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KAIPA

Symphonic Prog • Sweden


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Kaipa picture
Kaipa biography
Founded in 1973 as "Ura Kaipa" - Disbanded in 1982 - Reformed in 2000

In their early years, KAIPA was one of Sweden's best Symphonic Prog bands. Roine STOLT from THE FLOWER KINGS was a member of KAIPA. Their albums contain mostly instrumental music, drawing its influences from classic progressive Rock bands (CAMEL, YES, GENESIS...), Classical music (BACH), and also Swedish Folk music.

The first three albums ("Kaipa", "Inget Nytt Under Solen" and "Solo") are beautiful and probably most representative of their style - dreamy Symphonic Rock with simple, yet very effective melodies and a great deal of emotion. "Notes From The Past" is their 6th studio album since 1975 and the first one since 1982. All colours of the unique KAIPA-music from the 70's are present but with a brand new collection of masterpieces. With the new album "Keyholder", Hans LUNDIN and Roine STOLT perform some new music, searching for a new level of progress, yet echoing fragments of the glorious 70's, trying to bring the new Kaipa-sound to a higher level. The melodies linger on and will probably stay with you for decades to entertain and to thrill. An essential band for fans of Symphonic progressive Rock!

See also: KAIPA DA CAPO

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KAIPA discography


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KAIPA top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.90 | 268 ratings
Kaipa
1975
4.07 | 249 ratings
Inget Nytt Under Solen
1976
4.02 | 237 ratings
Solo
1978
2.42 | 80 ratings
Händer
1980
1.85 | 83 ratings
Nattdjurstid
1982
3.83 | 239 ratings
Notes from the Past
2002
3.78 | 279 ratings
Keyholder
2003
3.22 | 197 ratings
Mindrevolutions
2005
3.49 | 202 ratings
Angling Feelings
2007
3.83 | 411 ratings
In the Wake of Evolution
2010
3.91 | 335 ratings
Vittjar
2012
3.86 | 256 ratings
Sattyg
2014
3.79 | 179 ratings
Children of the Sounds
2017
3.82 | 78 ratings
Urskog
2022

KAIPA Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

KAIPA Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

KAIPA Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.43 | 41 ratings
The Decca Years 1975-1978
2005
4.57 | 14 ratings
Discovering Kaipa
2015

KAIPA Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 4 ratings
För Sent / Bay-e Bay-o
1974
3.40 | 5 ratings
Sen Repris / Visa i Sommaren
1978
3.33 | 3 ratings
Äntligen / Staden Lever
1980
3.00 | 3 ratings
Cellskräck / Bländad Ikväll
1982
3.24 | 34 ratings
Stockholm Symphonie
1993

KAIPA Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 In the Wake of Evolution by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 2010
3.83 | 411 ratings

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In the Wake of Evolution
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by Dapper~Blueberries
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Kaipa is in a weird spot between being a retro prog band, and a classic?symphonic prog group. They started in the 70s with their eponymous debut in 1975. They would go for a couple of years since then, releasing about five or so symphonic prog records before disbanding in 1982 after their new wave flop of Nattdjurstid. They then reformed in the 2000s with Notes From The Past, marking their new shift as what many would consider a retro prog group, with brand new members such as Patrik Lundström of Ritual, and some older members like Roine Stolt popping in to help the group out. This new iteration of Kaipa is not to be confused with Kaipa Da Capo, which features predominantly the older members of the classic Kaipa from the 70s. This timeline sort of makes Kaipa a time piece of sorts for both the old days of prog rock, and the modern music being put out.

Personally, I am more of a fan of their newer stuff. My journey with Kaipa actually started quite early in my prog rock adventure. You see, in early 2021 I was obsessed with the track 'In The Wake Of Poseidon' by King Crimson. I tried to scour any renditions or versions of the song the best I could. This was how I discovered the Italian band La Maschera Di Cera as they played that song live on their Belgium 2005 album. Whilst continuing my search for lofty Crimson covers, I managed to find the title track of the album I am currently reviewing. I didn't think much of it, I liked the song and carried on with my search. Then 2022 rolled around, and I discovered Kaipa once more through Urskog, which I still think is their best record they've released. I decided then to check more of their stuff out, even looking back at their older records. I wasn't obsessed, but I certainly had quite the infatuation in the summer of 2022. Then I eventually wound back right to where I started, In The Wake Of Evolution.

