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TRANSATLANTIC

Symphonic Prog • Multi-National


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Transatlantic picture
Transatlantic biography
Formed in 1999 - Disbanded in 2002 - Reunited in 2009

TRANSATLANTIC is Prog's premier super group. A truly illustrious collection of amazing talent that push the barriers which redefine the meaning of a progressive rock supergroup! Of course thats no surprise, looking at the all-star line-up: keyboardist / vocalist Neal MORSE (Spocks Beard), drummer Mike PORTNOY (Dream Theater), guitarist Roine STOLT (Flower Kings), and bassist Pete TREWAVAS (Marillion). Together, these multitalented guys have created some truly amazing music. For an all-star progressive rock band, TRANSATLANTIC has a chance to make some musical noise in the United States.

All four musicians agree that "SMPTe" is a timeless piece of rock history and one that shows such diverse influences as PINK FLOYD, YES, GENESIS, KING CRIMSON and The BEATLES. This album captures some of the finest progressive rock ever recorded. Barring the prog-nazis and their arrogant opinions! "Bridge Across Forever" is definitely more of a full-band effort. Those familiar with all the band members styles will certainly identify everyones characteristic touches -- Morses melody, Stolts vibrant playing, Trewevas tasteful licks, Portnoys intense drumming. Also appearing are: Chris Carmichael, violin, viola and cello; Keith Mears, saxophone; and the "Elite" choir, background vocals. Each member of the band gets a shot at lead vocals, and the vocal harmonies are outstanding. In all cases, the musicianship is intense, technical, and ambitious, but never goes over-the-top. Made for fans by fans, "Bridge Across Forever" will stand the test of time to epitomize progressive rock.

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TRANSATLANTIC discography


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TRANSATLANTIC top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.07 | 823 ratings
SMPT:e
2000
4.17 | 911 ratings
Bridge Across Forever
2001
4.04 | 986 ratings
The Whirlwind
2009
3.82 | 639 ratings
Kaleidoscope
2014
3.98 | 192 ratings
The Absolute Universe - Forevermore (Extended Version)
2021
3.67 | 113 ratings
The Absolute Universe - The Breath of Life (Abridged Version)
2021

TRANSATLANTIC Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.41 | 146 ratings
Live in America
2001
4.46 | 209 ratings
Live in Europe
2003
4.36 | 219 ratings
Whirld Tour 2010 - Live From Shepherd's Bush Empire, London
2010
4.28 | 129 ratings
More Never Is Enough
2011

TRANSATLANTIC Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.87 | 122 ratings
Live in Europe
2003
3.92 | 58 ratings
Building the Bridge / Live In America
2006
4.66 | 222 ratings
Whirld Tour 2010 - Live from Shepherd's Bush Empire, London
2010
3.79 | 14 ratings
The Official Bootleg DVD
2010
4.43 | 65 ratings
KaLIVEoscope
2014

TRANSATLANTIC Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.14 | 87 ratings
Bridge Across Forever - The Limited Edition
2001
4.52 | 30 ratings
The Absolute Universe - The Ultimate Edition
2021

TRANSATLANTIC Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.44 | 83 ratings
SMPT:e (The Roine Stolt Mixes)
2003

TRANSATLANTIC Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Absolute Universe - The Ultimate Edition by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2021
4.52 | 30 ratings

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The Absolute Universe - The Ultimate Edition
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by DangHeck

4 stars What can I say here? I am just so excited for a new Transatlantic release. And of course, I had to listen to Forevermore, the extended version. Right from the get-go, we get that satisfyingly epic sound fans will know and love. Mike Portnoy sounds incredible as expected. Coming off of listening to some of my favorite Flower Kings tracks, I was hungry for more and I was all smiles seeing this finally reached "up next" on my queue of albums for the day.

I'm hard-pressed to not be impressed by these tracks, even when, compositionally, the songs are just okay. I mean, just exemplary musicianship; how could it not be? That all to say, as with the track "Swing High, Swing Low," the clearly Morse-penned neo-gospel Worship song, I even turned to enjoying tracks that I otherwise didn't really like. And as an album (see how the aforementioned track runs into the next, "Bully"), again, right from the start, as others have noted, it is clear that this is one purposeful piece, linked together by not-so-disparate parts. Big surprise there lol.

