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TRION

Symphonic Prog • Netherlands


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Trion biography
The idea for this muscial project came from FLAMBOROUGH HEAD's keyboard player Edo Spanninga and was by accident when he tested some recording equipment in order to record Seventies styled music as a fun-project. Eventually Edo was so excited about the results that he recruited other FLAMBOROUGH HEAD member Eddie Mulder (guitars and bass) and ODYSSICE drummer Menno Boomsma to make an album. The name TRION is a contraction of the words 'trio' and '(Mello)tron', simply because the band is a trio and because Edo only used Mellotron samples (flute, oboe, strings, organ, cello, vibe and choir) for his keyboard sound on this album. The trio had total freedom to exchange ideas and to work on the arrangements.

All enjoyed making music as the trio TRION and eleven the tracks on their debut-CD "Tortoise" (2003) are no leftovers from Flamborough Head and Odyssice except the song "Spectrum of Colours" (Eddie originally wrote it for FLAMBOROUGH HEAD). The warm and melodic music ranges from classical and folk to symphonic rock and has hints from early IQ, MID GENESIS and YES and bands from the EARLY BRITISH PROGRESSIVE ROCK MOVEMENT like GRACIOUS and SPRING. It contains lots of fine guitarwork and moving Mellotron sounds (from a flute like "Strawberry Field Forever" to a choir like "Afterglow"). The wonderful cover art is made by Jasper Joppe Geerts, no surprise he's a Roger Dean aficionado! The TRION members will now concentrate on their bands (ODYSSICE is working on a new CD) but another album is an option for the future.

The music on TRION's debut-CD "Tortoise" is simply structured but it sounds very moving and is loaded with beautiful Mellotron samples. Eddie Mulder does a good job with his varied guitarplay (from mellow twanging acoustic guitars to howling electric guitar solos) and Menno Boomsma delivers a solid but subtle background. Some will complain that this album sounds a bit tame or too laidback but others will describe it as warm and compelling music. In my opinion we have to be grateful that TRION got the chance to make this wonderful music, far beyond the emotionless, predictable and multinational sponsored commercial crap from the charts. Tron maniacs alert, this is a Mellotron fan's wet dream!

: : : Erik Neuteboom, The NETHERLANDS : : :
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TRION discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

TRION top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.68 | 50 ratings
Tortoise
2003
4.17 | 72 ratings
Pilgrim
2007
3.94 | 38 ratings
Funfair Fantasy
2013

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TRION Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Funfair Fantasy by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.94 | 38 ratings

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Funfair Fantasy
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Oh, well, it took a long, long time to write this review. I really had mixed feelings about Funfaeir Fantasy. I guess they are all related to this bandīs past. Their debut album was a pleasant enough surprise. After all, who could guess that members of Flamborough Head an Odyssice would put out an entire work dedicated to instrumental prog based on the sounds of the olī mellotron? And make it much more than a curious experiment? And who could have guessed their second efford would be so powerful and remarkable as Pilgrim was? So the stakes were high. Too high, maybe.

For Funfair Fantasy is an excellent syphonic instrumental prog album. Still, it took some time for me to fully appreciate it. It has no real stand out track like The New Moon or Walk On Land, not to mention the massive and wonderful 24 minute epic of Frank (something one can expect to achieve once in a lifetime, if heīs lucky). But that does not mean that the CDīs tracklist is inferior: in fact the selection is very good and the overall quality of their work remains more or less the same. As usual we have the brilliant keyboards sounds os mastermind Edo Spaninga (yes, lots of mellotrons sounds!), the melodic and moving guitar lines of Eddie Mulder (who is still in the band although no longer a member of Flamborough Head) and the precise drumming of Memmo Boomsma.

Also as usual the production is crystal clear and the music is varies from the bombastic to the pastoral, with great flow and harmony. Thereīs no low moment in the entire album, although, as mentioned before, no real surprises either for those who know their previous output like me. The longest track, clocking at 11 minutes, In The Distance, is surely the most adventurous and interesting of the lot, with its several different sections and swinging moods, all very well done and performed. And I never get tired of listening to Spaningaīs tasteful keys neither Mulderīs beautiful guitar solos (oh, echoes of Latimer and Akkerman!)

So in the end, another winner CD from Holland. if Funfair Fanttasy maybe deserved a 3 star rating compared to their earlier works, it is nevetheless at least a four star piece of music when you listen to it on its own merits.

