Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

CAMEL

Symphonic Prog • United Kingdom


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Camel picture
Camel biography
Formed in 1971 in Guildford, Surrey, UK - Disbanded in 1984 - Reformed from 1991 to 2003 and again since 2013

The roots of CAMEL go as far as 1964, when the Latimer brothers Andrew and Bryan form part of a band called THE PHANTOM FOUR, after gaining some fame, the band changes their name to STRANGE BREW, a when the bass player Graham Cooper reaches the band. But things were about to change, Ian Latimer and Cooper leave the band and Doug Ferguson joins.

At this point drummer Andrew Ward joins the crew and the seeds were growing in this new Blues oriented band called simply THE BREW, and at last in 1971 with the arrival of keyboardist Peter BARDENS CAMEL is officially born.

In their first period CAMEL releases four albums, the self titled debut, which was received with limited enthusiasm by the public, which lead to the change of label from MCA (Who didn't wanted to take risks) to Decca, with whom they stayed for 10 years.

Followed by "Mirage", Snow Goose" and "Moonmadness" (for many their essential trilogy), during the latest album tour, the saxophonist and flute player Mel Collins joins and leads CAMEL to a first radical change in the sound, as well as in the formation because Doug Ferguson is replaced by the Ex CARAVAN bass player Richard SINCLAIR.

With this formation CAMEL releases two albums, "Rain Dances and "Breathless", which marks for many the end of CAMEL'S golden era mainly because Pete Bardens leaves the band and the next release "I Can See Your House From Here" is considered inferior to the previous releases by the critic.

From this point the lineups constantly changes but the band still releases seven more albums received with different degrees of acceptance, until the last studio album "A Nod And a Wink" sees the light in 2002 (the same year Pete Bardens passes away) completing a large discography of 14 studio releases, 9 live albums, 7 DVD's and several box sets .

Maybe because their style is softer than most of the pioneer bands with atmospheric and light Space Rock overtones their fanbase is not as huge as the ones of the coetaneous and more aggressive bands such as GENESIS (Who in my opinion influenced CAMEL), YES or KING CRIMSON, but CAMEL is without doubt among the most respected groups, and the Latimer - Bardens duo is considered one of the most creative compositional teams.

If I h...
read more

CAMEL forum topics / tours, shows & news


CAMEL forum topics Create a topic now
CAMEL tours, shows & news Post an entries now

CAMEL Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to CAMEL

Buy CAMEL Music



More places to buy CAMEL music online

CAMEL discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

CAMEL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.95 | 1391 ratings
Camel
1973
4.40 | 2842 ratings
Mirage
1974
4.30 | 2419 ratings
The Snow Goose
1975
4.39 | 2424 ratings
Moonmadness
1976
3.64 | 1036 ratings
Rain Dances
1977
3.17 | 854 ratings
Breathless
1978
2.91 | 744 ratings
I Can See Your House From Here
1979
3.63 | 817 ratings
Nude
1981
2.64 | 531 ratings
The Single Factor
1982
3.44 | 742 ratings
Stationary Traveller
1984
3.65 | 553 ratings
Dust And Dreams
1991
3.75 | 656 ratings
Harbour Of Tears
1996
4.08 | 913 ratings
Rajaz
1999
3.96 | 737 ratings
A Nod and a Wink
2002
4.18 | 595 ratings
The Snow Goose (Re-recording)
2013

CAMEL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.38 | 447 ratings
A Live Record
1978
3.38 | 186 ratings
Pressure Points
1984
3.71 | 131 ratings
Camel On The Road 1972
1992
4.45 | 183 ratings
Never Let Go
1993
2.46 | 81 ratings
Camel On The Road 1982
1994
3.45 | 76 ratings
Camel On The Road 1981
1997
4.29 | 152 ratings
Coming Of Age
1998
3.88 | 81 ratings
Camel 73 - 75 Gods of Light
2000
3.65 | 83 ratings
The Paris Collection
2001
4.89 | 18 ratings
Camel At The Royal Albert Hall
2020

CAMEL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.60 | 49 ratings
Pressure Points - Live in Concert
1984
4.54 | 124 ratings
Coming of Age (DVD)
1998
2.94 | 29 ratings
Curriculum Vitae
2003
3.98 | 52 ratings
Footage
2004
3.86 | 39 ratings
Footage II
2005
4.02 | 49 ratings
Total Pressure - Live In Concert 1984
2007
3.93 | 61 ratings
Moondances
2007
4.40 | 84 ratings
The Opening Farewell - Live At The Catalyst
2010
4.43 | 43 ratings
In From The Cold
2014
4.38 | 30 ratings
Ichigo Ichie - Live in Japan 2016
2017
4.98 | 34 ratings
Live At The Royal Albert Hall
2019

CAMEL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.28 | 21 ratings
Chameleon (Best Of Camel)
1981
3.26 | 22 ratings
The Collection
1985
3.67 | 33 ratings
A Compact Compilation
1985
2.68 | 12 ratings
Landscapes
1991
3.44 | 65 ratings
Echoes
1993
2.45 | 12 ratings
Camel (25th Anniversary Compilation)
1997
3.93 | 38 ratings
Lunar Sea - An Anthology 1973-1985
2001
3.17 | 5 ratings
Supertwister - Best
2006
3.98 | 46 ratings
Rainbow's End - A Camel Anthology 1973-1985
2010

