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CAMEL

Symphonic Prog • United Kingdom


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Camel biography
Formed in 1971 in Guildford, Surrey, UK - Disbanded in 1984 - Reformed from 1991 to 2003 and again since 2013

The roots of CAMEL go as far as 1964, when the Latimer brothers Andrew and Bryan form part of a band called THE PHANTOM FOUR, after gaining some fame, the band changes their name to STRANGE BREW, a when the bass player Graham Cooper reaches the band. But things were about to change, Ian Latimer and Cooper leave the band and Doug Ferguson joins.

At this point drummer Andrew Ward joins the crew and the seeds were growing in this new Blues oriented band called simply THE BREW, and at last in 1971 with the arrival of keyboardist Peter BARDENS CAMEL is officially born.

In their first period CAMEL releases four albums, the self titled debut, which was received with limited enthusiasm by the public, which lead to the change of label from MCA (Who didn't wanted to take risks) to Decca, with whom they stayed for 10 years.

Followed by "Mirage", Snow Goose" and "Moonmadness" (for many their essential trilogy), during the latest album tour, the saxophonist and flute player Mel Collins joins and leads CAMEL to a first radical change in the sound, as well as in the formation because Doug Ferguson is replaced by the Ex CARAVAN bass player Richard SINCLAIR.

With this formation CAMEL releases two albums, "Rain Dances and "Breathless", which marks for many the end of CAMEL'S golden era mainly because Pete Bardens leaves the band and the next release "I Can See Your House From Here" is considered inferior to the previous releases by the critic.

From this point the lineups constantly changes but the band still releases seven more albums received with different degrees of acceptance, until the last studio album "A Nod And a Wink" sees the light in 2002 (the same year Pete Bardens passes away) completing a large discography of 14 studio releases, 9 live albums, 7 DVD's and several box sets .

Maybe because their style is softer than most of the pioneer bands with atmospheric and light Space Rock overtones their fanbase is not as huge as the ones of the coetaneous and more aggressive bands such as GENESIS (Who in my opinion influenced CAMEL), YES or KING CRIMSON, but CAMEL is without doubt among the most respected groups, and the Latimer - Bardens duo is considered one of the most creative compositional teams.

If I h...
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CAMEL discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

CAMEL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.96 | 1336 ratings
Camel
1973
4.40 | 2766 ratings
Mirage
1974
4.30 | 2358 ratings
The Snow Goose
1975
4.39 | 2358 ratings
Moonmadness
1976
3.63 | 991 ratings
Rain Dances
1977
3.16 | 820 ratings
Breathless
1978
2.91 | 707 ratings
I Can See Your House From Here
1979
3.63 | 786 ratings
Nude
1981
2.64 | 508 ratings
The Single Factor
1982
3.44 | 712 ratings
Stationary Traveller
1984
3.65 | 534 ratings
Dust And Dreams
1991
3.75 | 628 ratings
Harbour Of Tears
1996
4.07 | 880 ratings
Rajaz
1999
3.96 | 709 ratings
A Nod and a Wink
2002
4.17 | 583 ratings
The Snow Goose (Re-recording)
2013

CAMEL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.38 | 424 ratings
A Live Record
1978
3.37 | 179 ratings
Pressure Points
1984
3.71 | 122 ratings
Camel On The Road 1972
1992
4.45 | 173 ratings
Never Let Go
1993
2.49 | 75 ratings
Camel On The Road 1982
1994
3.41 | 72 ratings
Camel On The Road 1981
1997
4.30 | 143 ratings
Coming Of Age
1998
3.86 | 75 ratings
Camel 73 - 75 Gods of Light
2000
3.63 | 79 ratings
The Paris Collection
2001
5.00 | 11 ratings
Camel At The Royal Albert Hall
2020

CAMEL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.59 | 47 ratings
Pressure Points - Live in Concert
1984
4.53 | 120 ratings
Coming of Age (DVD)
1998
2.93 | 28 ratings
Curriculum Vitae
2003
3.97 | 50 ratings
Footage
2004
3.84 | 38 ratings
Footage II
2005
4.01 | 47 ratings
Total Pressure - Live In Concert 1984
2007
3.92 | 60 ratings
Moondances
2007
4.40 | 81 ratings
The Opening Farewell - Live At The Catalyst
2010
4.43 | 41 ratings
In From The Cold
2014
4.36 | 28 ratings
Ichigo Ichie - Live in Japan 2016
2017
5.00 | 22 ratings
Live At The Royal Albert Hall
2019