Are you a fan of great instrumental symphonic prog in the vein of Focus and Camel at their peak? Then you have to check this out. Highly recommend it.

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 Funfair Fantasy by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.94 | 38 ratings

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Funfair Fantasy
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars The third Trion album `Funfair Fantasy' sees the band return with another winning selection of lush, endlessly melodic symphonic prog, and a more lovely and carefully crafted collection of instrumental music you won't find. Anyone who enjoys the pleasant instrumental passages of bands such as Rousseau, Camel and a little bit of Genesis will find an album lovingly crafted in the same style, proudly in debt to them yet not simply remaking their work. The music by the trio of Edo Spanninga, Eddie Mulder and Menno Boomsma is so gloriously joyful and proud of it's prog heritage that it's very easy to be swept along for the ride!

It's no surprise to find that the album is overloaded in Mellotron glory throughout, as well as plenty of tastefully melodic electric guitar solos in the Andy Latimar fashion. It's superb beginning to end, not a dud track or filler to be found. But special mention must go to the upbeat opener `Ampenmunnchen', the regal and drowsy Pink Floyd-styled `In The Distance' with it's gently humming Hammond and grand, bluesy David Gilmour guitarwork, and `Song For Canada', with the kind of hearfelt extended guitar soloing that would make Nick Barrett and Roine Stolt green with envy! The playful `Towers' could have appeared on any Glass Hammer album, the jazzy `Meat Prizes' features spiraling Moog runs that would have any Neo prog band taking notice, and the gently psychedelic closer `Secret Matter' is a warm and perfectly hazy soundtrack for balmy summer breezes.

A number of shorter pieces are also just as charming at the longer workouts. `Sealth' floats on a cloud of dreamy acoustic guitar over gentle synth and Mellotron washes, while acoustic ditty `Wandering' serves the same purpose as the Steve Howe solo pieces do on several Yes albums as a breather between the longer stretches.

But the emotionally charged dual Mellotron 11 minute epic `Scotland' may be one of the best instrumental pieces of the year, with numerous themes that will lodge themselves quickly and firmly in your mind! It's full of lovely Tron-flute passages, sky-high electric guitar soloing, murmurring bass that slinks around the backbone of the piece and confident punchy drumming. Dramatic, mellow, delirious and in a few spots ridicuously foot-tappingly upbeat, it's sure to make symph fans weep for joy.

2013 has seen an endless number of strong instrumental albums, and, along with Willowglass's `The Dream Harbour' and `Progenesi's `Ulisse: L'Alfiere Nero', this one will please fans who prefer carefully composed symphonic lusciousness over noodly jazz-fusion or fully improvised works. Trion has now released three terrific releases in a row that all beg for constant replays, and I have no doubt many symphonic prog fans will come to prize this one as a wonderful addition to their collection. `Funfair Fantasy ' is an album of tasteful, delicate and supreme instrumental timelessness bordering in near perfection.

Four stars.

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 Funfair Fantasy by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.94 | 38 ratings

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Funfair Fantasy
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Trion started out as a quirky little homage to the mellotron has now blossomed into a de facto band that keeps giving the instrumental prog fan more joyous pleasures. It has become serious enough for guitarist Eddie Mulder to quit his mainstay Flamborough Head gig (he is not on their imminent 2013 release) and, for the time being at least, see how far the mellotron worship can sustain itself. Let me just opine that the previous work 'Pilgrim' will be a very hard act to follow, as it was a superb collection in all aspects, from artwork, composition, material to playing. Certainly slanted in the mellow rock direction, a la Camel and its Dutch cousin Odyssice (drummer Memmo Boosma is a member of that band as well), the sky can be the limit when you have a deranged mellotron to be inspired by.

Some tracks are utterly magnificent such as the luscious and anthemic 'Scotland' and the ravishing finale 'Secret Matter' while the rest remain firmly entrenched in a solid formula of sonic expectations within simpler frameworks. The amusing opener 'Ampelmannchen' is playful enough, with even some brief backing vocalizations, but it's really an Eddie Mulder show as he spreads nicely on both guitar and bass, while Spanninga does some nice work on piano and adds some wistful recorder samples. Nice and breezy. 'Gananogue' is a little town in Ontario, Canada and as such, it's a short and sweet tune, highly melodic, sunny disposition and all. It has a latter sister track called 'Song for Canada' , a gorgeous track which is flattering I guess for us ice-skating Canucks. For those of you who do not know, Holland and Canada have a rather unique relationship, the Dutch never ever forgetting the liberation from the Nazi regime by troops from Canada, who also fed the famished populace. Some things stay imprinted forever!

