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KANSAS

Symphonic Prog • United States


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Kansas picture
Kansas biography
Founded in Topeka, Kansas, USA in 1970 - Continued activity with different line-ups - Still active as of 2017

Original members Kerry LIVGREN (guitar) and Phil EHART (drums) combined their two separate bands into one large band. Kerry's band was called SARATOGA, and Phil's was called WHITE CLOVER. The band changed its name to KANSAS. They were from the beginning just an ordinary rock band, but were quickly compared to other progressive bands in the 70's like GENESIS, YES and KING CRIMSON. Combining the musical complexities of British prog-rock with the soul and instrumentation of the American heartland, KANSAS became one of the biggest selling and most successful touring acts of the 1970s. With huge hits like "Carry On Wayward Son" and "Dust In The Wind", they helped define the sound of "classic rock". They are loved all over the world.

I- THE 1970s
The Early Days: Their self-titled debut album was released in 1974, but nationwide response was slow. Their second album, "Song For America", saw a softening of KANSAS' sound, with more classical influences evident. The third album, "Masque", featured more pop songs and lyrically quite dark. They suffered ridicule from people around the world, because they wore overalls and had a violonist, which made people think that they were a country music group.
The Best of Times: "Leftoverture", with the popular single "Carry On Wayward Son", became a signature piece and pushed the album to platinum success. The followup, "Point Of Know Return" (1977) contained the ever-popular acoustic "Dust In The Wind". During their tour, they recorded their first live album, "Two For The Show" (1978) and the next studio album "Monolith" (1979).

II- THE 1980s
Seeds Of Change: A year later, the band followed up with "Audio Visions", the last production of the original band lineup. WALSH left the band due to creative differences. "Vinyl Confessions" had Christian lyrical content. The next album, "Drastic Measures" (1983), had some hard rock material on it, including the song "Mainstream". In 1984, the band released a greatest hits compilation, "The Best Of Kansas", which featured one new song, "Perfect Lover".
The Second Generation: The group split in 1983, only to reform in 1986 with the albums "Power" and with "The Spirit Of Things" (1988). Sales of these two albums were not very strong. Thus, the second generation of KANSAS had...
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KANSAS discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

KANSAS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.01 | 673 ratings
Kansas
1974
4.14 | 782 ratings
Song for America
1975
3.68 | 582 ratings
Masque
1975
4.23 | 1236 ratings
Leftoverture
1976
4.18 | 855 ratings
Point Of Know Return
1977
3.25 | 422 ratings
Monolith
1979
3.07 | 327 ratings
Audio-Visions
1980
2.77 | 259 ratings
Vinyl Confessions
1982
2.19 | 236 ratings
Drastic Measures
1983
2.69 | 257 ratings
Power
1986
2.80 | 220 ratings
In The Spirit Of Things
1988
3.19 | 235 ratings
Freaks Of Nature
1995
3.37 | 155 ratings
Always Never The Same
1998
3.49 | 296 ratings
Somewhere to Elsewhere
2000
3.80 | 309 ratings
The Prelude Implicit
2016
3.69 | 155 ratings
The Absence of Presence
2020

KANSAS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.33 | 271 ratings
Two for the Show
1978
2.92 | 54 ratings
Kansas - Live at the Whiskey
1992
2.67 | 43 ratings
King Biscuit Flower Hour Presents Kansas (1989)
1998
2.16 | 16 ratings
Live: Dust In The Wind
1998
4.04 | 74 ratings
Device, Voice, Drum
2002
2.24 | 12 ratings
Dust In The Wind
2002
1.72 | 10 ratings
From The Front Row...Live!
2003
2.15 | 11 ratings
Greatest Hits Live (Kansas)
2003
4.17 | 64 ratings
There's Know Place Like Home
2009
4.14 | 14 ratings
Bryn Mawr 1976
2014
2.67 | 8 ratings
Carry on for no Return
2016
4.61 | 38 ratings
Leftoverture Live & Beyond
2017
4.68 | 13 ratings
Point of Know Return Live & Beyond
2021

KANSAS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.25 | 15 ratings
Best of Kansas Live (VHS) [Aka: Live Confessions DVD]
1982
4.20 | 73 ratings
Device - Voice - Drum (DVD)
2002
4.59 | 67 ratings
There“s Know Place Like Home (DVD)
2009
4.13 | 21 ratings
Miracles Out Of Nowhere
2015

