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ANTHONY PHILLIPS

Symphonic Prog • United Kingdom


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Anthony Phillips biography
Anthony Edwin Phillips - Born 23 December 1951 (Chiswick, West London, UK)

Anthony PHILLIPS was one of the original founding members of GENESIS featuring Peter GABRIEL, Tony BANKS, and Michael RUTHERFORD. Following "Trespass", GENESIS' second album, PHILLIPS left (purportedly due to stage fright) and was replaced by Steve HACKETT. Nothing was heard again from Anthony until 1977, when he favored us with his first solo, "The Geese and the Ghost", although PHILLIPS wasn't the first member of the band to release a solo album (that honor goes to Steve HACKETT, by releasing "Voyage of the Acolyte", in 1975). A more commercial audience was courted on "Wise After The Event" and "Sides", to no avail, and PHILLIPS spent much of his time releasing instrumental pieces (both old and new) under the "Private Parts & Pieces" series. Steeped in classical, pre-Baroque, and folk influences, he was able to record entire albums featuring only his acoustic instrument. He is one of the world's masters on the twelve string guitar and piano compositions that hark back to GENESIS' original lost innocence. His studio recordings reveal a distinctive character to his compositions on those instruments as well.

Some of his albums are more "progessive" than others, especially "Sides" (INTERESTING CD), "Private Parts and Pieces II" (A MUST! for fans of early GENESIS), "PP&P IX", and "Wise After the Event" (A MASTERPIECE); others are more "classical" in style like "PP&P III", "PP&P V", "PP&P VI" or "poppy" like "Invisible Men" and a few tracks on "Sides". Anthony PHILLIPS' 1977 debut album is one of the best works, but all of them are excellent. This album (1977) by Ant is my second favorite PHILLIPS album after "Wise After the Event". Even more its a jewel for every Rock collection, but in its own particular genre (a mix of those quiet moments of "Trespass" of GENESIS+the medieval folkprog style by GRYPHON). As you well have gathered, "Anthology" (1995) is an album that has a compilation of tracks from his solo career. This album is the perfect introduction to the world of Anthony PHILLIPS.

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ANTHONY PHILLIPS discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

ANTHONY PHILLIPS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.07 | 433 ratings
The Geese and the Ghost
1977
3.80 | 215 ratings
Wise After The Event
1978
3.32 | 120 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces
1978
3.04 | 114 ratings
Sides
1979
3.79 | 125 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces II - Back To The Pavillion
1980
3.76 | 116 ratings
1984
1981
3.64 | 81 ratings
Anthony Phillips & Enrique Berro Garcia: Private Parts & Pieces III - Antiques
1982
2.39 | 56 ratings
Anthony Phillips & Richard Scott: Invisible Men
1983
3.08 | 60 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces IV - A Catch At The Tables
1984
3.22 | 65 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces V - Twelve
1984
3.33 | 61 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces VI - Ivory Moon
1986
2.98 | 60 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces VII - Slow Waves, Soft Stars
1987
3.50 | 61 ratings
Anthony Phillips & Harry Williamson: Tarka
1988
3.31 | 37 ratings
Missing Links, Volume 1 - Finger Painting
1989
4.25 | 198 ratings
Slow Dance
1990
3.85 | 70 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces VIII - New England
1992
2.50 | 27 ratings
Sail The World
1994
3.00 | 35 ratings
Missing Links, Volume 2 - The Sky Road
1994
3.43 | 38 ratings
Anthony Phillips & Harry Williamson: Gypsy Suite
1995
3.54 | 50 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces IX - Dragonfly Dreams
1996
3.82 | 46 ratings
Anthony Phillips & Guillermo Cazenave: The Meadows Of Englewood
1996
3.63 | 34 ratings
Anthony Phillips & Joji Hirota: Missing Links, Volume 3 - Time & Tide
1997
3.78 | 46 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces X - Soirée
1999
3.20 | 25 ratings
Battle Of The Birds - A Celtic Tale
2004
4.22 | 98 ratings
Field Day
2005
3.15 | 20 ratings
Anthony Phillips & Joji Hirota: Wildlife
2007
2.80 | 28 ratings
Missing Links, Volume 4 - Pathways & Promenades
2009
2.72 | 18 ratings
Ahead Of The Field
2010
3.70 | 34 ratings
Anthony Phillips & Andrew Skeet: Seventh Heaven
2012
3.00 | 24 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces XI - City Of Dreams
2012
3.33 | 15 ratings
Strings of Light
2019

