) sax all sound good together. Jean-My is a little quiet. (9/10)

2. "Tserouf" (8:59) a very tight funky jazz fusion song that could have come off of any of the American masters of the era--Miles, Chick, Stanley, Zawinal, even JLPonty, Area or Bob James! Great song. Very melodic. (9.5/10)

3. "F.F.F. (Fleurs for Faton)" (2:34) very nice little musical Útude performed by piano, acoustic violin and bowed double bass--like a gift from DÚbussy or FaurÚ. (9.5/10)

4. "Kabal" (4:14) very tightly performed, fast-paced opening before stepping down to a slower tempo at 0:50 for some synth work--but then things ramp up again with EVERYBODY getting into the act MAHAVISHNU style. The bass and drum work remain super tight and focused at the bottom throughout this display of virtuosity. (8.5/10)

5. "Sadie" (3:43) opens rather loosely, as if walking by a Jean-Luc Ponty-like street musician. The sopranino sax, bass, and electric violin melodies and harmonic support throughout this oft-shifting tempoed song are gorgeous. At 2:40 we are even treated to an overdubbed solo track for the violin. Nice. Creative, inventive song. (10/10)

6. "Free Folk" (10:44) there's a very relaxed vibe throughout this song--like a WEATHER REPORT song. As a matter of fact, there's very little here--or on this album--that harkens to Zeuhl music. Feels and sounds like the Zao crew has shaken loose from the Vander clutches and moved fully into the jazz fusion fold. Nicely done. Probably the weakest song on the album--almost anti-climactic fill--but still good. (8.5/10)

The question is: why is Jean-My Truong so sedate and/or mixed so low in the soundscape?

 Shekina by ZAO album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.91 | 44 ratings

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Shekina
Zao Zeuhl

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Jazz-Rock / Fusion / Canterbury Team

4 stars Opening with one of my all-time favorite 'happy songs', "Joy!" (3:54) (10/10) a song that just grooves and gets into your bones so that you can't help but get up and dance, be happy, the rest of the album is interesting for the range of emotions it takes the listener through.

2. "Yen-Lang" (8:10) retains more of the band's Zeuhl foundations with its quiet start and slow build using a pulsing, bass-infused almost single chord (single key) melody line. Flute and strings are awesome on this one. (9/10)

3. "Zohar" (10:53) opens at breakneck speed with all band members laying it all on the line--though none more than drummer, Jean-My Truong. By the third minute the music transitions radically to an all-strings format. At 5:00 bass, drums, keys and percussion sneak back in while strings disappear. Cahen's experimentation with keyboard sound takes over for a bit. Though the band is tight in their occasional ensembleness, the song lacks cohesion and overall feels a bit more like a experiment in experimentalism. (8/10)

4. "Metatron" (8:17) opens with Zeuhlish voices and sax and bass before taking off on a run through a series of challenging sections of disciplined precision-timed chord sequences. At two minutes, driving bass and drum race us along while keys, horns and voices move at a deliberately contrasting snail's pace. Things finally shift around the frenetically paced drums as bass and keys open the way for some sax and keyboard solos. Very reminiscent of both Weather Report and even Brand X. Impressive song. Impressive drummer! (9/10)

5. "Zita" (4:38) opens quietly with strings and electric piano weaving into a little soundtrack chamber music exercise with a kind of sound similar to Eberhard Weber or Vangelis. The presence of the lone soprano voice slightly in the background is a cool effect. Beautiful and peaceful. (9.5/10)

6. "Bakus" (5:13) is just weirdness--though keys, bass and drums really put their Zeuhl chops on full display here. Really it's just Seffert's vocals--sounding more like the fore-runner of those from 21st Century Japanese bands Koenji Hyakkei or OOIOO. Solid song. (8/10)

Though Seffers, Cahen, PrÚvost and the rest of the band continue to move farther away from their Magma roots, and more into that of the Jazz-Rock/Fusion sub-genre, this is still an album I'd classify as 'Zeuhl'--unlike their next one, Kawana, which is pure jazz fusion (despite the addition of violinist Didier Lockwood). There's something I like so much about this album. Kind of like the way I feel about AREA's Arbeit Macht Frei versus the more polished and virtuosic follow up, Crac!

4.5 stars.

