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APHRODITE'S CHILD

Symphonic Prog • Greece


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Aphrodite's Child picture
Aphrodite's Child biography
Founded in 1967 in Paris, France, by Greek musicians - Disbanded in 1972

The short story of APHRODITE'S CHILD starts in 1967, when the Greek/Egyptian bassist and vocalist named Artemios Ventouris Roussos (Demis Roussos) and the powerful drummer Lucas Sideras were supposed to meet the multi instrumentalist Evengelio Odyssey Papathanassiou (VANGELIS) who had left his first group FORMINXS, but the first two were not admitted to the United Kingdom because they had no working permits and custom officers discovered photos and tapes in their luggage so they assumed the musicians intended to stay (Which was true).

A few months later the three musicians join in Paris with Anargyros Koulouris (Silver Koulouris) a very competent guitar player and they decide to form a new band which was supposed to mix traditional Greek music with Western Pop and Psychedelia, but they ended doing much more than was expected.

Due to their financial situation they had to sign a terrible contract with a record company. Soon after the birth of the band, Silver Kouloris has to leave the group because he was called for his Military Service and only joins again for the recording of their last album 666, during these years Demis Roussos has to play guitar and bass.

Their first two releases "End of the World" (which includes two hit singles, "Rain and Tears" and "I Want To Live", the last one reached N° 1 in most Europe) and "It's Five O'Clock", showed a commercial oriented band with a very peculiar sound. But it's not until 1970, when they start to record the brilliant and adventurous "666" that they get a place in progressive Rock history, even when the relation inside the band was at the lowest point mostly because VANGELIS wanted to do more serious music than Lucas Sideras and Roussos.

The paradox is that this masterpiece which combines 100% Symphonic structure, British Psychedelia, Greek Orthodox Religious music with a touch of pop was only released in 1972 (after the band had already split) due to several prejudices caused the controversial concept ("The Book of Revelations"), the confession made by the band that "666" was conceived under the influence of Sahlep (some people believed this word was referred to some kind of pagan divinity when in fact it's a common non alcoholic beverage from Turkey) and the track "Infinity" sung by the great actress Irene Papas which is really a five minutes orgasm.
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APHRODITE'S CHILD discography


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APHRODITE'S CHILD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.52 | 112 ratings
End Of The World
1968
2.78 | 96 ratings
It's Five O'Clock
1969
3.94 | 494 ratings
666
1972

APHRODITE'S CHILD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

APHRODITE'S CHILD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

APHRODITE'S CHILD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.70 | 23 ratings
Best Of Aphrodite's Child
1975
3.22 | 8 ratings
The Art of Démis Roussos and Aphrodite's Child
1993
3.50 | 4 ratings
The Best of Aphrodite's Child
1994
4.11 | 15 ratings
The Singles
1995
3.89 | 8 ratings
Greatest Hits
1995
3.96 | 9 ratings
The Complete Collection
1996
2.78 | 11 ratings
Babylon the Great
2002
4.25 | 12 ratings
The Singles +
2003

APHRODITE'S CHILD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.17 | 5 ratings
End of the World
1968
3.09 | 4 ratings
Rain and Tears
1968
2.09 | 4 ratings
Valley of Sadness
1968
3.00 | 4 ratings
Let Me Love, Let Me Live / Marie Jolie
1969
3.67 | 3 ratings
I Want to Live / Magic Mirror
1969
3.39 | 12 ratings
Lontano dagli Occhi/ Quando L'amore Diventa Poesia (7")
1969
3.89 | 9 ratings
Spring Summer Winter and Fall
1970
2.67 | 3 ratings
Such a Funny Night / Annabella
1970
2.67 | 3 ratings
It's Five O' Clock / Funky Mary
1970
2.00 | 2 ratings
Annabella / Take Your Time
1971
4.33 | 6 ratings
Special Radio Cuts!
1972
4.22 | 9 ratings
Break
1972

APHRODITE'S CHILD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Valley of Sadness by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1968
2.09 | 4 ratings

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Valley of Sadness
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

2 stars I haven't listened to Aphrodite's Child's debut album End of the World (1968) from start to end, but this third single surely must represent the weaker parts of it. The sugary but charming 'Rain and Tears' deserved its hit status and the dramatic title song is also fairly impressive.