CAMEL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.07 | 36 ratings
Never Let Go
1973
4.59 | 17 ratings
The Snow Goose
1975
3.64 | 14 ratings
Flight Of The Snow Goose
1975
3.96 | 30 ratings
Another Night
1976
3.62 | 20 ratings
Highways of the Sun
1977
4.11 | 9 ratings
Breathless
1978
3.80 | 5 ratings
Your Love Is Stranger Than Mine
1979
4.50 | 2 ratings
Some Exerpts From The New Camel Album
1979
2.75 | 4 ratings
Remote Romance
1979
3.75 | 4 ratings
Remote Romance (German Version)
1979
5.00 | 2 ratings
Camel In Concert No.250
1981
4.00 | 7 ratings
Lies
1981
3.75 | 8 ratings
No Easy Answer
1982
4.14 | 7 ratings
Selva
1982
3.32 | 9 ratings
Cloak And Dagger Man
1984
2.65 | 8 ratings
Long Goodbyes
1984
3.33 | 3 ratings
Berlin Occidental (West Berlin)
1984
3.75 | 4 ratings
Lies (Promo Single)
1984
4.33 | 6 ratings
Captured
1986
4.57 | 28 ratings
Never Let Go
2002

CAMEL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Rainbow's End - A Camel Anthology 1973-1985 by CAMEL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2010
3.98 | 46 ratings

BUY
Rainbow's End - A Camel Anthology 1973-1985
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N 462

"Rainbow's End ? A Camel Anthology 1973 - 1985" is a compilation of Camel and was released in 2010. It's a four CD compilation with fifty eight tracks. This is a compilation album that follows basically a chronological order with some few exceptions. It has a huge amount of tracks that cover all their discography, ten studio albums since 1973 to 1984. It has really a mix of studio and live tracks with most of the studio tracks being identical to the original album versions.

The CD 1 has eleven tracks. "Slow Yourself Down", "Never Let Go", "Curiosity" and "Mystic Queen", are from "Camel". "Camel" is a great debut album with great tracks. The two best tracks are present here, "Never Let Go" and "Mystic Queen". "Slow Yourself Down" and "Curiosity" are also two excellent tracks. "Nimrodel/The Procession/"The White Rider", "Freefall", "Earthrise" and "Lady Fantasy" are from "Mirage". "Mirage" is a masterpiece. It's considered by some, Camel's best work. All tracks are great and could be part of this compilation. But, there's one that deserves a special mention, "Lady Fantasy". It's the most celebrated track on that album and is one of their most famous tracks too. This is an original mix version. "Ligging At Louis" is an unreleased track and "Arubaluba" is from "Camel". Both were from the BBC Radio One "In Concert". "Supertwister" is from "Mirage". This is a live version at the Marquee Club.

The CD 2 has fourteen tracks. "Homage To The God Of Light" isn't a Camel's track, really. It was originally released on Peter Bardens' solo album "The Answer". It's a fantastic track. This is a live version. "The Great March", "Rhayader", "Rhayader Goes To Town", "Preparation" and "Dunkirk", are from "The Snow Goose". "The Snow Goose" is another masterpiece. It's Camel's breakthrough album. Despite be a concept album, all are great tracks. "Preparation" and "Dunkirk" are live versions at the Royal Albert Hall. "Aristillus", "Song Within A Song", "Air Born", "Spirit Of The Water", "Chord Change" and "Another Night", are from "Moonmadness". "Moonmadness" is also a masterpiece. All tracks are excellent. "Chord Change" and "Another Night" are live versions at the Hammersmith Odeon. "First Light" and "Elke" are from "Rain Dances". "Rain Dances" is a balanced piece with some great moments and some changes.

The CD 3 has fifteen tracks. "Tell Me", "Metrognome" and "Unevensong" are from "Rain Dances". "Metrognome" is a live version at the Colston Hall. "Lunar Sea" is a song originally recorded on "Moonmadness". This is also a live version at the Colston Hall. "Rain Dances" is from "Rain Dances". This is a live version at the Colston Hall too. "Echoes", "Starlight Ride", "Breathless" and "Rainbow's End" are from "Breathless". "Breathless" is the weakest album with Latimer and Bardens in Camel. "Echoes" is one of the best tracks on that album but the other three aren't really bad. "Rainbow's End" is a single version. "Survival", "Hymn To Her" and "Ice" are from "I Can See Your House From Here". "I Can See Your House From Here" isn't a bad album but is the weakest album of Camel with "The Single Factor". "Ice" is the best track on that album but the other two are decent tracks. "City Life", "Nude" and "Drafted" are from "Nude". "Nude" is the best Camel's album in the 80's. As a concept album all tracks are linked and all are great.

The CD 4 has eighteen tracks. "Docks", "Beached" and "Captured" are from "Nude". All were from the BBC Radio One "In Concert". "Summer Lightning" is from "Breathless". It's from the BBC Radio One "In Concert". "Sasquatch", "Heroes", "Selva", "A Heart's Desire" and "End Peace" are from "The Single Factor". "The Single Factor" is the weakest Camel's album. Still, it isn't a bad album either. These four tracks are some of the best tracks on that album. "In The Arms Of Waltzing Frauleins", "Cloak And Dagger Man", "Stationary Traveller", "Long Goodbyes", "Pressure Points", "West Berlin" and "Fingertips" are from "Stationary Traveller", except "In The Arms Of Waltzing Frauleins" that was released in 2004 on the digital remastered edition. "Stationary Traveller" is a very good album of Camel in the 80's. These tracks are good enough to be present here. "Pressure Points", "West Berlin" and "Fingertips" are live versions at the Hammersmith Odeon. "Rhayader" and "Rhayader Goes To Town" are live versions at the Hammersmith Odeon.