 2 (ni), AKA Viva Koenji! by KOENJIHYAKKEI album cover Studio Album, 1997
4.02 | 79 ratings

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2 (ni), AKA Viva Koenji!
Koenjihyakkei Zeuhl

Review by Tapfret
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The Zeuhl bloom of 1990's Japan appeared explosive from my vantage point across the sea. One of the most important figures, one might even use an overblown term like "The Godfather of Japanese Zeuhl", was percussionist Tatsuya Yoshida. As the creator of Ruins, what was likely the best known Zeuhl act in the country and progenitor of the movement, Tatsuya set out on a more diverse undertaking than the 2-man act he was previously known for. The result was Koenjihyakkei. Here we find their second album which I will refer to as Viva Koenji!! since that is the part of the cover I can read, likely the most accessible Koenjihyakkei album to this point.

At risk of overusing the term, this album opens in explosive fashion. Right out of the gate Viva Koenji!! shows that the comparative diversity to Ruins does not come at the cost of energy. The similarities between the two bands are obvious and numerous. Vocally the album is preached with the administration of syllabic rhythms of an unknown, seemingly alien language; a perhaps a sort of omni-lingual Esperanto, very similar if not exactly the language used in Ruins. I have honestly not researched the actual spoken words deeply enough to know. In any case, this linguistic set comes from a larger chorus that consists of two female voices that on this album is keyboardist Aki Kubota overdubbed in recording, and three male backing vocals. It is clear that the female vocal is the intended lead, with the male vocals either harmonizing or providing background orcish grunts and chants. Later manifestations and live performances would have multiple female vox on board. Stylistically the is an obvious leaning to the operatic tonality that is the Zeuhl formula on either continent where it is semi-popularized. The vocals alternate between dominant manic sequences and the drawn out clear legatos. The compositional themes are rhythmically dynamic, but do not employ any poly-metrics. Guitars are distorted but not to metal levels. Keyboards employ the use of organ and piano sounds with the occasional moogy waveforms. The overall presentation is complex but accessible, dark but energetic, and dynamic but deliberate.

Later Koenjihyakkei would employ more Rock in Opposition style rhythmic abnormality and instrumental dissonance. That likely makes Viva Koenji!! the most accessible of their albums to this point. Therefore it is highly recommended as an entry point to Koenjihyakkei's music, and in fact, the Japanese Zeuhl scene as a whole. I also recommend as a companion to this album the live DVD Live at Doors which features a number of songs from their first four albums including Viva Koenji!! as a good transition to their more challenging albums.

A very excellent album that would be a fine addition to any prog collection. 4 stars

 Mathematical Mother by UNIVERSAL TOTEM ORCHESTRA album cover Studio Album, 2016
4.06 | 30 ratings

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Mathematical Mother
Universal Totem Orchestra Zeuhl

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

5 stars This is the third offering from Universal Totem Orchestra, a quixotic Italian band that gets criticized for not being pure zeuhl (nothing is really, besides Magma) and thus dividing Progland into outright fans and naysaying purists. Too bad really, as they never claimed to be devoted followers in the first place. Their debut "Rituale Alieno" as well the follow up "The Magus" are both, in my humble opinion, extraordinarily brilliant albums that deserve the loftiest progressive praise. There are some similarities with Magma and some huge differences. First the common elements, namely a furiously talented leader in drummer UTO G. Golin who simply pounds and sizzles throughout all their tracks, pushed along by the reptilian bass of Yanik Lorenzo Andreatta. Definitely near Vander/Top/Paga levels of quality. The arrangements hover from bombastic Wagnerian explosions to jazzier climes, again a Kobaian characteristic. The major difference is Ana Torres Fraile's booming voice that is beyond description, capable of a wide variety of tones, octaves and styles, but much closer to opera than anything else. Occasional forays into Arabic, Gothic and Gregorian leanings only accentuate her stunning brilliance. She is also extremely attractive. Furthermore, guitarist Daniele Valle and keyboardist Fabrizio Mattuzzi can hold their own with the very best the prog universe can suggest, technically hyper-proficient but loaded with gusto, bravado and oomph. Finally, saxophonist Antonio Fedeli adds the sultry instrument at the most appropriate of times, such as one the shining and eloquent "Architettura Dell'Acqua". UTO's style is way more expansive, playful, symphonic, jazzy, retro, bucolic and medieval than anything unleashed by the Destruktiw Kommandohs.