But 'Scotland' has definitely strong ties to Latimer's dromedary, as it portrays dense emotional guitar phrasings, some delightful flute-synth ornamentation and solid rhythmic backing. Keyboardist Edo Spanninga lays down some evocative string mellotron carpets, as Mulder paints wildly on the fantastic 6 string canvas, a truly ravishing 11 minute piece of delectable mellow rock of the chiseled variety, perhaps even Trion's finest moment. 'In the Distance' is gifted with a soaring blues melody, clearly led by the slow-hand guitar solo which then evolves into a sweet pastoral acoustic section before reverting to the original theme. It's something you swear you have heard before, yes, that good! Acoustic interlude, you ask? Well, of course, Eddie taking his acoustic guitar for a little stroll among the tulip gardens in the aptly-titled 'Wandering'.

'Towers' is perhaps the least convincing tune here, a laborious arrangement that, to my ears anyway, has a tendency to plod on, missing some kind of spark, which is too bad, as it could have been a Focus-like masterpiece. 'Sealth' reverts to the acoustic/pastoral realm, a style that suits Trion well, very characteristic of their previous albums, seeping mellotron weavings, flute samples and stunning Spanish guitar phrasings that are truly magnificent. The oddly titled 'Meat Prizes' has a brisker tempo, not really as good as the rest of the material as the disc ends on the previously mentioned 'Song for Canada' and the amazing 'Secret Matter', a colossal finale. Both have rather impressive symphonic deliveries and majestic guitar lines, full of vibrant delicacy.

In all, a very enjoyable release but frankly, nowhere near the brilliance of the first 2 albums.

4 carnival whims

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 Tortoise by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.68 | 50 ratings

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Tortoise
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Trion came about when Flamborough Head keyboard player Edo Spanninga wanted to test out some recording equipment. Edo brought in friends Eddie Mulder (guitars/bass etc, also Flamborough Head) and drummer Menno Boomsma (Odyssice) and Trion were born. The name came out of the fact that they were a trio, and also that Edo was going to use the mellotron exclusively throughout the album. This is an instrumental album, but vocals really aren't missed at all, as the music definitely reaches back to the Seventies when prog was at it's most popular. There are times when they sound a bit like Yes, or Genesis, but most of that is down to the main instrument being used. But although the mellotron is an important instrument within the group, there is also plenty of room for some very fine guitar as well as flute and oboe.

The drumming is just what one would expect, restrained yet bombastic, simple, but downright complex. This is music to drift into, to fall into a world that has long gone yet is still relevant today as long as there are people who want to enjoy it. The songs may drift into each other, but the first time I played this I sat there with a grin on my face as this is a joy from start to finish. As it is instrumental and not overbearing there is a danger that some people will only use this for background music but that will be their loss as this is mighty fine. An album that I enjoyed immensely, as will all other progheads who investigate it further.

Originally appeared in Feedback #78, April 2004

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 Tortoise by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.68 | 50 ratings

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Tortoise
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

3 stars A project led by Flamborough Head's Edo Spanninga in order to compose some music closer to 70's styled Progressive Rock.He recruited fellow bandmate Eddie Mulder on guitars and bass as well as Odyssice's drummer Menno Boomsma and thus Trion were born.The debut of the project was released in 2003 on Cyclops under the title ''Tortoise''.

Spanninga & co. managed to come up with a nice, melodic, retro-sounding effort combining the modern technology with old school equipment and the result is a nostalgic, all instrumental journey into the world of GENESIS, CAMEL, GREENSLADE, FANTASY and the likes.The album is full of short and mid-length arrangements, where the focus resides on melody and harmony, but there are plenty of dramatic and grandiose themes to be found along with some good breaks between acoustic interludes and electric passages.Spanninga fills the sound with a number of analog keyboards, most notably huge waves of Mellotron as well as a fair dose of vintage organs and he is accompanied by Mulder's sensitive guitar style, offering series of melodic solos along with some LATIMER-like jazzy vibes, and Boomsma's solid drumming.The atmosphere is dreamy, ethereal and of course highly nostalgic regarding 70's Prog, with well-crafted orchestrations, which here and there contain also some string parts and delicate flutes.

Definitely a top prority if you are a fan of melodic Progressive Rock or vintage Symphonic Rock.This is a nice piece of dreamy instrumental music by this Dutch trio of talented musicians.Strongly recommended...3.5 stars.