KANSAS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.56 | 84 ratings
The Best of Kansas
1984
3.83 | 50 ratings
The Ultimate Kansas Box Set
1994
3.09 | 15 ratings
The Definitive Collection
1997
3.27 | 48 ratings
The Best of Kansas (1999)
1999
1.44 | 10 ratings
Extended Versions
2000
3.93 | 38 ratings
The Ultimate Kansas
2002
4.13 | 8 ratings
Closet Chronicles - The Best of Kansas
2003
4.08 | 6 ratings
Dust In The Wind
2004
4.16 | 38 ratings
Sail On: The 30th Anniversary Collection 1974-2004
2004
2.97 | 8 ratings
On The Other Side
2005
2.50 | 9 ratings
Works In Progress
2006
4.43 | 22 ratings
Original Album Classics
2009
3.65 | 6 ratings
The Music of Kansas
2010
4.27 | 17 ratings
The Classic Albums Collection 1974-1983
2011

KANSAS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.80 | 5 ratings
What's On My Mind
1977
4.00 | 9 ratings
Point of Know Return
1977
4.00 | 8 ratings
Carry On Wayward Son (Adelante, Hijo Descarriado)
1977
3.67 | 6 ratings
Portrait (He Knew)
1978
3.86 | 9 ratings
Dust In The Wind
1978
2.36 | 6 ratings
People Of The Southwind
1979
3.27 | 7 ratings
Hold On
1980
3.40 | 5 ratings
Play The Game Tonight
1982
2.80 | 5 ratings
Right Away
1982
3.00 | 5 ratings
Fight Fire With Fire
1983
2.16 | 6 ratings
All I Wanted
1986
3.00 | 6 ratings
Power
1987
1.38 | 7 ratings
Stand Beside Me
1988
2.50 | 4 ratings
The Light
2001

KANSAS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Freaks Of Nature by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.19 | 235 ratings

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Freaks Of Nature
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

2 stars Um?? not so much. With Livgren and Steinhardt gone from the band since the early 80's Kansas trues to sound like Kansas but only comes close on a few tracks off the next 3 albums this one included. At least the violin was back and never to leave again. David Ragsdale is a great musician and his work with Kansas has been great. He and Robbie are different in their approach but David holds his own. He had sent Ehart a tape back in the 80's offering his assistance but was never taken up until this album.

When I went and bought this album right after its release I had hoped for a great comeback but like so many, the writing was okay but nothing spectacular. Steve's voice on this album definitely shows issues and his fast living caught up to him. ClemofNazareth commented that the album's theme seems real depressing and that is so evident.

I Can Fly is an interesting song to start with and shows off the violin. The instrumental in the middle is just plain weird but in a good way and after that the song just fizzles out. Desperate Times sounds like a Kansas song and as usual Phil's drumming is top notch. Black Fathom 4 is probably the best track for me but again it is not anything too special. Under The Knife is also okay. The title track has some great driving places. Cold Grey Morning is just that: Cold. I know that was Kerry's song he tossed in but definitely not a Livgren type Kansas track. The ending song seems so very out of place on a Kansas album.

That is really what is interesting about the album. When the band started fracturing in 1980 it just wasn't the same Kansas anymore. Expecting any release to be like the old days is illogical. Though I will say their latest Absence Of Presence is not a bad album and only 2 originals remain. This one gets only 2 clicks. They get one for coming back.

 Kansas by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.01 | 673 ratings

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Kansas
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

5 stars Bata Bam! Bata Boom! Bata Bing!!! Hot the jackpot! I bought this album in 1978 after having heard Leftoverture and I was blown away by the lush originality and amazing layering of instruments on this album and to this day it ranks at the top of my Kansas list with "Leftoverture" & "Masque" taking in their positions.

I was amazed at the huge difference from the first 3 tracks to the rest of then album. The big highlights start with "Belexes" which grabs you and rocks along. "Journey From Mariabronn" was a fantastic tune all the way through. The highlight for me is "Apercu" which runs from amazing section to section and the middle interplay with guitars, keys and violin are amazing.