I gotta say, this album is certainly one of their best they've put out to me. This album is the second release of what I dub their 'butterfly era', which started with Angling Feelings in 2007, through Vittjar in 2012. I dub this the butterfly era, as their logo then had a butterfly over the i. They stopped this era with Sattyg in 2014. I haven't heard Vittjar yet, but out of the two I have heard from this era, Wake Of Evolution takes the cake.

I really love this album because of the joyous energy Kaipa has on here. Kaipa, and most retro prog in general, always had quite a celebratory energy, but here it feels like they took that power to a whole new level, which they continued to hold in the albums after. The title track has this very bouncy feel, Folkia's First Decision feels like I am in a glamorous medieval pub, Arcs of Sound has this absolutely fun guitar solo; You would be hard pressed not to find something enjoyable here, or at least something that doesn't make you smile while tapping your feet.

The title track in particular is really fun. A 10 minute extravaganza of these bouncy keyboards, fun guitar medleys, and super enjoyable vocal performances from Aleena Gibson and Patrik Lundström. I consider this track to be Kaipa's bonafide masterpiece, and that's not counting my slight nostalgia for it. It's also the best longer track on the album, which leads a bit to the issues I have here.

Aside from the title track, of course, the longer tracks feel just a tad too long for me. I know, "GASP!" a prog fan finds a song too long, but it's true. The epic of Electric Power Water Notes, and the final 10 minute track of The Seven Oceans of Our Mind just feel like they are played for much longer than they probably should, if I am being honest. Electric Power Water Notes ends quite greatly after the 11 minute mark, and would be a good end to the song with that nice guitar solo, but then it keeps going for much longer, and with a pretty not so satisfying ending too. It feels more obligatory than it should.

The Seven Oceans of Our Mind isn't the worst offender here, but it's certainly not the best either. It has a perfect cap on the song with the 6 minute mark, being a reprisal of the first lyrics sung off the track. It would be a great way to end off the album, but then we get an additional 3 minutes of guitar solos and music, and while it is admittedly good music, I cannot help but feel it is also very unnecessary. These two long tracks feel more enforced, and certainly show that later Kaipa releases have a better understanding of how to implement these longer songs much better into the track listings.

However, a remedy is found within the lyrics. A lot of Kaipa releases don't quite follow the same thematics this album includes, being that of questions that the new generations may have to answer, and how the future for the youth doesn't seem to be better than the present we have now. It is very conscious, and I think this album certainly holds some of the group's best lyrics, which is admittedly not a high bar to set since the group is more instrumently focused than lyrically.

While imperfect, this record holds some of the best moments of Kaipa, and Swedish prog in general, and is just in general a very good-feeling record to listen to. While I say listen to Notes From The Past first if you want a taste of modern Kaipa, give this one a try too if you dig the group's retro prog stylings. You can never go wrong with a good Kaipa release, that's for sure.

Best tracks: In the Wake of Evolution, Folkia's First Decision, Arcs of Sound

Worst tracks: Electric Power Water Notes, The Seven Oceans of Our Mind

 The Decca Years 1975-1978 by KAIPA album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2005
4.43 | 41 ratings

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The Decca Years 1975-1978
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 644

Kaipa is definitely one of the best Swedish progressive rock bands and one of the most interesting from the 70's. Their first three albums are highly and deservedly praised and are occasionally available individually to can be purchased. However, this compilation "The Decca Years 1975-1978" has more than that. It's comprised by the three mentioned studio albums, a demo which was previously unreleased and a previously unreleased live set. This collection is the only place where you can obtain the demo and the live set. The main problem is that this is a limited edition hard to get.

So, "The Decca Years 1975-1978" is a box set with five CD's of Kaipa. It has the three first studio albums of the band, "Kaipa" from 1975, "Inget Nytt Under Solen" from 1976 and "Solo" from 1978, plus two bonus CD's, "Kaipa Live" with eleven tracks of concert material from the same period and one called "1974 Unedited Master Demo Recording", which also has eleven tracks and speaks for itself with regard to its content. So, we have here a total of fifty-three tracks in all on the five discs. Each one is housed in a mini LP replica sleeve and the whole set is packaged in a nice top close style box and includes a thick booklet with tons of photos and details about this legendary Swedish prog band's history.