Conclusion: "Rainbow's End ? A Camel Anthology 1973 - 1985" is focused on Camel's long association with Decca which yielded some of the best and most prog material ever made by them. It features key album tracks plus rare studio and live recordings. Housed in a hardback book package, the lavish booklet contains previously unseen photographs, memorabilia and an essay by Mark Powell. Taken as a whole, the compilation does an admirable job of showing the various sides of Camel. A judicious selection of live and studio cuts, single oriented tracks and especially deep album numbers paint an accurate and fascinating portrait. While not as timeless as some of their contemporaries, Camel produced a body of work that well worth investigation. The newcomers will be very well served by "Rainbow's End". However, they may also want to seek out for the more straightforward "Lunar Sea" compilation, or even "Echoes".

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Chameleon (Best Of Camel) by CAMEL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1981
2.28 | 21 ratings

BUY
Chameleon (Best Of Camel)
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by Lupton

4 stars Ever changing colours.

I am probably one of the very few Camel fans who actually enjoy this album.Obviously someone at Universal Music shares my enthusiasm because it finally got a CD release (in Japan) last year much to my pleasant surprise.Obviously as a single vinyl LP originally, there is no way it could ever manage to be fully representative so the compilers have simply taken a minimum of one track off all the Deram Lps.Fortunately with a couple of exceptions, this compilation has managed to cherry pick many of my favourite tracks. "Echoes" from Breathless is far and away the best and proggiest track on that album. "Rhayader /Rhayader Goes to Town" from the Snowgoose album is arguably the strongest track from that album.I was never as enthusiastic about Moon Madness as most fans seem to be but I always liked "Song Within a Song" from that album and here it is- track 4.I actually really liked the Raindances album and my favourite from that album "Unevensong" is here as well.I always found Nude a bit difficult to digest like a lot of concept albums but "Nude/Drafted" and "Lies" from that album were pretty strong and make a welcome appearance too. I Can See My House From Here saw the group moving into dangerously commercial waters and unfortunately this compilation includes "Remote Romance" from that album which is the most irritating song they ever recorded. There are actually quite a few decent tracks from that album which the compiler could have chosen but there you go. "Rainbow's End from Breathless round off the compilation and is rather a lightweight syruppy ballad and there are any number of tracks I would have preferred - maybe "Highways of the Sun"

Overall though, as a listening experience I think this album works extremely well. There are much more comprehensive collections like the 2CD Echoes but I actually find those exhaustive compliations a bit tough to get through. Ironically unlike single LP samplers which make no attempt to be comprehensive but work as an album when listening to these blockbuster 2CD collections I spend most of the time irritated by the tracks they omit.

So again- I realise I am in the minority but I still recommend Chameleon as an excellent sampler and a very enjoyable album in its own right

4 stars

 A Nod and a Wink by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.96 | 737 ratings

BUY
A Nod and a Wink
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars In continuous musical evolution, with new ideas motivated by the success of the previous Rajaz work, the latest effort for the camel once again brings a change of course. The magnificent cover is the perfect synthesis of this particular and courageous record: a sweet and fairytale atmosphere, broken by the distant passing of a train moving towards who knows where! It is perhaps a look at his own past, a mature man who looks at his own child from above, while far away a steam train (life?) Continues its journey hissing along the tracks of his own existence. And it is precisely the whistle of a departing train that opens the disc, the album's first masterpiece, with a sparkling flute by Latimer and a finale full of anguish and melancholy (... day or night, in the dark or in the light, it returns from me, the same way you leave. Then you can always find me in your dreams ...) that flows, without interruption, into "Simple Pleasures", a composition with bluesy sounds with long and delicious guitar phrases. It is not a concept, the compositions are conceptually unrelated but united by a common meaning, the magic of existence (... when he left the room his perfume filled the air. Thirty years have passed, it is still there ...) .

There are so many references to the past, to the eternal child who lives in each of us as in the acoustic-pastoral "A Boy 's Life" (... I try to see through your eyes, but life continues to change the point of view. Are we so different? It's a boy's life after all ...). Flutes, acoustic guitars and keyboards intersect in a whirlwind of meaningful emotions. The fast-paced rhythm of the song's finale introduces one of the most picturesque moments of the record, but I would also dare to say of the entire Camel discography: "Fox Hill". It is still the acoustic guitars, supported by the keyboards of Guy Leblanc to open the song. The story of fox hunting is told, a story that ended badly? but not for the fox Tod, who will never be caught! Indeed it is she who challenges the English aristocrats in this game (... "well, I'm a skilled dodger" said the fox. "They never catch me, no. I lead them all in a happy dance" ...). Around four minutes we find an interesting guitar and keyboard duet that takes up the initial theme, to close once again with a very inspired Latimer.