CAMEL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.01 | 18 ratings
Chameleon (Best Of Camel)
1981
3.34 | 21 ratings
The Collection
1985
3.74 | 31 ratings
A Compact Compilation
1985
2.51 | 11 ratings
Landscapes
1991
3.46 | 59 ratings
Echoes
1993
2.45 | 12 ratings
Camel (25th Anniversary Compilation)
1997
4.11 | 35 ratings
Lunar Sea - An Anthology 1973-1985
2001
4.33 | 3 ratings
Supertwister - Best
2006
4.19 | 44 ratings
Rainbow's End - A Camel Anthology 1973 - 1985
2010

CAMEL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.02 | 33 ratings
Never Let Go
1973
4.77 | 13 ratings
The Snow Goose
1975
3.55 | 12 ratings
Flight Of The Snow Goose
1975
3.91 | 28 ratings
Another Night
1976
3.54 | 18 ratings
Highways of the Sun
1977
4.33 | 9 ratings
Breathless
1978
3.50 | 4 ratings
Your Love Is Stranger Than Mine
1979
4.00 | 2 ratings
Some Exerpts From The New Camel Album
1979
3.20 | 5 ratings
Remote Romance
1979
4.00 | 5 ratings
Remote Romance (German Version)
1979
5.00 | 1 ratings
Camel In Concert No.250
1981
4.17 | 6 ratings
Lies
1981
3.89 | 9 ratings
No Easy Answer
1982
4.25 | 8 ratings
Selva
1982
3.38 | 10 ratings
Cloak And Dagger Man
1984
2.70 | 9 ratings
Long Goodbyes
1984
3.33 | 3 ratings
Berlin Occidental (West Berlin)
1984
3.75 | 4 ratings
Lies (Promo Single)
1984
4.00 | 4 ratings
Captured
1986
4.72 | 24 ratings
Never Let Go
2002

CAMEL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Rain Dances by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 1977
3.63 | 991 ratings

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Rain Dances
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by thesimilitudeofprog

4 stars Rain Dances was the fifth studio album by the English progressive rock group Camel. It was originally released in 1977 and brought a major change in the band's lineup by replacing bassist Doug Ferguson with ex Caravan member Richard Sinclair and adding saxophonist Mel Collins formerly of King Crimson. Expectations for this album must have been very high back in 1977. The band had established themselves as major players in the Prog scene having released a string of four excellent albums Camel self-titled, Mirage, The Snow Goose and Moonmadness. All witch gathered a strong fan base and attracted critical acclaim.

This album marked a first in a series of changes in personnel. Doug Ferguson having decided to leave the band due to musical differences mainly with drummer Andy Ward, who wanted the band to take a jazzier approach. Ferguson was replaced by EX- Caravan bassist singer Richard Sinclair. This would be the first of two albums that would feature wind instrument player extraordinaire Mel Collins previously of King Crimson. Rain dances is an excellent album, it would also mark the beginning of a low point in Camels career. The album opens with one of my favorite Camel instrumentals First Light. First Light is a superb song very well written with amazing melodies from Collins on sax and Lattimer on guitar. Barden's keyboard parts are very atmospheric, reminiscent of Pink Floyd. Ward's drumming is tasteful, precise and filled with subtleties. Following First Light we have a song called Metronome. This would be the first song which Sinkler would sing as Lattimer would do backing vocal parts. There is a great instrumental moment showcasing an amazing melodic interplay between Lattimer and Collins. Following Metronome is the beautiful ballad Tell Me. The definite highlight of this song is the fretless bass. Following Tell Me we have the song called Highways of The Sun. This should have been a big hit single for the group. Now if we flipped over the record, we would have a song called the Uneven Song. It has always sounded like Supertramp to me especially the keyboard work. It is a wonderfully constructed song brilliantly executed with a very beautiful instrumental ending. Following Uneven Song, we have a song called One of These Days. I'll be honest with you; this isn't my favorite song on the album. It is well played and has some great jazz flavors, but I do find this song somewhat boring and underwhelming. The next is a song called Elka. It is a hypnotic number. I really love Brian Eno's collaboration on this one, so you can imagine it has an atmosphere all its own. The keyboards are the highlight here and this is a personal favorite of the album and in the top three of my favorite Camel songs. The album closes with two instrumentals. Skyline's is the first, a very jazzy number with an incredible bassline throughout as well as good playing for everybody else. Finally, the last song on the album is the title track Rain Dances, which is a short instrumental that uses a theme from the opening song First Light but played differently. It ends the album on a good note and even with the few weak tracks on the album it makes you want to play it all over again. Rain Dances is an excellent album and would be an excellent addition to anybody's prog rock collection but not essential.