ANTHONY PHILLIPS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.97 | 18 ratings
The "Living Room" Concert
1995
3.79 | 10 ratings
The Live Radio Sessions
1998
3.61 | 14 ratings
Radio Clyde 1978
2003

ANTHONY PHILLIPS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

ANTHONY PHILLIPS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.53 | 13 ratings
Harvest of the Heart
1985
3.28 | 17 ratings
Anthology
1995
4.13 | 8 ratings
Legend (1997)
1997
2.85 | 11 ratings
The Archive Collection Volume One
1998
4.20 | 5 ratings
Legend
1999
3.75 | 4 ratings
Soft Vivace
2002
3.20 | 5 ratings
All Our Lives
2002
3.86 | 9 ratings
Soundscapes - An Anthology
2003
3.61 | 10 ratings
Archive Collection Vol II
2004
4.25 | 8 ratings
Harvest of the Heart: An Anthology
2014
4.00 | 3 ratings
Private Parts & Pieces IX - XI
2018
5.00 | 1 ratings
Missing Links I-IV
2020
4.00 | 1 ratings
Archive Collections: Volume I & Volume II
2022

ANTHONY PHILLIPS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 2 ratings
Collections
1977
3.17 | 4 ratings
We're All as We Lie
1978
3.08 | 6 ratings
Um & Aargh
1979
4.50 | 2 ratings
Prelude '84
1981
4.00 | 2 ratings
Sally
1984
5.00 | 1 ratings
The Anthem from Tarka (Five Track CD-Single)
1988
5.00 | 1 ratings
The Anthem From Tarka
1988
0.00 | 0 ratings
Let Let Go (featuring Lettie)
2020

ANTHONY PHILLIPS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Um & Aargh by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1979
3.08 | 6 ratings

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Um & Aargh
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars In my late teens I had bought on used vinyl the first two albums by the ex-Genesis guitarist Anthony Phillips, and liked them both very much, as different as they are from each other. A bit later I also found his third album Sides (1979) which was a disappointment for me, despite some resemblance with Wise After the Event (1978). The opening track 'Um & Aargh' was especially hard for me to like, and re-listening it now for the first time in probably thirty years, I still don't like it. With a much, much better production and a much, much better vocalist it could be a decent uptempo song by The Alan Parsons Project around the time, but the sharp & noisy soundscape and Ant's vocals really put me off. The song is so heavily vocal-oriented that it absolutely craves for a good singer.

The B side song 'Souvenir' wasn't on the album but it's been included on the reissues of Sides as a bonus track. This is a tender and romantic ballad, slightly comparable to some AP Project ballads, although the production is not quite as sophisticated. The vocals are by Dan Owen who also sang some album tracks. I like his clean voice, which is not very far from Noel McCalla (the vocalist on Smallcreep's Day by Mike Rutherford), or a not-as-high version of Colin Blunstone. In fact this is a surprisingly good B side song.

2 stars for 'Um & Aargh' and 3+ stars for 'Souvenir'.

 Wise After The Event by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.80 | 215 ratings

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Wise After The Event
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 442

Given the extended gestation of their debut studio work "The Geese And The Ghost", it's somewhat surprising that barely six months later he was back into the studio to recording tracks for his second studio release "Wise After The Event". His record label and his manager convinced Anthony Phillips that is was in the best interests of his career that his next future album should feature more songs and less instrumental tracks than his debut had. With very few music written between 1973 and 1975, when Phillips was studying music and the time after that was spent almost completing his debut album, tracks for his second album had to be written during the rehearsal and the recording sessions of it.

So, "Wise After The Event" is the second solo studio album of Anthony Phillips and was released in 1978. Phillips invited to participate on this album a very extensive list of musicians including some names very well known. So, the line up on the album is Anthony Phillips (vocals, guitar and harmonica), Michael Giles (drums), Mel Collins (soprano saxophone and flutes), Rupert Hine (backing vocals, percussion, locks, probs, modes and vibes), John G. Perry (bass), The Vicar (guitars, keyboards and sundries), Jeremy Gilbert (keyboards and harp), Robin Phillips (oboe), Perkin Alanbeck (synthesizer), Rodent Rabble (clicks, claps and crampons), Humbert Ruse (drums and bass), Vic Stench (bass) and an orchestra conducted by Gilbert Biberian.