Excellent vocals and vocal harmonies too, just as we know them to bring to the table. How could these parts not have been a blast for them to put together? From one review to the next, I go from jaded to excited (not that anyone asked). Random aside time: There is a guitar part at the end of "Higher Than the Morning" that I could have sworn was a David Gilmour line.

At the intro to "Looking for the Light" (following the excellent Beatlesesque Psych-soaked Power-Pop-turned-Symphonic- masterpiece, "Rainbow Sky") my jaw literally dropped haha. And is that Mike on lead vox? It's a great, beefy track. Fortunately here, by the middle of the first disc, we have plenty of interest and diversity, while still feeling like one whole piece of music. This carries on to the very end. Just like when I first heard The Whirlwind, all I can say is "Impressive."

Far as I'm concerned, "Owl Howl" is the best track on the album. Give me as much of that Roine Stolt DARK ENERGY as humanly possible. A not-quite-close second for me was clearly "Looking for the Light (Reprise)". Quite the very-mini Epic. Other personal standout tracks include "Rainbow Sky," "The Sun Comes Up Today," and "The Greatest Story Never Ends."

 The Absolute Universe - The Ultimate Edition by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2021
4.52 | 30 ratings

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The Absolute Universe - The Ultimate Edition
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars Portnoy, Stolt and Morse scare me. They must necessarily have made a pact with the devil by exchanging their souls for an inexhaustible creative vein, because otherwise it is not possible to explain why, for years, these three musicians have been able to churn out piles of records non-stop and carry out numerous parallel projects simultaneously. What then this enormous prolificacy follows a constant superfine quality is always to be seen. Last year we were overwhelmed by the works of The Flower Kings, Neal Morse Band, Sons of Apollo and Flying Colors, all formally excellent as they are creaky in reproducing roughly the same sauce, arousing some perplexity about the actual genuineness of the music in the long run. To further intensify doubts and very high future expectations on the compositional health of the musicians in question, finally there was the bolt from the blue represented by the return of Transatlantic, the definitive super progressive rock band and daughter of the three aforementioned workaholics, to whom we adds bassist Pete Trewavas, already active in Marillion. Transatlantic's approach to music hasn't changed. It is always progressive rock with strong roots planted in the seventies that is inspired by big names such as King Crimson, Genesis, the first Kansas, Rush, revised based on their experience gained with their respective bands of origin, namely The Flower Kings, Neal Morse Band, Dream Theater and Marillion. The result is practically a magmatic tribute to prog which by its nature does not want to invent anything new, but rather enhances the formal characteristics of the genre such as the excellent cantabile melodies, the long instrumental sections with cascading solos and the extremely technical, lively, warm arrangements, colorful and cheerful, but constantly inlaid and screwed on themselves.

The Absolute Universe: Forevermore

The first disc is very dynamic and lively. The choral performance immediately convinces for its freshness of ideas and the songwriting is always focused and inspired. There are several memorable pieces permeated by an enthralling, cheerful and light-hearted mood that almost blurs the very high level of every single moment. Among the best songs we point out Heart Like A Whirlwind, The Darkness in The Light, Swing High, Swing Low, the frenetic divertissment of Bully, Rainbow Sky and the very long and already known The World We Used to Know. The second disc, on the other hand, is more reflective and also leaves room for some slow, a relaxed mood and more successful electro-acoustic insertions (see Lonesome Rebel). The pinkfloydian Owl Howl, the ballad with Beatlesian echoes Solitude, with a convince Portnoy on the microphone, or the concluding Love Made a Way deserve attention, even if in general we can say that each song is very interesting and presents some ideas that raise the level. qualitative.

The Absolute Universe: The Breath of Life

The arrangements, the words and even those who sing the vocal parts change, but the result does not disappoint at all thanks to the extreme attention and study at the table of every single musical passage. Even in this case, listening is smooth and focused on a lot of technique and melody where the difference is made by the personalities of the individual musicians capable of enhancing each other while having ample space allowed to demonstrate their technical-executive skills. The Higher Than The Morning button is positively striking with Trewavas in evidence, the cheerful Take Now My Soul which reworks its mirror Swing High, Swing Low in the extended version, but in PFM sauce. Or again, Owl Howl comes out slightly downsized in the minutes, but supported as always by the drumming from the great "pat" on cymbals and snare drum by Portnoy and by the acid atmosphere in the middle of the song, daughter of the best Pink Floyd. Looking for the Light also returns here broken into two parts with slightly different timing compared to the versions on Forevermore, without however having significant changes that somehow revise the essence of the piece, as well as a short prelude of the mold. bucolic in Genesis style to the track Love Made a Way.

