Header

ARS NOVA (JAP)

Symphonic Prog • Japan


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Ars Nova (JAP) picture
Ars Nova (JAP) biography
This female keyboard trio started in the next line-up: Keiko Kumagai (keyboards), Kyoko Kanazawa (bass) and Akiko Takahashi (drums). In '92 ARS NOVA released their promising debut-album "Fear & Anxiety", a tribute to ELP with floods of powerful Hammond organ and flashing synthesizer solos, supported by a strong and adventurous rhythm-section. After several album and changes in the line-up, ARS NOVA is still going strong and end 2003 the trio released their new CD entitled "Biogenesis Project": it's loaded with spectacular instrumental prog rock in the vein of ELP, UK and TRACE. The current ARS NOVA includes Keiko Kumagai (keyboards), Akiko Takahashi (drums, voice) and Mika (vocal and chorus).

My favorite ARS NOVA CD is "The Goddess of Darkness": captivating compositions with lots of spectacular keyboardplay (Hammond organ, Mellotron and synthesizers) and a splendid, very propulsive rhythm-section. In my opinion ARS NOVA has reached their pinnacle with this album, other albums also contain great material but sound less mature, they fail to generate the same excitement. At some moments I think "I've heard this before" and then my attention fades away. Nonetheless, all ARS NOVA albums reach a decent level and always contain good keyboardplay to enjoy. The last album "Biogenesis Project" (a SF-concept) is literally another story: it's a project with a lot of known progrock guest musicians like members from GOBLIN, PFM and IL BALLETTO DI BRONZO, the rhythm-section from GERARD, singer Alex Brunori (ex-LEVIATHAN) and Arjen LUCASSEN (mastermind of Dutch AYREON project and a possible inspirator to this story). They all give this album an extra dimension (great violinplay, good vocals and biting and howling guitarplay) and lift it above the level of the last ARS NOVA albums. I'm stunned by the magnificent keyboardplay and the exciting instrumental interludes. Fresh Blood was needed the result is there!

: : : Erik Neuteboom, The NETHERLANDS : : :
Fan & official Prog Archives collaborator

Ars Nova (JAP) official website

ARS NOVA (JAP) MP3, Free Download (music stream)


Open extended player in a new pop-up window | Random Playlist (50) | How to submit new MP3s

ARS NOVA (JAP) forum topics / tours, shows & news


ARS NOVA (JAP) forum topics Create a topic now
ARS NOVA (JAP) tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "ars nova (jap)"
Post an entries now

ARS NOVA (JAP) Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all ARS NOVA (JAP) videos (2) | Search and add more videos to ARS NOVA (JAP)

Buy ARS NOVA (JAP) Music



More places to buy ARS NOVA (JAP) music online Buy ARS NOVA (JAP) & Prog Rock Digital Music online:
  • AmazonMP3: Search for ARS NOVA (JAP) DRM-Free MP3 Downloads @ AmazonMP3 (USA Only) | AmazonMP3 (UK Only)

ARS NOVA (JAP) shows & tickets


ARS NOVA (JAP) has no upcoming shows, according to LAST.FM syndicated events and shows feed

ARS NOVA (JAP) discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

ARS NOVA (JAP) top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.91 | 21 ratings
Fear & Anxiety
1992
3.04 | 13 ratings
Transi
1994
3.62 | 55 ratings
The Goddess of Darkness
1996
3.43 | 36 ratings
The Book Of the Dead (aka Reu nu pert em hru)
1998
3.38 | 32 ratings
Android Domina
2001
3.48 | 29 ratings
Biogenesis Project
2003
3.38 | 22 ratings
Seventh Hell
2009

ARS NOVA (JAP) Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.47 | 7 ratings
Across The World
2003

ARS NOVA (JAP) Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

2.00 | 1 ratings
Christmastide
2004

ARS NOVA (JAP) Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.95 | 3 ratings
The Six Singular Impressions
1997
2.36 | 9 ratings
Lacrimaria
2001
3.00 | 8 ratings
Chrysalis - Force For The Fourth
2005

ARS NOVA (JAP) Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

ARS NOVA (JAP) Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Fear & Anxiety by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Studio Album, 1992
2.91 | 21 ratings

BUY
Fear & Anxiety
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

3 stars `Fear and Anxiety' is the 1992 debut for Japanese all female instrumental band Ars Nova, led by virtuoso keyboard player Keiko Kumagai. Also comprised of Kyoko Kanazawa on bass and Akiko Takahashi on drums, although the band has been through a number of slight line-up changes over the years, including incorporating vocalists (as well as male members!) later on, it's this core trio version that is the most highly regarded by followers of the band. An exhausting, frantic take on symphonic prog, the band also incorporates heavy classical and gothic elements, as well as a surprising amount of the darker Italian Prog/R.P.I traits.