Rating-80%

Recommended Tracks: Tell Me, Elke and Rain Dances.

 A Nod and a Wink by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.96 | 709 ratings

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A Nod and a Wink
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars The last three studio albums by Camel are for me return to the shape and confidence of the 70's. While not as experimental and visionary, Camel decided that progressive rock would be the album cornerstone.

Camel seem to have found their new face on the last two albums, in particular. Calm textures, elaborate guitar melodic lines, enough time for compositions to expand and limited singing to highlight instrumental ideas. Camel music has always had more feelings than an average prog band; late Camel can be as melancholic and mellow as some late 70's albums.

The first title track has both old and contemporary 90's prog sound with modern rock guitar, some synth sounds are also modern. "Simple pleasures" is notable for the marvellous guitar lines with great slides, it reminds a bit of Dire Straits. The drummer has some room to show off in the next "A boy's life". This is another relaxing track, sometimes even without drums and I would be slowly willing for more dynamism, which comes in the "Fox hill". This excellent track has tight interplay between keyboards and guitars. My personal highlight is the last "For today" - most emotions left till the end. This ballad starts a bit in a restrained manner with singing and sparse guitar. Then comes a Pink Floyd rhythm + Hammond and picteresqe guitar soloing that is tasty and original. The second part of the track is joined by multiple instruments to create a cresciendo of sounds and a memorable motive.

Camel was in their third creative phase until 2002 and this is another album that can stand on its own as a better work in their discography.

 Breathless by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.16 | 820 ratings

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Breathless
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by Squire Jaco

3 stars I own virtually ALL of the recorded Camel material, and if I had to compile a Top Five Songs list of the group, two of those five songs would come from THIS album alone: "Echoes" (my favorite Camel song of all time!) and "The Sleeper".

We diehard Camel fans will usually admit that it's the instrumentals that we love most about the band, with vocals only a peripheral element to the music. (Why else do you think we all feel that "The Snow Goose" is their best album?) Both "Echoes" and "The Sleeper" are heavy on the instrumental gymnastics. The few vocals that do appear in "Echoes" are really well-done, and flow perfectly with the rest of the song. The two-part "The Sleeper" is a classic Camel instrumental with odd time signatures and jazz-rock soloing. Clever drums, dancing bass lines, cool synthesizer sounds, and great guitar/sax/keyboard soloing in both songs make them essential songs for the serious Camel collector.

Hey, I'm compulsive enough to have plopped down good money just to own ONE song from an otherwise unnecessary album. But with this album, you get some decent secondary songs to make the whole purchase worth your while, as well as a heavy dose of great sax, courtesy of guest Mel Collins. Some of the "decent" music includes the title track that begins the album, and the three-minute Santana-like guitar outro to "Summer Lightning", which is simply STUNNING (despite the disco drumming). After those, you have some "nice" songs ("Wing and a Prayer" and "Rainbow's End") and the admittedly disappointing, blah, unremarkable ones ("Starlight Ride", "You Make Me Smile", and the Canterbury-ishly tongue-in-cheek "Down on the Farm"). Curses!

This was my very first Camel album purchase back in the mid-70's, so I've always tried to defend my little discovery against the critics. But there's no sense in denying that some commercialism crept into this album on a few tracks, and the album would have to stand behind at least 5 or 6 other Camel albums in terms of overall quality.

Unfortunately for your wallet, you NEED "Echoes" and "The Sleeper".....so buy the album if you can't find them on any other compilations. I'm going with 3-1/2 stars.

 Live At The Royal Albert Hall by CAMEL album cover DVD/Video, 2019
5.00 | 22 ratings

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Live At The Royal Albert Hall
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by judahbenkenobi

5 stars At last! It took the band nearly a year to release this DVD as promised and teased on YouTube, but finally the wait is over! At least for us mortals that live far away from where all the action takes place, a concert film is about the only way in with we will ever see and listen to our favorite bands performing live.