The few lines of "The Miller's tale", one of my favorite pieces, bring back the typical Camelian atmosphere built on a guitar arpeggio accompanied by the omnipresent flute. Here Latimer surpasses himself, in a few lines he sings beautifully, then the atmosphere darkens and the cello and oboe forcefully take over in a crescendo ending (... and the two friends went home. No need for words. They are like one thing. . And now the summer is over, the light on the fields gets old?). The unmissable instrumental by Camel, highly recognizable, keeps the level of the album high. It is an interesting piece, also from a compositional point of view, but which perhaps descends a step below the previous Rajaz's "Sahara". However, there is a great deal of work on the drums with notable rhythmic variations. This leads to the final "For Today", the only one that also sees Leblanc's signature on a record whose lyrics are the prerogative of the leader and his wife Susan Hoover. The wounds of the 9/11 attack on the twin towers are still open, but in the bitter awareness that nothing will ever be the same again, the record closes with a glimmer of hope (... nothing lasts forever, there are no second chances, no never miss a day, always live every day ...).

A nod and a wink is not only the latest album by the English band, it is perhaps the most intimate. An album that talks a lot about Andy himself and that has the merit of going beyond certain writing patterns that are often imposed on musicians. It is also the least progressive, less pop, less experimental album, but you will surely realize from the very first notes that it is a great album.

 Rajaz by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 1999
4.08 | 913 ratings

BUY
Rajaz
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

5 stars After the valid "Stationary Traveler" of '84 the Camel went through a difficult period. Only seven years later, thanks to the efforts of Andrew Latimer (the only survivor of the group), the Camels were able to reconstitute themselves with a new base of operations in Mountain View, California.

After two excellent albums, "Rajaz" was released in 1999. In my opinion, the present disc is superior to the famous "The Snow Goose" slightly fragmentary disc. Of course in "Rajaz" there are no longer the incomparable A.Ward on drums, P. Bardens on keyboards, D. Ferguson on bass. Latimer, however, has always remained a great guitarist and over the years has also become a convincing multi-instrumentalist. The construction of his guitar solos is excellent, not for the high technical rate, but for the intense lyricism and melancholy. His music has not adapted to the new musical fashions, but has kept the progressive spirit of the 70s, evolving only in part. It is no coincidence that Latimer defines his music "Emotional Music". The whole disc is full of vaguely oriental sounds and possesses refinement and homogeneity.

It starts with "Three Wishes" instrumental with a slow and quiet beginning which then continues faster and faster with guitar cuts in evidence. "Lost And Found" song sung with an intense and convincing voice, closing with long guitar phrases. "The Final Encore" rhythm track with a deep and calm voice by Latimer. "Rajaz" sad piece with cello by B. Phillips and flute by Latimer. Extremely fascinating track. Simple and calibrated acoustic "Shout" ballad. "Straight To My Heart" wonderful autobiographical sung piece. The instrumental "Sahara" is one of my favorite songs. It starts out as a slow and progressively progresses to a phenomenal guitar solo. It closes with "Lawrence" a powerful piece dedicated to Sir.Thomas.Edward.Lawrence or "Lawrence of Arabia". Extremely evocative piece where the guitar solo reaches peaks of absolute sentimental and expressive charge. Undoubtedly a masterpiece (in my opinion). A magical drive that will transport you to distant and mysterious places.

Also noteworthy is the folding booklet where the image of the guitar blends with the desert dunes. Cover with four stars. The explanation of the disc title is perfectly clarified by the following words in the booklet - The music of poets once carried caravans across the great deserts. Sung to a simple metre of the animal's footsteps, it transfixed weary travellers on their sole objective...journey's end. This poetry is called "Rajaz". It is the rhythm of the camel.

 Harbour Of Tears by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 1996
3.75 | 656 ratings

BUY
Harbour Of Tears
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars The only survivor of the Camel, A. Latimer, after various ups and downs, including economic ones, manages to settle in Mountain View, CA. Animated by new musical projects, he manages to found a personal record company (Camel Productions) and in 1991 to produce the excellent Dust And Dreams. Only five years later, Harbor Of Tears was released, a complex and rather personal work. In fact, after his father died in 1993, Latimer decided to carry out a grueling and expensive genealogical research. With the discovery of his Irish origins, he probably decided to develop this concept album. The story takes place in 1845 and tells the vicissitudes of many families forced to abandon their roots to find fortune in new continents. There is a note on the back of the CD packaging which fully explains the meaning of the album title. "Cobh Harbor is a beautiful deep-water port in County Cork, Ireland. It was the last sight of Ireland for hundreds upon thousands of fractured families who departed her shores for fates unknow. They called it the Harbors of Tears".

In addition to Latimer, ten other musicians appear on this record. Colin.Bass (bass), M.Simmonds (keyboards), D. Paton (bass, vocals), M.Mckenna (a capella vocal), J.Xepoleas (drums), N.Panton (oboe, soprano sax, harmonium) , J.Burton (french horn), B. Phillips (cello), K.Bentley and A.Stoneham (violin). It starts with the delicate "Irish Air" with a beautiful ethereal voice by M. McKenna, with instrumental reprise by Andy. "Harbor Of Tears" sung by Andrew with inevitable and melancholy guitar solo. "Send Home The Slates" song and guitar solo with clear and elongated sounds. "Under The Moon", one of the songs that always moves me in a particular way, despite being a simple guitar solo. "Watching The Bobbins", a partially rock sung song with a rhythmic beginning and a long final solo. "Eye Of Ireland" rather catchy acoustic ballad. "Running From Paradise" joyful song with Latimer's flute in evidence. With "Coming Of Age" Andy shows off his artistic skills. The piece begins with a quick, decisive insert of violins followed by a very effective guitar solo. Quite complex and articulated piece. It ends with "The Hour Candle (A song for my father)". Apparently it begins as a "dirge", and then ends in a dazzling guitar solo with a basically bluesy setting. The solo features a high amp saturation rate to create a noticeable melancholy impact. The piece ends by reconnecting at the beginning of the disc, with the same voice as M.McKenna. I must also add that the track does not end here but continues for another sixteen minutes with the sound of the refracting of the sea waves. Beautiful song, undoubtedly a little gem.

