Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

APHRODITE'S CHILD

Symphonic Prog • Greece


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Aphrodite's Child picture
Aphrodite's Child biography
Founded in 1967 in Paris, France, by Greek musicians - Disbanded in 1972

The short story of APHRODITE'S CHILD starts in 1967, when the Greek/Egyptian bassist and vocalist named Artemios Ventouris Roussos (Demis Roussos) and the powerful drummer Lucas Sideras were supposed to meet the multi instrumentalist Evengelio Odyssey Papathanassiou (VANGELIS) who had left his first group FORMINXS, but the first two were not admitted to the United Kingdom because they had no working permits and custom officers discovered photos and tapes in their luggage so they assumed the musicians intended to stay (Which was true).

A few months later the three musicians join in Paris with Anargyros Koulouris (Silver Koulouris) a very competent guitar player and they decide to form a new band which was supposed to mix traditional Greek music with Western Pop and Psychedelia, but they ended doing much more than was expected.

Due to their financial situation they had to sign a terrible contract with a record company. Soon after the birth of the band, Silver Kouloris has to leave the group because he was called for his Military Service and only joins again for the recording of their last album 666, during these years Demis Roussos has to play guitar and bass.

Their first two releases "End of the World" (which includes two hit singles, "Rain and Tears" and "I Want To Live", the last one reached N° 1 in most Europe) and "It's Five O'Clock", showed a commercial oriented band with a very peculiar sound. But it's not until 1970, when they start to record the brilliant and adventurous "666" that they get a place in progressive Rock history, even when the relation inside the band was at the lowest point mostly because VANGELIS wanted to do more serious music than Lucas Sideras and Roussos.

The paradox is that this masterpiece which combines 100% Symphonic structure, British Psychedelia, Greek Orthodox Religious music with a touch of pop was only released in 1972 (after the band had already split) due to several prejudices caused the controversial concept ("The Book of Revelations"), the confession made by the band that "666" was conceived under the influence of Sahlep (some people believed this word was referred to some kind of pagan divinity when in fact it's a common non alcoholic beverage from Turkey) and the track "Infinity" sung by the great actress Irene Papas which is really a five minutes orgasm.
...
read more

APHRODITE'S CHILD forum topics / tours, shows & news


APHRODITE'S CHILD forum topics Create a topic now
APHRODITE'S CHILD tours, shows & news Post an entries now

APHRODITE'S CHILD Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all APHRODITE'S CHILD videos (2) | Search and add more videos to APHRODITE'S CHILD

Buy APHRODITE'S CHILD Music



More places to buy APHRODITE'S CHILD music online

APHRODITE'S CHILD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

APHRODITE'S CHILD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.54 | 109 ratings
End Of The World
1968
2.77 | 94 ratings
It's Five O'Clock
1969
3.91 | 469 ratings
666
1972

APHRODITE'S CHILD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

APHRODITE'S CHILD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

APHRODITE'S CHILD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.68 | 23 ratings
Best Of Aphrodite's Child
1975
3.22 | 8 ratings
The Art of Démis Roussos and Aphrodite's Child
1993
3.50 | 4 ratings
The Best of Aphrodite's Child
1994
4.11 | 15 ratings
The Singles
1995
3.89 | 8 ratings
Greatest Hits
1995
4.00 | 9 ratings
The Complete Collection
1996
2.75 | 10 ratings
Babylon the Great
2002
4.25 | 12 ratings
The Singles +
2003

APHRODITE'S CHILD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.17 | 5 ratings
End of the World
1968
3.09 | 4 ratings
Rain and Tears
1968
2.67 | 3 ratings
Valley of Sadness
1968
3.00 | 4 ratings
Let Me Love, Let Me Live / Marie Jolie
1969
4.00 | 2 ratings
I Want to Live / Magic Mirror
1969
3.39 | 12 ratings
Lontano dagli Occhi/ Quando L'amore Diventa Poesia (7")
1969
4.20 | 10 ratings
Spring Summer Winter and Fall
1970
2.67 | 3 ratings
Such a Funny Night / Annabella
1970
2.67 | 3 ratings
It's Five O' Clock / Funky Mary
1970
2.00 | 2 ratings
Annabella / Take Your Time
1971
4.50 | 6 ratings
Special Radio Cuts!
1972
4.25 | 8 ratings
Break
1972

APHRODITE'S CHILD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 End Of The World by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.54 | 109 ratings

BUY
End Of The World
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by NmDPlm