"Wise After The Event" has nine tracks. All songs were written by Phillips except "Greenhouse" which was written by Phillips and Jeremy Gilbert. The first track "We're All As We Lie" is a near perfect opener to the album. Here, he blends the acoustic folk, the high pitch 12 strings guitar, adds a special folk touch to the song, with dreamy vocals followed by Giles' pulsating backbeats and an enduring melody line. The second track "Birdsong" is in the same vein of "The Geese And The Ghost". It benefits from Phillips' reflective vocal and soaring electric guitar coda which tellingly exhibits some similarities between his and Steve Hackett's technique at the time. It was originally written just after Phillips left Genesis and has echoes of Genesis' "Trespass" album. The third track "Moonshooter" is one of the best songs to showcase Phillips' unique acoustic guitar style and reserved vocals. It's a slow song very sweet and very acoustic not very different from Phillips' standard songs. The fourth track is the title track. It's an eerie and lengthy piece with a strange other worldlyfeel. It demonstrates the subtle and perfectly judged drumming of Michael Giles, and such is the unusual nature of this song that in some ways it does brings to my mind, King Crimson. The fifth track "Pulling Faces" has a range that perhaps uncovers some of the limitations in Phillips' singing, but on the whole he handles vocal duties with charm and sincerity. It has some rare energy, more in the rock Genesis' vein that settles down when the vocals arrive. The sixth track "Regrets" is a mournful song of lost love, and most clearly features Phillips' distinctive wistful cracking voice, conveying heartbreaking emotion on the only song on the album with orchestration. Written in 1975, it shows the slow burning nature of his song writing. The seventh track "Greenhouse" brings us back to a more familiar melodic territory with lyrical, musical and vocal hints of The Beatles in their psychedelic phase. It's a short piece that has something to do with the early Genesis' drama. The eighth track "Paperchase" has a trippy feel that is continued by the gossamer thin, floating opening as the song seems to focus positively and supportively on the memory of beautiful summer days from the depths of winter. It's more meandering and less detailed in their arrangement. Still, it remains engaging and containing of enough depth to keep you thoroughly hooked. The ninth track "Now What (Are They Doing To My Little Friends)?", Phillips' plaintive voice perfectly glides over the sad and emotive music, soaring with emotion and restrained anger in the choruses. It drifts away elegiacally before appropriately fading into a dark ominous sounds.

Conclusion: "Wise After The Event" is an album totally different from "The Geese And The Ghost". So, it gave him a chance to select some early material. He was able to release the album in a record time. As Phillips said, this was really his first album, because "The Geese And The Ghost", despite being came out under his name solely, was very much written closely with Mike Rutherford. "Wise After The Event" marks also the only album where Phillips sings as a lead vocalist on the entire album, like Tony Banks did on his second solo studio album "The Fugitive", released in 1983. In my humble opinion, and as Banks, Phillips, despite has a nice voice he isn't properly a vocalist. However, he composed all songs to his voice and I think he made really a very decent vocal work. So, all in all, "Wise After The Event" is a very good album and it's, in a certain way, more cohesive and more uniform than its predecessor is. Still, I sincerely think that it lacks to it some magic. Still, it represents an excellent effort of him and deserves to be listened by all Genesis' fans and by all that simply love the symphonic classic rock music. It's a great addition to any prog decent collection.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 We're All as We Lie by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1978
3.17 | 4 ratings

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We're All as We Lie
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars 20-Year Chronological Run-Through pt. Sixteen: 1978.

-- First review for this single -- For his second solo album, following the very pastoral debut The Geese & the Ghost (1977), ANTHONY PHILLIPS, an essential founding member of Genesis as we know, had a change in style which is rather similar to one that Genesis was having simultaneously on their first trio album ...And Then There Were Three... (1978). Wise After the Event (1978) contains tighter songs and a dynamic band sound balanced between accessible poprock and progressive rock. This time Phillips himself sings on each track, with his warm and intimate but technically weak voice.

'We're All As We Lie' is the album's playful opening song and it features a lot of guitars. As on the album in general, there is a notable emphasis of chorus in the song structure but at the same time a richness in details. A nice, suitably catchy song with an atmosphere and sounds comparable to the more upbeat songs of ...And Then There Were Three.