At the end of this huge progressive binge, one can feel largely sated and satisfied. The Transatlantic do not disappoint at all expectations and indeed we can say that against all odds The Absolute Universe casts any real doubt on the inspiration and compositional weakness that appeared at times in the solo works of the individual members of the supergroup. The teamwork in this case has paid off, avoiding those sporadic moments of extremely tired quotationists and children of an exercise in style that hover here and there in the works of The Flower Kings, Neal Morse and Flying Colors, creating a work as usual mammoth, but of very high quality that manages to be memorable from the first impact and at the same time to grow slowly with the audience. 2021 starts with a bang!

 Kaleidoscope by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.82 | 639 ratings

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Kaleidoscope
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars After the great effort of The Whirlwind in 2009, but especially after 8 years of silence from the previous Bridge Across Forever in 2001, many were wondering if it would have to pass another 8 years before a new studio release of Transatlantic. Considering the high caliber of The Whirlwind and the many commitments of the musicians of the supergroup, the expectations were not the most optimistic. However, after 5 years, inundated with interviews and news from the group, and graced by two live releases (Whirld Tour 2010 - Live in London and More Never Is Enough: Live in Manchester & Tilburg), Kaleidoscope finally arrives. When four Progressive Rock veterans, such as M. Portnoy, N. Morse, R. Stolt and P. Trewavas, are called to report, also considering their previous experiences, and considering the excellent releases they have produced under the name of Transatlantic, the expectations can only be high. The creation of ideas is part of the human soul, as well as rejoicing or being disappointed in them, even if one tries to judge things with the most resolute objectivity. After having filled my head with thoughts, imagination and hopes, I finally insert the record and let it go for its entire duration, without ever interrupting it and without letting anything escape me, in the warmth of the pavilions of my headphones. Warmth: It's not just the warmth of the soft, enveloping headphones that I feel, but something much deeper, something extremely intimate. In fact, the impression that Kaleidoscope arouses in the listener is that of a warm record, totally devoid of the coldness deriving at times from the technicalities of the progressive. The Transatlantic manage in every way to transmit a majestic, epic and varied sound impact, which envelops the listener with sounds rich in softness, despite their complexity and strength. Everything harmonizes and basks in enthralling emotions that take the listener for almost 76 minutes in a parallel dimension. The greatness of this record is to be found in two things that strongly influence listening: first of all the masterful execution of the songs through a truly high level technique, which however is never lost, and I repeat never, in the arrogance of a full supergroup. of oneself; the second aspect, on the other hand, is a very strong influence of the progressive rock of the 70s (impossible not to think of two names like Yes and Genesis, and in part to that of Deep Purple), which however is not heavy or antiquated, rather refreshed and renewed , thanks also to an extremely clean, accurate and modern production.

