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THE ENID

Symphonic Prog • United Kingdom


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The Enid picture
The Enid biography
Founded in London, UK in 1973 - Hiatus from 2000-2006 - Still active as of 2018

British group THE ENID were formed around the founder/keyboardist Robert John GODFREY (BARCLAY JAMES HARVEST) and his fellow founder-members, guitarists Stephen STEWART and Francis LICKERISH in 1973. Almost like a combination of classical and rock, the band combined vast orchestral movements, exclusively classical instrumentation, rigourous construction completely well-written and romantic rock music led by composer Robert John GODFREY. For the most part the albums have some orchestrated sound, all created using the standard guitars, basses, keyboards and drums. THE ENID are probably the TOP of the symphonic tradition.

"THE ORB MEETS PINK FLOYD MEETS THE BERLIN PHILARMONIC" in Time Out

The only band on the planet to have successfully fused rock based music with the power, dynamics and scale of symphonic classical music. They are the absolute masters of their art and their achievements over more than twenty years of creative work set them apart from everything else which calls itself progressive.

THE ENID - In the beginning Part I (1972 - 1980)
In 1969 Robert John GODFREY (RJG for short) became of BARCLAY JAMES HARVEST (BJH) and it was he who developed the orchestra and co-wrote some of the music for which BJH are now so famous. He remained with BJH until 1971. At the end of 1972 he recorded a solo album on the Charisma label "The Fall of Hyperion" showed the musical foundations on which his future music with THE ENID would be built on. In 1974 he became friends with Steve STEWART and together with others they found the highly individual and now very respected rock band known as THE ENID.

They released their first album in 1976. "In the Region of the Summer Stars" is one of those epic symphonic progressive rock albums for the seventies that are a must for every serious collector of progressive rock. Two years later the group followed that release with "Aerie Faerie Nonsense". Fans of the "heavier" or jazzier side of progressive rock might find this album somewhat too classical. However for all those who love to hear majestic with broad classical ovetones, this album is a MUST. The group's third album was called "Touch Me" and was released in 1979. Once again there is the return of an amount of response between various rock and classical modalities, though the classical features are much more prominent. The last album in the first part...
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THE ENID discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

THE ENID top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.55 | 53 ratings
Robert John Godfrey: Fall Of Hyperion
1974
3.89 | 54 ratings
In the Region Of The Summer Stars
1976
4.56 | 58 ratings
Aerie Faerie Nonsense
1977
3.63 | 89 ratings
Touch Me
1979
3.89 | 80 ratings
Six Pieces
1980
3.70 | 58 ratings
Something Wicked This Way Comes
1983
3.62 | 119 ratings
Aerie Faerie Nonsense (1983)
1983
4.26 | 241 ratings
In the Region Of The Summer Stars (1984)
1984
3.39 | 54 ratings
The Spell
1985
3.09 | 44 ratings
Salome
1986
3.51 | 39 ratings
Godfrey & Stewart: The Seed And The Sower
1988
3.84 | 47 ratings
Tripping The Light Fantastic
1994
3.94 | 26 ratings
Sundialer
1995
3.92 | 61 ratings
White Goddess
1997
3.79 | 33 ratings
Arise And Shine
2009
3.67 | 52 ratings
Journey's End
2010
3.83 | 41 ratings
Risen
2011
3.30 | 21 ratings
Shining
2012
4.00 | 173 ratings
Invicta
2012
3.68 | 31 ratings
First Light
2014
3.13 | 39 ratings
The Bridge
2015
3.64 | 72 ratings
Dust
2016
3.06 | 25 ratings
Resurgency
2017
4.00 | 27 ratings
U
2019