The end of " Death Of Mother Nature Suite" wove its way intro my mind and heart from day one and is one of then greatest endings in prog music. The story behind this band getting their first record deal coming from small town wheat fields is pretty amazing and these musicians were already extremely well trained and practiced and this band would go onto score some fantastic albums.

I have to admit that I despise the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. They induct crap bands that had a few hit singles and didn't last anywhere near as long as bands like Rush and others. The fact that Kansas hasn't been inducted yet especially before the death of Robbie Steinhardt is a crime. It kills the credibility of that so called institution as they pass them up year after year in favor of so many bands that play only basic chords and got lucky.

This album is not perfect in every song but it is close.

 The Absence of Presence by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.69 | 155 ratings

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The Absence of Presence
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

4 stars Now that's what I'm talkin bout!!!

I have been a massive Kansas fan since their beginnings. I can still remember putting on the first album on my turntable as a 17 year old closing my eyes and letting "Journey From Mariabronn" take me on a journey along with "Apercu" and "Belexes." I was hooked quickly and all the way through "Point Of No Return" they dazzled. As I pointed out in my past review of "Monolith", there is that time when a band starts drying up and losing its creative edge and that album was the start of the decline.

Don't get me wrong, that record, "Audio Visions" and Vinyl Confessions" had some good moments but not the caliber of their first 5 albums. "Drastic Measures" was too drastic and after Steve Walsh returned, his 3 albums were really lacking but since the songwriter who really defined Kansas was missing along with Robbie's voice and violin, it just isn't Kansas.

Fast forward to 2014, Walsh having had serious voice issues for many years and lacking desire retired as he had reached the end of his rope and I cannot blame him. He was the reason that no new studio albums had been released since 2000's reunion "Somewhere To Elsewhere" which honestly was a disappointment to me but maybe my expectations were too high. According to Rich Williams, Steve didn't see why they should record and as Rich stated if one person doesn't want to record you cannot do it.

So when Steve left this opened the door to "Prelude Implicit" in 2016. I had expected to not hear Kansas and wondered why they would do an album but I was pleasantly surprised by it. It was a pretty decent album but not spectacular. Rich had also stated that they weren't just a bunch "of old farts" doing one last gasp; they intended to record another album after "Prelude." So when they decided to go back into the studio I thought we would see something similar to that album.

Hold the press!! Oh, Em, Gee!!! I was in shock hearing this album as it rolled through the tracks. No, not every song is a zinger but no Kansas album hits on every single tune. I am a firm believer that you cannot recreate a band that has lost so many key members. But what happens when you only recruit people who are excellent and proficient musicians who love Kansas? You get "The Absence Of Presence."

I have always liked Ragsdale and he fits Robbie's shoes on the violin very well and he Billy Greer have been part of Kansas a lot longer than Dave Hope and Kerry Livgren were. The sound is classic Kansas at its best and no other group of that era sounds closer to the original than this set of guys.

So after babbling on about all this, what about the tracks? The title track starts out very well and the vocal harmonies work well. "Throwing Mountains" tears it up great and with the solos in the middle it kept me surprised. After you hear a band their songs become predictable and there are less surprise hooks but this album has many. "Propulsion 1" is one of my favorite tracks not just on the album but in the Kansas library. This one screams classic! It is a great kicking instrumental. "Circus Of Illusion" has a few surprises on it as well. The start of "Animals On A roof" reminds me of something on "Leftoverture" and it is also a strong track. The final track, "The Song the River Sang" was a great way to end this jewel and is my favorite vocal track.

My only issue with the band is the lack of a clear second vocalist like Robbie. Greer does a good job but the wider range would be better. But if that is the worst part, I can live with it. I cannot imagine these guys following this up with anything better but I could never have guessed this would be so good. They only have Ehart and Williams from the glory days and they aren't really songwriters. Brislin, Rizvi & Platt wrote this music and it is obvious they have that Kansas blood. The instrumentation is amazing and nothing less than astounding. Phil's drumming never ever is anything less than stellar.

This album has so many great moments that I have to rank it just behind their first 5 albums. I liked it better than "Monolith" and "Audio Visions" and that is saying a lot!

 Drastic Measures by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 1983
2.19 | 236 ratings

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Drastic Measures
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

1 stars If "Vinyl Confessions" was a shot across the bow of the USS Kansas, then "Drastic Measures" was a head on torpedo hit! The dude in the middle of the front cover was smiling but if he was Kansas he turned the big gun on himself. I was in college when this album came out and after watching one of my all time fav bands slowly go downhill starting with "Monolith" I was very curious what would come next after Vinyl.

