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FLAMING BESS

Symphonic Prog • Germany


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Flaming Bess biography
Flaming Bess is not your typical band. The oringinal band was formed in 1969, in Düsseldorf. There was the usual club gigs, and personnel changes, before finally recording an album. It just took them ten years. This was 1979's "Tanz Der Götter." A highly regarded album, and very much influenced by other symphonic music of it's time.

The second release, 1980's "Verlorene Welt," had a more rock-oriented approach, and featured Marlene Krükel on vocals. This would be the last recording from the band for 15 years.

In 1995, they resurfaced with "Fata Morgana." Apparently, this was not just an attempt at recapturing past glory. They had kept up with changes in the music scene, and produced a progressive album to fit the times.

Seemingly a pattern now, the next album was not recorded for another ten years. "Finestere Sonne / Black Sun" was released in 2005. It is a double CD, with one in German and one in English.

Though adversity, changing trends, and music industry woes, this band has kept going. They remain true to their vision, without becoming antiquated. A truly admirable group, that shows no signs of giving up (ever).

H.T. Riekels (bhikkhu)

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FLAMING BESS discography


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FLAMING BESS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.26 | 29 ratings
Tanz Der Götter
1979
2.59 | 20 ratings
Verlorene Welt
1980
2.74 | 14 ratings
Fata Morgana (Special Edition 2001)
1996
2.22 | 9 ratings
Finstere Sonne / Black Sun
2005
3.08 | 7 ratings
Wächter Des Lichts
2008
3.47 | 53 ratings
Der Gefallene Stern
2013

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FLAMING BESS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Der Gefallene Stern by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.47 | 53 ratings

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Der Gefallene Stern
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

3 stars With their 2013 release, FLAMING BESS continues to scale the upward trajectory established by "Waechter des Lichts", while not quite fanning their feathers as on their original recordings. This is as rock oriented as anything they have ever done, with recent electronica yielding to a percussive bite. Mike Hartman is the main vocalist with Jenny K appearing on several tracks. As is customary, narration of the ongoing fable punctuates the proceedings, perhaps somewhat less obtrusively than has been the case in recent years.

The album fairly explodes with a few rousing old style instrumentals that are not that dissimilar, although the theme of the first will reappear several times throughout the 77 minutes like a trusted friend. The ensemble approach illuminates the guitars and keys to best effect. It's true that the acoustic dimension remains perhaps forever buried, but some might not miss it. "Verzweifelt und Vergessen" is one of their best song oriented pieces, launching atmospherically before propelling forward rhythmically while retaining a spacey core.

From here the quality descends a notch for most of the duration, although most pieces are still entertaining, the best being the epic "Haravienna" which overlaps azz/funk/psych territories shamelessly. It's hard not to admire the ambition even if the GPS loses its signal here and there.

Whether or not FLAMING BESS is a rising star or even a star at all may be debatable, but this collective luminescence is anything but fallen.

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 Verlorene Welt  by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 1980
2.59 | 20 ratings

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Verlorene Welt
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

2 stars Press and public received warmly ''Tanz der Goetter'' and six months after its release the album had sold about 36,000 copies.Propably not enough for Peter Wahle, who decided to part ways with the band (and record the solo album ''Happy bananas'' in 1980).His departure did not slow down Flaming Bess, the remaining duo of Wende and Jansen hired Hans Schweiss on drums and Barry Peeler on guitar, heading for a contract with Polydor.They recorded their next album ''Verlorene welt'' in September/October 1980 at Dierks Tonstudio and released it in 1981.Many guest musicians/singers participated in this work, among them was guitarist Achim Wierschem, who would later reach the main core of the band.