So don't expect musical experimentations, or compositions with intricate instrumental virtuosity on this record. Expect an excellent record full of sincere emotions, with a "CameLatimer" (nicely nicknamed by me) as always in excellent shape. An unjustly forgotten record ...

 A Live Record by CAMEL album cover Live, 1978
4.38 | 447 ratings

BUY
A Live Record
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars The live record is always a decisive appointment for a rock group called to confirm its ability to keep intact the energy of the songs expressed in the studio on stage. Camel passes the test with flying colors with this double album, a real must for the group's lovers, always lived a bit on the edge of the crowded prog scene of the '70s, suspended in this romantic and gentle sound dimension of the Canterbury sound.

The work opens with "Never Let Go", a song curiously tinged with funky suggestions that support the meek singing of Latimer which is repeated in the subsequent "Song within a Song" this time in the tradition of the classic Camel-sound, brilliant melodies in their simplicity, almost a music on a human scale. The prolific Latimer-Bardens pairing also signs the subsequent "Lunar Sea" which after an ethereal intro goes into a furious ride in which Latimer's guitar always proves to be very lyrical and recognizable. A wink at the sirens of jazz-rock, a real temptation for every musician of the time, and off to "Skylines" among the trills of the electric piano and moog hums of the late Bardens, intelligent and discreet architect of the group's harmonies . A pleasant and anonymous "Ligging at Louis" anticipates "Lady Fantasy", Camel's ensemble contribution, which soon became their live classic: a couple of quiet initial verses colored by Bardens' Hammond that lead to the usual fast-tempo it hosts the evolutions of Latimer's six strings, before a sweet and melancholy bridge and an epic-toned finale.

Ultimately a great test of the group that confirms to be master of the romantic rock language, characterizing it with the personal and recognizable imprint of the talented guitarist-flutist Latimer, as well as the intelligence of the arrangements of the keyboardist Bardens.

A must have.

 A Compact Compilation by CAMEL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1985
3.67 | 33 ratings

BUY
A Compact Compilation
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N 452

Camel released their eponymous debut studio album "Camel" in 1973. In the following year the band released their second studio album "Mirage". In 1975, the band decided to record a concept album based on a book's story. Doug Ferguson suggested Paul Gallico's "The Snow Goose". So, the group released their third studio album with the same name, which has become a very successful release. In 1976, the band released "Moonmadness" their fourth studio album with better commercial success in America than in England. In 1977, Doug Ferguson quit the band being replaced by Richard Sinclair an ex-member of Caravan. Saxophonist Mel Collins, who was spending most of his time in the studio and touring with the band, became an official band's member. In the same year Camel released their fifth studio album "Rain Dances". These are the albums of which some of these tracks belong on this compilation album.

"A Compact Compilation" is a compilation of Camel and was released in 1985. This is a compilation album that only features songs from 1974 to 1977. Unfortunately, it hasn't any song from their eponymous debut studio album "Camel".

"A Compact Compilation" has thirteen tracks. The first and second tracks "Freefall" and "Lady Fantasy: Encounters/Smiles For You/Lady Fantasy" were originally released on their second studio album "Mirage" in 1974. "Freefall" is almost an instrumental largely dominated by Latimer's guitar. It has nice moments performed by Bardens' keyboards, well supported by an inventive bass and a dynamic drumming work. It's influenced by diverse styles of music and the melody is excellent. "Lady Fantasy: Encounters/Smiles For You/Lady Fantasy" is the most celebrated track on that album and is one of the most famous Camel's tracks. It's one of their most progressive tracks and shows why Camel is one of the most respected bands in the progressive rock. The third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth tracks, "The Great March", "Rhayader", "Rhayader Goes To Town", "The Snow Goose", "Flight Of The Snow Goose" and "Dunkirk", were originally released on their third studio album "The Snow Goose" in 1975. "The Great March" is a punchy and nice tune played with a flute. It opens and concludes the album with an exploration of nature sounds. "Rhayader" is a track with a powerful melody combining flute, guitar and organ. It has a memorable flute melody supported by an organ's solo. "Rhayader Goes To Town" brings the music into a faster tempo, with great combination of guitar and organ with energetic beats. It has an extended guitar solo too. "The Snow Goose" is a mellow track with a slow guitar solo with snippets of synthesizer and bass here and there as well as a steady drum beat. It has a powerful melody that is repeated in the end of that album. "Flight Of The Snow Goose" is a typical progressive track with plenty of moog synthesizers. It begins with a synthesizer and guitar part gradually increasing in volume until a new theme comes in. There's a nice synthesizer solo that is followed by a repeat of the main melody. "Dunkirk" is dominated by the keyboards. Yet, guitar fills some parts and serves as a melody in others. It uses Hammond organ as basic rhythm section plus some howling guitar work followed with a nice guitar solo. The ninth and tenth tracks "Song Within A Song" and "Lunar Sea" were originally released on their fourth studio album "Moonmadness" in 1976. "Song Within A Song" is a calm, beautiful, and melancholic track that contrasts with the deep voice of Ferguson. It's a great track with a nice and relaxing guitar and flute works. "Lunar Sea" is an instrumental track. It's one of the best tracks on that album. It's a track with great individual and collective performances. The melody changes and evolves all over the theme. It reminds me something spatial, as its name suggests. The eleventh, twelfth and thirteenth tracks "First Light", "Metrognome" and "Rain Dances" were originally released on their fifth studio album "Rain Dances" in 1977. "First Light" is an inspired and a fantastic instrumental piece. It's the first time that we can listen to a sax on a Camel's album. Collins did a great job on that album. "Metrognome" is a great track with a calm and beautiful start. It becomes progressively more complex and experimental, with some jazz influences. "Rain Dances" is a reprise of the opener. It's the smallest but a great instrumental track, almost classic. It's a natural great ending to this excellent musical working.