For a certain outdated sweetness, 'Valley of Sadness' is closer to the first mentioned, but the elegant Baroque flavour (the harpsichord is heard here too) is often buried beneath a cruel psych-rock loudness, and especially the electric guitar played by vocalist Demis Roussos is almost painful to my ears. The song is more progressive and dynamic than 'Rain and Tears', but in a rather disjointed way. Frankly I don't like it.

'Mister Thomas' was also taken from the album. Apart from the rollicking chorus, Roussos does not sing but narrates a story in an irritating style. 'The Story of a Hare Who Lost His Spectacles' in Jethro Tull's A Passion Play is very delightful and entertaining compared to this! Vangelis plays organ and harpsichord below his usual standards, and Lucas Sideras joins on drums only for the choruses. To be honest, a terrible piece of humour music.

Another version of Valley of Sadness single contains 'Funky Mary', a poor track from AC's second album It's Five O'Clock (1969). it has a cool vibe solo but otherwise it sounds like a basement demo of a band having fun with a half- finished song.

Because I don't enjoy any of these songs and they are all album tracks, I can give two stars at maximum, if not just one. I'm on a generous mood and give the other star for the risk-taking playfulness.

 End Of The World by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.52 | 112 ratings

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End Of The World
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by DangHeck

3 stars I never pretended I ever knew anything about Vangelis [perhaps I should rectify this once and for all], as famous as he may be or appear, but I (therefore?) had no clue he was in Aphrodite's Child. I'm considering this more of a re-dig into this early Symphonic Prog band, borne out of a Classical Crossover and the contemporary (international) Psychedelic Rock movements. I assume like many others, I first heard 666 (1972), their third and final album. I'd consider it at least adjacent to YouTubecore. [This will be a review for the 2010 remaster with 2 bonus tracks. More on that and my rating decision at the end.]

"End of the World" is a sweet, melancholic ballad. And given the time period and the general vibe of it, this is like a dark Moody Blues to my ears. Rooted in Trad Pop, yet full aware of the (Romantic?) Classical and the Psychedelic. The drums are pretty wild. "Don't Try to Catch a River" is a bright, upbeat number. I love the rhythm section in full view here and the sort of harpsicord sound. And I haven't mentioned it yet, but the vocals of Demis Roussos are just excellent. Full but gruff. "Mister Thomas" is an interesting Renaissance-evoking(?) song. A little silly. Very interesting, especially to hear this in 1968. This is not the Edwardian Classical Psych of the Beatles...

"Rain and Tears" feels like a Procol Harum-style Trad Pop lift of "Canon in D" [I highly recommend the "BEST WEDDING VERSION" available on YouTube /s]. It's very of the time, especially with, to me, that unavoidable Procol Harum feel. Up next is "The Grass is No Green" [sic?]. Sweet yet ominous, and then it picks up (for not the first time to my ears) in a way that seems to precede the darker lilt of other Classical obsessives ELP (maybe I'm misremembering, but a similar vibe to bands like Jackson Heights, too?). Very cool. Continuing in this still-very-Psychedelic vein is "Valley of Sadness", a shockingly upbeat number. Interesting vocal performance, and now, with that, my mind goes to early Bee Gees--I'll always recommend Bee Gees' 1st (1967). And then a short bouzouki solo! Hell yeah! The first time I had heard the instrument, to my knowledge, was through Zappa, who used it intermittently (if not randomly) through his career. But really, the general sound of the instrument here is reminiscent of the bright, twangling jangle of the beloved Byrds (but with a booming, post-Ringo-Paul rhythm section... all compliments, by the way).