The first of the two suites, "Into the Blue", opens the disc. 25 minutes that pass quickly and without weighing on the listener. The opening minutes are very lively, with Portnoy's drumming varied and frenetic and a Roine Stolt doing the same; but the initial charge then leaves room for a delicate and dreamy part, with delicate carpets of keyboards; the most interesting part, however, is the most central one, with a very fusion flavor, marked by dark bass lines and a splendid crescendo solo by a Stolt never so expressive; also worth mentioning is the suggestive part sung by Daniel Gildenlow of Pain of Salvation, tour member in the two previous tours but who does not take part in the one scheduled for "Kaleidoscope" due to the serious health problems that hit him. Immediately after the suite, space for short tracks. The first is "Shine" a splendid ballad of 7 and a half minutes, an intense and touching piece but with a simple and essential melody driven mainly by the acoustic guitar and organ carpets that integrate the melody very well; still highlight Stolt with an exciting guitar solo. Then follows the lively "Black as the Sky", in which the suite-band proves to be able to concentrate its elements even in just 6 and a half minutes; this time to dominate are the keyboards of Neal Morse, who here sings little but is highlighted with articulated passages of synths, particular effects and distorted organs; also worth mentioning are the heavy bass lines and a pretty good Portnoy that dynamically accompanies the synth parts with sudden hits; for the fast-paced rhythm, for the distorted organs, for the very choral chorus and for the instrumental intertwining the song is very reminiscent of "Devil's Got My Throat" by Spock's Beard, demonstrating how much Morse still cares about his old band in which continues to play the brother. Then there is "Beyond the Sun", which is practically a solo song by Morse, a bit like "Bridge Across Forever" was at the time: piano ballad and very warm and welcoming voice but with the addition of inserts (entrusted to external musicians) of steel guitar and cello: four and a half minutes of relaxation to prepare for the real masterpiece of the record ... Oh yes, because it's time for the other suite, "Kaleidoscope", which exceeds 31 minutes and gives the disc its title. A varied suite, dynamic and unpredictable in evolution, less smooth than the other but never verbose, in any case complete, it contains all the elements of the band developing them in the best way, without any element being lacking or underdeveloped but also without over-overloading any part with unnecessarily repeated solutions. For me one of the high points of their discography! The beginning is lively with articulated guitar-organ passages followed by an even more lively part, with Stolt's almost funky guitar and flowing and full-bodied organ passages. The following parts are very suggestive, sung by Roine Stolt first and then by Pete Trewavas; especially in the latter the work of the guitar is more than ever focused on the melody, with delicate and exciting touches. But it is after the beautiful part dominated by the acoustic guitar that the vortex is unleashed: there probably the peaks of the entire album are touched thanks to enthralling rhythms, lightning and frequent changes of rhythm, full-bodied synths and interesting sounds, plots and important instrumental dialogues , well-fitted orchestral arrangements before the pompous but more moderate final.

Once again, great proof of character by Transatlantic, which while not adding anything particularly new to their proposal confirm themselves as a very close-knit and inspired band also able to know how to put a pinch of personality to their compositions even if inspired by the 70s. Also noteworthy is the performance of some singles: Roine Stolt more inspired and enterprising than ever but also Mike Portnoy's drumming proves to be decidedly varied, never prolix and even full of interesting ideas, almost in response to those who criticize the excessive lack of ideas. Another feature to underline is the greater space for the vocal parts of Stolt and Trewavas, with Morse almost losing the role of lead vocalist; it is enough to listen to the two suites but above all "Black as the Sky" where it is practically limited to the choruses in the chorus.

The listening is over, the headphones are very warm having been in contact with the skin all the time. Slowly I open my eyes and take them away, however that sense of warmth does not leave me. It is precisely this sense of warmth that I recommend to all those looking for an emotionally strong listening and especially to those who, perhaps a bit like me, approach the progressive rock of the 70s with an eye that is always a bit suspicious, fearful that be it something already heard or musically dusty and confusing. Let yourself be warmed by a well-kept record, sometimes sweet, sometimes epic and simply beautiful.

 The Whirlwind by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Studio Album, 2009
4.04 | 986 ratings

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The Whirlwind
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars Transatlantic, or four musicians who, although born on two different continents and separated by an ocean, cancel distances in the name of a common passion, that for progressive rock. Having released two studio albums, SMPTe in 2000 and Bridge Across Forever in 2001, as well as a couple of live records, the super band made up of four of the most eminent personalities to emerge in the prog world, namely Neal Morse (formerly Spock's Beard) , Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater), Roine Stolt (The Flower Kings) and Pete Trewavas (Marillion), return with a brand new album, dusting off the project just as there was a fear that it had been permanently put aside. First of all, they certainly return with a different approach, because if even in the first records references to the style of their mother bands were easily recognized, in The Whirlwind the four Transatlantic show to be able to emancipate themselves more, giving more the idea of being a group in all respects and not personalities who meet sporadically for the classic side-project. The disc in question is, however, certainly the most ambitious they have ever made, since it includes a single song, entitled The Whirlwind, lasting 77 minutes, which are divided into twelve parts. But we would like to underline that these are not at all twelve separate tracks, but actually parts of the same piece, given that there is a certain basic homogeneity between them, different themes that recur from time to time and a continuous game of quotations and internal references, which gradually appears clearer after repeated and continuous listening and which puts even the most attentive ears to the test. Already from this point of view the work proves to be nothing short of astounding. But even more surprising is the ability to recall the great icons of the 70s, almost never openly mentioned, but which are made to resurface in a subtle and refined way, almost as if the music allowed them to be transported to a different temporal dimension. Transatlantic do nothing but speak a common language with their listeners, transforming what are now inseparable elements of their genetic heritage, translating it into a current sound. This is a fundamental difference compared to many contemporary bands that pick up seventies sounds. In Transatlantic the speach really seems to relive the sounds that were of Genesis, Yes, Gentle Giant, King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, but (going a little further back in time ) also Beatles, at the same time it is music in all respects that comes from our days, daughter of our time, we could say an act of love of four musicians towards the music that has formed and made them grow for what they are today, what was the soundtrack of their life. And that it is a record that exudes this passion is perceived note after note, because it shows itself capable of transmitting deep emotions and of great intensity, at times making moments of nostalgic melancholy emerge, with a spectacular performance by all four. musicians. In particular, already in the second part, listening to Stolt's thrilling solos you immediately realize that you are in front of a record that has something special. Beautiful melodies, great atmospheres, sublime technique, never aimed at virtuosic display and always functional to music. Each time the final Dancing With Eternal Glory comes, a new little inner revolution takes place and nothing is the same anymore.