Conclusion: "A Compact Compilation" is a good compilation album of Camel. It has some of their best tracks that belong to some of their best studio albums ever. All those albums belong of what we can call the golden era of Camel. However and unfortunately, none of the tracks that belong to the eponymous debut studio album of Camel were included here. And it was a pity. That album also belongs to their golden era and can be considered one of their best, indeed. Anyway, there are plenty of great tracks on this compilation, really. We can say that all tracks are excellent, in their own way. But, if the band had chosen some others, instead of these, it would be also great because the quality of those five albums is immaculate. So, we can say this is a very good introduction to the world of Camel. And this is also a nice introduction for those who aren't familiar, yet, with the world of prog rock music. So, 3 stars is a right rating to it.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Supertwister - Best by CAMEL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2006
3.17 | 5 ratings

BUY
Supertwister - Best
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N 448

The roots of Camel can be found in 1969 when guitarist, flutist and vocalist Andrew Latimer, bassist Doug Fergusson and drummer Andy Ward formed a band called The Brew. In 1970, the trio joined with keyboardist and vocalist Phillip Goodhand and changed the name to Tait. But, at the end of the same year, Goodhand quit the band. In 1971 keyboardist Peter Bardens, an ex member of Them, came to strengthen the trio. The new quartet formed in Surrey chose the name Camel. The end of 1971 saw the day the band made their first musical performance as a support band of Wishbone Ash.

"Supertwister - Best" covers the career of Camel released in the 70's and in the 80's. So, it includes some of their best works between 1973 and 1984. The tracks span the great career of the band. Almost all the studio albums released in that time are represented here. The only exception is their ninth studio album "The Single Factor" of which no tracks were chosen. Still, this wasn't a real problem. As many of we know, "The Single Factor" is in general considered the weakest studio album released by them. So, we can say that some of their best tracks are included on this compilation.

So, "Supertwister - Best" is a compilation of Camel and was released in 2006. It has thirteen tracks. "Never Let Go" and "Six Ate" are from "Camel". "Never Let Go" is my favourite track on that album and one of my favourite songs from the band. It's a wonderful piece with the presence of Bardens on vocals. He made a great keyboard solo well accompanied by a nice Latimer's flute work. "Six Ate" is really the weakest point on that album, for me. It isn't really a bad track but it's a bit repetitive, for my taste. Anyway, it has a pleasant instrumental work, really. "Supertwister" and "Lady Fantasy" are from "Mirage". "Supertwister" is a nice and peaceful track. It's a great instrumental track partially dominated by a great flute work by Latimer. With this track, he proved to be a great flute player too. "Lady Fantasy" is a multi-part epic track. It's the most celebrated track on that album and it's one of the most famous tracks written by Camel. This track contains one of the most progressive tracks made by them and is a good example why Camel is one of the best and most respected bands in the progressive rock universe. "Rhayader" and "Rhayader Goes To Town" are from "The Snow Goose". "Rhayader" is a track with a powerful melody combining flute, guitar and organ. It has a memorable flute melody supported by a solo of an organ. "Rhayader Goes To Town" brings the music into a faster tempo, with great combination of guitar and organ with energetic beats. It has an extended guitar solo too. "Song Within A Song" and "Lunar Sea" are from "Moonmadness". "Song Within A Song" is a calm, beautiful, and melancholic track which contrasts with the deepest voice of Ferguson. It's an excellent track with some nice and relaxing guitar and flute works. This is a typical Camel's track. "Lunar Sea" is an instrumental track. It's the lengthiest track on that album and it's also one of the best tracks on it. It's a track with great individual and collective performances. The melody changes and evolves all over the theme. It reminds me something spatial, as its name suggests. "Elke" is from "Rain Dances". "Elke" is almost a Latimer's solo piece, featuring the usual excellent electronic experimentation by Brian Eno. This is a nice, peaceful and atmospheric instrumental track. "Echoes" is from "Breathless". "Echoes" is a typical Camel's track and represents one of the most progressive tracks on that album. It's a track with a great Latimer's guitar working. This is certainly the best track on that album. This is Camel at their best. "Wait" is from "I Can See Your House From Here". "Wait" represents a good starting point to that album. It's a track in the vein of Camel's usual opening tracks on their albums. This is a good track with some nice and interesting keyboard work. It has also a nice Latimer's guitar solo. "Drafted" is from "Nude". "Drafted" is a track with great melodies and guitar themes in the classic Camel's style. It proved, beyond any doubt, that the band was back at their best and most pure progressive roots on that album. "Fingertips" is from "Stationary Traveller". "Fingertips" is a beautiful, melodic and a cool ballad on that album. This is a love song, one of the most commercial tracks on that album. Thus, despite it has the return of the nice sound of the saxophone of Collins, it doesn't represents one of highest points on that album. Still, this remains to me a good track.