4 stars The debut album from Aphrodite's Child straddles three lines at once: Brit rock, Psychadelic, and Prog. That they straddle all three in fine fashion is quite the achievement. The album is missing a solid guitar, likely due to their guitar player having to stay behind in Greece to serve in the military as his band mates moved on to Paris, but Demis Roussos steps in to handle what he can on guitar while also kicking it on bass and vocals. Any guitar that may have been overlooked is more than made up for by the widespread sounds of various keyboards by Vangelis. The album was a big deal when it came out and a couple singles earned them some goodwill and fame. The prog guest of the bunch are The Grass Is No Green as well as Day of the Fool. Even so, a shorter track like The Shepherd and the Moon still evokes a prog sensibility while also highlighting their ability to keep a sense of their cultural ideal intact. Despite not being a prog track, You Always Stand In My Way is a killer rock number and Roussos absolutely slays the vocal on this one. All told, End of the World is a striking debut and sets up a further expansion of the growing prog genre.
 Best Of Aphrodite's Child by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1975
2.68 | 23 ratings

BUY
Best Of Aphrodite's Child
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Prog123

3 stars Hmmm ... Ok, only with "666" we can define them Progressive. But here I can't say I listen to bad music. If you like bands like The Move, ELO, The Moody Blues, Procol Harum, 10CC or I Dik Dik, Aphrodite's Child will surely please you. I could finish the review here. But, correctly ... Correctly you will not find Progressives here but a POP that is not very far from the music of the bands I mentioned above. What comes to the ears is, in fact, excellent music, excellently written and played. The production is honest and the sound is clear and well balanced. So we can't help but notice that it is the typical transition POP band from POP/ Beat to Progressive Rock, with all the strengths and weaknesses we know, in relation to these bands. However, compared to other similar bands, the songs have aged very well and some are real anthems of that period. Well ... It will also be POP. But the quality is such that it will satisfy even the most demanding ears.
 666 by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.91 | 469 ratings

BUY
666
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars Aphrodite's Child ventured into a concept about the devil and the struggle between the good and bad. The album was, in fact, posthumous (at the time of publication the group was now dissolved) and could be considered to all intents and purposes the first solo work of keyboardist / composer Vangelis (stage name of Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou). Already completed in the 1970s, it will have to wait two whole years before finally being released by Vertigo and only a couple of tracks (out of a total number of 26) will manage to get the limelight as radio hits.

The album opens with the short intro The System, a crescendo chorus of only male and female voices that limits itself to repeating to the bitter end "We got the system to [%*!#] the system". The chorus culminates in the riff of Babylon, a relentless outburst at the edge of hard rock. This is followed by the slow and hopeful prayer for piano and female voice "Loud, loud, loud". An ethereal and distant ringing opens to "Four Horsemen", a paradisiacal ballad that with fascinated fear shows the horsemen of the apocalypse coming out of the gates of hell, culminating in a Dionysian jam between blues-rock and psychedelic. The Hellenic ethnic influence of the group appears clear in the following "The Lamb ", mystical elegy with oriental tones for keyboards and mandolin. The ceremonial "Seventh Seal" and "Aegian Sea" follow, where the same biblical verse is recited, in the first, and engaged, in the second, in a funeral dance with melancholy and solemn tones with the lead guitar. The prophetic dirge of "Seventh bowls", the idiophones that appear all the more like shattered shards in "The Wakening Beast" and the exasperated and ethereal song of Demis Roussos in "Lament", as deadly as it is timeless, return to paint landscapes filled with desolation and without hope. After the chaotic "The Marching Beast" and the exasperated and wild free-jazz of "The Battle of The Locust", at the "Do It" by vangelis the drums launch into a wild and unstoppable race against time where a lead guitar he immediately throws himself into mad as well as desperate pursuit. The entanglement and relaxation of the two sounds results in a majestic duet suspended between hard-rock and free-jazz. The short and cacophonous "Tribulation" for wind and woodwinds is followed by the more goliardic "The Beast". The first disc is closed by the verses taken from Karagiozis and recited by the Greek painter Yiannis Tsarouchis in "Ofis". The winking "Seven Trumpets" whose conclusion "... and now the music changes" is decidedly prophetic. The track is resolved in the Zappian "Altamont", where orchestral warbling is harmonized by a voice that, alone, dictates time to the chaos of the composition, which is resolving itself in a mixture between the psych and the minimalist. The passage to the next "The wedding of the lamb" is practically devoid of continuity solutions, but in the latter the instrumental chaos of the previous one is abandoned in favor of a more suffocating soliloquy of keyboards, with the rest of the instrumentation framing . The track is closed by the voice of Vangelis himself, who then goes on to introduce the dark "The capture of the beast", governed by percussion, which oscillate between martial and tribal, and idiophones like shattered glass.