I was not prepared for what this album held. Oh Em GEE! Seriously!? John Elefante stepped in and searching for a new direction, settled on this. It is obvious that John was still a rookie Kansasian. Very little of this album even sounds like Kansas and more like John & Dino's Hit Parade!

"End Of The Age" was one of only 3 songs Kerry wrote and that is the only song that has the Kansas sound. John sent the band into Commercial City with most of his entries. It was obvious Kerry was burned out on Kansas and mentally was on his way out into solo land. When I first heard this album I knew right there Kansas would not survive. No violin, only MTV rated hits. That being said, I have to admit??? um??. that I did like some of the tracks?.. Okay, I said it! In a strange sort of way, some of the songs were good. BUT, I didn't listen to it as a Kansas album. I heard it as a new artist.

I found myself somehow liking "Fire With Fire". "Mainstream" was Kerry's attempt at saying "This album really sucks!" and I liked it as well. The middle section was a nice surprise. The track that stood out for me the most was "Going Through The Motions" and I have to tip my hat to John on this one.

In summary, only 4 songs on this album were enjoyable but again this was not a Kansas album. So if you listen to it, act like it is a different band.

 Vinyl Confessions by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 1982
2.77 | 259 ratings

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Vinyl Confessions
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

3 stars 6 Members; 3 born again Christians and 3 secular walked into a bar?? Okay but it did seem like the start of a good joke. This album is no laughing matter though. It was pure irony that put this album together. After Kerry's Christian lyrics turned off Walsh, especially since he would be singing things he didn't believe in, Steve walked away and sadly the band was broken up. Dave Hope now also catches the Christian bug.

I do think that Elefante was the right pick to replace Steve with his similar range but Steve Walsh is one of a kind. What is funny is that Kerry & Dave had no clue John was also a born again! What are the odds? Divine intervention!?

Regardless, they headed back into the studio and what came out was in my opinion an album that had better songs on it than the last 2 with Walsh. As I stated in my review of Audio Visions Kerry really should have reserved his Christian songs for his solo work since Kansas was a democratic 6-member band. His decision to integrate this way led to the fracturing of this band. I am a born-again so I can say it would be best to defer to the majority in the band. It was a mistake that destroyed the band. Robbie left after this tour due to the fact that they now had 2 sets of fans: The old school and the Christians and those silly born-agains chose to use the lyrics to put them in evangelical tracts and gave them out at concerts. Bye-bye priceless violin and amazing singer.

As far as the album is concerned it sounds fresh in places but way too commercial. With the first wave of prog fading away in the late 70's which turned my favorite prog band Genesis into a bad rendition of Hit Parade! What a tragedy??. But that's another sobfest. I have to admit I am not much intro lyrics. I am very much an instrumental music lover and classic Kansas has some of then most amazing and complex instrumentation of any band which is the definition of true musical talent. Anyone can play an instrument but with prog, you have to be incredibly proficient to be successful.

I sensed more flavorful instrumental passages on this album than Audio Visions. I could do without the hit "Play the Game Tonight" but it did make Kirshner more happy. The first side of the album for me was a complete waste of vinyl. Side 2 redeems the album much better. I liked Face It and John shows his Walshy abilities as he hit a great high note rolling intro the solo.

Windows is probably my favorite track and it is one of the better songs they have done since "Point Of No Return". I wish they had done more with the middle solo section as it could have been a great prog song. "Play On" was good with its beat and flow. "Crossfire" was another back to Old Kansas kind of song and obviously has Kerry written all over it.

Audio Visions marked the end of Kansas as we knew it and this album solidified that end. Robbie's violin got them a record contract and his contributions in the studio and on stage as the MC can never be discarded. What Kansas was about to face was a head on collision with disaster.

 Audio-Visions by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 1980
3.07 | 327 ratings

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Audio-Visions
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

3 stars Being written so long after its release, my opinion of this album has shifted somewhat over the decades. Being a rock solid fan of the band and drooling over the likes of their debut and "Masque", "Leftoverture" and "Point Of Know Return", as my review of "Monolith" stated, every band has that moment when they have hit their creative heights and then begin to run out of unique songs that have that "WOWZA" sound. This band was great at throwing in hooks into their songs that were anything but predictable. They were unique and fresh.