Kick off the Mathematical Mother opus with a 14 minute surge "Terra Cava", a whirlwind demonstration of the various talents at hand, a scat singing opener that quickly evolves into a complex and insistent polyrhythmic explosion with zooming bass, deft stick work, cool piano musings and a hard carving guitar rampage. Fraile's voice seduces immediately, her lung capacity is quite impressive to say the least, extended long series of notes and trembling invocations, a truly impressive diva. The ornamental piano takes over a great deal of the melodic arrangement, sumptuous and elegant as it should be, deepening the reflective emotions and enriching the pace. At the 8 minute mark, the rabidly intense bass guitar rumbles through like a freight train, the dynamic mood turning Saharan and the spirit utterly adventurous. The bass tone is trebly and extremely fluid, a sort of Squire/Entwhistle synthesis that will astound the fans of the mythical instrument. Guitarist Valle then goes on his flowery rant, egging Mattuzzi to take over and rise to the heavens. I find myself slammed right between the eyes by the sheer power of their demanding and virtuous music.

A blistering fury is set with the exalting "Codice Y16", a synth-blasted shorter piece that seeks to underline a kind of a Charlie Brown?like piano motif (you will get it when you hear it), a perfect platform for Mattuzzi's wild synthesizers to parallel Fraile's thrilling and athletic voice. The jazz elements are straight forward here, almost Canterbury-esque in many ways, again muscled along by that impulsion -fueled bass guitar, a joy to follow throughout this splendid disc.

The ebb and flow on "Elogio del Dubbio" will make your head spin, from misty serene to ethereal Gothic as well as out right bull in a china shop, the whole thing just spirals mightily into the celestial heavens. A blizzard of persevering notes, played at breakneck speed, then suddenly, an eerily Dead Can Dance like Arabic lamentation swoops in from the desert, assisted by some cool tablas , meandering into the labyrinths of the mind. Fraile wailing majestically once again, the scimitar-edged pace heightens as the ravaging guitar slashes mightily through the haze. Praise be to the Golin School of drumming, the man is a total beast.

The compelling "Architettura Dell'Acqua" is the masterpiece on this album, a simply incredible piece of music, incorporating the mellifluous soprano voice, lyrics in English and the sophisticated saxophone , unified in an idyllic initial setting, lush with heartbreaking fragility and purest design. Then the alternating themes begin their madcap ballet, the echoing piano treatment giving rise to some furious guitar pirouettes, as well as some dazzling turbo- charged flurries from the band, swift and adventurous. Back to the momentary calm before heading back to the fury. Tons of little details abound, like the squeaky synth wobbles, the heavy rock guitar showcase, the choir additions giving this a Orff-ian bombast that is hard to resist.

Back to jazzier horizons on "Citta Infinite", another perfect platform for Ana Torres Fraile to shine, a mesmerizing vocal display. This is semi-mellow stuff but it does include a snippet from UTO's masterful epic "De Astrologia" off the Magus album, which remains in my humble opinion, a classic prog tour de force. The vibraphone solo from Mirko Pedrotti is eyebrow raising to say the least. Wow! The final track "Mare Verticale" borrows again the disorienting and pounding rhythmic style that is their claim to fame, aided by a devilish bass and drum assault and adorned by some technically astute voice work that never ceases to amaze. I can listen to this a thousand times and still be impressed by the brilliant playing and the technical savvy by each band member.

In recap, this is an album that one can listen to as a whole, then go through it again just listening to one instrument, one at a time. That for me is the inherent attraction of any prog album. To the 19% who labelled this poor and only for completionists , you have my deepest condolences.

5 Measured mammas

 FloŰ ╦ssi / ╦ktah by MAGMA album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1998
3.90 | 36 ratings

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FloŰ ╦ssi / ╦ktah
Magma Zeuhl

Review by Tapfret
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Never have I been much of a collector of singles, but this "single/b-side" CD has a very special place in my collection. Their is a fairly long-winded story that goes along with my affinity for the disc that is likely not particularly review appropriate. The short version is hearing this on the radio (yes, the radio) accidentally one early 1999 night before bed while setting the clockradio alarm. The unmistakable vibrato of Chistian Vander with the familiar muffled ring of slightly overdriven Rhodes whiffled through the tinny little clockradio speaker. "That sounds like Magma!!! ON THE RADIO!" It was, as it turns out, ╦ktah being played during a promotional interview for the 1999 International Progressive Music Festival in San Francisco. What better than to hear Magma on the radio? How about finding out I was about to see them live?!? Something most of us thought would not happen in the US at that time.