And the monumental, almost 20-minute long "All The Seats Were Occupied" is a multi-threaded, typically rock track with numerous solos and quotes from other parts of the album. We are also dealing here with a certain modernization of the Book of Revelation. After all, the witnesses of the revelation are the hippies ("Altamont"), the seven biblical trumpets are announced by the announcer in the style of a TV show, and the second coming of Christ into the world ... well, that's it. There was an unusual composition on this album - unusual even for this original and unusual album. Its title is "∞". The improvisation recorded live in the studio was almost 40 minutes long, on the album Vangelis he cut it down to a five-minute fragment. It is performed by a duo: the composer himself and Greek actress Irene Papas. Vangelis plays various percussion instruments, Papas performs crazy vocal improvisation. He repeats one sentence over and over: I was, I am, I am to come - I was, I am, I will come. Direct reference to: He who is coming will come. Paraphrase of a fragment of the Book of Revelation. Performed in a way that makes the skin tingling: Irene Papas' amazing voice first reflects the pleasure of sexual fulfillment, to the orgasmic scream and then the pain of childbirth. A definitely controversial thing.

It is a difficult record. Composed of very different elements, yet very coherent. It's a pity that it remained the last such rock work by Vangelis, who focused on solo work, mainly based on synthesizers. It is definitely a must-hear for every progressive rock fan.

 The Art of Démis Roussos and Aphrodite's Child by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1993
3.22 | 8 ratings

BUY
The Art of Démis Roussos and Aphrodite's Child
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Prog123

3 stars There are a thousand ways to read a band. In the case of the Greek Aphrodites Child it becomes very complicated in its simplicity to read his story in such a way as to enter into why this compilation is not a split compilation. The problem is that Aphrodites Child was a band that produced a vaguely progressive POP that had Vangelis as the lead songwriter and a great singer like Démis Roussos. Except "666" which, however, for me, is a Vangelis album, the style of Aphrodites Child is similar to that of Procol Harum, I Dik Dik, The Moody Blues and other similar bands. "666" is full Progressive. But, as mentioned, I don't read "666" as a band album. The dissolution of Aphrodite's Child opens up a small problem. On the one hand Vangelis was a source of wealth for the Phonogram. But she thought it would be better to focus on Aphrodites Child's singer and bassist, Démis Roussos. The problem was that without the compositions of Vangelis Démis he could have been shipwrecked. Instead he didn't happen. The split of Aphrodite's Child opens up a small problem. On the one hand Vangelis was a source of wealth for the Phonogram. But at Phonogram they thought it would be better to focus on Aphrodites Child's singer and bassist, Démis Roussos. The problem was that without the compositions of Vangelis Démis he could have been shipwrecked. Instead he didn't happen. Therefore it was natural for Phonogram to extend the band's contract to Démis Roussos alone, at least to take advantage of the moment. Incredibly Démis was successful. Even as an author. The compositions lost the Progressive elements gaining those Folk elements of the Greek tradition which, however, were never really exhibited at the forefront. In general, although the style is still that of Aphrodites Child pre "666" we can, in the singer-songwriter Dčmis (because this became), insert it in the Schlager genre, without scandalizing anyone. Listening well to Démis roussos, however, I am surprised at how much he has managed to compose extraordinary songs, full of epicity (linked to light arrangements yet steeped in epicity), building a repertoire that is not at all trivial (and, for me, superior to the Aphrodites Child repertoire ). In the case of Démis Roussos, a more unique than rare case in history, we can say that the operation of transferring Aphrodites Child fans to Démis Roussos was successful. And (mystery of musical history?) I have not yet found anyone who mentions "666" among his acquaintances when we discuss Aphrodites Child and Démis Roussos as one entity.

"The Art of Démis Roussos and Aphrodites Child" is a compilation, in conclusion, that I recommend to all fans of Aphrodites Child and Démis Roussos (and to those who love the music of the groups mentioned in the review and do not know Aphrodites Child or Démis Roussos). It is really well built and not at all obvious.

 666 by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.91 | 469 ratings

BUY
666
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Igor91

4 stars As an avid listener and collector of music, I had come across Aphrodite's Child's 666 on YouTube several years ago and gave it a quick, fast-forwarding, listen and remembered being unimpressed. Then, about a year ago I was out of my hometown and decided to explore some record shops in the city I was visiting. I found 666 while browsing through the used CD section of one of these record stores. I was very surprised to see a copy, especially here in the States. Priced at a mere six bucks, I figured that it would, at the very least, make an interesting addition to my music collection, so I bought it. It was then that I was able to give the album a proper "deep listen" and give it a second chance.