THE ENID Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.62 | 22 ratings
The Enid - Live At Hammersmith (Volumes I & II)
1983
3.77 | 13 ratings
The Stand (1984)
1984
3.12 | 8 ratings
Liverpool Live
1986
3.41 | 15 ratings
Final Noise
1989
4.44 | 9 ratings
Live at Town Hall, Birmingham
2011
4.14 | 10 ratings
Live with The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra & The Warickshire County Youth Choirs
2012
3.67 | 3 ratings
Something Wicked This Way Comes - Live at Claret Hall Farm and Stonehenge 1984
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live in Tokyo 2016
2017
4.00 | 1 ratings
Live at the Citadel (w/Robert J. Godfrey)
2017
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live at Union Chapel 2017 (w/Robert John Godfrey)
2018
4.00 | 1 ratings
Live at Loughborough Town Hall, 1980
2020

THE ENID Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.43 | 7 ratings
Something Wicked This Way Comes
2004
4.00 | 4 ratings
Live at Hammersmith Odeon
2009
4.08 | 5 ratings
Live at Town Hall, Birmingham
2010
4.67 | 3 ratings
The Enid en Concert á Crescendo
2014
4.50 | 4 ratings
The Bridge Show, Live at Union Chapel
2015

THE ENID Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.33 | 6 ratings
The Stand (1985)
1985
3.75 | 4 ratings
Lovers And Fools
1986
0.00 | 0 ratings
An Alternative History Volume One
1994
0.00 | 0 ratings
An Alternative History Volume Two
1994
3.33 | 6 ratings
Anarchy On 45 (Complete Singles Collection)
1996
5.00 | 1 ratings
Healing Hearts
1996
3.00 | 2 ratings
An Alternative History Volume 1
1998
3.00 | 1 ratings
An Alternative History Volume 2
1998
0.00 | 0 ratings
An Alternative History Volume 3
1998
3.92 | 29 ratings
Tears Of The Sun
1999
4.50 | 5 ratings
Sheets Of Blue. An Anthology 1975 - 2004
2006

THE ENID Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.00 | 1 ratings
Golden Earrings
1977
0.00 | 0 ratings
Dambusters March / Land of Hope & Glory
1979
0.00 | 0 ratings
Fool (w/Malcolm Le Maistre)
1980
0.00 | 0 ratings
Heigh Ho
1981
0.00 | 0 ratings
When You Wish Upon a Star
1981
0.00 | 0 ratings
And Then There Were None
1984
4.50 | 8 ratings
Fand
1985
0.00 | 0 ratings
Itchycoo Park
1986
0.00 | 0 ratings
Salome
1990
4.00 | 4 ratings
Members One of Another
1996
4.33 | 3 ratings
Live at King George's Hall Blackburn 2010
2011
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live at HRH Prog 3 & Live and Unreleased
2015

THE ENID Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 In the Region Of The Summer Stars (1984) by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 1984
4.26 | 241 ratings

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In the Region Of The Summer Stars (1984)
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

5 stars An "updated" remake of the original 1976 release.

1. "Fool" (2:43) definitely a treated variation on a familiar classical piano intro before distorted guitar notes, water noises, and reveille trumpet are interjected. Very Vangelis Blade Runner-like. (5/5)

2. "The Tower Of Babel" (5:05) weird Dick Dale-like tremolo-picked guitar opening before Spanish-sounding melodic theme over Genesis-like rhythm pattern. This could be Renaissance! (8.75/10)

3. "The Reaper" (4:03) very Camel-esque--especially with the background synth strings. Then it turns Vangelis with tubular bells until the disturbing third minute's guitar chords and tympanic hits. Theatric but lacking substance. (8.75/10)

4. "The Loved Ones" (5:20) romantic piano bombast that sounds like sounds like THE RASPBERRIES, RICK WAKEMAN, and SERGEI RACHMANINOFF. (8.75/10)

5. "The Demon King" (4:18) not my favorite passage. I'm not even sure why elements of evil need be present. (8.75/10)

6. "Pre-Dawn" (1:12) cool horn solo--like Aaron Copeland. (4.75/5)

7. "Sunrise" (3:27) great! Rivals Vangelis! (9.25/10)