The Whirlwind is truly a fantastic piece of music and a near masterpiece of our times, which, in some ways, dares, with profound humility and respect, where perhaps not even the greats of the past had dared.

 Bridge Across Forever by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Studio Album, 2001
4.17 | 911 ratings

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Bridge Across Forever
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars Transatlantic probably needs no introduction, being one of the most popular supergroups in the progressive scene. However, for the record, we remember that the project conceived by Neal Morse (formerly Spock's Beard) takes part names of the caliber of Roine Stolt, founder and mastermind of The Flower Kings, Pete Trewavas, still under the Marillion and Mike Portnoy, former drummer of Dream Theater. After the debut entitled SMPTe, acronym of the initials of the surnames of the members, the four musicians are publishing the here present Bridge Across Forever. Released shortly after the previous one, it does not differ greatly in terms of sonority, proposing that mixture of progressive and AOR so dear to Neal Morse, although the songs (four, for a good 76 minutes in duration) bear the signature of the whole group .

It starts off great with the Duel with the Devil suite, divided into five movements and introduced by the strings played by Chris Carmichael. Motherless Children immediately gives the four the opportunity to express their intentions: endless melody and technicalities, take it or leave it. Morse's voice is persuasive as never before, worthily supported by the supporting choruses. The influences of the mother bands (Flower Kings above all) are evident, especially as regards the choice of sounds, but it is not a mere "more of the same", because the song is sufficiently engaging and personal. Not dissimilar is the second track, Suite Charlotte Pike. Needless to say, guess what, this is another suite, this time, however, shorter and less complex than the previous one. The song flows between references to fusion and also to groups such as Toto and Mike Portnoy lends his voice on several occasions, as he sometimes used to do in Dream Theater. After the fifth movement, reprise of Motherless Children, the suite ends with a fade-out, only to be resumed after the end of the last song Stranger in your Soul. We thus move on to the shortest track of the lot, or the title track Bridge Across Forever, a pleasant break from the technicalities of the two previous suites. Voice and piano are the body and soul of a pure Morse style ballad. Despite the simplicity of the song, everything remains extremely enjoyable and catchy, without being cloying. After the ballad parenthesis, we start again with another long piece, comparable to the incipit Duel with the Devil, as it is similar in structure and sound. Stranger in your Soul is in fact the "summa" of everything we heard in the rest of the album. The numerous instrumental ups and downs of the four musicians are proof of this, but despite some flashes of news such as the heavy break at minute six, the song lacks a little solidity, offering many good ideas but not reaching the levels of the opening track.

Having reached the end of the journey inside the disc into which the Transatlantic airship took us, it is possible to say that this is a very successful job. A record that can thrill both those who are already fans of the groups of origin of the individual members, and those who do not particularly love their exploits, but are still able to appreciate well- written and well-played music.

 SMPT:e by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Studio Album, 2000
4.07 | 823 ratings

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SMPT:e
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars 2000 is a hotbed of ideas, productions and creations for the newborn duo Portnoy / Morse: the first is engaged in the tour in support of the masterpiece Metropolis Pt.2: Scenes from a Memory, while the second is working with the Spock` s Beard at the release of album V. The two are in one of the best moments of their careers with their respective groups, yet this is not enough, they need new stimuli, to found more bands and to produce new material . In this atmosphere of great creativity, Transatlantic was born: the multi-instrumentalist and lead vocalist Neal Morse and drummer Mike Portnoy were joined by Roine Stolt on guitar and Pete Trewavas on bass to complete the line-up.