I'm going to write in a short way what are my thoughts about the five CD's contained on "The Decca Years 1975- 1978".

"Kaipa": Kaipa's debut album should actually appeal to all friends of the melodic variety of the progressive rock of the 70's. The elegiac elements predominate and one should not expect complex cabinet pieces. For me, Kaipa is still one of the really big bands of the 70's, probably the biggest Swedish prog band in those years. I know few other prog bands that possessed such a keen sense of a so elegant and beautiful melody. Unfortunately, this outstanding band is usually only mentioned in a subordinate clause when talking about Roine Stolt's Flower Kings. So, Kaipa's debut is overall an impressive 70's prog rock classic that should satisfy fans of Genesis, Yes, Camel and the melodic prog rock in general.

"Inget Nytt Under Solen": "Inget Nytt Under Solen" captures the band at the peak of their exploration ride and is one of the most essential Swedish prog albums of the 70's. It has all the elements you would want in a prog band, beautiful captivating songs with superb musicianship. The band managed to create a right balance between the energetic parts and the emotional melancholic parts. All tracks are well constructed, having been given to them lots of space to breathe and to create some lovely atmospheres. Stolt brings his accurate and lively guitar work, Lundin brings his analogue keyboard wizardry, Eriksson adds some real solid punchy bass lines and Bergman delivers some solid percussion.

"Solo": "Solo" turned out to be Kaipa's last prog album in the 70's. Having recruited a singer, the band wrote a bunch of shorter, though still progressive material. In a way the band followed on this album the same musical path as on their two predecessors meaning making progressive rock music that was very much related to the music of bands such as Genesis, Camel and Focus had made in the mid of the 70's. Despite the considerable contributions from the rest of the band, especially Lundin and his arsenal of analogue keyboards, it's the young Stolt who is the high achiever on "Solo", with some of his most memorable playing. It's really a pity that Kaipa only reappeared twenty years later of its split.

"Kaipa Live": The tracks were recorded in different time and places. Tracks 1-7 were recorded at Huset, Copenhagen, Denmark in 1978, tracks 8-9 were recorded at Ostanaskolan, Eksjo, Sweden in 1976, track 10 was recorded at Bullerbyn, Stockholm, Sweden in 1977 and track 11 was recorded at Stenungsundsgymnasiet, Stenungsund, Sweden in 1977. There are really some fairly great cuts here in which the youth of the musicians is belied by the maturity and depth arrangements. I especially enjoy "Total Forvirring", "Skenet Bedrar", "Musiken Ar Ljuset", and "Se Var Morgon Gry".

"1974 Unedited Master Demo Recording": This is a CD with eleven tracks. As its name indicates, they were all recorded in 1974. Of these eleven tracks only two "Saker Har Tva Sidor" and "Allting Har Sin Borjan Genom Solen" were used on the eponymous debut studio album of Kaipa. Still, the arrangements were in some places drastically changed and some parts were excluded. The rest are all unreleased tracks. They were all gradually exchanged during 1975 in favour of new compositions to their debut. I really like of these tracks that show Kaipa's early promise that would be fully confirmed.

Conclusion: "The Decca Years 1975-1978" gives a complete overview of the years of the first Kaipa's incarnation. Even if you already own Kaipa's old albums, it's worth buying this box set because of the almost sensationally good live recordings, even if the sound quality fluctuates at times, and of course, the original unreleased demos cuts, which show that it's really Hans Lundin and his ideas that are the driving force behind Kaipa, despite some amazing guitar work displayed by the young Roine Stolt. If you haven't had any of the old Kaipa's albums yet, you're in good hands here anyway. The downside is that is very difficult to put your hands in one of them. So, go for it, like me, if you can.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Urskog by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 2022
3.82 | 78 ratings

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Urskog
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars For some reason or another it has been years since I last reviewed Kaipa, and I actually think Roine Stolt was still playing with them back then but he left some years ago, which means the only founder member still there is keyboard players Hans Lundin. However, since they reformed in 2000 there has been some wonderful consistency with singers Patrik Lundström and Aleena Gibson plus bassist Jonas Reingold having been there throughout, and then guitarist Per Nilsson replacing Roine in 2006. The only recent change is the departure of drummer Morgan Ågren who left the band prior to this album as he was unable to commit to the recording, so he has now been replaced by Darby Todd (Devin Townsend, The Darkness, Gary Moore, Martin Barre etc.).