Flaming Bess was always a heavily CAMEL-influenced band and with ''Verlorene welt'' they seem to walk parrallel ways with the British legends.The strong organ and the light symphonic flavors of their debut were replaced by a smoother and extremely melodic approach with a deep, jazzy sound, while the poppy sensibilities are present as well, they appear to do what CAMEL were creating during the same period.The tracks are now passing through Lounge Jazz aesthetics with soft piano lines to acoustic crescendos with a period sound and from melodic rockers with some sort of ANDY LATIMER-like sensitive guitar touch to 80's Fusion with piano, synths and guitar in evidence.Among or within the pieces there are plenty of narrations with German lyrics.Not among the tasteful works one should expect from a band, that created a nice, progressive album a couple of years ago.The atmosphere is dreamy and ethereal, the melodies are mostly nice but the lack of some adventurous twists or deep instrumentation make the album sound a bit pale.Of course there are also a pair of exceptions, the opening ''Mythos'' with the mellow electric piano and the beautiful acoustic/electric melodies hold some of the band's previous inspiration, while the 7-min. title-track is even better, a nice combination of melodic, jazzy and Fusion stylings with a couple of great melodies and notable work on clavinet, acoustic guitar and synthesizers.

The CD reissue contains only reworkings of the album's tracks, so there is no big deal of prefering it.''Verlorene welt'' ends up to be some sort of smooth Jazz Rock combined with CAMEL-esque melodies, not entirely convincing or satisfying, suffering from some bland 80's tunes.CAMEL fans are propably the ones to reach this album...2.5 stars.

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 Fata Morgana (Special Edition 2001)  by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 1996
2.74 | 14 ratings

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Fata Morgana (Special Edition 2001)
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by maryes

2 stars How I've said in my review (#918083) about " Veronelt Velt " posted in Saturday, February 23, 2013 "I don't know much about FLAMING BESS discography " and maybe due this fact I'm not the more qualified menber of P A community to write a deep analysis about none of their albums. But, I think which due to my knowledge about progressive rock, I'm able to write a review about this third album " FATA MORGANA". In terns of symphonic -prog music my sensation is the same as in "Veronelt Velt" - ... "The music shows in their arrangements so much few rhythm variations and in all of tracks they sounds like "dance or relax" music". I can cyte the 2 track "Arkana (Kapitel III)" are much more colse from space-prog or world music and not from a realy Symphonic-Prog music. The track 4 " Die Reise " is oher example that I said about the secound track. But the disk reserves some good moments (although not much) like track 12 "Fata Morgana" or track 13 "Für Mau-Ri-Tse " a beautiful ballad. But if you add this brief moments you can take about only 10 min in 66min 33 sec. Due this considerations my rate is only 2 stars !!!

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 Tanz Der Götter  by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.26 | 29 ratings

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Tanz Der Götter
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

3 stars Thanks to a TV programm Flaming Bess enjoyed a long and decent career.Formed in 1969 in Duesseldorf they gained some local fame through small gigs with an original line-up of Hans Wende (guitar), Horst Wagner (bass), Rolf Selbach (drums) and Peter Figge (keyboards).They soon fell into hiatus and this would be possibly their entire story, remained propably in dust in a mystery rehearsal room, if some tapes weren't dicovered in 1977 by the Westdeutschen Rundfunk (West Germany's broadcasting) and being hosted by Wolfgang Neumann's ''Rockstudio'' series.Neumann was so impressed by the group that he decided to take part in their first album, recorded in Koln in 1979 and released privately the same year as ''Tanz der Götter''.By the time the crew of the group featured only Hans Wende from the original line-up next to keyboardist Joachim Jansen and multi-instrumentalist Peter Wahle, while several musicians appear as guest members with Neumann being responsible for the album's narration parts.

Each track features a short intro with Neumann's spoken words with piano, harsichord and acoustic guitars supporting, quite close to NEUSCHWANSTEIN's ''Alice im Wunderland''.From the opening 10-min. ''Bedrohung'' the CAMEL influence on the group is more than evident, combining the melodic textures with sensitive solos, but the organ work is rather too soft comparable to CAMEL's approach, instead you get the typical Teutonic-styled atmospheric synthesizers in full mode.The following ''Kampf Und Vertreibung'' is a mix of instrumental Deutschrock with light Symphonic Rock, containing a repetitive funky beat on guitars with background electric solos and symphonic synths, closing with a more pronounced guitar-oriented style.Good track, but a bit too long for its own good.''Oasis'' is much closer to Jazz Rock with a definite FOCUS touch in the guitars and CAMEL-esque organ supporting, though the middle section is again a nice synth-drenched moment of symphonic grandieur.''Arkana'' follows more or less the same path, there is even some Canterbury vibe in the guitar/organ interplays beyond the constant CAMEL flavor and the style remains a jazzy-inspired Progressive Rock with loose textures and solos.The longer and more interesting track comes at the end, the title cut with the great intro built on clavinet, synthesizers and bass, emerging into a light Symphonic/Fusion piece with the guitars now reminding of Japanese bands like BELLAPHON and AIN SOPH, surrounded by tremendous orchestral keyboards, a nice sax solo around the middle and deeper organ moves, always in a lovely melodic enviroment, strengthened even more by the mellow piano lines at the closing minutes.