The song itself, as previously stated, was undeniably Magma textured. Obviously not the epic composition we have come to expect, but very intricate and tightly mixed music. Vocally the verses not only carry the operatic tonality we come to expect from Magma, but Christian's syllabic rhythms on ╦ktah are unique even for him.

The "A side", FloŰ ╦ssi, is the jazzier of the tunes. My only live experience with Magma has featured Phillipe Bussonnet on bass and he never disappoints. Here, he blasts into the song with his driving, growling sound in he songs jazzy intro, then softens in the middle; complimenting the soft ethereal harmonies of Stella and Isabelle. The song rounds out in less then 3 minutes, but does not feel short or in any way incomplete.

Overall, this is an extremely enjoyable listen, albeit short. It is highly recommended for fans and actually makes a very accessible intro to Magma's sound for the unfamiliar; a feature that actually convinced me this was worthy of tipping to the 4 star side. The catch is availability. To my knowledge, at the time of this review, neither of these songs is featured on any of the many Magma compilations or live publications.

4 Stars

 Simples by MAGMA album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1998
3.55 | 18 ratings

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Simples
Magma Zeuhl

Review by Tapfret
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Rather than have an accidental "quick rating" deleted, I decided to give this collection of singles a listen, then another, and another. Moments that I totally expected, but obviously I found enough enjoyable aspects to these 5 songs to warrant several listens and a review.

Familiarity arrived in the form of Mekanik Kommandoh, which as is it implies, is the 6th movement of MDK; and Tendei Kobah, which is recognizable as the intro to 1001 Centigrades opener Riah Sahiltaahk. The latter would be identified in the 2014 re-recording of Riah Sahiltaahk as Watse´ koba´a. The recordings sound comparatively primitive to later renditions, but take nothing away from their enjoyability in that regard. Whether hearing these pieces outside of the context of their parent compositions is left for the subjectivity individual listener.

The highlight of the album for me was Mekanik Machine, which I will be presume to label "proto-funk-metal". By most Magma standards it appears quite simple. But it is a raw and heavy tidbit that most Magma listeners should find joy in.

The low point would be Klaus kombalad, which I would not be able to pick out of a lineup of late 60's psychedelia as an actual Magma tune.

Overall, Simples exists in the early horn-heavy phase of Magma. I would say it is not likely a good starting point for Magma noobs, but an enjoyable enough listen that it should be included in any Magma collection. Unless you have all these singles individually. In which case, forget it.

 Ruins - Hatoba by RUINS album cover Studio Album, 1994
3.06 | 6 ratings

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Ruins - Hatoba
Ruins Zeuhl

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE Team

3 stars While the unhinged drummer Tatsuya Yoshida is often referred to as the Japanese version of Christian Vander for his avant-garde crazed and adrenaline fueled take on Magma's zeuhl contributions to the musical world, on this particular early collection of recordings (1991 - 1993) where he hooked up with experimental and psychedelic noise rocker Omoide Hatoba, he created a very, very strange and bizarre album that will surely leave anyone who dares to enter these realms with the lingering question of if most of this could actually be called music! While zeuhl rhythms dominate the majority of RUINS releases, on this one it is the pure essence of noise rock laced with the extreme and utmost experimental features that could leave the uninitiated running away in sheer terror. On this release there is no doubt that RUINS (sometimes referred to as RUINZHATOVA) runs side by side with label mates the Boredoms in creating the most bizarre and extreme sonic expressions possible all the while maintaining a humorous journey through the unexpected. If you think RUINS in general produces some of the most asymmetric angular bizarreness in the experimental rock world on their "normal" albums then you really need to check out this freak-a-zoid world of the oblique and free form psychosis rock that equally eschews the norms at every step similar to the early Boredoms albums while worshipping the cult of unconventional and placing pandemonium on center stage with a crown royale gracing its riotous presence.