I've had the album on vinyl since my youth, and naturally have noticed that the inner sleeve contains lyrics also for one song NOT included on it, 'Squirrel'. At the time there weren't YouTubes or anything like that, and funnily I never came to hear the song -- until now. This is a mellow, moody, slow-tempo song featuring only vocals and piano. Comparable to 'Regrets' on Wise After the Event, but in my opinion more beautiful as a composition. [ On the release info there's another B side track 'Sitars and Nebulous' which I can't find any trace of, nor is it mentioned on the single's cover design. ]

 1984 by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Studio Album, 1981
3.76 | 116 ratings

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1984
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nº 378

Some consider Anthony Phillips as one of the true unsung heroes of the progressive rock music. A major influence on Genesis' classic early sound and his suddenly departure from the band in 1970 was regarded as a major blow in much the same way as Peter Gabriel and Steve Hackett's departures, some years later. Phillips cited several reasons for his decision including, the stage fright, the ill health and the disillusionment with the band's collective musical work. It would take almost seven years for his debut solo studio album 'The Geese And The Ghost', released in 1977, to be materialised. In addition to writing the album and recording the demos, he spent the intervening years studying composition, orchestration and piano. By 1980 Phillips had released four solo studio albums and had a fifth one being readied for release. As none of his previous albums had set the world alight, a change was on the cards and so Phillips started playing around with synthesizers, an instrument that he had not fully explored on his previous albums. The result of that exploration was his next studio album, named after George Orwell's apocalyptic view of the future, '1984'.

So, '1984' is the sixth studio album of Anthony Phillips and was released in 1981. Unlike 'The Geese And The Ghost' and 'Wise After The Event', albums I intend review on Progarchives, the list of musicians on '1984' is very small and very few musical instruments were used. The line up on the album is Anthony Phillips (piano, keyboards, Roland CR-78 drum box, guitar and basic percussion), Richard Scott (basic percussion, effects and vocal ideas) and Morris Pert (percussions). So, '1984' is an instrumental electronic album with some vocal effects and some variety of percussion.

The cover art of the album shows a picture of a small cage, which is probably a reference to Winston's cage, affixed to his face, cited on the '1984' book. '1984' is a world's famous novel, written in 1949 by George Orwell, an English writer and journalist who also wrote another famous and satirical novel named 'Animal Farm', in 1945. '1984' is a literary political fiction novel of the social fiction subgenre. On the story of the novel, the individual is always subordinated to the date and to the Party, which manipulates and control the humanity. The principal protagonist, Winston Smith, is a civil servant who works in the Ministry of Truth and is responsible for revising historical facts and changes them in order to perpetuate the Party and its big leader, the Big Brother. This kind of life, created inside Smith a great disillusion what caused him to rebel against the Big Brother. That led to his arrest, torture and later conversion. Many of the terms and concepts used on '1984' such as the Big Brother and Orwellian became contemporary, and are related to propaganda, lies and manipulation, in service of the totalitarianism, especially in the political regimes of only one-party.

A completely electronic, instrumental keyboard album recorded by a rock guitarist, '1984' remains quite a peculiarity. Consisting of four connected pieces, the album is both musical and sonic an excellent piece. The sheer creativity of the music is dynamic and even listening to it all of these years later. I was still taken aback by its adventuress qualities and depth. The first track, 'Prelude '84', is a mix of chord progressions influenced by Tony Banks and some Rick Wakeman like flourishes. Towards the end of the piece, a guitar with a bit of crook starts. The second track, '1984, Part 1', begins with keyboard chords accompanied by some embellishments and underlaid by the rhythm machine. This is interrupted by some bombastic transitions, then to go into a synthesizer solo, then a driving theme is initiated leting Phillips doesn't fall asleep, topics and moods are constantly being changed. The third track, '1984, Part 2', the cheerful arpeggio tones, which begin with a quick rhythm, are reminiscent of the Mike Oldfield's instrumental pieces. It sounds similar to '1984, Part 1'. This isn't strange because both are parts of the same track. The fourth track 'Anthem 1984' is an atmospheric sad looking theme, as if Anthony Phillips was already seeing all humanity in the Orwellian's cage. This short keyboard number is characterized by a wide keyboard sound, which makes this piece sounds like a 'hymn-like'.