The gruff returns on "You Always Stand in My Way"! Fantastic sound on this one. Booming bass and crashing keys underneath this awesome, basically Metal vocal performance (something about it reminiscent of Rod Stewart, if I can try to make a more popular connection... but that's just a small part of it). We are all over the place here as we once again shift focus on "The Shepherd and the Moon". More dark, nega-Moody Blues energy to my ears. Even as it falls away to a spoken poetic section over soft near-ambience (R.I.P. Graeme Edge). Interesting song. Certainly progressive haha. And finally for the original album run we have "Day of the Fool", with an eerie, haunting, [insert synonym here] allure. And indeed this is a dark song to close out the album. This will likely appeal (more than me) to many (early) Prog fans.

Finally finally we have the two bonus tracks, both singles from 1968. Up first, the quirky, buzzing positivity of "Plastics Nevermore". A lot of strange effects and definitely a balls-to-the-wall approach to production. This is sort of in the Magical Mystery Tour vein of early progressive ideations. Very interesting, to say the very least. Best to experience it yourself. And then, to close out this edition, we have "The Other People", with understandably comparable production to "Plastics". A lot less enthused about this one... A lot less.

Gonna stick to my guns on this (as stated above, as I reviewed here the 2010 remaster specifically), and round down from a True Rate of 3.5/5.0.

 666 by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.94 | 494 ratings

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666
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by WJA-K

5 stars Impressive. Groundbreaking. Highly Influential. Terms that often are uttered when people discuss 666.

I agree with these terms. This is a product that must have blown people away at the time. I still consider it to be absolutely unique amongst the prog albums of that era. And any time for that matter.

I like this album. I like the concept and the creativity. Some of the songs are especially stellar, like Aegian Sea, the Four Horsemen and All the Seats Were Occupied.

I love the lyrics and the arrangements. They are awesome.

I rewrote the review 1 month after my initial post to upgrade the rating to 5 stars.

 666 by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.94 | 494 ratings

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666
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Saimon

5 stars Review #7: 666

The most "hybrid" album I've ever listened to, and at the same time one of my favourites. This album was recommended to me by my brother when I started to delve much more into unknown prog environments and the truth is that the introduction to everything with this album was a great decision.

Well... How to start... 666, third and last release by Aphrodite Child, is an album, or rather I should say "mind trip", released in 1972. The concept of "6 6 6" was created by Vangelis and film director Costas Ferris, who served as lyricist for the project.

"∞" ("Infinity"), the most controversial song on the album, consists of Greek actress Irene Papas chanting "I was, I am, I'm to come" over a sparse percussion track, gradually building into an orgasmic frenzy. Vangelis described the track as conveying "the pain of birth and the joy of sexual intercourse".

My favourite songs on the album are "The Beast" and "All the Seats Were Occupied". "The Beast" is bar fight style rock & roll, with a background chorus of agonised vocals as an aggravated voice narrates the appearance and presence of the much memorialised "Beast". "All the Seats Were Occupied" is the longest song on the album, and a piece of music that summons different melodies and rhythms from the album's length.

The best experience is achieved if you lie down with headphones and close your eyes. At least, that's the way I used to listen to this masterpiece and I must admit that's why I call it a "mental journey", hearing such a gem for the first time was something splendid and magnificent, as much as the very presence of the songs in my ears. Every moment of the album thrills equally and leaves you surprised and shocked by the level this band reaches, and I know I'm not giving much information about what the album is ultimately about, but I honestly can't describe in words what it feels like to hear this for the first/second/whatever time. The only thing I could tell you is to listen to it as I said and be dazzled by it for yourself,

The album ends with "Break", a more peaceful and comforting instrumental that welcomes you to a quiet end after the whole hellish odyssey that is the album.

666 seemed a rather complex project by the band's standards, they had to recruit several Greek artists such as Irene Papas, Harris Chalkitis and Michel Ripoche.