This DVD is almost complementary to the other film Camel released a couple of years before, "Ichigo Ichie", which featured the same lineup. Although some of the tracks are here again, most of the setlist is different. Its main difference being that the classic "Moonmadness" album is performed in its entirety. "Spirit of the Water", "Airborn" , and "Lunar Sea" were on " Ichigo Ichie ", but hearing them within the album context gives them a different, very special feel. The arrangements for the "Moonmadness" tracks are not immensely different from the originals, but since 75% of the band is different from the one who played the original version, it is only logical that there will be some personalized changes to each instrument. The only exception to this is the opening track, "Aristillus" which is the original recording played back as an intro to the concert.

The second half of the setlist consists of other classic tracks, mainly from their 90's repertoire, Andy Latimer's most cherished period it seems. There's two tracks from the "I Can See Your House..." album (not what I expected, but thankfully the best tracks on that release), "Unevensong" from "Rain Dances" and nothing from the debut, "Mirage" or " Snowgoose", except for the obligatory closer. If you want something from those other albums or from their 80's material please visit the other concert releases.

The musicianship here is top notch. Everyone seems to be in perfect shape and absolute control of their respective areas. Andy Latimer is the highlight, of course. There is little evidence to his having been so close to death or at least close to disability. His guitar playing is more emotional than ever, and his modesty moved him to delegate some of the vocal duties to the rest of the band. Colin Bass's lines are solid as always, and his voice doesn't seem to have aged one bit. Denis Clement, always smiling and enjoying himself delivers a strong, steady rhythm beat that, although sometimes slower than the original tempo, keeps a very energetic attitude that permeates to the rest of the band. And last, but certainly not least, Pete Jones, who has been blessed with the physical blindness that is compensated for what appears to be superhuman musical abilities. His excellence at the keyboards is unquestionable, his voice is soothing as it is powerful, and he steals the show with his sax soli on "Rajaz" and "Lady Fantasy", the latter respectfully substituting Pete Bardens's original organ solo.

Camel's concerts have never been known for its visuals, and this one is no exception to that rule, although the sole beauty of the Royal Albert Hall is enough to impress the eye. As always, the highlight is the music, the performance itself. Buy this album. I absolutely recommend it. After careful consideration and attention to PA's review guidelines I must admit it: this one is definitely an essential masterpiece.

 Coming of Age (DVD) by CAMEL album cover DVD/Video, 1998
4.53 | 120 ratings

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Coming of Age (DVD)
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by judahbenkenobi

4 stars Excellent live performance! The setlist presented here is not as varied or chronological as in "Never Let Go" or "Pressure Points", but it is a good selection from some of Camel's best studio output. I didn't really like the rehearsal and soundcheck parts, so I skipped those halfway. But the rest of the concert is excellent. And to hear "Harbour of Tears" live in its entirety is surely a reward.

Couldn't manage to highlight any particular song, because all are played with energy and enthusiasm. I do have to mention that the production and camera work here is better than on the video of "Pressure Points". The chemistry between the players is also better, and of course, having less music from their 80's catalogue is definitely a plus

 Never Let Go by CAMEL album cover Live, 1993
4.45 | 173 ratings

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Never Let Go
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by judahbenkenobi

4 stars An excellent selection of tracks from all Camel albums up to 1993. If you're looking for a live introduction to this criminally underrated band, this might be a good start. And I would recommend disc 1 as your starting point. Disc 2 was a live performance of the album that had been released a few months earlier, "Dust and Dreams", which is not among my favorites. Nevertheless, these versions are generally better than the studio versions, perhaps because they are not burdened with the overproduction that characterized D&D and because the musicians really put their whole energy into them. Take for example Rose of Sharon, which had very bad vocals in the studio album, but now they are subtituted by Andy Latimer's voice. He has not a perfect or enviable voice, but it certainly makes up for the flaws of the original.
 Total Pressure - Live In Concert 1984 by CAMEL album cover DVD/Video, 2007
4.01 | 47 ratings

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Total Pressure - Live In Concert 1984
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by judahbenkenobi

3 stars The 80's is not my favorite decade, for Camel, and for any other thing. Why would I want to see and hear a live show from Camel's lowest points in its discography? The reasons were very simple: first, the only live recordings I owned by this wonderful band were a downloaded from YouTube video called Moondances, and 1975's A Live Record. Second, I wanted a live version of "Lies", because my copy of Nude (a remastered CD release) has a live performance of that album but is sadly lacking that track, my favorite of that album.