Somber opener `Dark Clouds' recalls RPI legends Antonius Rex and Jacula, a brief introduction built around stark and dank piano notes over rising imperial synths. The oddly titled `[dziha:d]' takes off instantly, a driving up-tempo beat surging the relentless bass ever onwards. The template for the album is set right away, with intimidating church organ, Hammond, Mellotron, whirring Moog and the most sweeping grand piano offering lavish themes. There's symphonic movements, fanfare pomp, and even just a dash of brief regal Genesis flavour as the piece grows more dangerous and deranged as it progresses. The opening of `House of Ben' again calls to mind the Antonio Bartoccetti projects, an ambient passage of eerie voices, scary sound effects and a generally chilly mood. A searing scratchy ancient flavoured Mellotron theme and spectral piano dance in eachothers arms in this ghostly ballroom waltz with a booming stabbing crescendo. Fans of Italian horror soundtrack band Goblin will find an almost cinematic quality here.

Although parts of `Prominence' are modeled very much on Emerson, Lake and Palmer due to it's racing beat and victorious synth themes, there's also plenty of jazzy and playful soloing from all the girls. The frequently piano driven two-part finale `Fata Morgana' sees the band completely unleash. A wicked, gleeful malevolence pirouettes around attacking smashing bass, destructive drumming and ballistic break-neck synth soloing, the band dashing through a range of tempos and direction changes before ending on a beautiful piano solo, filled with an achingly beautiful loneliness.

Despite running a rather brief 31 minutes (although a recent mini LP release adds two extra live tracks as a bonus), the band rarely slows down for any quieter or more sedate moments, so the shorter length is probably welcome. But although Ars Nova would go on to make superior albums with a richer production sound (`Goddess of Darkness' and `Book of the Dead' instantly come to mind), this album gets the band off to a successful and dynamic start, and lovers of dark gothic music, aggressive keyboard-driven symphonic progressive music and the gloomier, more classical inspired RPI should investigate this talented band and addictive album.

Three stars.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 The Goddess of Darkness by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Studio Album, 1996
3.62 | 55 ratings

BUY
The Goddess of Darkness
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

4 stars ''Transi'' gave the opportunity to Ars Nova to become known worldwide, leading to an invitation for a live at the 95' Progfest in the USA, the first ever live performance of the trio outside Japan.The bombastic music of the band led to an interest by the Musea label.As a result the third album ''The goddess of darkness'' was released in 1996 both in Japan on Made in Japan and in Europe on Musea.The two versions feature different tracklists.

Eventually the title of the album reflects perfectly to the music of Ars Nova, who now had fully developed their own haunting Symphonic Rock style.The three goddesses from Japan play again an intricate, bombastic and very complex music, led by Kumagai's unque keyboard executions and the solid rhythm section.While stylistically not much have changed, the composing of Ars Nova has become extremely solid with impressive solos, twists and breaks, resulting though to well-arranged and tightly delivered long symphonic, instrumental suites.The trio seems absolutely passionate and restless with endless changing themes and tempos in a very short time, led by majestic Mellotrons, mascular synthesizers and pounding Hammond organ.Full of Classical inspirations and a special influence from soundtracks, ''The goddess of darkness'' starts from pompous DEVIL DOLL-like orchestrations, passes from frenetic E.L.P.-influenced keyboard experiments and ends up in romantic, Baroque-inspired themes in a LE ORME vein.Absolutely efficient and compact music, reminiscent of the best moments of GERARD.The only negative point I could find are some scarce yet apparent 80's-styled synths lines with a questionable sound.

Ars Nova at their peak.Bombastic, semi-personal, E.L.P.-styled Symphonic Rock with a huge amount of great parts.An album to remember, highly recommended to all Progressive Rock fans.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Transi by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Studio Album, 1994
3.04 | 13 ratings

BUY
Transi
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

3 stars The same year ''Fear & Anxiety'' was released the Japanese trio participated also in the compilation "Progressives' Battle 1992 ".In 1993 though drummer Yumiko Saito left Ars Nova and was replaced by Akiko Takahashi, member of the New Wave/Avant-Garde bands Nothing Inside and Danball Bat.The following year Ars Nova returned with their second full-length attempt ''Transi'', released again on Made In Japan Records.