The System/Babylon: 5/5

Loud, Loud, Loud: 3.5/5

The Four Horseman: 3.5/5

The Lamb: 5/5

The Seventh Seal: 4/5

Aegian Sea/Seven Bowls/The Wakening Beast: 5/5

Lament/The Marching Beast/The Battle of The Locusts/Do It: 3.5/5

Tribulaton: 2.5/5

The Beast: 5/5

Ofis: ?

Seven Tumprets/Altamont/The Wedding of The Lamb/The Capture of The Beast/Infinity Simbol: 5/5

Hic And Nunc: 5/5

All the Seats Were Occupied: 5/5

Break: 5/5

10/10, 5 stars for the most abnormally fantastic astral/infernal journey (or whatever, it's wonderful, you get the idea) that I could witness with my ears, and that I recommend for every lover of long conceptual works with stories, characters, references, etc... What else to say, just listen to it.

 666 by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.94 | 494 ratings

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666
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Argentinfonico

5 stars Probably the biggest journey I traveled with a record in my entire life. I can't understand how it doesn't pass the 4 stars! It is so flawlessly produced that it is impossible not to melt with pleasure at the sounds of discord and human contradiction. It's one of the best concept albums of all time, with (I think) the one special song "∞ (Infinity Symbol)" - the most bizarre and cheeky (in the wonderful senses of the word) female performance I've ever heard on my life. Irene Papas created a 5 minute blast that cannot be compared to any other song out there (excluding the songs that copied this one). As a complex work and piece that gives the album instrumental level, there is the beautiful "All the Seats Were Occupied". The short passages are very creatively placed. This album deserves to be played until you drop. Firm 5 stars.
 End Of The World by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.52 | 112 ratings

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End Of The World
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by NmDPlm

4 stars The debut album from Aphrodite's Child straddles three lines at once: Brit rock, Psychadelic, and Prog. That they straddle all three in fine fashion is quite the achievement. The album is missing a solid guitar, likely due to their guitar player having to stay behind in Greece to serve in the military as his band mates moved on to Paris, but Demis Roussos steps in to handle what he can on guitar while also kicking it on bass and vocals. Any guitar that may have been overlooked is more than made up for by the widespread sounds of various keyboards by Vangelis. The album was a big deal when it came out and a couple singles earned them some goodwill and fame. The proggiest of the bunch are The Grass Is No Green as well as Day of the Fool. Even so, a shorter track like The Shepherd and the Moon still evokes a prog sensibility while also highlighting their ability to keep a sense of their cultural ideal intact. Despite not being a prog track, You Always Stand In My Way is a killer rock number and Roussos absolutely slays the vocal on this one. All told, End of the World is a striking debut and sets up a further expansion of the growing prog genre.
 Best Of Aphrodite's Child by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1975
2.70 | 23 ratings

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Best Of Aphrodite's Child
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Prog123

3 stars Hmmm ... Ok, only with "666" we can define them Progressive. But here I can't say I listen to bad music. If you like bands like The Move, ELO, The Moody Blues, Procol Harum, 10CC or I Dik Dik, Aphrodite's Child will surely please you. I could finish the review here. But, correctly ... Correctly you will not find Progressives here but a POP that is not very far from the music of the bands I mentioned above. What comes to the ears is, in fact, excellent music, excellently written and played. The production is honest and the sound is clear and well balanced. So we can't help but notice that it is the typical transition POP band from POP/ Beat to Progressive Rock, with all the strengths and weaknesses we know, in relation to these bands. However, compared to other similar bands, the songs have aged very well and some are real anthems of that period. Well ... It will also be POP. But the quality is such that it will satisfy even the most demanding ears.
 The Art of Démis Roussos and Aphrodite's Child by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1993
3.22 | 8 ratings

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The Art of Démis Roussos and Aphrodite's Child
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Prog123