Portnoy's initial idea was to found the group with Jim Matheos as guitarist, but the latter's refusal for too many commitments with Fates Warning forced the two to fall back on Stolt, hired by Morse. Which may have been lucky as far as the name of the album is concerned: SMPT: e. The title, in fact, is the acronym of the initials of the surnames of the four participating musicians and with Matheos on guitar it would have been perhaps MMPT: e. It is probably better that it went this way, also because in addition to being an acronym, the title refers to the communication standards between audio-video devices, and therefore the reason for adding the e after the initial four is revealed.

With only 5 tracks, 4 of which derive from their pen plus a cover, Transatlantic are there to prove that progressive rock is not dead at all! It did not stop in the 70s ... it continued to exist and after more than thirty years it is still able to give us masterpieces! For example, what should be said for example about the 30-minute suite that opens the disc? All you have to do is keep quiet and listen to it for its entire duration: those four instrumental minutes, where guitar, drums and various keyboard instruments appear, already invite you to put a gag in your mouth and to admonish yourself to listen to the record in silence without neglecting the slightest note, even the one hidden in the farthest corners of the staff! And when the voice of Neal Morse appears, caressed by the hammond organ, we let ourselves be enchanted by its beauty! Splendid to say the least is that instrumental part of the piano that intervenes at about ten minutes ... There we understand that the prog really does not stop giving us particular and rare beauty ideas! Then when the rhythm slows down with that bass riff and when we hear those symphonic parts past the middle of the song ... we really have confirmation of everything we think! And the final ... oh my what a feat! A long guitar solo accompanied by full- bodied and atmospheric keyboards and those final effects of a starry night with a full moon! The next We All Need Some Light is an acoustic ballad with a radio duration, the least progressive song on the album. The refrains constantly recall the human need to receive light from above, as suggested by the title, which sweeps away the darkness and darkness from the Earth. The prog sound makes its appearance again in the instrumental sections of Mystery Train, between one choir and another, while Pete Trewavas' bass emerges powerfully.

The icing on the cake is My New World. Solos for guitar, keyboards, drums, bass; there really is something for everyone. Impossible to find a flaw in a track like this, from 10 in the report card, the best of the album despite it was a really difficult task to improve what was heard in All of the Above. The frenetic rhythms are broken by interludes of calm and tranquility where the quartet makes its voice heard in the choirs that accompany the lead singer Neal Morse. Plus, Portnoy's dual pedal is a delight to the ears. We close with a Procol Harum cover, directly from 1968, taken from the album Shine On Brightly: it is a modern reinterpretation of the suite divided into six parts In Held ('Twas) in I. The choice is not accidental: even here liturgical references can be clearly heard, both in the spoken introduction, and during the numerous stanzas, and in the refrains. It is a certain effect to listen to Procol Harum reinterpreted in this way, but it must be admitted that after listening to the song remade by Transatlantic, the original has lost its appeal. A small flaw of the album is the still immature cohesion between the various members of the group. However, it must be emphasized that this is their absolute debut as a complex, and for this reason they are forgiven. In subsequent releases, especially in the exceptional The Whirlwind, this feeling of lack of homogeneity will be lost. Really a great album, but I don't say it because I'm a fan, I say it because you have to be objective and objectively speaking I have to say that this album is a near masterpiece.

Progressive rock isn't dead, it's just been a little neglected over the years; I don't want to hear about neoprogressives, it's a word I don't like; progressive rock is still clearly alive, it still breathes very fresh air and will continue to give us strong emotions and fresh breaths of oxygen for an eternity!

 Live in Europe by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Live, 2003
4.46 | 209 ratings

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Live in Europe
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by sgtpepper

5 stars Transatlantic playing the best of their first two albums and in absence of enough of original material, add in some cover ingredients by one of the best Beatles pieces - the Abbey Road "Suite" which is almost complete (except Sun King)". Since Translantic was a hobby group, they could play whenever they had fun and you can see that they enjoy every minute of it. Morse doing magic on two pieces of keyboards only with synths/Hammond/piano/moog etc. You may complete that the sound is a bit artificial but it's modern and simpler to play. Guitar is less prominent and one would wish for more by Mr. Stolt. Drums and bass are well distinsguishable in the mix. Drumming is very proficient but you can hear that Portnoy is first and foremost, a metal drummer - his technique represens how much you can play in 1 sec and does not contains little feeling.