The Japanese ladies followed the same formula as with ''Fear & Anxiety'', a 6-track album of bombastic, keyboard-driven Symphonic Rock with a fair dose of melodies and a huge amount of virtuosic themes.Keiko Kumagai uses a variety of analog and digital keyboards, inclusing organs, church organs, Mellotrons and multiple synthesizers to produce the appropriate mood for its case.The style of Ars Nova is still grounded in the E.L.P./RICK WAKEMAN Symphonic Rock category, but this time they colored their sound with darker and more sinister atmospheres akin to DEVIL DOLL or GOBLIN.The performances remain excellent with Kumagai being the central figure.Superb edgy synthesizers and haunting organ sounds supported by huge Mellotron waves and some delicate harsichord in rich arrangements with a very dynamic rhythm section offer modern rock symphonies of nice quality for all lovers of technical listening experiences.The themes are complex and adventurous with a few smoother passages added for good measure, highlighted by the excellent self-titled track and its changes between horror atmospheres and more elegant and Classical-based textures.

Recommended to the audience of both vintage and modern Symphonic Rock, ''Transi'' is certainly a music heaven for all fans of majestic, keyboard-driven soundscapes with tons of virtuosic passages.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Across The World by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Live, 2003
3.47 | 7 ratings

BUY
Across The World
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

3 stars An energetic document of all girl Japanese prog trio Ars Nova, `Across The World' has the band deliver a punchy and powerful live performance from 2001. For those unaware, the girls play a heavy brand of neo-classical bombastic instrumental prog, with heavy gothic and even medieval elements. Much of the band's music draws to mind haunted manors, ghostly visions and stalking terror! Main lady Keiko Kumagai dominates this live performance. The keyboard virtuoso plays with the power of Keith Emerson and the classical pomp of Rick Wakeman, but avoids the whimsical elements that sometimes let those two down. She is an aggressive player, and the album is overloaded with her huge sound.

I've had a lot of problems trying to work out exactly who the other players on this album are. From some sources the album is credited to a trio, other times to a 5-piece, with an additional keyboard player and a guitarist. I think this confusion comes from the CD being included as a bonus with a live DVD from 2010, which indeed had a 5-player lineup. To add to the confusion, the CD credits two keyboard players (Keiko and Mika), with a drummer Akiko, and no bass player! The original J- pop inspired front cover shows three members, too. I suspect there may be two keyboard players for the more complex moments. But enough guessing and confusion, best to let the music speak for itself!

After a ghostly and eerie beginning, with cold clinical programmed beats, the first three minutes of `Android Domina' is one booming intro with cold, imperial organ. Quite intimidating! Dazzling swirling synths fly all around, and about four minutes in there's a terrific moment with stomping drums and huge imposing organ. There's a brief section with female operatic vocals followed by solemn church organ. A reprise of the mechanical beats and more fiery keyboard/drum eruptions gets the concert off to a great start! `Succubus' alternates between delicate reflective and heavy aggressive pounding piano, with plenty of tasteful synth solos. It's a very uptempo piece with lots of wild energy and snappy playing, overloaded with classical themes and drama. The organ especially has such a hard thick sound on this one, very addictive. With a rising call-to-arms intro, `Horla Rising' is a heavily classical gothic piece. Strong medieval influences also feature, and the music is full of spectral tension and imminent threat. The main synth theme that first appears at 4:30 is very moving and stirring, and is reprised at several points throughout the track.

`Pairi-Daeza' contains almost joyful synth themes, constantly reprised, but also features a ghostly and sinister middle section, before a triumphant and heroic return near the end. Lovely floating and drifting synth climax over gentle programmed percussion. `Piano solo' is a nice thoughtful and moving break from all the horror and bombast! They should include more moments like this on their albums, but in extended compositions. It's an example of how subtle and low-key the band can perform, not something usually associated with them. `Fata Morgana' is a very piano heavy finale, lots of emotional and urgent playing, backed with dirty heavy organ grinding and crashing drum- work. There definitely appears to be some murmuring bass on this one too. A highlight is a sprightly drum solo in middle with wild angry synths around it, before a return of operatic vocals and ending on grand church organ.