Conclusion: "Supertwister ? Best" is another good compilation of Camel. It covers all their studio albums released in the 70's and in the 80's, with the exception of "The Single factor". But, above all, it covers all their albums that usually are considered as belonging to their golden era, "Camel", "Mirage", "The Snow Goose" and "Moonmadness". From those albums were chosen two tracks from each one. All those tracks are great with the exception of "Six Ate" that I consider the weakest track on that album. Anyway, those four albums are so good that if they were chosen other tracks, it would be great too. About the other five tracks all are great, despite "Breathless" and especially "I Can See Your House From Here" not being such good albums as the others. So, we can say this is a well representative compilation of Camel almost without weak points. It has songs with enough quality to be considered good and be rated with 3 stars.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Lunar Sea - An Anthology 1973-1985 by CAMEL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2001
3.93 | 38 ratings

BUY
Lunar Sea - An Anthology 1973-1985
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N 444

"Lunar Sea ? An Anthology 1973 - 1985" is a compilation of Camel and was released in 2001. It was made to cover all the musical career of the group released in the 70's and in the 80's. It includes some of their best works between 1973 and 1984. The tracks span the great career of the band. The ten studio albums released in that time are represented here. Especially, it includes some of the tracks that belong to their golden musical era, their first four studio albums.

"Lunar Sea ? An Anthology 1973 - 1985" has twenty-six tracks. "Never Let Go" and "Slow Yourself Down" are from "Camel". "Never Let Go" is a wonderful piece with Bardens on vocals. He did a great keyboard work, accompanied by a nice Latimer's flute work. "Slow Yourself Down" has a great organ work and a relaxed vocal work. It has a good rhythm section too. "Freefall", "Nimrodel/The Procession/White Rider" and "Lady Fantasy" are from "Mirage". "Freefall" is almost an instrumental track with nice moments and a nice melody. It's influenced by several styles. "Nimrodel/The Procession/White Rider" is one of the best tracks on that album, with frequent time changes and musical soundscapes, It has a great symphonic climax. "Lady Fantasy" is the most celebrated track on that album and is one of the most famous and progressive tracks of Camel. This is a live version. "The Great March", "Rhayader" and "Rhayader Goes To Town" are from "The Snow Goose". "The Great March" is a punchy and nice tune played with the flute. It opens and concludes that album with an exploration of nature sounds. "Rhayader" has a powerful melody combining flute, guitar and organ. It has a memorable flute melody supported by a solo of an organ. "Rhayader Goes To Town" brings the music into a faster tempo, with good combination of guitar and organ with energetic beats. "A Song Within A Song", "Spirit Of The Water", "Air Born" and "Lunar Sea" are from "Moonmadness". "A Song Within A Song" is a beautiful and melancholic track with a nice and relaxing guitar and flute works. "Spirit Of The Water" is a short track, an atmospheric pretty ballad with a nice piano work complemented by a distant vocal singing. "Air Born" is a good developed track. It begins with flute and piano, which suddenly explodes with instruments and vocals. "Lunar Sea" is an instrumental track with great performances. The melody changes and evolves all over the theme. This is a live version. "Tell Me" and "Elke" are from "Rain Dances". "Tell Me" is a calm, delicate and beautiful ballad with a fine Latimer's flute work. It's a very dreaming track. "Elke" features an excellent electronic experimentation by Brian Eno. It's a nice, peaceful and atmospheric instrumental track. "Echoes" and "The Sleeper" are from "Breathless". "Echoes" is a typical Camel's track and one of the most progressive songs on that album too. It has a great Latimer's guitar work. "The Sleeper" is an instrumental track. It's a typical Camel's track with a slight jazzy touch. "Ice" and "Hymn To Her" are from "I Can See Your House From Here". "Ice" is a classic Camel's instrumental, the only progressive on that album that shows Latimer at his best. "Hymn To Her" has a traditional Camel's sound. It's a beautiful ballad with a good instrumental section. "City Life", "Drafted" and "Lies" are from "Nude". "City Life" is a bit poppy but is well done. Mel Collins adds some nice sax work to it. "Drafted" is a track with nice melodies and guitar themes in Camel's style. It shows that the band was back at their most pure roots on that album. "Lies" is a strong vocal track. It delivered a Mackay's organ solo proving he could understand the kind of keyboards that a prog band should use in the 80's. "Sasquatch" is from "The Single Factor". It's an interesting instrumental. It's the only track on that album that features the presence of their former keyboardist, Peter Bardens. "Cloak And Dagger Man", "Stationary Traveller", "West Berlin" and "Long Goodbyes" are from "Stationary Traveller". "Cloak And Dagger Man" sounds in the new wave pop style with a fast and frenetic rhythm. It was written in a more commercial vein. "Stationary Traveller" is an instrumental track with the typical Camel's sound. It's the best track on that album where we can see Latimer at his best. "West Berlin" is a good track with a nice rhythm and good musical passages. It's influenced by the new wave style, with fine textures and is well produced. This is a live version. "Long Goodbyes" is an epic and mellow ballad, and is a nice way to close that album and this compilation too.