8. "The Last Day" (7:59) the slow building militaristic start seems to indicate routine that would constitute a human being's approach to a day in which they were completely unaware of the world's demise. Full theatric orchestral force at the end of the third minute. I love this section! The crescendo and dénouement, not as much. (13.75/15)

9. "The Flood" (1:12) water ? lots of it, with racing trumpet over the top. (4.25/5)

10. "Under The Summer Stars" (5:42) harps and synth horns to recapitulate an earlier-used melody. I like this second part a lot! Almost New Age beauty. The quiet mid-section followed by the ball-busting guitar solo is wonderful. (9.75/10)

11. "Adieu" (3:03) spacey piano and distant electric guitar and synth "light" provide a perfect, beautiful outro. (5/5)

Total time 44:04

When I compare this beautiful music to that of other artists or album labeled "symphonic" I cringe at the injustice and inequity. The music of In the Region of the Summer Stars is like CAMEL's "Snow Goose" composed in true classical symphonic forms and performed by truly classically trained musicians with orchestration. And I use the Camel reference intentionally because "Snow Goose" is considered a "masterpiece" by so many prog lovers! So should this be. And this re-recording is so clean and warm! (Still pre-digital?) What's even more impressive is how orchestra-strings-like the synthesizer strings sound. Obviously, classical musician Robert John Godfrey had sound quality standards that he worked hard to maintain. Not only are the sounds of the individual instruments impeccably rendered and separated, the levels and integration of the final mixes are so well spaced and yet beautifully rendered into a stage-like tapestry presentation. If there is any fault to this album it is with the relatively narrow space of pacing: there are no real steroidal pieces running away with reckless abandon, though there are plenty of spacious quiet passages to fit the cosmic direction of this album's view. Also, all of the musicians are fairly tightly reigned in, never really allowed to free-range with improvisational forays with their respective instruments: it all feels very contrived, programmed, and governed (by a composer or a composer's sheet music).

A-/five stars; a minor masterpiece of progressive rock music symphonic

 Sheets Of Blue. An Anthology 1975 - 2004 by ENID, THE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2006
4.50 | 5 ratings

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Sheets Of Blue. An Anthology 1975 - 2004
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by Matt-T

5 stars Far better than its been rated previously on here. Its a broad spectrum selection; with intelligent well though out selections from across the bands output up to 2004. The emphasis is, as it should be, on the earlier recordings for which the band are best known. Accordingly the 1st disk focuses exclusively on the bands 1st 4 seminal albums; whilst the 2nd disk after a large chunk of 1983's Something Wicked This Way Comes, address the remaining years, stopping at the long Hiatus at the beginning of the 20th century. Granted a 3rd disk would allow for a greater exploration of the bands work beyond 1983 ... but, as it stands, this is a fine introduction to an eclectic band .... and hey ... its not as if there's many alternatives out there. Unfortunately, a great deal of the band output is deleted. including this compilation. Happy hunting to those of you wanting to explore The Enid's music on CD!
 Invicta by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 2012
4.00 | 173 ratings

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Invicta
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by Mspy1

5 stars THE ENID - INVICTA (2012)

After a brief intermission, the album begins with "Anthropy," a short work that acts as an introduction to the album. After 30 seconds, a thunderous smash is followed by a gentle choir.

Second track "One and the Many" is a 10-minute tune that follows. Godfrey starts the piece with his little orchestra like composition, lasting 50 seconds, and beautiful vocals take place along with diverse keyboard sounds, percussions, gentle guitar with Max Read backing the vocals. You may think that there is a woman singing? No! It's Joe Payne with his spectacular falsetto and operatic (?) voice.

Follows Who Created Me, which has Godfrey's keyboard work and Joe Payne's natural voice, his vocal performance builds up to a beautiful guitar solo at the end.

There is a seamless transition into the next track "Execution Mob" which starts with some kind of carnival music, bird sounds, and incomprehension human speech. Different harmonized vocals come together, these vocals sound like a mix of band members' voices, this track segues into next track "Witch Hunt".