Conclusion: '1984' is completely different from 'The Geese And The Ghost' and 'Wise After The Event'. 'The Geese And The Ghost' is a very beautiful and almost an acoustic classic album clearly influenced by the medieval era and its music flows together as a continuous piece. It represents a real trip back in the history of time. 'Wise After The Event' is essentially an album composed with a collection of beautiful guitar tracks. But, surprisingly, on '1984' all music was totally composed for keyboard instruments. Everybody knows that Phillips is a brilliant guitarist, especially on classical guitar. His previous albums were mostly acoustic guitar based. However, '1984' is totally dominated by synthesizers, apart some real percussion played by Pert. Then, we were also able to know that Phillips is also a brilliant keyboardist. So, '1984' is an excellent album, where the sound of the keyboards is floating, rhythmic and melodic. The album is very melodic and harmonious and confirms that Phillips is also a great songwriter. This is a great addition to your collection.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Strings of Light by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.33 | 15 ratings

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Strings of Light
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

3 stars Don't expect a tracklist full of killer songs, you won't find that in this mildly shaded picture-in-sound of many moods and landscapes.

There's the Genesis reminiscence, nevertheless, like on "Andean Explorer", with all that odd-but-nice chord sequences on the 12-stringer. Also the nylon-string moment of sensibility is here, for example, on "Caprice In Three". However, the true achievement of the artist, I think, lies in the great variety of tonal and timbric textures emerging step-by-step as the listening proceeds.

This may not be the kind of album that you desperately need to complete your record collection, but may be of the kind that's important for reasons that only become apparent when the music starts to play. How can you know? Listen to "Fleur-de-Lys", then tell me.

 Field Day by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Studio Album, 2005
4.22 | 98 ratings

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Field Day
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by Squire Jaco

5 stars I have probably half of Phillips' albums from the earlier days, up through the "New England" album that came out in 1992, and I too am one of those people who love the diversity, songwriting skills and level of technical ability that this man displays across most of those albums. Personally, he sort of started to lose me a bit with the more cinematic-sounding albums ("Tarka", "Slow Dance", even the later "Dragonfly Dreams"). Not bad albums, but not what I was primarily coming to Ant Phillips for...

But when he came back in 2005 with "Field Day", I took a dive in the deep end again. He even notes in the liner notes that "this is a lot" - yeah, over 60 songs of a shorter nature, all acoustic, using numerous guitars from his collection. It IS a lot. But it's not too much.

Listening to this album again today, I was surprised at HOW GOOD most of these songs are. He somehow keeps us from being bored by a similar phrase or guitar sound with endless originality here. Really nice, and really surprising given the number of pieces here. If this is to be considered "prog", it would have to be under the most pastoral and simplest of definitions. But the more important point is that it is great music.

Before I played this today, I noticed that I rated this 4-1/2 stars on my RYM page many years ago - the only AP album I have rated that high since his 1979 "Sides". I raised an eyebrow; could this really be that good with so many songs, and short ones at that, and all acoustic?...

Uh, yup.

 Anthology by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1995
3.28 | 17 ratings

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Anthology
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by Squire Jaco

4 stars Since leaving Genesis after their "Trespass" album in the early 70's, the reclusive Anthony "Ant" Phillips went on to record numerous albums of a mostly acoustic or pastoral nature. I've always liked the Trespass album, and I was curious to hear more from a major originator of this unique sound. But I also don't play the Trespass album all that much anymore, so it didn't seem to make sense to me to buy a whole bunch of Phillips albums either. This Anthology cd from 1995 was a nice compromise.

I freely admit that trying to give listeners a one-cd overview of his vast catalog is a bit akin to asking someone to summarize Shakespeare's "Hamlet" in one or two paragraphs; you get the gist of the story (or music), but you lose out on the optimal enjoyment of the whole work. But let's be frank: Phillips' output is not so very varied in nature that one couldn't get a pretty good taste of his music from a nice 79-minute anthology like this one. So, for the casual Phillips fan, or for someone who would just like to sample his music, I think this cd does a very good job. But just as I can't imagine a single-disc anthology that could do justice to Genesis, I'm sure that Phillips' ardent fans will have many complaints that too much great material is ignored here on this one. Fair enough.