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 Pilgrim by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.17 | 72 ratings

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Pilgrim
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by Dark Nazgul

4 stars Sorry friends for the long dissertation on the bonus tracks!

"Pilgrim" is the second album of Dutch prog band Trion. It is totally instrumental and consists of eleven tracks and two bonus tracks.

I've never been a great lover of so-called "bonus tracks". I do not like re-releases on CD, including bonus tracks added to the songs that historically make up the album, especially when the albums in question are those of the classical era (the seventies) of progressive rock. Few years ago I recommended a friend (who did not know very much the prog rock genre) to buy the CD "Close To The Edge" to get an idea of the amazing music of Yes. Imagine my surprise when I had to explain that the songs were not seven but three, and the album ended with "Siberian Khatru". The CD reissue (I am not sure but I think it was the 2008 remastered edition) in fact, contained seven songs including "America" and other excerpts from studio rehearsals.

This kind of commercial operations completely distort the meaning of the message that the progressive music has spread in recent decades. In the context of rock music, progressive rock has always been regarded as the maximum expression of art. The intention of the bands of the 70s was to promote a true art form through rock music. Assuming that an object of art ought not to be modified by others, how you can reprint a CD by adding more songs than the original ones? it is like adding a few poppies and daisies to Van Gogh's "Sunflowers"! For this reason, when I do a review, I prefer to completely ignore the bonus tracks and I just express an opinion on the album considering only the songs in the very first issue.

Here, however, I must make an exception.

The heart of this album is in fact represented by a bonus track: the long instrumental epic Frank. Probably, as the band explains in the liner notes of the album, if it were not for the positive reviews of Frank, this album would not have been achieved, at least in a short time. Frank is a 22-minutes epic inspired by the eponymous character of Sergio Leone's movie "Once Upon A Time In The West", played by Henry Fonda. The song was recorded for a Musea / Colossus project who wanted to include it in the album "The Spaghetti Epic" (which I already did a review on this site). I do not know why the band decided to publish it as a bonus track and not in the ordinary list of songs, perhaps for contractual reasons with Musea / Colossus. The version included in "Pilgrim" is slightly different, surely better than the version of "The Spaghetti Epic" (a short section characterized by a larger footprint rock, that has nothing to do with the rest of the epic, was cut in the middle of the track). The song is really amazing, totally instrumental, and inspired by the 70s band (especially Camel and Genesis) with intelligent use of various keyboards (church organ, mellotron, sinth) and delicate acoustic guitar arpeggios. In the first part of the song dominates the solemnity of a church organ: then, after few minutes, the same organ chords are played again in a magical piano solo. The second half of the epic sees a great guitar playing. Excellent solos evoke typically western themes. In particular, the last amazing guitar solo gives me a lot of chills: if you love prog and also like the typical music of "Spaghetti Western" movies you'll appreciate very much this fantastic great finale.

The other songs are not at the same level of Frank. Listening to the album, the most obvious flaw that you feel is the sensation of being in front of a lot of musical ideas not fully executed: for this reason some songs, especially The Book, The Deep Ocean and A Dream are a bit inconclusive . Another negative aspect that characterizes "Pilgrim" is a little monotony, and perhaps the excessive duration. The atmosphere is, more or less, almost always the same, often characterized by slow rhythms and a classical pastoral calm (in the context of contemporary prog, Andrew Marshall, aka Willowglass, makes music in a very similar way). It also does not help the lack of a singer: the presence of vocals would certainly mitigate this monotony.

Despite some negative aspects the level of the tracks is generally quite good. Walk On Land and The Magnificent Forest for example, are very beautiful, with many parts reminiscent of Camel and magical mellotron and guitar parts. Pilgrim, Giant Man, How We Used To Go and Blue Shadows are other interesting songs.

Definitely, "Pilgrim" is a good album, if you love the symphonic genre, and the magical mellotron atmospheres. The quality of the sublime epic Frank allows to obtain one more star.

So, four stars and a final rating of 7/10.

Best song: Frank

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 Pilgrim by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.17 | 72 ratings

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Pilgrim
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

3 stars TRION are from The Netherlands and they are a trio with Menno coming from ODYSSICE while Eddie and Edo are from FLAMBOROUGH HEAD.Their band name comes from the fact they are a trio and also that they use mellotron. It's interesting though that they've chosen to use sampled mellotron instead of the real thing. I like this better than the debut. It's very pleasant sounding with lots of acoustic guitar, light drums and keyboards (organ, piano).