This concert should be preferred over "Live in America" which contained more covers. This is one of the reference live progressive rock concerts of 2000' so 4.5 or 5 stars can be granted. See them live and you will remember my words.

 Bridge Across Forever by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Studio Album, 2001
4.17 | 911 ratings

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Bridge Across Forever
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by lukretio

4 stars Transatlantic are the dream team of modern progressive rock. Comprised of Neal Morse (keyboards, vocals), Mike Portnoy (drums, vocals), Roine Stolt (guitars, vocals) and Pete Trewavas (bass, vocals), the project brings together some of the best musicians from the best bands (Spock's Beard, Dream Theater, The Flower Kings and Marillion, respectively) of the contemporary prog rock and metal scenes. Supergroups are not always a recipe for success, but in this case the class, expertise and artistic integrity of the four musicians involved is guarantee of quality and genuine musical value. Bridge Across Forever is perhaps not perfect and shows one or two rough edges, but it is nevertheless a great album, far superior to ninety-percent of the prog rock that was released around the same time.

The music "formula" that underlies the album is straightforward: full-blown prog rock extravaganza. This is music that harks back to the golden days of progressive rock and the work of bands like Yes and Genesis, albeit revisited in contemporary fashion and bringing in the metallic bite of prog metal. It can be described as a cross between Spock's Beard and The Flower Kings, with a slightly more metallic undertone relative to these two bands. The Marillion and Dream Theater influences are instead much less pronounced. The emphasis is on long-form compositions with multiple sections, extended instrumental run-throughs and recurring themes that tie together the different parts of the song and give the listener a reference point to hold on to as they navigate the sprawling compositions. The playing is highly-technical and virtuosic ? it could not be otherwise given the calibre of the four musicians involved in the project -, but it never loses sight of melody and accessibility. Whether you are into extended guitar solos, flamboyant keyboard parts, spectacular bass grooves or six-armed drum extravaganza, Bridge Across Forever has it all and it's guaranteed that you can spend hours dissecting the monstrous performances of the Morse, Portnoy, Stolt and Trewavas.

The vocal department is also strong. A difference between this album and its predecessor, Transatlantic's debut record SMPTe, is that on this one Morse, Portnoy, Stolt and Trewavas share duties behind the mic. This was a more or less conscious attempt at making Transatlantic sound like a Neal Morse's solo project, after the debut album, where Morse had a leading role in the vocal parts, had been criticized for its excessive similarity with Morse's and Spock's Beard's output. The alternation between four voices is interesting and freshens things up, although Morse does remain the most accomplished vocalist of the four, followed with some distance by Stolt.

The album is comprised of four songs for a total duration exceeding 70 minutes. Two tracks, the opener "Duel with the Devil" and closer "Stranger in Your Soul" are approximately 26 minutes each, "Suite Charlotte Pike" clocks at 14+ minutes, and the title-track is only a mere 5:33 minute long. "Duel with the Devil" and "Stranger in Your Soul" are the two "prog epics" of the album, where Transatlantic pour all of their creativity and skills and then some more. The two pieces share some common musical themes (the strings section that opens both tracks) and a similarly complex structure, with multiple parts that feed into one another, alternating between furious musical workouts and more atmospheric and mellower sections. Although both songs are great fun to listen to, "Duel with the Devil" is the one where Transatlantic truly reach near-perfection, thanks to a beautiful melodic theme (the chorus "Motherless Children?") that recurs throughout the song in multiple arrangements (including a sublime choral arrangements near the end), and a balanced structure that does not abuse with too many digressions but is firmly grounded around its central melodic idea. "Stranger in Your Soul" is instead slightly less satisfactory and shows some of the pitfalls of long-form songwriting. It opens strongly with some of the most exhilarating musical passages of the album ("Pt I: Sleeping Wide Awake" and the heavily metallic "Part II: Hanging in the Balance"), but it loses steam afterwards (the dull section "Pt III: Lost and Found pt 2") and then gets tangled into a messy conclusion, with a faux finale (the orchestral crescendo at the end of "Pt IV: Awakening the Stranger") and a repetition of quiet/loud sections that goes on for too long.