Delicate, smooth and professional instrumental Progressive Rock by an overlooked German group, that had its hard years before reaching its potential.Maybe not too personal of an album, but certainly good enough to fully enjoy it.Recommended.

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 Der Gefallene Stern by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.47 | 53 ratings

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Der Gefallene Stern
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by Leon Marx

4 stars Seven years ago, a friend of mine with a penchant for the obscure got me acquainted with a German band called Flaming Bess. The albums back then were Tanz der Gotter and a more recent one called Finstere Sonne. The music of both albums was pleasant enough, if nothing spectacular. Given that both Camel and the Alan Parson's Project are among my favorites, I grew to like them quite a lot in their own right, yet it felt hardly like I was listening to the same band (and safe for the bass player, it apparently wasn't), the one sounding dreamy and romantic, the other one more electronic and experimental. I also checked out the guitarist's Mindmovie albums, which I liked even better.

The group's newest effort is quite a strong one. While the German narrative bits are mostly lost to me, the album gives of a mostly meditative and sometimes dreamy vibe that reminds me of Tales of Mystery and Imagination - perfect for a longer car ride or a relaxed evening at home - with the occasional rocker or ballad thrown in. There are some highly interesting tracks, many of which only unfold their full strength and details on repeat listen. The obvious highlight is the more adventurous, very cool and eclectic Haravienna, the English lyrics of which make me wish I knew more of the overall story.

With a rich, unique and well-defined sound that crosses the boundaries between symphonic and electronic aesthetics, and some inspired instrumentation, especially from Mindmovie, I feel this is what Alan Parsons might sound like if he were still making good music today.

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 Der Gefallene Stern by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 2013
3.47 | 53 ratings

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Der Gefallene Stern
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by PleasantShadeofGray

5 stars Flaming Bess' music has always struck me as charmingly at odds with its lyrical contents. Simply put, the somewhat self-aware nature and epic cheesiness of their B-movie Sci-Fi/Fantasy plots about the eponymous star-goddess and queen of light tends to clash with their music. The latter, by 2013, has gone through a vast range of mutations from mid-tempo Camel-esque romanticism with symphonic elements (Tanz der Götter, Verlorene Welt), to world music (Fata Morgana), to smooth jazz/ambient electronic trip-rock à la Massive Attack (Finstere Sonne). Flaming Bess have consistently strived to incorporate modern elements and thus been, quite literally, progressive. None of this screams "tales of sorcery and high adventure," and it may equally be questioned whether the band's insistence on having their stories told separately from their songs, rather than incorporating them musically, is a wise artistic choice. After all, the narrative bits by their very nature constitute a break within the musical flow that arguably is the strongest feature of the band's compositions. On the other hand, it is perhaps precisely this idiosyncratic mixture that has provided the band with a unique identity of its own.

That being said, the mesh of narrative and music has never been more accomplished than on the bands' newest effort, "Der Gefallene Stern" (The Fallen Star). The album continues the story of 2008s "Wächter des Lichts" (Guardians of the Light), and is apparently the second part in a trilogy entitled "Music of the Spheres." As always, the story is a journey narrative which in this case takes the shape of a descensus ad inferos, much in the vain of Dante's Divine Comedy. Its narrator and protagonist (spoken by Markus Wierschem, who also penned the story) is a nameless soul cast into a doomed world of darkness. Led by a shining star (Mirjam Wiesemann), he and and other lost souls go on a pilgrimage to evade their annihilation and uncover their identities. Thus unfolds a mysterious quest, that, at its best moments, is utterly beautiful, endowed with a lyricism that will unfortunately be lost to those not familiar with the German language.