Apparently, most of the songs were written in 2018 when Hans was working on the six CD set 'Hans Lundin: The Solo Years', and listening to his older songs influenced what he was working on, and in some cases he actually took a fragment of an old song and turned it into something new as well as sampling some '80's sounds which were included. It would be very easy for people to say Kaipa cannot exist without Stolt, especially as he has formed Kaipa Da Capo, but unless he is working with another very strong individual it is very easy for Roine to turn the band into The Flower Kings, which is why Transatlantic work so well as there are four musicians who all have their own very strong identities. Pers is a very fluid and enjoyable guitarist who is not Roine and so consequently plays in a quite different manner but with Hans at the helm as he has since the very beginning some 50 years ago, this is most definitely Kaipa. There are some wonderful instrumental passages on this album, with "In A World Of Pines" containing some fine examples with both Pers and Hans having a blast with some wonderful runs, while Jonas delivers the melodic and bouncing basslines we have all come to expect. Darby may be a new member of this band, but he has worked with different progressive and metal bands over the years and he has fitted in incredibly well, not sounding like a newbie at all as he brings structure and plenty of nuances to his performance. I do prefer Patrik's vocals over Aleena, but she does have a nice range and when they are both singing at full blast it is quite something.

This rarely sounds like a modern progressive rock album, and is quite firmly in the Seventies with some Eighties influences, but given that this band has been around for so long I have no issue with that, and who can resist a Mellotron anyway? A very strong album with much contained within for any proghead.

 Urskog by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 2022
3.82 | 78 ratings

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Urskog
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by alainPP

3 stars If I counted correctly KAIPA arrives in this year at fifteen albums released. What about with this latest installment, did they finally stand out from Roine's weight?

'The Frozen Dead of the Night' to have fun and realize that the KAIPA sound has evolved; layered keyboards from Hans, a guitar from Per that stands out, fruity, twirling and Patrik who uses his voice like a certain QUEEN singer. 'In a World of Pines' for the voice of Aleena, beautiful but which requires getting used to the vocal duality. 'Urskog' for being sung in the mother tongue. 'Wilderness Excursion' for the slap of the album, let me explain: it starts out jazzy-prog and it irritates my hair, I don't see the point even if it's nervous and well done; then it really starts around 3 minutes for a punchy instrumental; well nothing new but a title ... well done. 'In the Wastelands of My Mind' which bluffs its audience with an intro where the shadow of KANSAS floats, ah this violin; then the addition of the acoustic guitar gives new blood, it's still beautiful but always in the same vein. 'The Bitter Setting Sun' for the epic piece, a condensed, progressive melting-pot of what can be good in this slightly sclerotic world, beautiful flights of synths, rhythm guitar, solo, a sax that is reminiscent of the 70's and 80's; in short, beautiful things that also turn irremediably in circles.

KAIPA has therefore released a beautiful album of progressive rock, the kind of music that brings back and recalls the work of the great elders, from GENESIS to YES in particular. It's professional but/and it reminds me a little too much of the magnificent opuses of FLOWER KINGS, SPOCK'S BEARD and other Neal MORSE; it is in the continuity of a de facto symphonic prog rock, to be listened to preferably during the long winter nights. I can already hear the old progs throwing stones at me, while they unfortunately forget that this music could be shortened a bit to reach an audience, otherwise the prog will go into deep lethargy.

 Urskog by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 2022
3.82 | 78 ratings

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Urskog
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by Dapper~Blueberries
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The Flower Kings have become one of my bread and butters. They usually deliver some great A+ Prog that leaves me wanting more. Their lead Roine Stolt has sort of became the mastermind behind many Prog outfits such as Transatlantic and The Tangent. This masterminded aspect of his work even goes far back into the 70s with a band that has gained very high recognition in modern light throughout the years, and that band is Kaipa. I heard a ton of stuff surrounding them, mostly good stuff about them, but I also heard that after they broke up in the 80s, they no longer had Roine Stolt's help anymore, which made me pretty interested on how a band that had one of Prog's biggest faces can achieve such marvelous praise throughout their life after their reunion in the early 2000s. With their release of their new album, Urskog, I knew it'd be very fitting to dive into the band for the first time and hear what they have to offer.