On "Witch Hunt" Joe Payne and Max Read back are on track with their vocals. In this track, percussions are alive, in addition, this song is kind of in a fast mood at first which changes later.

Next song is called "Heaven's Gate", it's instrumental and it definitely has atmospheric sound at the start. There is not much to tell till 2:50 mark, then synthesizer and his orchestra sounds are introduced. Guitar feels like it is floating during the song. Then orchestral sounds increase in pace and blow up!

"Leviticus" has Max and Payne's vocals. Their vocals are powerful and rise with orchestral. Lyrics are meaningful as always, and make the concept more clear to the critical listeners.

Next track "Villain of Science" is another song that features Payne's vocals and incredible percussions, along with bombastic orchestral, and a beautiful guitar solo. This song is very playful in that it never makes you bore. The song closes with Payne's falsetto and it reprises into the last song of the album "The Whispering".

"The Whispering" has Payne and Max's vocals, Max's back chorals support Payne. We hear falsettos which sound wonderful, Godfrey's doing his little touches on keyboard, and the album ends.

Easily 5/5 from me, the more you listen to it the more you appreciate the album, it has beautiful compositions, vocals, percussions, guitar sections, and synthesizer use.

 Aerie Faerie Nonsense by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.56 | 58 ratings

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Aerie Faerie Nonsense
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by Mspy1

5 stars The ENID / AERIE FAERIE NONSENSE (1977)

Aerie Faerie Nonsense is The Enid's second album. With the genius of Robert John Godfrey's Classical and Symphonic touches, The Enid paved a new path for themselves by blending late (Wagner, Mahler, Sibelius, Elgar, Grieg, Beethoven) from Late Romantic Music Era into their symphonic arrangements. However, an important note, if you're not a fan of classical music (especially the romantic Mahler kind of era), then you're not going to enjoy this album.

Aerie Faerie Nonsense is a concept album, first side of the album is based on Robert Browning's Childe Roland To The Dark Tower Came poem. The second side of the album is based on the Irish mythology of Fand. Fand is the queen of fairies, and the album art is based on her image. Tristan and Isolde and Myth of Parsival also make their way into the narrative of the album sparingly.

Let's start the review, shall we? The album opens with a brief prelude that sets the stage for a beautiful romance piece with mellow musical tone arrangements, and it ends with little vibraphone touches, It is a great prelude for the next track.

The next track is called "Mayday Galliard" which starts the tale of Roland. This track is kind of whimsy, I love Stephen Stewart's guitar work on "Mayday Galliard," a lovely piece of gentle Symphonic Prog.

The third track "Ondine" is a short dreamy song that features flute (keyboard simulated) backed acoustic guitar melodies, soft piano melodies, light keyboard parts. These soft harmonic melodies do give this piece a medieval touch, and piano melodies remind me of Beethoven. Guitarist Francis Lickerish does a great job here playing melodic guitar in this little song.

"Childe Roland" the fourth track of the album reveals The Enid's playful side in the middle of their voyage. When you combine very alive and kicking percussions and melancholic classical movements with ferocious (definitely not the right word) guitar sections and brilliant keyboard arrangements this happens! This tune symbolizes, in other words, embodies Symphonic Progressive music at its utmost best.

In the name of Classical Progressive music, who wouldn't love the soaring crescendos of the wonderfully orchestral "Fand" the sixteen-minute epic. Divided into two movements, the first movement musically portrays the meeting of Lady Fand and her love Cuchulainn, the second movement depicts the separation of them. These movements by The Enid, are based on the "Irish myth of Fand" originally but musically based on "The Garden of Fand", a symphonic tone poem composed by Sir Arnold Bax. In "The Garden of Fand", Lady Fand and her boyfriend Cuchulainn are introduced. Cuchulainn is seduced away by Lady Fand from her home and duty. As soon as Emer (the wife of Cuchulainn) becomes envious of the pair, she assaults them. Cuchulainn and Emer's affair upsets Lady Fand so much that she decides to leave Cuchulainn forever as she's worthy of Cuchulainn as his wife. Musically, this piece is the flagship of the album that brings such emotion and romance which is hard to resist, and in my opinion, it is one of the best compositions ever by The Enid. "Fand" does have The Enid's defining signature guitar melodies, and it has some sinister moments which alternates into engaging moments or vice versa which requires the attention of the listeners. This orchestral shouldn't sound boring to the listeners of late romantic classical composers, such as Mahler. This piece is classical music obviously, just done with rock instruments.