Two words can sum up this work by this band from Greece: "eclectic" and "ambitious." The band employs everything from rock, jazz rock/fusion, pop, psychedelic, Middle Eastern/Raga, to Greek folk music and more to present the concept of the album: The Apocalypse. Spread over 2 CD's (or 4 sides of vinyl), and recorded in 1971, it predates other, better known double concept albums such as Genesis' Lamb Lays Down on Broadway. I won't go into detailed descriptions of each track here, there are many other good reviews here on PA that I would only end up repeating.

What I do want to address is, "does the music really work as an album?" My answer to this would be yes ? and no. The majority of the music is well written and performed, and the production is very good for that period as well. The vast territory of music covered often reveals weaknesses in bands' skills, but here everything is executed very well. Many of the songs are very interesting and enjoyable, and are woven together to create quite an epic piece of progressive rock.

So, what then, is the problem? The first issue I have with 666 is that it does seem to have a bit of filler, in my opinion. On disc one, in particular, there are several short tracks that go nowhere and really don't add anything to the concept, nor the music as a whole. An example of one of the worst filler tracks, though comes from disc 2. This controversial track, its title being the mathematical symbol for "infinity,' consists of a woman, chanting something (I can't make it out), over percussion, in a manner like she is either having an orgasm or in pain ? or both. And to top it off this track goes on for over five minutes! I think when the band, or Vangelis Papathanassiou to be more precise, finished writing the music, they/he found that they only had about three sides of vinyl worth of music. In order to fix this, several short filler tracks were added to complete the double album. That is only my guess, of course. Either way, 666 contains both good and excellent music, but only about enough to fill three-fourths of a double album.

Another issue I have with the third, and final, album from Aphrodite's Child, is how the mood of the album shifts. Parts of the album are upbeat, almost happy sounding, others are somber and serious. Then there are Zappa-esque moments of humor in others. So, are we to take this journey as a serious, religious/societal/cultural statement, or just a lark ? or both? And lastly, the longest song "All The Seats Were Occupied," is a well-conceived conglomerate of previous songs wedged into parts of a new theme. Overall, I like it, but in some parts it just comes off as awkward.

So, you may be wondering, based on the amount of negative points I bring up here, why there are four stars attached to this review. Well, that is because, despite all its flaws, I really like this album. When I finished giving 666 my first deep listen, I told myself that this was a solid 3 star effort. It just didn't seem to gel all together due to these flaws. The thing is, that each additional time that I have listened to this album, I like it even more. So, while I think this LP is better than "good," but not quite "excellent," my actual rating is a 3.5 stars. I tend to have a soft spot for obscure, weird pieces of music that do not get the recognition they deserve, so I usually round up my .5 ratings. Definitely not background music, I recommend giving this one several attentive listens before making a judgement of your own.

 666 by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.91 | 469 ratings

BUY
666
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars The most experimental album of all three by Aphrodite's child is not a very coherent effort but presents musicians at peak of their artistic abilities and the group as a whole.

"The four horsemen" is one of few pop-oriented and melodic songs with dominant vocals. "The lamb" is a fantastic instrumental work by Vangelis in the Greek style. Clavinet and maybe some organ are used to create a dual sound in the right and left channel. "Aegian sea" is a good psychedelic track with narrative and moog.

After that, a couple of experimental tracks that are interesting at first hear but hardly essential. "Marching beast" is a first one with a structure centered around piano, organ and bouzouki. "Do it" is a short furious battle between drums and guitar having bass supporting. "Tribulation" might be a saxophone tribute Canterbury style. "The beast" is a classic late 60's track but released in 1972. "Altamont" has a deep organ or moog sound with a simple motive but numerous instrument changes. "The wedding of the lamb" finally brings again Greek folk music into perspective although retaining experimentation. "Infinity" is an annoying track with orgasm of a woman, that should not be included on a progressive rock effort like this. I can't but skip this track each time. It brings nothing but awkwardness to faces of all listeners.

"Hic et nunc" partly corrects the previous bad impression by offering a user-friendly Beatles-inspired tune with group singing.

The lengthy "All the seats were occupied" starts good as an epic but after turning the half-mark, it gets deteriorated by the questionable mix of the previous songs including the terrible moaning from "Infinity". Thankfully, the jam continues soon showcasing clear guitar tones with moog and percussions.

The last and swang song bears traces of nostalgy but gives some hope at least in the lyrics. Progressive rock goes away for a while and pop-rock with monumental piano chords and clever guitar improvisation. Lucas Sideras vocals suit here well.