Starting things off is The Frozen Dead of the Night. This starts the album strong, with a very great 18 minute epic that immediately shows off the album's themes of the changing seasons, starting with the change of Winter to Spring. This song also introduces the band's more keyboard and guitar driven stylization where they combine the use of guitars and keyboards to create very symphonic and organic sounding melodies. I also applaud how uniquely they sound, usually bands like this have a smoother, more water-like flow with their music, but here it is a lot more rhythmic, which is a nicer change of pace than what is usually done, and I like that a whole lot. I also do enjoy how the beginning loops back around to a reprisal for the ending, closing the song with a nice payoff, though I find it a tad weak and would prefer something else, but otherwise it is a great song to start the album with.

Next is In a World of Pines. Keeping up with the same flow as the song before, we are now fully developed in Spring, with that we have lyrics based on growth and going forward despite a world filled with thorny and spiky pine trees. I really like the interpretation and use of nature within the lyrics because it allows the use of relating things in the world like societal issues or personal conflicts with more nature focused metaphors as a veil. Plus, Aleena Gibson's vocals really set those lyrics to some strong heights. The instrumentation styles are similar to the first song, but with a little acoustic bits to spice things up. Pretty dang good.

Next up is the title track, Urskog. It's rare to hear a Swedish Prog band sing in their native language, so hearing a song sung in Swedish is pretty cool. Anyways, this song is another gemstone of a song, super rhythmically grand, super catchy, and just super well done all around. What I love most about this song is the drums. I feel like drummer Darby Todd is on his top game here and really drives the song to some really cool movements that I really love, so it definitely gets a thumbs up for me.

After that we got Wilderness Excursion. Now I feel like here is where I start to feel some problems with this album. Obviously this band has a really good and fun style, however they seem to not stray away or try new things all that much with it and it is evident with this song. After 3 great songs that are similar in tone and feel, I'd expect a little change, but when I got to this song, I was a tad let down. Obviously I liked their sound so I wasn't mad or sad about anything drastically changing, but I did expect something a bit more, and I guess that's the main issue with the album, it's a bit closed minded with its sound. It feels a bit formulaic and doesn't use the genre of Prog to create something a bit more fresh. I am not saying that they should pick oranges off a branch when you were picking apples before, I'm just saying that they should pick different types of apples, if that makes sense. Anyways, besides that I do think this song is quite good, the sound they create is super fun and with its instrumental focus, we can get a good understanding on how the band creates their sound a little more, which I dig a lot.

Next is In The Wastelands of My Mind. Now this is something I wanted for a bit. When I first heard the intro with that whirly keyboard, I knew I was in for something neat. I have always been a fan of bands taking inspiration in sound from other regions in the world, like Japanese bands taking notes on British and American psych bands who were also taking notes on stuff like Indian music and sometimes German krautrock bands. It's always fun to hear bands doing their homework and using it to create some great songs. Here you can hear a mix of more French violin styles with a more Spanish sounding guitar. Those two aspects of the song really helped this album shine way more, where Wilderness Excursion left me wanting for something more, this song redeemed the faults of the former and really allowed this album to really be one of my favorites. And I have to say, more bands should really use more Spanish guitar, it just sounds super good and I bet they can do some great stuff with that instrument.

That ain't the last song though, there is one more and that is a 15 minute epic, The Bitter Setting Sun. If you liked the songs before, you'll very much like this one. It continues that rhythmic symphonic rock sound from the last several songs while continuing the themes of seasons and personal growth throughout, leading to a climactic finish where we loop right back around to Winter, after we and the band grew to new heights through the album. While the ending of the song could've use some work, it definitely felt like it ended a bit abruptly, I felt like it was a great payoff for this album, simple, effective, and gets the point across for its themes. Instrumentally, it's sorta the same as songs before, but that's fine at this point, though it's a little cut and dry. Overall a very good closing for a very good album.

So far, this has to be my favorite album of 2022. There has been a lot of good ones, but this one definitely does a lot of things right to where I could see this becoming my favorite of the year, especially how it's structured and how it plays out, though we're still only halfway through the year so this very well may change, but right now this has been a very good ride despite its faults.