Some listeners dislike the band for the schizophrenic nature of their arrangements, as they frequently head in so many directions, never staying with one idea for too long. I think the works performed on this album show a lot more cohesion, with many of the tracks having frequent reprises of earlier sections to make for a more complete and satisfying listen. I admire the band greatly for their endless ideas and over-the-top delivery.

Long deleted, the only way to snap up this album is to buy it in the combo DVD/CD package `Divine Night', which itself seems to be quite rare these days. It's worth tracking down, as the short but exhausting concert is full of memorable and immersive musical themes from this ferocious and passionate band.

Well worth three and a half stars.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 The Book Of the Dead (aka Reu nu pert em hru) by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Studio Album, 1998
3.43 | 36 ratings

BUY
The Book Of the Dead (aka Reu nu pert em hru)
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

3 stars Japanese trio (at least on this album) Ars Nova present a highly bombastic and aggressive keyboard/organ driven instrumental prog assault, very influenced by both Emerson, Lake and Palmer and Rick Wakeman, but with enough original ideas of their own. Fortunately, they don't do schmaltzy whimsical moments like Mr Wakeman sometimes does, and they certainly don't stoop to goofball `comedy; tracks like ELP often did! A total plus on both counts! Occasional spots remind me a little bit of Goblin too.

There is a strong classical approach to the arrangements, with constant gothic and Egyptian elements thrown in to compliment the concept of the album. Much of the sound is dominated by thick Hammond organ, with occasional Mellotron to add to the atmosphere - it's used to tremendous effect in the finale of my favourite track `Ani's Heart' (which is almost up there with the most evocative Goblin tracks), while I very much dig Ken I[&*!#]a's grumbling bass about 2 minutes in! Lots of moments like this throughout the album, all enhanced greatly by Akiko Takahasho's stomping drums - really gets your foot tapping and head nodding in approval!

Leading lady Keiko Kumagai is a total virtuoso. Well worth checking out one of the band's live DVD's or online footage of them to see her in action. A real talent, backed up superbly by additional top-notch players on this album.

However, on `Book Of The Dead' the band rarely seem to calm down, most of the music being quite heavy and oppressive, fast and crashing. The brief interlude tracks throughout the album are some of my favourite, offering more sedate and reflective passages that I would have loved to see more of throughout. Some of the better musical themes don't hang around long enough, while other parts are very undeveloped and a little forgettable. Again, a few more quieter sections would have stopped much of the album from constantly sounding the same. It can also have quite a cold sound to it, making it difficult to get through the entire album in one sitting. However, I much prefer this line-up of the band, before they added additional players and vocals.

Still, the band are all very talented, and this album really would make a perfectly decent addition to any progressive music collection. Really deserves a 3 and a half star rating! Not a classic, but plenty to enjoy from a highly regarded prog band.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Android Domina by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Studio Album, 2001
3.38 | 32 ratings

BUY
Android Domina
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by Matti
Collaborator Neo-Prog Team

2 stars Apart from an excellent compilation "Le Meilleur du Rock Progressif Japonais" I haven't much heard prog from Japan. Sadly there's very little of it in Finnish libraries. If the mentioned compilation was a happy surprise by having only a little of that kind of bombastic keyboard- attack heavy prog which is perhaps the stereotype, then this album was exactly my worst expectations come to flesh.

The tracks (instrumental except for a short section in the opener) are all quite similar: over- dramatic and awfully thick of synths & organs. I can bare with a little amount of it but listening to the whole album is nearly a torture that makes me feel angry. The distasteful cover suits well to the music. Titles reveal some more: 'All Hallow's Eve', 'Horla Rising' (I don't know what else Horla is but it's the title of a Guy de Maupassant story dealing with horror & madness) and 'Succubus' (demonic female spirit). Yes, the mood of this album is nightmarish, perverse and doomed.

Of course these women can play like hell, but if just about everything else sucks, just forget it. I'll give two stars however, because I did include two tracks into my CD and so it isn't completely unlistenable.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 The Goddess of Darkness by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Studio Album, 1996
3.62 | 55 ratings

BUY
The Goddess of Darkness
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by 1967/ 1976

3 stars I have Musea version and I admit that for who I know Ars Nova is a copy of The Nice/ ELP (P as Palmer, P as Powell)! And nothing more! "Kali - Demolition & Massacre" is not a normal song because this song not have melody but only a series of musical figures and it is a battle for a normal listener, as a pure ELP song, in my opinion. But Musea version have a diverse sequence of compositions (not present "Ainsel" but present "Isis") so it is difficult to judge this album because in real fact Made In Japan version is another album respect to Musea version. In my opinion Musea version is great, as a little gem if you are ELP fan.