So here in PA I found out that not only did this DVD contained that song, but it had a surprisingly high rating. So after a thorough and difficult search I finally got hold of a copy.

What can I say about this concert video? I have to swallow my pride and admit that it was a lot better than I thought. Of course, it is far from perfect, and I wouldn't compare it to other, more recent concerts, like the latest one at the Royal Albert Hall, simply because I haven't seen any other. In spite of including mostly 80's material, I recognize the good performance these guys put out. The setlist has some good choices, like the inclusion of three tracks from Nude, one of my favorite Camel albums. There's only one track from each "The Single Factor" and " I Can See... " which is probably for the better, and the bulk of the setlist is taken from their newest album to that point, "Stationary Traveler" . Although I really didn't like that album very much, most of the songs included here sound better than the originals. A notable exception is "Fingertips" , which was an ok song in the studio album, but here Chris Rainbow's high-pitched voice ruined everything. There's only a few older songs, especially in the "Added Pressure" section, which is something a long time fan is sure to enjoy.

There are some issues with this DVD, or course. First of all, the poor camera work. I was never able to discern the actual position of the players on stage, since there was never a clear shot of it. Up to this moment, I'm only sure about Andy's position center stage; as of the rest of the band, I have no idea if they are left or right stage. And there's the poor direction and editing, in which the musician who should be in focus is sometimes left out. The very special guest, Pete Bardens, is never seen clearly, and as I said before, his position on stage is not clear either.

That leads me to the other deficiency. To my taste, three keyboards (and when Pete shows up, four keyboards) is just too much, especially for a band whose central figure is the guitar player. Maybe Andy was just trying to be humble, and to not take the credit for everything, but this time he went too far. There is nothing one single keyboard player can do with the right technology, even in the 80's. For the sake of tradition, two keyboardists were ok, but three, four, is just much more than I can tolerate.

A surprisingly good DVD, but still, not essential. 3.5 stars rounded to 3

 A Live Record by CAMEL album cover Live, 1978
4.38 | 424 ratings

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A Live Record
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by judahbenkenobi

5 stars This is the album that marks the end of an era for Camel.

Their first 5 albums for me define their "classic" era. Even though the band had a significant lineup change in "Rain Dances", new bass player Richard Sinclair and Mel Collins officially joining the band, that album still contained the essentially prog elements that defined that "classic" period. But this Live Record is what "Seconds Out" was to Genesis: a farewell to their progressive rock sound. It is true that Camel would always have some prog elements on the albums that followed, and contrary to what Genesis did, Camel would return during the late 90's to that characteristic prog sound, and would finally embrace its roots again in the 00's. But starting from 1979 on through the 80's and early 90's Camel basically became a pop band, albeit not commercially succesful.

A Live Record (the 2009 remaster) is a fine selection of tracks taken from 5 different performances between 1974 and 1977. Their most beloved songs and instrumentals from their days of glory are presented here in a live setting, including their masterpiece concept album "The Snowgoose" performed in its entirety, featuring nothing less than the London Symphony Orchestra, performed in nothing less than the Royal Albert Hall, the Holy Cathedral of rock. All musicians involved gave their absolute best; some tracks feature the original lineup of Latimer/Bardens/Ferguson/Ward, and others the addition of Collins/Sinclair.

I am not an expert in the audio quality and production; to me most stuff out there sounds great. But I really like the way the audience noise was perfectly balanced as to not be a nuisance and to make the listener feel as if being inside the venue.

Although I've never had to pleasure to hear the original 1978 release, neither the 2002 remaster, I truly and dearly recommend the 2009 remastered release, which is an absolute must-have.

5 stars, easily

 Rain Dances by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 1977
3.63 | 991 ratings

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Rain Dances
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by judahbenkenobi

4 stars Camel's fifth album, the first with newcomer Richard Sinclair from Caravan and Mel Collins in a permanent position in the winds.

To me, this album marked a turning point for Camel. The band and the music would never be the same after this, and it would never recover its initial glory. That doesn't mean Camel became a total loss. Apart from "Breathless" and " The Single Factor ", which were a disappointment to me, Andrew Latimer maintained a high level of quality in Camel's albums that didn't reach any significant lows.