"Monolith" was the starting to come down album and I still remember my disappointment when it first came out. They had come off the high of Point and their first live album and the fizzle happened. While there were some notable songs on that album it just didn't measure up and was too predictable. I rushed right out and swallowed up "Audio Visions" as soon as it was released hoping that they had another great surge. Back then I was not aware of the internal politics as I am today and one thing I do like about Kansas is that they did better to keep the drama out of the public's sight than most bands.

I was to be disappointed again but I would rate this album higher than "Monolith" but I am not sure why. As has been pointed out, the longer songs with heavy instrumental passages were being left behind in the dust. We must also understand that in the late 70's and early 80's prog was being left behind in the dust by many of the great prog bands. Don't even get me started on my favorite band Genesis whose transition to 3 was not a good one.

There are some songs on the album that have that Kansas sound and that is Kerry's songs. As "ClemofNazareth" penned in his review to the left "No One Together" sounded out of place and that is because Kerry wanted it on "Monolith" but after an argument with Walsh, Steve's "How My Soul" got on the album so this was a leftover without the ture?. That song is fair as well as my favorite "Don't Open Your Eyes" which was a group written song minus Robbie. "Relentless" opens then album up and I liked it's straight at you rock drive. Steve's selections didn't do much for me but "Loner" was the best of them.

It is good to note that I am writing this the day after I watched an old live Kansas concert during this tour. The concert played a lot of old tunes and they did so well at reproducing them but when the time came to do these songs, I could tell they struggled maybe just because they were new? They also played 1 song from each of Steve's and Kerry's first solo albums. Steve's was mediocre just like the songs on this album and Kerry's was better.

I cannot help but wonder how many good songs this album could have had if the 2 of them had not done solo albums. When you are already struggling to get songs written for an album and your allegiance is now spread too thinly, something will suffer. I think Steve was already on his way out his "Back Door" when they did this album. In all, the album struggles to achieve anything but mediocre music. Worth having but not essential by any means.

 Monolith by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.25 | 422 ratings

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Monolith
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

3 stars It had to happen sometime?? Every band that has talent hits a spot where they have "Done it." They hit their artistic peak and what follows is usually lacking. Being a die hard Kansas fan starting with their debut, these guys were their own genre to a degree. Walsh, who has his progressive leanings is more a straight ahead rocker; Livgren was born into classical music with his grandmas old 78RPMs.

Each album from the first up through "Point Of No Return" encompassed the best of the progressive they could write. By the time this album hit there was a great deal happening in the band. Walsh and Livgren were putting together their first solo albums so one may wonder if they held back the better tracks for those and went with tracks that were not as impactful.

This is the first album that is produced by Kansas. That becomes evident to a degree to me. This album lacks the sophistication and originality that their previous albums did. They were risk takers and here they seem to be focused on more of an established formula. Upon hearing it when it first came out I was disappointed. It is hard to follow up the previous 2 albums. In retrospect years later I have grown more appreciative to the album. I normally prefer Livgren's entries more than Walsh's but in this case I think Steve had some better songs on here.

"How My Soul Cries Out" is a favorite with the hard driving beat and the ruckus in the middle followed by the 100MPH ending is good. On vinyl, side 2 starts out with the quick and faint reprise of the ending which I liked. "Away From You" and "Stay Out Of Trouble" are fair. They goofed by choosing "Southwind" as a single to start with and when it bombed they released "Reason To Be" as the next single which is the closest thing to "Dust" on the album.

Overall, the album is a signal that the band was declining. Drug use and the like had caught up to some of the members. Livgren was about to run into his conversion to Christianity which would cause a creative rift between Steve and himself. Kansas was about to hit a wall where they would never recover from. Honestly, "The Absence Of Presence", the 2021 entry that only has 2 original members is better than this album and fresher.