3 stars There are a thousand ways to read a band. In the case of the Greek Aphrodites Child it becomes very complicated in its simplicity to read his story in such a way as to enter into why this compilation is not a split compilation. The problem is that Aphrodites Child was a band that produced a vaguely progressive POP that had Vangelis as the lead songwriter and a great singer like Démis Roussos. Except "666" which, however, for me, is a Vangelis album, the style of Aphrodites Child is similar to that of Procol Harum, I Dik Dik, The Moody Blues and other similar bands. "666" is full Progressive. But, as mentioned, I don't read "666" as a band album. The dissolution of Aphrodite's Child opens up a small problem. On the one hand Vangelis was a source of wealth for the Phonogram. But she thought it would be better to focus on Aphrodites Child's singer and bassist, Démis Roussos. The problem was that without the compositions of Vangelis Démis he could have been shipwrecked. Instead he didn't happen. The split of Aphrodite's Child opens up a small problem. On the one hand Vangelis was a source of wealth for the Phonogram. But at Phonogram they thought it would be better to focus on Aphrodites Child's singer and bassist, Démis Roussos. The problem was that without the compositions of Vangelis Démis he could have been shipwrecked. Instead he didn't happen. Therefore it was natural for Phonogram to extend the band's contract to Démis Roussos alone, at least to take advantage of the moment. Incredibly Démis was successful. Even as an author. The compositions lost the Progressive elements gaining those Folk elements of the Greek tradition which, however, were never really exhibited at the forefront. In general, although the style is still that of Aphrodites Child pre "666" we can, in the singer-songwriter Dčmis (because this became), insert it in the Schlager genre, without scandalizing anyone. Listening well to Démis roussos, however, I am surprised at how much he has managed to compose extraordinary songs, full of epicity (linked to light arrangements yet steeped in epicity), building a repertoire that is not at all trivial (and, for me, superior to the Aphrodites Child repertoire ). In the case of Démis Roussos, a more unique than rare case in history, we can say that the operation of transferring Aphrodites Child fans to Démis Roussos was successful. And (mystery of musical history?) I have not yet found anyone who mentions "666" among his acquaintances when we discuss Aphrodites Child and Démis Roussos as one entity.

"The Art of Démis Roussos and Aphrodites Child" is a compilation, in conclusion, that I recommend to all fans of Aphrodites Child and Démis Roussos (and to those who love the music of the groups mentioned in the review and do not know Aphrodites Child or Démis Roussos). It is really well built and not at all obvious.

 666 by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.94 | 494 ratings

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666
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by Igor91

4 stars As an avid listener and collector of music, I had come across Aphrodite's Child's 666 on YouTube several years ago and gave it a quick, fast-forwarding, listen and remembered being unimpressed. Then, about a year ago I was out of my hometown and decided to explore some record shops in the city I was visiting. I found 666 while browsing through the used CD section of one of these record stores. I was very surprised to see a copy, especially here in the States. Priced at a mere six bucks, I figured that it would, at the very least, make an interesting addition to my music collection, so I bought it. It was then that I was able to give the album a proper "deep listen" and give it a second chance.

Two words can sum up this work by this band from Greece: "eclectic" and "ambitious." The band employs everything from rock, jazz rock/fusion, pop, psychedelic, Middle Eastern/Raga, to Greek folk music and more to present the concept of the album: The Apocalypse. Spread over 2 CD's (or 4 sides of vinyl), and recorded in 1971, it predates other, better known double concept albums such as Genesis' Lamb Lays Down on Broadway. I won't go into detailed descriptions of each track here, there are many other good reviews here on PA that I would only end up repeating.

What I do want to address is, "does the music really work as an album?" My answer to this would be yes ? and no. The majority of the music is well written and performed, and the production is very good for that period as well. The vast territory of music covered often reveals weaknesses in bands' skills, but here everything is executed very well. Many of the songs are very interesting and enjoyable, and are woven together to create quite an epic piece of progressive rock.