The music on the other hand combines all of the various musical influences and experience the band has acquired throughout the four decades of its existence. And it is here that the true magic of this record is to be found. This is all too fitting, given that, as far as I can tell, the story is at some level about the nature of music itself. The mixture of ambient rock and modern electronica within the band's tried and true symphonic approach works to perfection here. It pleasantly reminds me of "Tanz der Götter" and "Verlorene Welt," without denying that the band has moved on.

The reunion with former member Hans Schweiss (drums) is truly beneficial, as the electronic drums of the past have never quite worked for me, as is the addition of Mike Hartmann, who joins FB veteran Jenny K. on vocals. Of all the various singers that have appeared on FB's albums in the past, he is the best by far, blending sensitivity and melody with rawness and power. This is best witnessed in "Die Kyberniten" - probably the most rock-driven song the band has ever put out and a welcome change of pace from the predominant mid-tempo. But the album's highlight is the twelve minute epic "Haravienna" which seamlessly blends all the band's talents and features some stunning experiments, unexpected twists and turns, and great guest performances. This may be the most complex piece of music the band has written. Certainly, it is one of their best.

Peter Figge's keyboards have never sounded better, Achim Wierschem's guitars are at their most melodious, and Hans Wende's laid-back bass lines provide a fitting foundation for the songs. The compositional material is consistently good, avoiding the painful experiments of the past (like the children's rap in Aklabeth on "Wächter des Lichts"). The music flows seamlessly, evoking its story's mystery and (mild) suspense without any particular urgency, and thus reflects the nature of the journey that its characters take. Variations of some central, symphonic leitmotifs punctuate the album to give the whole a very complete, well-rounded quality.

All in all, this is a very fine, atmospheric concept album, perhaps the band's best so far. Musically at least, if not commercially, the band's star is hardly falling, but ascends and shines on ever brightly. I can only hope we won't have to wait another five years for the conclusion of the trilogy. "Der Gefallene Stern" comes highly recommended: 8.5 out of 10.

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 Finstere Sonne / Black Sun by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 2005
2.22 | 9 ratings

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Finstere Sonne / Black Sun
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by PleasantShadeofGray

4 stars "Finstere Sonne / Black Sun" represents something of a transitional piece in Flaming Bess' slow-motion "one album a decade" evolution. While keeping true to the band's roots in the 70s and 80s, and with that the predominantly instrumental, mid-temo ambience of the bands' debut "Tanz der Götter" and its follow-up "Verlorene Welt," which resonate strongly in this album's more accoustically driven arrangements, the ethno/world music flair of "Fata Morgana" is still somewhat of an influence, though much subdued. Instead, the album is primarily driven by a lot of electronica and synth-sounds, giving the whole thing a more contemporary flair that in its best moments is reminiscent of groups like Massive Attack. This is no doubt due to the addition of Claas Reimer to the band, who is not an unknown in the DJ-scene of Düsseldorf.

Mel Halbauer is perhaps the best female singer the band has ever had, displaying both variety and a style that, in some stand-out moments, is decidedly her own, and Achim Wierschem's guitar playing has perhaps never been more daringly adventurous than here. The band's approach is progressive in the literal sense of the word: if you're adverse to modern beats, the heavy use of electronic sounds and samples, as well as the occasional gimmick, and the trip-rock of bands like Massive Attack or the newer The Gathering does nothing for you, this may simply not be your cup of prog.

That being said, composition or songwriting are decidedly scenic on this one, neither presenting much in the way of highs or lows, but instead going for cinemascopic routes that are well-suited to the band's storylines, which have always been journey narratives. On the other hand, there is a whole lot to discover on this one: slow and smooth jazz and grooves (Endloses Nichts) , accousticly driven rock-numbers, electronic extravaganzas of wildly shuffled beats, orientalisms and even some brief flirtations with heavy metal (Die Prüfung), all of which flow quite seamlessly into one another, making for three long track-like chapters.

The journey of Finstere Sonne, then, is not just that of Prince Arkana looking for a way to resurrect the eponymous princess. It is, in fact, the journey of a band firmly arriving in the new millenium - another kind of resurrection.