"Rain Dances" opens with a powerful instrumental: First Light, which was perhaps an introduction for the listeners to the new kids in town. Very reminiscent of the glorious "Moonmadness" or " Mirage ", it was a very promising beginning.

Metrognome was quite a surprise. Its first notes sounded a little silly to me on first impression, but the music was just matching the funny lyrics. The song evolves into a pure prog composition, a nice guitar solo with an excellent rhythm section and a coda that left me wanting more.

The electric piano and the fretless bass are always enchanting to me, so Tell Me got to me pretty quickly. Sinclair's voice gives truly enticing touches to this sweet ballad.

Highways of the Sun was their first truly pop song. They had made attempts to it early on their debut, but this has been the most commercial track onto this point. Still, the Moog solo around two thirds of the song kind of saves it.

Unevensong lives to its name. It's got its nice bits and its silly bits. A very forgettable one.

On One of These Days I had to double check if my player was still playing Camel. Turns out it was. My first really bad taste of Camel. Some might disagree, but to me that's disco. Maybe because I didn't live in that decade, but to me it doesn't sound too different from the Beegees, the Village People, (alright I went too far) or that guy with a deep, baritone voice, but with a slow tempo; perhaps a subgenre of disco. I don't know, but I don't like it. The keyboard and bass playing are wizard, and the beat side is catchy but just not Prog enough for my taste.

Elke is another mellow yet soaring instrumental featuring the outstanding performance of the great Andy Latimer on guitar and flute, complemented by Brian Eno on keys.

Skylines was composed and completed before Sinclair arrived, so Andy Latimer took the bass duties. There's a poppy feel, but once again, the performance is superb, from Latimer's part, but mostly from Bardens's keyboards. A track that definitely doesn't deserve to be overlooked.

The concluding title track, sounds more like an opener, with its opening crescendo of majestic synths, emotional saxes and plucked strings, but ends the album with a really nice touch.

4 stars, well earned.

 The Single Factor by CAMEL album cover Studio Album, 1982
2.64 | 508 ratings

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The Single Factor
Camel Symphonic Prog

Review by AFlowerKingCrimson

3 stars I'll admit I have a soft spot for this album. I first bought this on cassette in a local department store after seeing the band Camel mentioned in a progressive rock mail order catalog at the time. I figured they must be pretty well known among prog collectors since their name kept popping up. Seeing how they were compared to Genesis quite a bit(as in "such and such band is in the Genesis/Camel vein")made me think they must share some similarities which indeed they do but I think both also very much had their own distinct and identifiable sound.

When I popped the cassette in the player I didn't know what to expect. Obviously this album is from a later period and so doesn't sound much like the earlier Camel that was much more typical prog sounding.

So fast foward over 30 years later(yes I'm old(ish))and I listen to this again(the esoteric version from 2009) after just recently buying it(yes, I still buy cds and no I won't apologize for it or pretend to be up on the latest technology). So has my opinion changed? Am I more snobby now and think this album is crappy because it's not prog(or at least as prog)as their earlier output? Actually, no. While I won't pretend this album is in the same league as Mirage or the Snowgoose(the two other Camel albums I bought way back when on cassette tape for the first time in that same department store)it's a very good pop album with some mild prog textures thrown in. You can call it prog pop or prog lite if you want.

Some of my favorites on this recording are: "no Easy Answer" which starts the album and is a nice power pop tune, "heroes" which is a very thoughtful almost ballad like song with a nice chorus, "Selva" which is a nice mellow guitar led instrumental and "Sasquatch" another instrumental which features Anthony Phillips(ex Genesis)on 12 string guitar(Ant is featured on other tracks on this album including on keyboards on two other tracks on here). "Sasquatch" features an almost Alan Parson's like guitar sound(which is interesting considering that Chris Rainbow(who sang with APP) is also guest performer on here). I also liked "Today's Goodbye" which is another solid pop rock tune.

To sum it all up, no this is not a prog masterpiece and only has a few moments(particularly Sasquatch)which harken back to the classic era of the band. However, those who enjoy later Utopia or the Alan Parson's Project(from roughly the same time period) could do a lot worse. Although it obviously shows the band trying to keep up with the times by eschewing their prog past(for the most part)I enjoyed this album all those years ago and still do.

Thanks to Ivan_Melgar_M for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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