 Urskog by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 2022
3.82 | 78 ratings

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Urskog
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

3 stars In my view, the more recent albums by Kaipa can't be compared to their early material, since they lack in the guitar department the original and sheer intensity of Roine Stolt.

Having said that, there is still a lot of musical quality infusing each track of this album: the vocalists are really good, even when I must confess that the alternation between male and female voices is not my favorite feature here, and the vocals in the beginning are too much in a Freddie Mercury vein to my taste, since that doesn't sound very authentic. Also the keyboards are good, supporting the vocalists with tasteful, yet really predictable, layers of harmonic grandeur, and alterning with the electric guitar, the violin and the sax in the solos. The rhythm section sounds perfectly capable of handling a wide variety of pace and accent changes, bringing a fine sense of dynamics and energy to the mix.

Anyway, in total honesty, I can't really say that I've found anything else than a good amusing time listening to this album, and the excellence certainly requires more. Originality, boldness, inspiration, who knows, but something seems to be missing.

 Keyholder by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.78 | 279 ratings

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Keyholder
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron
Prog Reviewer

3 stars 'Keyholder' is a really, really good symphonic prog album by the Swedish band Kaipa, the country's first major prog act, known for a couple of very well-received 70s albums in the vein of Yes and Genesis. The band's 21st century resurgence is the deed of keyboardist and vocalist Hand Lundin and guitarist Roine Stolt (who played with them in the 70s, when he was just a teenage guitar prodigy) - and normally, while the music reminisces the symphonic explorations of the old Kaipa, it also strongly resembles another major act from Sweden - Roine Stolt's very own The Flower Kings (this should come as no surprise, since Jonas Reingold has been handling the bass duties in Kaipa ever since their reunion).

Released in 2003, on Inside Out Music, 'Keyholder' is a very interesting case, and a good example of the present-day album length phenomenon, when a single-disc record can have the length of a classic 70s double album. With just some seconds over the seventy-eight-minute mark, this very intricate, exhaustive, and often mind-blowing collection of songs is, in fact, equaling the playtime of records like 'Third' by Soft Machine or 'Tales From Topographic Oceans' by Yes, just to give an example of how long this one really is.

The all-star line-up and the wacky, almost comical, album art are two prerogatives indicating that 'Keyholder' is going to be an interesting undertaking for the curious listener, who unfortunately might end up slightly disappointed, tired and even confused. This last statement comes after the realization that if we split the album into two halves (with each half being represented by the first and the final four songs respectively), we will get one pretty excellent almost-forty-minute ride of prog extravaganza, with the first four compositions, and one more repetitive, overplayed and less engaging-and-entertaining side, represented by the latter four songs on the track list.

Opener 'Lifetime of a Journey' has some otherworldly instrumentation that could easily rival the most technical of moments we may hear on a Yes or on an ELP album - simply mind-blowing, intense, and cathartic playing from Lundin, Stolt, and Reingold. The next track 'A Complex Work of Art' continues to impress with the fabulous harmonies and chemistry between the bass, the drums, and all the keyboards. The vocals, however, are not necessarily compelling, and ruin what could have otherwise been a prog classic. 'The Weed of All Mankind' is another energetic composition, full of astonishing keys and gorgeous guitars - so far, the instrumental sections on the album are above sublime, with everyone in the band playing 'at the top of their game'. 'Sonic Pearls' is a little bit more relaxing and slower, compared to the previous musical fiesta. Once again, Stolt impresses quite a lot. Then comes 'End of the Rope', a great song that had the potential to be even more enjoyable had it not been overlong (and dare I say, overplayed). 'Across the Big Uncertain' is not very interesting, feels like a bit of a drag, and put against the rest of the album, is plain filler. Same concern goes for the final track, 'Otherworldly Brights', while the 13-minute 'Distant Voices' is a much better offering, as Kaipa go back to tremendous playing.

A good album, an enjoyable listen for the most part, and full of fantastic ideas (some of which get washed out by the occasional overplaying and over-symphonization), 'Keyholder' will thrill some and frighten others (let's not forget how long the record is, with its whopping seventy-eight minutes). There are tons of phenomenal keyboard and guitar moments, lovely interplay between the bass and the drums, and it seems the vocals and the songwriting (on specific tracks) are the only lows of what is certainly a crazy album by a band full of incredibly skilled musicians.