"Pilgrim" opens with mellotron as drums and organ join in. Guitar after 2 minutes comes in soaring.The tempo picks up 3 1/2 minutes in. Some nice guitar before 5 minutes as well. Piano follows with mellotron only as it settles down. "Silence Of The Universe" takes a while to get going then the guitar starts to soar with a beat and organ.Synths after 3 minutes. "Walk On Land" has this slow repetitive rhythm that starts to pick up then we get acoustic guitar only after 2 minutes as contrasts continue. "How We Used To Go" features acoustic guitar melodies throughout.

"The Magnificent Forest" has more life to it as a full sound kicks in right away.Synths lead a minute in. It settels back 2 1/2 minutes in and mellotron comes in after 3 minutes. "Reveal The Mystery" opens with gentle guitar and mellotron then it picks up quickly with drums and organ as contrasts continue."Giant Man" is one of my favourites. A beat with bass and mellotron leads early then the guitar comes to the fore. Back to that earlier sound as the contrasts continue,. "The Book" opens with mellow sounds that pulsate. Organ and drums kick in then guitar before 2 1/2 minutes. "Blue Shadows" opens with acoustic guitar melodies as the mellotron rolls in. "A Dream" is mostly piano and mellotron while "The Deep Ocean" opens with an almost haunting mood and acoustic guitar. It comes to life with organ and electric guitar then settles back as contrasts continue.

A relaxed and enjoyable instrumental album. 3.5 stars.

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 Pilgrim by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.17 | 72 ratings

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Pilgrim
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

5 stars As I stated in my previous review of Trion's debut "Tortoise", I was in a state of advanced trepidation while waiting for this sophomore contribution. The first album was an exemplary mellotron orgy, loaded with bristle melodies, sensational soloing by guitarist Eddie Mulder and winks at Camel, KC, Ant Phillips and Focus. Because of incredible feed-back from both fans and media, the Dutchmen decided to turn their one- shot deal into a sequel offering "Pilgrim", without any attempt to not progress into deeper adventure: the mighty 'trons are still present of course but Edo Spanninga has wisely added some organ, piano and even synthesizer to his arsenal. Eddie continues to double on bass but he really gets to showcase his incredible talent (not always apparent with day-band Flamborough Head) with some well crafted signature solos. Odyssice's talented Memmo Boosma is steady as a dyke, keeping it all together. This remains an all- instrumental affair of the highest caliber, with a multitude of ingenious workouts that have more substance than endless noodling, suggesting deep felt emotions that need no lyrics or vocalist. Had this been in vinyl LP form, we would have a double album as this monster is 76 minutes in length. So how to these Hollanders set sail? With an opening title track that seizes the casual listener by the melodic jugular, a 7 minute + ride that is certainly mellow (no crunch here!) but fully loaded with passionate evocations of the Jemetrion saga (first broached with the debut), a story with no singing (similar to Xang, who have deep lyrics and momentous storylines but no vocals). There is no point in describing each track as they are all luscious affairs, my fellow colleagues have done a splendid job throwing light on the magnificent moments. Suffice to say that this is a huge melodic banquet that has everything a progfan needs to get his jollies: stupendous mellotron expressions, fascinating guitar solo sorties and a rich variety of acoustic and electric adornments. Without a doubt the epic monster "Frank" is a typical example (or recap) of the creative genius expressed in the grooves, full of alternating contrasts, shifting moods and unpredictable surprises. An unmitigated instrumental masterstroke. After all, we PA reviewers can't be wrong, we do have taste ! Also very cool : the debut had a Roger Dean style artwork while here we are in an overt Hipgnosis mood, very reminiscent of Yes' Going For the One . 5 Try-ons

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 Tortoise by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.68 | 50 ratings