Aerie Faerie Nonsense, in my opinion, still belongs to the progressive music genre, however with very significant classical influences, from Mayday Galliard to the Fand. From a technical standpoint, the last two songs of the album "Fand 1 & 2" may either require a sound amplifier or pre-amp if your headphones are not loud as these two songs are low on volume, and they were not mastered very well for bassy headphones, as the band had been low on budget. Irrespective of the audio quality, this album is still a masterpiece of symphonic prog so it gets 5/5 from me.

 In the Region Of The Summer Stars (1984) by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 1984
4.26 | 241 ratings

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In the Region Of The Summer Stars (1984)
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by Mspy1

5 stars What can I say? It's one of The ENID's most shocking albums. From the sublime orchestral arrangements to beautiful guitar solos, they were capable of creating their own style. The band is at its utmost level in terms of blending orchestral arrangements, drums, synthesizer, keyboards from Godfrey which serve as a key reference for many progressive bands around the world in the late 1970s and early 1980s, even when they were largely unappreciated. I'd want to give it a perfect score, as everything is basically perfect. This album cannot be skipped if one is into classical music and rock music at the same time.
 Aerie Faerie Nonsense by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.56 | 58 ratings

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Aerie Faerie Nonsense
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by kurtrongey

5 stars What? As of 2020 only 39 ratings and one review for this absolutely essential progressive rock album from the heart of the seventies?

On their debut, In the Region of the Summer Stars, The Enid charted out a new path for symphonic rock, rooted in late-19th century romantic symphonic music. It had all the rhythmic subtlety, rich orchestration and vibrant emotion one finds in Elgar, Puccini, Rachmaninoff and Mahler. Aerie Faerie Nonsense takes the raw materials of the debut album and pushes it into a territory that no other band has before or since approached. That's because carrying out their chosen style requires an expertise in rubato, articulation and dynamics that classical musicians struggle over many years to acquire. The Enid formula isn't one that can easily be emulated.

The first side of Aerie Faerie Nonsense is a symphonic suite in itself, bookended by bristling high energy numbers Mayday Galliard and Childe Roland, each full of counterpoint and instrumental detail. Robert John Godfrey's keyboards at first seem to be the foreground focus. Rather than the overt synth and organ flash of a Wakeman or Emerson, Godfrey forms miraculously authentic orchestral textures with the keyboard technology of the day, sometimes requiring stunning virtuosity. But we've learned over time that guitarist Francis Lickerish provided a lot of the melodic soul of the album. The duo guitars of Lickerish and Stephen Stewart weave through these rich arrangements, proving once and for all that the electric guitar is capable of more powerful melodicism than any other instrument yet invented by man. The slower track on the side, Ondine features Lickerish on lute and is absolutely enchanting.

Side two is probably the defining moment for this band. Fand is a continuous 17-minute symphonic movement that reaches far into the ethereal depths of the English imagination. A mythical tale is told with late- romantic orchestration filtered through rock and electronic instrumentation. It's done with confidence, mastery and inspiration. A brooding opening gives way to grand musical gestures that come in waves, with peaks of soaring electric guitar and rock orchestra that defy the needle to stay in the vinyl groove.

The release history of this album is confused. The band revisited Fand in a few different studio re-recordings, which have their strengths and weaknesses. The album itself was largely re-recorded in the 80s. Although the "updated" versions are pretty cool in their own way, I recommend getting to know Aerie Faerie Nonsense in the original versions as released in the fall of 1977 to get the full force of what they achieved. Then take a listen to the live Fand from Hammersmith, which is one of the greatest live performances ever put on record.