The other two tracks of the album are less spectacular, but nevertheless enjoyable. The title-track, a simple piece for piano and vocals beautifully sung by Neal Morse, is especially endearing. "Suite Charlotte Pike" is a sort of "glorified blues jam", where Transatlantic showcase their love for The Beatles and 1960/70s pop rock. It's fun to listen to, but it lacks the depth and musical nuance of the two epics, which makes its 14+ minutes perhaps a tad unwarranted.

Overall, Bridge Across Forever is a strong album that will surely not disappoint prog rock/metal aficionados. It has everything that the genre is known for: tight musicianship, sprawling compositions, clever songwriting and sophisticated arrangements. Most importantly, it packs four songs that strike a great balance between melodic accessibility and musical complexity, making this a record that is both instantly enjoyable and with great replay value.

 The Absolute Universe - Forevermore (Extended Version) by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.98 | 192 ratings

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The Absolute Universe - Forevermore (Extended Version)
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by Mark-P

5 stars This album should be in my opinion one of highlights in 2021 progressive music scene. With a long seamless listening experience consisting of 9 shorter pieces of each of two CD (last respectively 47 and 43 minutes), this concept album is an epic progressive record.

One of great features of Neal Morse and Roine Stolt being in the same band is that both of them are really good in writing well-structured track, most of the time with grand theme and creative elaboration of that theme throughout the album. The opening track 'Overture' is the example of this. The theme is well composed and nicely performed by Roine's soaring guitar, with complex time signature, several key changes and great rhythm (bass and drum) arrangement. This theme will be played throughout the album with many wonderful approaches.

The fourth track 'The Darkness in the Light' has a nice jazz-flamenco feel particularly in the middle of the song. Pete Trewavas' bassline is really good in this track. The seventh track 'Rainbow Sky' is a nice track, with Genesis and Beatles influences creating a unique style. There is a good moment where the theme is played with such style.

The ninth track 'The World We Used to Know' has a heavy instrumental intro. I think there is an intentional homage to Yes's 'Ritual' (from 'Tales from Topographic Oceans') before the vocal section starts. This track ends the first part (first CD).

The second part is opened by an uplifting track 'The Sun Comes Up Today'. Roine's guitar work in this track is amazing. Twelfth track 'Owl Howl' is a rather dark track, with part of has a flavor of modernized Pink Floyd. Again the main theme is performed with different style that really fit in this track. Mike Portnoy's drumming in this track and the next track 'Belong' are outstanding. 'Belong' is mostly instrumental track, with a great guitar works with amazing bass and drum companions.

The last 3 tracks are kind of crescendo that bring us to a beautiful end. 'Greatest Story Never Ends' has a vocal harmony that reminds me to Gentle Giant's and Yes' style. The main theme is played gloriously with orchestral background, before smoother ending with 'Love Made a Way'.

These four progressive rock masters of present day have brought so many creativity and great musicianship in this album. A great enjoyable 90-minutes journey with a lot of musical intelligent to appreciate. References to other prog- rock giants like Yes or Pink Floyd and additional orchestration are other nice elements of this album. A different (and shorter) version of 'The Absolute Universe' is also released ? and despite the fact that each version has its own great feature, I like this extended version better, for it has a lot more of Roine's guitar work and more listening enjoyment. A five-star album, that for me set another standard for present day progressive rock.

 The Whirlwind by TRANSATLANTIC album cover Studio Album, 2009
4.04 | 986 ratings

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The Whirlwind
Transatlantic Symphonic Prog

Review by CygnusX72

3 stars Day 2 random review, and with some trepidation given the high regard for this Supergroup including this album. The Whirlwind never grabbed me, and on yet another listen, it still doesn't. Sure, the musicianship is top notch, and credit for ambition, but song length and a concept does not necessarily a great album make. In stark contrast to the first two excellent Transatlantic albums, this one is largely ponderous and dull, which is a problem for an album consisting of one continuous track. There are moments: A Man Can Feel; Out of the Night; and the brooding Is It Really Happening ? But otherwise, its a bit of a drag, and lacking in inspiration.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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