Overall, this is certainly a peak of this band's output but some stars are removed because of uncoherence and experimentation that won't appeal with each repeated listening.

 It's Five O'Clock by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1969
2.77 | 94 ratings

BUY
It's Five O'Clock
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

2 stars Another mainly pop oriented effort by Aphrodite's child. Roussos voice and Vangelis keyboards are the main selling points.

The first and title track is a fine ballad with Moog and organ chords, solemn and a bit reminding of "A whiter shade of pale". Vocal is in the foreground of this song.

"Annabella" is another ballad with gentle instrumentation with flute, water flow, but also mighty organ.

"Let me love, let me live" is a hippie repetitive song with good organ improvisation in the background. "Funky Mary" has a Hendrix chaotic vibe to it although without an ingenious guitar. The vocal does not come from Roussos at all. "Good time so fine" has two vocal types by Roussos: rough for the initial phase and the shiny vocal for the chorus part. This is a nice pop song.

"Such a funny night" has a very playful melody, bouzouki and bass. The vocal is almost female in the beginning and descending all the time - an unusual approach.

One of my favourite tracks.

A good pop-oriented album but not much for a progressive mind.

 End Of The World by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.54 | 109 ratings

BUY
End Of The World
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars The debug album unusually by a Greek group based in France. The style is progressive pop, not so much of rock. Songs are accessible and some of them catchy. It is the instrumentation that closely resembles a progressive rock ensemble: flutes, organs, piano, harpsichord and other keyboards.

The album starts strongly with "End of the world" and introduces Roussos unusual nose voice and fantastic range. Vangelis provides nice piano and organ arrangements. It sounds warm and Greek to me.

"Don't try to catch a river" is a more British world 70's inspired upbeat song that has organ lines similar to Penny Lane trumpet. "Mister Thomas" is more a "merry-go-round" type of song but still has a memorable harpsichord/cello section. The most famous song by AC, "Rain and tears", is a simple classically influence number with a dominant voice.

"The grass is no green" points to the art rock ambitions of Vangelis and also shows signs of psychedelia, if you isten to the colour of Roussos' voice. Finally, also the bass and drums get into foreground. "Valley of Sadness" is a fine and typical psychedelic song with equal focus on melody and instrumental rhythm section. Vangelis provides organ chords in the right channel and harpsichord in the left. Bouzouki is also heard thanks to Roussos.

"The shepherd and the moon" displays Arabic influence and is a good fire to the already warm music. Notable is muscular bass by Roussos in the outro of the song.

 End of the World by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1968
3.17 | 5 ratings

BUY
End of the World
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Besides the hit single 'Rain and Tears', also other songs of the debut album End of the World were released on singles. This is the title track, and it's among the more interesting Aphrodite's Child songs of the pre-666 era. Again I'd make a reference to the classic Moody Blues for the rich and warm soundscape dominated by keyboards creating orchestral nuances. The song is nocturnally atmospheric and has a lot of passion & drama, especially for the emotional vocals of Demis Roussos. Early Barclay James Harvest had songs with a similar feel.

'You Always Stand in My Way' sees the Greek trio rocking hard. Yes, this is actually a heavy rock song! Just change the Moody Blues type of Mellotron-oriented keyboard arsenal to a Hammond, and it could be an obscure Deep Purple song. A curiosity more than a recommendable or representative Aphrodite's Child number.

 Rain and Tears by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1968
3.09 | 4 ratings

BUY
Rain and Tears
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Aphrodite's Child were a Paris-based trio of Greek musicians (two of them, singer Demis Roussos and synth maestro Vangelis, later had success as solo artists). In the prog circles they're best remembered for the conceptual double album 666 (released belatedly in 1972), but in the late sixties they made a couple of albums and had some international psych pop hits. Without a doubt the best known is 'Rain and Tears', which still can be heard occasionally from radio. I don't think it's their best 60's song, instead it's very sweet, sentimental and accessible to a big audience. Vangelis' selection of vintage keyboard sounds however makes it pretty listenable to anyone interested in proto prog, and the harpsichord sound gives the song a Baroque pop flavour.

Also the B side song 'Don't Try to Catch a River' was included on the album End of the World (1968). This one's an energetic and rocking psych-era pop song in a fast tempo. Demis Roussos' raspy vocals are backed by high vocal harmonies reminiscent of the early Moody Blues. The song hurries ahead in a very straightforward way without much new details, and for that reason it is quickly worn out. But 'Rain and Tears' has proved to be an evergreen classic, hence three friendly stars for this pop single.

Thanks to Ivan_Melgar_M for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.