 U by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 2019
4.00 | 27 ratings

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U
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by kurtrongey

4 stars The Enid, who started as a staunchly classical/symphonic-rock band, has a very diverse catalog with all kinds of surprising artistic side paths into other genres and approaches that often torment their long time fans. So it's almost jarring to for them to release a new album that reverts back to their original style from 1976-77. It's strangely like a band paying tribute to themselves. Now, when I say "band" I'm really talking about Robert John Godfrey, the keyboardist-composer and primary creative force of The Enid from the very beginning. Joining him is guitarist Jason Ducker, who's on his 4th album as guitarist and co-composer. First-era drummer, and really maybe the most underrated drummer in all of 70s rock, Dave Storey is also along, mostly being restrained and supportive on this recording. As always, Godfrey sets a musical stage for gorgeous guitar playing, embracing the unique role that only an extremely impressive guitarist can perform. The sound world on U is that of their first two albums - elegant, delicate, wistful, and extremely grand in the climaxes. It begins with a slight mutation on the main flute theme from the title track of their first album, "In the Region of the Summer Stars," and then proceeds into an alternate but familiar universe, like one of those alternative history novels. Carrying on through the album, there's a Mahler march, some waltzing a la "Spring" from The Spell, a re-treatment of the basic idea of "Sheets of Blue" from Salome that's been transcendentally transformed and expanded. The album ends exquisitely with a slow, dignified melody in which Ducker's lyrical electric guitar playing is just so beautiful and expressive, then an appropriately grand coda. This is a band for whom getting back to basics results in something very un-basic. If it sounds like a rehash, well it is, but with the full conviction of some very sincere and accomplished music makers to produce a substantial and hopefully enduring work of art.
 Robert John Godfrey: Fall Of Hyperion by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.55 | 53 ratings

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Robert John Godfrey: Fall Of Hyperion
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by Psychedelic Paul

4 stars He may have the appearance of a college professor with his long beard and studious expression, but ROBERT JOHN GODFREY is the main driving force behind THE ENID, the Symphonic Prog band that's been around now for well over 40 years. Although this album, "Fall of Hyperion" (1974), is billed as a Robert John Godfrey solo album, it's really an album by The Enid in all but name, and presumably, that's why this album is included at the beginning of The Enid albums roster on Prog Archives. Most importantly though, this album SOUNDS like The Enid, with all of the symphonic pomp and ceremony you might expect from such a distinguished Prog-meister as "Professor Godfrey". His first album release as The Enid, "In the Region of the Summer Stars"was released two years later in 1976, followed swiftly by the humorously-titled "Aerie Faerie Nonsense" album in 1977. This solo album "Fall of Hyperion" features vocals, although the first four albums by The Enid proper were all orchestral pieces with no lyrics. It wasn't until the release of the band's fifth album, "Something Wicked This Way Comes" in 1983, that lyrics were featured for the first time. Robert John Godfrey worked with Barclay James Harvest in the early 1970's before deciding to go solo. Godfrey and The Enid have 20 studio albums to their credit, and despite him being diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in 2013, The Enid still continues to this day with many changes of line-up along the way. Although Robert John Godfrey has had to retire from touring due to his illness, he IS The Enid, because without keyboard maestro Godfrey ever- present at the helm, the band would never have existed.