 Kaipa by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.90 | 268 ratings

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Kaipa
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars At this stage, with the debut album, Kaipa shows promising musicianship but haven't developed their own signature sound yet, you can hear many influences from other premiere prog-rock bands. Kaipa can however already boast about fluid guitar playing that has a lot of emotions as well as vocal sung in Swedish. Keyboards sound quite undistinguished and focus is on more traditional playing on organs, Hammond and mellotron, less on synths. Playing is not that equilibristic yet and prefers colours to speed. Some of the exceptions is synth soloing in "Allting har sin början" We can hear folk influence in the instrumental "Skogspromenad". Classical music also has its place on the record, mainly as chord sequence and some Hammond arrangements. Two other highlights are the long pieces "Se var morgon gry" with plenty of symphonic instrumental interplay keyboard/guitar and "Oceaner föder liv" with dynamic guitar and Hammond runs.

A highly recommended delicate piece of Swedish prog.

 Inget Nytt Under Solen by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 1976
4.07 | 249 ratings

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Inget Nytt Under Solen
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars This album captures the band at the peak of their exploration ride and belongs to the most essential Swedish progressive rock albums of the 70's. The band managed to create a right balance between energetic and more emotional melancholic parts, mainly uses instrumental power although singing in Swedish is not bad either. Playing is very competent with aggressive sound by bass guitar, sometimes also coupled with guitar. Keyboards have many faces from more traditional organ and piano to the contemporary first league Moog/synths/mellotron and even modern electric piano, clavinet and Fender Rhodes. He can create a powerful atmosphere. The band manages to create their own sound and emotions. The first composition is very representative, it has classical music influence, a few hard-rock elements but first of all, it is original and sounds like Kaipa. Instrumental parts like 12-13th minute or 17th minute are very pleasant to listen and completely different from each other. Guitar playing by the young Roine Stolt is melodic, tasty and emotional. And as I said, the keyboard player is so versatile with his array of keyboards. The other tracks are also very good, although shorter. They are melodic and well constructed. Listen to the typical Swedish prog sound in "Korståg" which has the smoking guitar and is purely instrumental. "Dagens Port" is a very symphonic and solemn track with strong chords structure given by keyboards.

The last track is the title track and it is a more reflective track with a sliding guitar motive that is mellow but typical Stolt's.

Highly recommended and one of a kind.

 Sattyg by KAIPA album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.86 | 256 ratings

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Sattyg
Kaipa Symphonic Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This Swedish symphonic prog group (dating back from the mid-seventies) plays a mixture of fusion-prog and Swedish folk. Add a layer of seventies glam-prog singing and endless lines of virtuoso fusion-metal guitar and you get the picture. This album is perfectly produced (oh boy, does it sound thick and steady) and the band is really tight, both in playing as in stylistic continuity. The talent and fiery motivation of all involved is felt throughout. I own the InsideOut 2LP and this label never lets us down with well printed vinyls and nice artwork.

Kaipa makes compositions in which the verses and the refrains serve only as a main body for the long list of themes, variations and solo's it has to offer. The folky themes sounded a bit cheesy at first, but I kind of came around and started liking them a lot. It's quite interesting how Kaipa found this natural sounding mix of fusion and folk. The male and female vocals by Gibson and Lundstrum are a bit over the top, but never disruptive of the flow of the music. Though 'Sattyg' means darkness, this album will function as a feel-good and girlfriend friendly album in collection. Kaipa doesn't seem to want to impose its seriousness on the listener - in stead offering pleasantness in a high-temp and highly technical fashion. The lead themes on keyboards sound like a distorted fuzz guitar. The 'real' electric guitars by Per Nilsson are however well distinguishable, for he is one of the genre most technically gifted players. The over- abundance of his technical yet harmonically safe solo's diminishes the impact a bit though. The last track 'Without Time - Beyond Time' could have easily been left out without damaging this otherwise excellent album.

Conclusion. This album will not impress with the soul crushing impact of its individual parts, but as a whole its extremely pleasant and easy to listen to. You have to get a sense of the fun of it all. Don't bother about the lyrics or the grander scheme of it. This is fusion- folk-prog played by the greatest the progressive genre has to offer and I liked it more then I ever would have thought. I don't expect to buy another Kaipa LP though and had I already owned more Kaipa records like this one, I probably would have never rated it with four stars.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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