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Tortoise
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars This is a ridiculous album and just plain revolting! Why did we have to wait so damn long for a mellotron orgy? Retro-this and retro-that but let it be known that this storied contraption that made many a musician green with envy at getting their fingers on one, red-faced with anger when the damn Mark IVs would go haywire (which was often) and outright ashen when everything would go right (which also was often). But by God, when it decided to evoke majesty, splendor and emotion, it was a mind blowing experience that left one breathless and trembling with glee. Anyone out there who had the privilege (I was lucky to be a teen then) of witnessing "Watchers of the Skies" opening a Genesis show in 1973 and being floored by the sheer aural assault, knows exactly what I mean. There are modern samplers that can reproduce a 40 piece symphony orchestra or a male/female mass choir PERFECTLY but in the every early 70s, the 'tron was still teething and it possessed this metallic gritty sound (as the metal 7 second tapes would grind to a premature halt) that just can't be reproduced (just like the Mini-Moog & the VCS3 synths, the Hammond 3c or the Lowry organs). When the acoustic guitar interacts with choir or string mellotron, something approaching revelation occurs; when the lead electric kicks in, it becomes genius (ex Genesis' "Hairless Heart") . So it's up to our Dutch friends to lovingly and reverently assemble this sultry homage to the big white (most of the time) monster. Starting out as an accident of circumstance , Edo Spanninga asked his Flamborough Head bandmate Eddie Mulder in guitar and bass as well as Odyssice's Memmo Boosma on drums to help him with this project. We now know that what started as this one -off recording has evolved into a parallel band with the day gig, as "Pilgrim" has just been released (On my acquire at all costs list). "Tortoise" is a slick affair with a masterful cover and artwork from obvious Roger Dean inspired Jasper Joppe Goers. As the liner notes very clearly inform, there is a lot of love and respect for this instrument (making a comeback as new production models have allegedly resumed!!!) This is a stellar all-instrumental album with no piano and no synths that starts of with choir samples and massive doses of various acoustic/electric guitars and rock steady drumming. The 11 tracks form various chapters in the saga of a turtle's tale, offering up different textural scenarios for all the various incarnations: flute, cello, oboe, strings, organ, vibe and choir. That there are outright winks at Camel (the supremely splendid "The New Moon" in particular), Genesis (the booming "Tortoise"), early King Crimson (the brief "Radiation" 1 & 2 and the sultry guitar- guided "The Seagulls"), Anthony Phillips (the short but fragile "Hurt"), Focus (the slow burn fiery 7 minute "Tribulation" with its multi facetted guitar promenades) is entirely par for the course but the added little gems are also scintillating: the pristine ultra orchestral cello-tron driven "Hindsight", the playful opulence of "Jemetrion" that shimmers with unabashed charm, the baroque slow pace luxury of "Spectrum of Colours" and the pastoral aural landscape of "Endgame" each bullied along by tremendous Mulder guitar solos that shake, tremble and shine . Way beyond my or anyone else's expectations. Knowing that a follow up is on the way just makes my day! 4.5 rabbit eared trons.

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 Pilgrim by TRION album cover Studio Album, 2007
4.17 | 72 ratings

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Pilgrim
Trion Symphonic Prog

Review by Tarcisio Moura
Prog Reviewer

5 stars When I heard Trion had released a second CD I was a bit suspicious. Tortoise was supposed to be an one offshot side project by members of Flamborough Head and Odyssice. That first release was excellent but it seemed to me it could not go further from that. Well, I was wrong. Pilgrim is quite a big step forward. So much it got me completely off guard. Those guys are in their prime both as songwriters and players.

Edo Spanninga keyboards are even more varied than before, using a vast array of old-but-gold analogic sounds like the Hammong Organ, Fender Rhodes piano, mini-moogs and, of course, mellotrons. Eddie Mulderīs guitar playing is another highlight thorughout the CD: he is an acomplished player of both the electric and the acoustic guitars. Sometimes his style bearing the trademarks of such great ones like Andy Latimer, Steve Hackett and Jan Akkerman. Menno Boomsma is also a precise and creative drummer.

The music on the album is that kind of instrumental progressive music that has the rare quality of mixing simple structures and melodies to fine craft and intricated arrangements. The result is both complex and accessible, captivating and challeging. One fo those rare albums you hear with the same pleasure from start to finich (ever rarer in a 76 minute long CD!).

Highlights? Yes! Giant Mn with its killer guitar solo and a wonderful mellotron sound that sends shivers down the spine everty time I hear it. The Silence Of The Universe (great Hammond Organ runs and good use of acoustic and eletric guitars sounds). And then, of course, there is Frank. Frank is a 22:57 prog epic that was born a classic. It has nods to early Genesis, Focus, Yes and Camel with many shifting moods, tempo changes and a grand finale that would make any of those great bands proud of. I never heard the original version of this song,but this one might be the definitve one! Iīm really glad it was included as a bonus track!

This is one of the best prog albums of 2007 and certainly one of the top five instrumental prog albums of all time. A classic. Highly recommended!

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