The album opens in grand symphonic style with "The Raven". This anthemic piece of music is so extravagantly ostentatious in in all of its glorious pomp and splendour, that you may feel the patriotic urge to stand up and give a rousing rendition of "Land of Hope and Glory", or maybe the "Star Spangled Banner" if you're an American. Yes, it really IS that anthemic. It's booming, it's bombastic, and it's fantastic! You really have to hear it to believe it. This grand stentorian, orchestral symphony would have been equally at home as a magnificent finale to the album. And so, how do you follow up such a marvellous 9-minute album opener? You follow it with "Mountain", a 7-minute-long, energetic and euphonic piece of music with classical glissandos galore. Even classical music buffs couldn't fail to be impressed by this flawless fugue. This theatrical and emotionally uplifting music is like Renaissance with knobs on, where the dynamic and dramatic classical influences are even more in evidence. This is masterful Symphonic Prog taken to even more powerful extremes of classical greatness. Sailing onwards now on a patriotic wave of glory, comes the 6-minute "Water Song". You can expect to hear a profusion of grand- sounding keyboard runs on the piano with the ever-present full orchestra there in all of their magnificent power and glory.

Side Two opens with "Isault", an emotional powerful song with all of the grand theatrics of a BBC costume drama. It's grandiose and spectacular and just what we've come to expect by now from such an accomplished keyboard maestro as "Professor Godfrey". And now we come to "The Daemon of the World, a 15-minute long 6-piece suite to round off the album in grand style. Listen in awe and be prepared to be swept away by the magnificent grandstanding on display here in this powerful symphonic opus. It's melodious and triumphal with constant changes of tempo, staccato breaks, and sparkling fast and slow keyboard runs. This marvellous finale is sure to delight fans of The Enid and the whole Symphonic Prog genre generally. There's even the stentorian sound of a pipe organ thrown in for good measure. What more could you ask for!?

A gloriously powerful album of passionate majestic anthems that's guaranteed to astound and delight fans of classically- inspired Symphonic Prog. This album might be described as overblown and pretentious (just like this review) by those who aren't in the know, but to prog aficionados, this is prog heaven! Let Robert John Godfrey carry you away to a Land of Hope and Glory in this unashamedly pompous and sonorous extravaganza. It's an absolute must-have album for connoisseurs and collectors of classic British Symphonic Prog.

 Resurgency by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.06 | 25 ratings

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Resurgency
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by kurtrongey

3 stars The Enid without Robert John Godfrey is unimaginable. And so I held off checking out this album for a long time. This was a trio led by Enid guitarist Jason Ducker proceeding on The Enid path with Godfrey's blessing, it would have had to be pretty remarkable to satisfy its heritage. About all I can say is that these are serviceable renditions. Reborn in the Fire and Someone Shall Rise are worth a repeat listen because they're pretty different from their original versions. The rest is a pale shadow by some guys who learned the material but lack the power to suffuse it with Enidness. Godfrey has since taken The Enid back under his irascible wing and that's for the best.
 In the Region Of The Summer Stars by ENID, THE album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.89 | 54 ratings

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In the Region Of The Summer Stars
The Enid Symphonic Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This is an album which inspires a lot of "Ifs" from me. If it had just been released a few years earlier... if the Enid and their mastermind Robert John Godfrey hadn't had such a turbulent career... if they hadn't been forced to re-record the album for CD reissue for ridiculous legal reasons... if any of these factors had been different, I wonder whether we'd regard the Enid as one of the top-flight prog bands of the 1970s. They might have had a shot, since they are one of a select group of bands - such as Genesis, Yes, King Crimson, or Gentle Giant - who could say that they carved out a style in the 1970s which was uniquely their own and could be instantly recognised as such.

Quite simply, no other band quite managed to bring together a combination of classical music techniques and styles, high-calibre technical proficiency and musicianship, and emotional breadth and depth as the Enid - and it's the emotional aspects of the music which are given priority. From the playfulness of the Fool, to the fear evoked by The Last Judgement or Death, to the warmth of The Lovers and The Sun, the compositions never fail to evoke an incredible depth of feeling that other bands of the time sometimes struggle to convey - and all without saying a word.

I highly recommend seeking out the original version of the album - I first heard the rerecording, which left me cold, but the original opened my eyes to what the Enid could do. Supposedly, Godfrey intends to do another rerecording, as part of a project to produce final, definitive editions of all the Enid albums; I'd be interested to hear how that turns out, though for now I will enjoy the 1975 version, vinyl hiss and all.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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