 Power by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 1986
2.69 | 257 ratings

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Power
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

2 stars Uh..... not so much. There were 2 problems that doomed this album

Problem #1: Over one half of the songwriting team is gone. This is a similar story to Supertramp when Roger Hodgson left the band and they released their next album without him. Ironically that occurred the same time Kerry Livgren left Kansas. Sure, Rick Davies wrote some of the band's hits but Roger's songs were the ones that catapulted them to fame. After Hodgson's departure, Supertramp was but a shadow of its former self and everything that was put out was weak. With Kansas, they also lost the songwriter that wrote their biggest hits. Like Supertramp, Walsh wrote some of the bands memorable songs but it was Kerry's songs that really defined the Kansas sound. That is not just my opinion; Walsh said that himself.

Problem #2: Key instrument is now missing. With Robbie Steinhardt's exit due to similar reasons as Walsh, Kansas lost its key instrument that got them signed to a record deal in the first place. Without that violin this album and the one that followed ("In The Spirit Of Things") just do not sound like Kansas.

They would have been better off releasing it under a new name. I went out and bought it right after its release to only be disappointed. The only songs I cared for on the album were "We're Not Alone Anymore: and "Musicatto". I love Steve Morse not just for his playing but also his personality and demeanor. He fills in the second guitar section very well even though his style is not Kerry's. Rich Williams is strong in his own way but Kansas is a 2 guitar band.

But again, that empty first violin chair is incredibly noticeable. In 1983's "Drastic Measures", Robbie was missing and that album was even more so NOT a Kansas album save one song that Kerry wrote. He only wrote 3 on that album since he was obviously through.

We would have to wait for the year 2000 and the release of "Somewhere To Elsewhere" before we would see a reunion of the classic lineup but that album was only decent. Again, on that record, Kerry was the only one who wrote songs. We really need that Dynamic Duo of Walsh / Livgren + Steinhardt to really consider an album to be worthy of the name Kansas. I will note that the 2021 release of the "Absence Of Prescence" was surprisingly good.

 Somewhere to Elsewhere by KANSAS album cover Studio Album, 2000
3.49 | 296 ratings

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Somewhere to Elsewhere
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Sidscrat

2 stars Um..... not so much. Having been a die hard Kansas fan since their beginnings, it would be near to impossible to create anything as epic as the deep prog of their first album or the polished greatness of Leftoverture or Point Of No Return. The bar would have to be set high. When Monolith was released in 79 that for me was the start of the decline. I tend to like Kerry's songs more than Steve's but on that album Steve's songs won out for me. Audio Visions had some good tracks but the band sounded like they were going in circles by then and Steve quit over the "musical differences" bit. The few albums since then have been lame at best.

When this album came out I was at the front of the line to get it only to be disappointed. First of all, you can tell that there is not the chemistry there once was. Come to find out Steve wasn't even in the studio the entire time. He did his vocals from his own home studio as he was working on his solo album. You would think that something as monumental as a complete reunion would be done when all the players could be available or maybe Steve just didn't want to be there. The poor guy's voice had started its decline from the once epic voice he had. Drug and alcohol abuse took its toll. So his vocals on here have very little punch and are not at the front of the mix. Steve contributes no songs here at all and it isn't a Kansas album without contributions from both of the main songwriters.

So the rest of the players recorded at Kerry's studio. Most of the songs sound okay but there is no real surprises. Flash forwards to the new Kansas album, The Absence of Presence. The songs on that album sound fresher than this one! I would rate it higher as well. I did like a few songs as many have mentioned. The best is Myriad & Distant Vision.

Again, I think if the band had sat down and truly worked together on this album and Steve was present and added input the album would have been a great last one for the classic lineup.

 Original Album Classics by KANSAS album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2009
4.43 | 22 ratings

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Original Album Classics
Kansas Symphonic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars If you know the Original Album Classics series and similar, you know the deal here: small slipcase, set of CDs in simple cardboard sleeves replicating the original LP sleeve design, no booklet, no frills.

In this case, this collection brings together the first five Kansas studio albums. There's another box set which includes the Two For the Show live album and all the studio albums up to Drastic Measures - but you'd have to be a very uncritical Kansas fan to want all of those.

As it is, this is a cheap way to get the cornerstone of a Kansas collection, and for many this (plus perhaps Two For The Show) will be the only Kansas they really need. For a fairly reasonable price you get two widely-acknowledged classics (Leftoverture and Point of Know Return), a strong and overlooked album (Song For America), and two albums which aren't as hot as the others here but which both have strong moments and are nice to have as a bonus (Kansas and Masque).

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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