I do think most people will agree that the vast majority of his music shares a great similitude with the songs "Dusk", "Visions of Angels" and "Stagnation" (at least the beginning of that song) from Trespass - dreamy, slower-paced, acoustic strumming in a very pastoral/Canterbury sort of way. His music is not real challenging - I daresay it's not even "rock" music per se. Some call it "mood" music, at least the material from most of his "Private Parts and Pieces" albums, which are well represented here on this disc. But not all of the music here is slow either; some of the songs feature a full band, and even include playing and singing from Mike Rutherford and Phil Collins. Phillips plays most of the keyboards and guitars, though you won't find him doing many solos.

When an artist doesn't have a string of hits or singles from which to compile a "best of" album, you have to rely on a sampling from many albums - that's what this Anthology does. In addition to selections from his "PP&P" series, you get one or two songs from albums such as "The Geese and The Ghost", "Wise After The Event", "Tarka", "Sides" and more. This is all very enjoyable music. (Gawd, even my wife likes it!)

If this is your type of music, then you're going to want to go out and buy a few of the albums referred to above, some of which have garnered rave reviews on their own. Regardless, "Anthology" is a great place to take pleasure in this man's unique style of music.

 Wise After The Event by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.80 | 215 ratings

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Wise After The Event
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by Zoltanxvamos

5 stars 𝗔𝗻𝘁𝗵𝗼𝗻𝘆 𝗣𝗵𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗶𝗽𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝗴 𝗣𝗿𝗶𝗺𝗲

If Klaatu and Genesis had come together to write Trespass part 2, that would be exactly what this album sounds like. Anthony Phillips (ex-Genesis) has written another fantastic record, The Geese & The Ghost was a wonderful prog-folk release, but I feel the description at the beginning of this review is pretty accurate. Another thing I'm going to point out is that Anthony Phillips really does sound like a singer from Klaatu, I really do enjoy his voice and it does fit the albums mood (not to mention the album cover is gorgeous). The harmonies on this album are very well produced, well performed, and well mixed. Songs like 'Birdsong and Reprise', 'Moonshooter', 'Wise After The Event', and 'Greenhouse' are the standout tracks, all very well written tracks that all sound like they could fit on Trespass and/or a Klaatu record. 'Pulling Faces', 'Paperchase', and 'Now What' are also fantastic tracks, they fit on the album, and I just wish that this album just more material to praise.

Overall, this is a very enjoyable listen from ex-Genesis guitarist Anthony Phillips, most of his albums are very underrated and I find that he deserves a bunch more credit than he is getting.

 The Geese and the Ghost by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.07 | 433 ratings

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The Geese and the Ghost
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by ssmarcus

5 stars Whatever realm or alternate timeline the music on this record came from, I desperately want to go there. The record cover does a pretty good job of capturing the pastoral beauty and simplicity of life that clearly must be characteristic of the place from where this music came. And while I recognize that visiting this place may be an impossibility, I am grateful to Anthony Phillips, his 12-string guitar, and his majestic songwriting abilities for giving us our only window into this world.

Unlike the song writing and production of most rock music of the era which was done mostly during short windows between tours, the music on this record was written, arranged, and re-arranged over the better part of a decade since Phillips' departure from Genesis. The added time and thought put into these songs paid off tremendously as all the music feels lean and purposeful despite including two sprawling epic centerpieces.

If, like me, you are a fan of heavy music but in need of ambitious light music, The Geese & the Ghost is your fix!

 Wise After The Event by PHILLIPS, ANTHONY album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.80 | 215 ratings

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Wise After The Event
Anthony Phillips Symphonic Prog

Review by ssmarcus

3 stars While Anthony Phillips' debut record The Geese & the Ghost was a proper progressive rock epic, Wise After the Event appears to be Philips attempt at making safer single-ready pop music. However, given Phillips' less than stellar singing voice, it's hard to imagine a record like this every truly gaining mainstream notoriety.

Yet despite the more modest song writing and even more meek vocal performance, there's still plenty to love about this record. The songs are largely characterized by well-produced lush 12-string guitar and piano chord progressions. Surprisingly, Anthony's vocal delivery adds a bit of psychedelic flavor to the album, particularly on tracks like 'Moonshooter' and 'Wise After the Event.' The song 'Goodbye Moonmen' from Rick and Morty season 2 is a pretty close modern-day, and probably more well known, comparison.

The songs do kind of bleed together and therefore make it difficult to focus on them straight through. But honestly this record is absolutely perfect for spacing out on a warm summer afternoon outside anyway.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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