"The Goddess Of Darkness" is an instrumental album, that is great also because is written and made by a female trio. But, in my last opinion, the similarity with ELP is the reason because i am not proper a fan of Ars Nova and because I think that Ars Nova killed ELP!

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Across The World by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Live, 2003
3.47 | 7 ratings

BUY
Across The World
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by octopus-4
Special Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl Team

4 stars Somewhere between Emerson, Wakeman and Pete Bardens this Japanese female trio offers a more symphonic side in this live respect to their studio albums. On this live they have two keyboardists on stage and even if the influece of ELP is clear on the opening track, while proceeding in the performance we can discover a Wakemanian piano while the main keyboards are on melodies and sounds that remind more to early Camel (that's why I have mentioned Bardens) or to their Japanese clones Bellaphon.

The hihglight of this live is the epic Fata Morgana. It has uptime, piano and keyboard and an incredibly good short drums solo that would make sweat also Carl Palmer.

An excellent example of symphonic prog with dark moments with the typical sound of a live exhibition. The band is very technically skilled and the skill is used to make good music. There are no useless virtuosisms, everything is functional.

A 4 stars album for all the fans of symphonic prog.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Fear & Anxiety by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Studio Album, 1992
2.91 | 21 ratings

BUY
Fear & Anxiety
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by octopus-4
Special Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl Team

3 stars Not an EL&P clone. Of course when a lineup is made of keyboards, drums and bass it's easy to make this comparison. Instead of ELP, I think they are closer to bands like Niacin (same kind of trio). This debut album has of course some contact points with ELP but no more than a generic influence of classical music. A difference respect to ELP is that Keith Emerson is more influenced by moderrn authors like Stravinskij and in some way Gershwin and Copland. Ars Nova are more "european" in this sense.

The album is good and well played. In Particular, House of Ben, the 3rd track has good moments and varies from a baroque organ, more "a la Wakeman", to jazzy accents in the Niacin style. The only track really close to the ELP style is Prominence, but also this is less ELP influenced than some more acclaimed artists like Par Lindh Project. I also want to remind that many of the bands of the Eastern Europe were strongly influenced by ELP and have never been considered clones, also because they are excellent bands. I mean the Slovakian Collegium Musicum and the Hungarian After Crying.

"Fata Morgana" is a gothic track that could be the soundtrack of a horror b-movie like some good RPI bands, and Emerson himself did in the 70s for the Italian cinema. The cymbal sound that drives the first section of this track reminds to Keith Emerson's "La Chiesa" or to Goblin's "Profondo Rosso". The second of the two is a sort of masterpiece of the genre and Fata Morgana doesn't have anything less, apart a bit more of psychedelia. It doesn't have the orchestral accent typical of ELP in "Works" and could be easily classified into RPI, not only for the Italian title. What lacks is maybe the continuity, because the transitions between the different parts are not always "soft" and at the end it's more like a patchworks of short pieces (like a b-movie horror sountrack can be expected to be).

It's a promising album from a promising group, not enough mature to have four stars, but good enough for 3.

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

 Transi by ARS NOVA (JAP) album cover Studio Album, 1994
3.04 | 13 ratings

BUY
Transi
Ars Nova (JAP) Symphonic Prog

Review by snobb
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Second this Japanese full-female trio album contains their characteristic keyboards- based symphonic prog. Heavily influenced by ELP, a bit more modern, but at the same time with specific "Japanese" synthetic sound.

Melodies are OK, and musicianship level is not lower than average. Drummer's work is even better that you can expect (and better than in their later works). Keyboards passages spiced with light jazzy sound.

Compositions are different enough to save you from being bored, but not memorable. Too often the sound balances on danger border with instrumental pop-music. Possibly, absence of vocals doesn't help as well.

Generally, average band's album, will be pleasantly listened by ELP and neo-classical keyboards music lovers. Not innovative or serious enough to attract other listeners .

MEMBERS LOGIN ZONE

As a registered member (register here if not), you can post rating/reviews (& edit later), comments reviews and submit new albums.

You are not logged, please complete authentication before continuing (use forum credentials).

Forum user
Forum password

WARNING: Forum software upgrade in progress, login function maybe affected for some users during that time.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition.

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | GeoIP Services by MaxMind | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — the ultimate jazz music virtual community | MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music virtual community


Server processing time: 0.67 seconds