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 Wächter Des Lichts by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.08 | 7 ratings

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Wächter Des Lichts
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

3 stars After the frozen wasteland of "Finisterre Sonne", I didn't expect much from FLAMING BESS for the duration. They had all but abandoned their symphonic roots and acoustic underpinnings in favour of percussive tech savvy. Instead of a standalone album with a story, it played out like an audio book for which the narrator's channel had gone silent for the most part, and the accompaniment was anything but free standing let alone free living. One would have then expected "Wachter des Lichts" to be dead on arrival. The patient is, thankfully, no longer on life support!

This is actually a somewhat entertaining disk in much the manner of most other FLAMING BESS output, even if the acoustic dimension remains suppressed and the narratives seem even more overwrought. The vocal work of Erika Naidenow is particularly compelling in a NINA HAGEN sort of way, even if she only appears on 2 tracks. Achim Wierschem's lead guitars express authoritative allure throughout. The rhythms do not overpower. "Der Verhüllte" is a mesmerizing blend of conventional keys, sound effects, and vocal ambushes by Rene Lentin, and the raucous instrumental "Der Dieb" is just as persuasive . "Ein Langer Weg" approximates the early CAMEL-esque sound for long time fans. "Erkenntnis" seems influenced by Leipzig based DICE specially in the synthesizers.

Apart from the overly industrious and metallic "Die Höhle Unter Dem Eis" and the narrative bits in general, most of the material here is enjoyable for what it is, and the group is to be commended not only for taking steps to right the ship but for simultaneously sidestepping categorization. 2.5 stars rounded up.

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 Finstere Sonne / Black Sun by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 2005
2.22 | 9 ratings

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Finstere Sonne / Black Sun
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by kenethlevine
Special Collaborator Prog-Folk Team

1 stars With 9 years separating "Finisterre Sonne" from the prior "Fata Morgana", FLAMING BESS survived a second lengthy sabbatical to record again. Sadly, I don't have much else positive to say about this effort. The near incessant electronic keyboards and percussion rarely yield more than a moment or two of interest. The symphonic and acoustic dimensions are largely abandoned in favour of funky electronica, "lite jazz" and gimmickry.. Composition was never the group's forte but it was always detectable. Still BESS were primarily notable for their arrangements, atmospheres and instrumental powers, all of which failed to make it to the station/studio on time.

The narrative breaks conveying further installments to the story of Bess continue but whereas before they upset the musical flow, here they are almost welcome in relation to their surroundings. Elsewhere, although more or less sung vocals are occasionally present, the songs are sheer drudgery. Only "Ruhe vor dem Sturm" is remotely worthy of the FLAMING BESS name, with a fine build up on vocals by Lucy Wende, acoustic guitar and dreamy keys. Still it's far too little and you'd be quite excused if you didn't make it that far. There are so many low lights that I don't know where to begin, but let's say "Kampf um Dig Dagg" would have been rejected as theme music for a C grade low budget Cold War spy flick even if offered gratis.

I don't know the history behind the near decade absence and the making of "Finisterre Sonne", but it sounds as though they felt that they had to record something yesterday or the window of opportunity might never return. Whatever the reason, this black sun is the bete noire of the FLAMING BESS discography. Avoid at any cost.

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 Verlorene Welt  by FLAMING BESS album cover Studio Album, 1980
2.59 | 20 ratings

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Verlorene Welt
Flaming Bess Symphonic Prog

Review by maryes

2 stars I don't know much about FLAMING BESS discography , however, based in the average of 10 ratings from P A members and even after only 2 or 3 auditions from 'VERLORENE WELT ' , I can conclude which my impression is correct... this disk don't deserves figures in my collection. Why ? The music shows in their arrangements so much few rhythm variations and in all of tracks they sounds like "dance or relax" music ( very monotonous and a deadly sin in progressive rock music ). In spite of some jazzy "hints" and some good acoustic guitar passages, the album is very poor in pleasant moments. One exception is the track 5 "Cron Endor", with a beautiful introduction ( obviously, after the narration ) and pretty female voice. My rate is only 2 stars !!!

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