This album is (for the most part) a series of short attitude filled with short punk (in attitude) mode tracks that come and go rather quickly most lasting less than a minute but some reaching the unthinkable three minute mark. Sometimes some thrash metal is added, sometimes weird sound effects, but always highly unstructured musical creations that offer glimpses into the musical ward of an insane asylum but somehow always finding a glimmer of resolution. Graced with ridiculous track titles like "Macrocosmic Microcassette," "We Are All Frozen Stiff," "United States Of Stink Bug," "Geeg Geeg Geeg," the short but sweet post-punk meets avant- prog tracks that deliver all kinds of bizarre twists and turns ranging from funk guitar to chanting to heavy distorted punk / thrash guitar to acoustic psychotic folk that makes me think of Tiny Tim during an acid trip. Everything about this album is meant to be jarring as one idea simply harpoons the previous down. While not quite to the level of early Boredoms where things change by the second, this callithump of creativity at least has the decency of staying somewhat stable for enough time to grasp what is going on.

While the first 25 tracks are an interesting sonic rotisserie of one bizarre idea after another, the true test of the listener's patience comes from the very last track "Rock + 1 (Challenge Your Face)" which lasts a staggering 24 minutes and 51 seconds! This is a true shocking contrast to the in-yer-face punk fueled shorter tracks that make up the first half of the album. The last track could possibly qualify as the most unlistenable piece of, a hem, "music" ever recorded down to tape (as it was in 1991 when this was recorded). This long and surprisingly LOOOOONG track is nothing more than a totally bizarre and wild a cappella ride that has the pseudo-form of creating melodies that has many vocal parts delivering the most bizarre interpretations of monkeys, dog wining and chicken clucking. It goes on for a staggering 20 minutes adding counterpoints and occasionally bizarre and weird echo effects. It's the kind of stuff you can't believe you are hearing! After those 20 minutes, it actually does some weird instrumental things and then turns into the first track of the first album by Italian avant-garde jazz fusionists Area ("Luglio Agosto Settembre Nero")

Just when you think it will never end, it does. This album is definitely a 10 out of 10 on the experimental bizarre-omater. It challenges all notions of what music is. It disturbs the senses like an atheist at a sacred religious ritual. It is Copernicus to the Catholic Church. It's just wild. It all sounds like a fun-fueled event that was caught on tape and subsequently released to the public. Everyone on board is having a very good time as evidenced by the laughter on board. This is free form rock of the highest degree with a healthy dose of Zappa humor on board despite the desire to utterly eschew every orthodox rule of established rock ethics. This is a must hear but will hardly be something that demands repeated listening, however there is something subtly addictive to this if you are an adventurous music lover and i would highly recommend this for everyone to at least check out once. While hardly essential, it is nonetheless strangely satisfying for those seeking out the most bizarre and heterodox musical creations to be heard.

 Amaterasu by CORIMA album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.97 | 14 ratings

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Amaterasu
Corima Zeuhl

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Jazz-Rock / Fusion / Canterbury Team

4 stars Wonderful modern Zeuhl with very strong presence of classical, jazz, and folk themes and instrumentation.

1. "Tsukutomi I" (6:44) starts out quite pretty then gets downright kelzmer! Yet, this is good, modern Zeuhl! (9/10) 2. "Tsukutomi II" (10:36) opens with some gentle foundation music supporting a nice soprano sax solo. (9.5/10) 3. "Tsukutomi III" (2:31) the finale of the three-part suite almost sounds like an overture from a late-1960s Broadway rock opera--heavy on the Hammond. (8/10)

4. "Amaterasu I" (3:45) Zeuhl classical piano?!! (9/10) 5. "Amaterasu II" (3:31) slowed down and spacious but just as ominous with violin, saxophone and female voices mirroring each other. (9/10) 6. "Amaterasu III" (4:53) again presents the Klezmer sound masked in JANNICK TOP/UNIVERSAL TOTEM ORCHESTRA- like female and male vocals. (8.5/10) 7. "Amaterasu IV" (2:34) sounds like it could have come straight off of a 1970s JEAN-LUC PONTY album! Great drumming. (8/10) 8. "Amaterasu V" (6:12) very standard Zeuhl in the Magma tradition (8/10) 9. "Amaterasu VI" (8:02) which is then continued in the album and suite's final song. (8/10)

4.5 stars; B+; a near-masterpiece of progressive rock music. It's so difficult for me to not like the intense spiritual feelings evoked by true Zeuhl music like this. This is the best Zeuhl album of 2016 that I have heard.