So, what then, is the problem? The first issue I have with 666 is that it does seem to have a bit of filler, in my opinion. On disc one, in particular, there are several short tracks that go nowhere and really don't add anything to the concept, nor the music as a whole. An example of one of the worst filler tracks, though comes from disc 2. This controversial track, its title being the mathematical symbol for "infinity,' consists of a woman, chanting something (I can't make it out), over percussion, in a manner like she is either having an orgasm or in pain ? or both. And to top it off this track goes on for over five minutes! I think when the band, or Vangelis Papathanassiou to be more precise, finished writing the music, they/he found that they only had about three sides of vinyl worth of music. In order to fix this, several short filler tracks were added to complete the double album. That is only my guess, of course. Either way, 666 contains both good and excellent music, but only about enough to fill three-fourths of a double album.

Another issue I have with the third, and final, album from Aphrodite's Child, is how the mood of the album shifts. Parts of the album are upbeat, almost happy sounding, others are somber and serious. Then there are Zappa-esque moments of humor in others. So, are we to take this journey as a serious, religious/societal/cultural statement, or just a lark ? or both? And lastly, the longest song "All The Seats Were Occupied," is a well-conceived conglomerate of previous songs wedged into parts of a new theme. Overall, I like it, but in some parts it just comes off as awkward.

So, you may be wondering, based on the amount of negative points I bring up here, why there are four stars attached to this review. Well, that is because, despite all its flaws, I really like this album. When I finished giving 666 my first deep listen, I told myself that this was a solid 3 star effort. It just didn't seem to gel all together due to these flaws. The thing is, that each additional time that I have listened to this album, I like it even more. So, while I think this LP is better than "good," but not quite "excellent," my actual rating is a 3.5 stars. I tend to have a soft spot for obscure, weird pieces of music that do not get the recognition they deserve, so I usually round up my .5 ratings. Definitely not background music, I recommend giving this one several attentive listens before making a judgement of your own.

 666 by APHRODITE'S CHILD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.94 | 494 ratings

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666
Aphrodite's Child Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars The most experimental album of all three by Aphrodite's child is not a very coherent effort but presents musicians at peak of their artistic abilities and the group as a whole.

"The four horsemen" is one of few pop-oriented and melodic songs with dominant vocals. "The lamb" is a fantastic instrumental work by Vangelis in the Greek style. Clavinet and maybe some organ are used to create a dual sound in the right and left channel. "Aegian sea" is a good psychedelic track with narrative and moog.

After that, a couple of experimental tracks that are interesting at first hear but hardly essential. "Marching beast" is a first one with a structure centered around piano, organ and bouzouki. "Do it" is a short furious battle between drums and guitar having bass supporting. "Tribulation" might be a saxophone tribute Canterbury style. "The beast" is a classic late 60's track but released in 1972. "Altamont" has a deep organ or moog sound with a simple motive but numerous instrument changes. "The wedding of the lamb" finally brings again Greek folk music into perspective although retaining experimentation. "Infinity" is an annoying track with orgasm of a woman, that should not be included on a progressive rock effort like this. I can't but skip this track each time. It brings nothing but awkwardness to faces of all listeners.

"Hic et nunc" partly corrects the previous bad impression by offering a user-friendly Beatles-inspired tune with group singing.

The lengthy "All the seats were occupied" starts good as an epic but after turning the half-mark, it gets deteriorated by the questionable mix of the previous songs including the terrible moaning from "Infinity". Thankfully, the jam continues soon showcasing clear guitar tones with moog and percussions.

The last and swang song bears traces of nostalgy but gives some hope at least in the lyrics. Progressive rock goes away for a while and pop-rock with monumental piano chords and clever guitar improvisation. Lucas Sideras vocals suit here well.

Overall, this is certainly a peak of this band's output but some stars are removed because of uncoherence and experimentation that won't appeal with each repeated listening.

Thanks to Ivan_Melgar_M for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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