Conclusion: "Lunar Sea ? An Anthology 1973 - 1985" is similar to "Echoes", another compilation released by Camel in 1993. Still, this compilation more or less supplants in some ways and also enhances the 1993 compilation. However, with a slightly longer running time and a fair difference in song content, though with the same number of tracks, the overlap between the two compilations is surprisingly very limited. Covering almost their entire musical career, Decca era at least, this double set includes their most progressive music, as well as a few rather misguided attempts at hit singles. Anyway, Camel was always an album's band, like this compilation shows, with some extended instrumental pieces. Concluding, this is another good compilation of the band that serves as a good introduction for anyone who's not familiar with Camel's music, especially the selection tracks that represent their earlier and most progressive phase.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Echoes by CAMEL album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1993
3.44 | 65 ratings

BUY
Echoes
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N 440

"Echoes" is a compilation album of Camel and was released in 1993. It was made to cover all the musical career of the group until that moment. It's comprehensively two discs set that include many of their musical work all over the years and lays it out over an hour and an half. The tracks spanning twenty years of a great musical career and all the eleven studio albums released by Camel till that moment are represented. So, obviously it includes some of their best tracks.

"Echoes" has twenty-six tracks. "Never Let Go" is from "Camel". It's a wonderful piece with Bardens on vocals. He made an amazing keyboard work, accompanied by a marvellous Latimer's flute work. "Freefall" and "Lady Fantasy" are from "Mirage". "Freefall" is almost an instrumental track with nice moments. It's influenced by several styles, with an excellent melody. "Lady Fantasy" is the most celebrated track on that album, is one of the most famous Camel's tracks and is also one of the most progressive tracks of them. "Rhayader" and "Rhayader Goes To Town" are from "The Snow Goose". "Rhayader" has a powerful melody combining flute, guitar and organ. It has a memorable flute melody supported by an organ solo. "Rhayader Goes To Town" brings the music into a faster tempo, with great combination of guitar and organ with energetic beats. "Song Within A Song", "Air Born" and "Lunar Sea" are from "Moonmadness". "Song Within A Song" is a beautiful and melancholic track with a nice and relaxing guitar and flute works. It's a typical Camel's track. "Air Born" is an excellent developed track. It begins with flute and piano, which suddenly explodes with all instruments and vocals. "Lunar Sea" is an instrumental track. It's a track with great individual and collective performances. The melody changes and evolves all over the theme. "Unevensong", "Tell Me", "Elke" and "Skylines" are from "Rain Dances". "Unevensong" is a track with great variations. It has a lot of breaks and tempo changes and has also great Latimer's guitar solos. "Tell Me" is a calm, delicate and beautiful ballad with a fine Latimer's flute working. It's a very dreaming track. "Elke" features an excellent electronic experimentation by Brian Eno. It's a nice, peaceful and atmospheric instrumental track. "Skylines" is an instrumental track with great jazz influences. It's a good number well performed by all band's members. "Breathless", "Echoes" and "The Sleeper" are from "Breathless". "Breathless" is a beautiful and melodic track with a touch of pop. It's an excellent example how a prog band can make a good pop song. "Echoes" is a typical Camel's track and one of the most progressive songs on that album. It has a great Latimer's guitar work. "The Sleeper" is an instrumental track. It's a typical Camel's track with a slight jazzy touch. "Your Love Is Stranger Than Mine", "Hymn To Her" and "Ice" are from "I Can See Your House From Here". "Your Love Is Stranger Than Mine" is a melodic track with a pop style. It has nice vocal harmonies in the wave of the commercial hits. "Hymn To Her" is a song with a traditional Camel's sound. It's a beautiful ballad with a good instrumental section. "Ice" is a classic Camel's instrumental track, the only progressive on that album and that shows Latimer at his best. "Drafted" and "Lies" are from "Nude". "Drafted" is a track with great melodies and guitar themes in Camel's style. It shows the band was back at their best and pure roots on that album. "Lies" is a strong vocal track. It delivered a Mackay's organ solo proving he could understand the kind of keyboards that a prog band should use in the 80's. "Sasquatch" and "You Are The One" are from "The Single Factor". "Sasquatch" is an interesting instrumental track. It's the only track on that album that features the presence of their former keyboardist, Peter Bardens. "You Are The One" is a commercial track, well structured. It's a good track that keeps the good quality on that album. "Refugee" and "West Berlin" are from "Stationary Traveller". "Refugee" is a solid track with a modern sound. The final result is a well balanced track. "West Berlin" is a good track with a nice rhythm and good musical passages. It's influenced by the new wave style, with fine textures and well produced. "Mother Road" and "Whispers In The Rain" are from "Dust And Dreams". "Mother Road" is a nice Camel rocker that starts innocently but develops well along the way. The harmonies are created through guitar, keyboards and vocals. "Whispers In The Rain" is a very short and a nice instrumental track.

Conclusion: "Echoes" is a good compilation, really. It appeals to me because it has the ingredients that a compilation must have. It's a good overview of Camel's work of those years. It revisits the entire career of Camel, at the time, and it has some of the best tracks of Camel. It has good sound and a nice booklet too. As all big Camel's fans like me know, the musical style of Camel changed a bit all over the years. As many of us know, Camel has two great musical periods, the 70's and the 90's. Like most of the progressive rock bands of the classic era, and Camel wasn't an exception, they lived in the 80's a terrible period for them, a terrible period for all progressive rock music. Concluding, I sincerely think that "Echoes" is, in general, a good compilation that represents very well the musical career of a great band, until that moment, and represents a great introduction for those who are newbies with Camel. So, I'm going to give it 3 stars.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

Thanks to Ivan_Melgar_M for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.