 Ruins II by RUINS album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1987
4.00 | 3 ratings

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Ruins II
Ruins Zeuhl

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE Team

4 stars RUINS released their second EP a year after the first and doubled the length by upping the time length to over 20 minutes! They also changed up their sound quite a bit. This begins totally different as it has a mix of melodic bass lines that have a rather subdued effect although the drums are chomping at the bit for a major energy explosive release. After the short opening "Human Being" which belies their true nature, the appropriately titled "Entropy" unleashes the full RUINS effect with Kimoto Kazuyoshi abusing his bass and Tatsuya Yoshida going wild on his retrospective drum kit. Both men scream and holler like animals being violated in test labs and the mix of chaotic zeuhl rhythms and avant-punk chaotic dissonance destroy the musical landscape like a tsunami erasing entire coastal villages.

The main difference between the first EP and RUINS II is that this one has more moments of reflection and contrast in the form of straight forward melodic and rhythmic intros and snippets of sanity between the free-for-all noise rock meets avant-prog and zeuhl rhythms although they are short and to the point but at least recalibrate the listener's perception before taking the chaotic train to nowhere. The slower parts are much more in line with noise rock bands like Sonic Youth or The Jesus Lizard despite the wild and unhinged vocals but when the duo jump into the swirling eddies of brutal avant-prog they create a maelstrom of time sig tornadoes and unrelenting brutality that the listener finds difficult to believe that only two guys are creating. RUINS II is a step up from the debut in that it has more layers of sound, more diverse musical approaches and is slightly more accessible but still would be deemed extreme noise by the uninitiated who happened upon this.

 Ruins by RUINS album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1986
3.00 | 1 ratings

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Ruins
Ruins Zeuhl

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE Team

— First review of this album —
3 stars Although intended to be a power trio the Japanese band RUINS (there's an Australian band of the same name) ended up as consisting of only two members: drummer/vocalist Tatsuya and bassist of which there have been four in the history of the band. On this debut EP that to date has only been released on 7" vinyl finds Kawamoto Hideki handling bass duties. Therefore there is no guitar to be heard but rather a cacophonous noise rock production that utilizes the Magma inspired zeuhl rhythms as inspiration but at this point these guys were into free improvisation with highly distorted bass tones, frenetic brutal prog workouts and screamed, shouted and screeched lyrics that were created in their invented language (the Magma connection runs deep).

On this short but sweet debut release that came out in 1986 they manage to cram six tracks into a 10 minute and 17 second release. The whole thing comes off as an avant-punk type of sound actually as the bass gallops so fast that it sounds like a guitar frenzy at times and some of the rhythms remind me more of a Dead Kennedys on speed than anything Christian Zander pumped out however the Magma influences are quite pronounced in the vocals even if the blatant instrumental aspects hadn't quite conjured up the sophistication to evoke their favorite prog superstars. RUINS is the logical beginning of this band that has always been about speed, distortion and avant-bravado. This EP was never released on CD but is on YouTube and many of the tracks are on the compilation "1986-1992" however "Crisis," "Catastrophe" and "Nocturne," half the EP is missing. This is decent but nothing totally unexpected or overly different than their more easily obtainable 90s releases.

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Zeuhl bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
ALTA¤S France
AMYGDALA Japan
ANAID France
ARCHAIA France
ARKHAM Belgium
BONDAGE FRUIT Japan
SERGE BRINGOLF France
CAILLOU France
CORIMA United States
DAIMONJI Japan
D▄N France
EIDER STELLAIRE France
ELEPHANT TOK France
ESKATON France
FRACTALE France
GA'AN United States
HAPPY FAMILY Japan
HONEYELK France
KAKUSENJO NO ONGAKU (BASE OF FICTION) Japan
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LAGGER BLUES MACHINE Belgium
MAGMA France
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NEOM France
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OFFERING France
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PAGANOTTI/PAGA GROUP France
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RH┘N France
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RUINS Japan
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FRANăOIS THOLLOT France
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UNIT WAIL France
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VAK France
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VAULTS OF ZIN United States
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